Council limits “holdover” clauses for certain boards, commissions

BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
03/22/2017 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Tribal Councilors on March 20 amended Legislative Act 30-04 to limit “holdover” clauses to six months for people appointed to certain Cherokee Nation boards and commissions after their terms expire.

According to the amendment, after six months, if no one is confirmed or appointed for the expired seat, it becomes vacant.

The act passed 15-1 with Tribal Councilor Rex Jordan voting against it. Tribal Councilor David Thornton was absent.

During the Feb. 22 Rules Committee meeting, Tribal Councilor Frankie Hargis said having some positions “holdover continuously for years” creates an “unstable environment” and a “time limit” is needed.

“We have some positions that holdover continuously for years, a year or two. Maybe some having been longer, I don’t know. In my opinion it’s an unstable environment and we need to set a time limit,” she said. “It shouldn’t take more than a month or two to reappoint or replace a board member or commissioner, but set a time limit of six months to do that.”
Tribal Councilor Frankie Hargis reads an amendment to Legislative Act 30-04 during the March 20 Tribal Council meeting in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. The act would limit a “holdover” clause to six months for a person with an expired term serving on certain Cherokee Nation boards and commissions. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Tribal Councilor Frankie Hargis reads an amendment to Legislative Act 30-04 during the March 20 Tribal Council meeting in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. The act would limit a “holdover” clause to six months for a person with an expired term serving on certain Cherokee Nation boards and commissions. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Council tables same-sex marriage ballot attempt

BY JAMI MURPHY
Senior Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
03/22/2017 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – During the March 21 Rules Committee meeting, Tribal Councilors indefinitely tabled legislation aiming to have Cherokee Nation citizens vote this year on whether the tribe should allow same-sex marriage.

“This has been an extremely sensitive subject within the Cherokee Nation. The Osages (Osage Nation), they had an election yesterday. It was favorable for the same-sex community. It passed 52 percent. The thing is, their people had a vote in the matter. Our people didn’t have a vote in the matter,” Tribal Councilor David Walkingstick, the legislation’s sponsor, said referring to Attorney General Todd Hembree’s Dec 9 opinion.

The opinion, which has the weight of law, states two sections of the CN Family and Marriage Act – one defining marriage as between a man and woman and another prohibiting parties of the same gender to marry– were unconstitutional.

Following the opinion, CN citizens Dawn Reynolds-McKinley and Kathy Reynolds-McKinley filed their marriage license on Jan. 19 at the CN Courthouse. As of publication, only two same-sex marriage licenses have been filed with the District Court.

Walkingstick said as a legislator he did not think the attorney general’s office should be making laws because that was the Tribal Council’s job.
Cherokee Nation citizens Dawn Reynolds-McKinley and Kathy Reynolds-McKinley visit with Attorney General Todd Hembree after the March 21 Rules Committee meeting in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. The couple is the first same-sex couple to marry under CN law. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizens Dawn Reynolds-McKinley and Kathy Reynolds-McKinley visit with Attorney General Todd Hembree after the March 21 Rules Committee meeting in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. The couple is the first same-sex couple to marry under CN law. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
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Tribes economically thriving 30 years after Cabazon decision

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
03/22/2017 08:15 AM
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – Lindsay Robertson started his law career working on business development. He was familiar with laws regarding tribal sovereignty, but he was asked to combine the two areas starting in 1987.

On Feb. 25, 1987, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of the Cabazon Band of Mission Indians in its lawsuit with the state of California. The decision ultimately allowed tribes to have gaming operations, even where states were given criminal jurisdiction over Indian tribes, The Journal Record reported.

California was a Public Law 280 state, which gave the state criminal jurisdiction over Indian lands. In the mid-1980s, the Cabazon and Morango Bands of Mission Indians operated bingo parlors on their lands. In 1986, the state tried to shut down the games, claiming they violated state regulations.

The Cabazon Band’s argument and the Supreme Court’s decision rested on the state not prohibiting gambling as a criminal act. The state did not have jurisdiction over the operations.

Robertson was working in Washington, D.C., at the time the decision was announced. He was one of the few attorneys familiar with Indian law. When the calls started coming in from tribes that wanted to open gambling operations, they were directed to him.
Patrons play electronic gaming machines at the Cherokee Nation’s Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa in Catoosa, Oklahoma. In 2016, Oklahoma collected a record $132 million in total tribal gaming exclusivity fees, a 3-percent increase from 2015. When the fees were first collected in 2006, only $14.2 million came into the state. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Patrons play electronic gaming machines at the Cherokee Nation’s Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa in Catoosa, Oklahoma. In 2016, Oklahoma collected a record $132 million in total tribal gaming exclusivity fees, a 3-percent increase from 2015. When the fees were first collected in 2006, only $14.2 million came into the state. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Sequoyah Schools to celebrate Lady Indians hoops team

BY STAFF REPORTS
03/21/2017 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Sequoyah High School will celebrate the 2017 3A state champion Sequoyah Lady Indians basketball team at 5:30 p.m. on March 22 at The Place Where They Play gymnasium on the SHS campus.

According to an email from Athletic Director Marcus Crittenden, the public is invited to attend and celebrate “the outstanding achievements of these players and coaches.”

“This is the second gold ball in three years for the Lady Indians, and the fifth in program history,” Crittenden said.
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Trump celebrates Andrew Jackson: ‘Does that sound familiar’

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
03/21/2017 08:15 AM
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) – President Donald Trump is paying homage to a predecessor, Andrew Jackson, with the highest form of flattery. Trump says the nation’s seventh president reminds him an awful lot of himself.

The president paid a visit on March 15 to The Hermitage – Jackson’s Nashville home - to commemorate Jackson’s 250th birthday.

Trump hailed Jackson as “one of our great presidents” and described some of their similarities. Trump’s team has long seized on parallels between the current president and the Tennessee war hero, comparing Jackson’s triumph in 1828 over President John Quincy Adams to Trump’s victory over Hillary Clinton last year.

Trump described Jackson as a fellow outsider who pledged to represent the forgotten worker and took on the Washington establishment.

“It was during the revolution that Jackson first confronted and defied an arrogant elite,” Trump said.
President Donald Trump talks on the phone in the Oval Office with a portrait of President Andrew Jackson. Trump on March 15 visited Jackson’s Nashville, Tennessee, home to commemorate Jackson’s 250th birthday. WASHINGTON POST
President Donald Trump talks on the phone in the Oval Office with a portrait of President Andrew Jackson. Trump on March 15 visited Jackson’s Nashville, Tennessee, home to commemorate Jackson’s 250th birthday. WASHINGTON POST

Supreme Court hears White’s candidacy appeal

BY JAMI MURPHY
Senior Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
03/20/2017 07:45 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation Supreme Court on March 20 heard arguments regarding Cherokee Nation citizen Randy White’s appeal of the Election Commission decision that disqualified him as a Dist. 11 Tribal Council candidate.

Dist. 11 covers Craig County, northern Mayes County and northern Nowata County.

Prior to appeal arguments, the court rejected two motions – one for intervention in the case by the tribe’s attorney general’s office and the other to dismiss made by the EC.

Attorney General Todd Hembree said he should be able to intervene because of his responsibility to uphold the CN Constitution. However, White’s attorney, Deb Reed, said the election law (Title 26) states the EC contracts with its attorney and that no other attorney may work on its behalf.

Regarding the dismissal motion, EC attorney Harvey Chaffin said Title 26 states the EC may present evidence and testimony and that it “intends the EC be made a party.”

OU to host symposium on environmental issues on March 24

BY STAFF REPORTS
03/20/2017 04:00 PM
NORMAN, Okla. – The University of Oklahoma College of Law on March 24 will host the American Indian Law Review’s annual “Indigenous Peoples, Law, and Power Symposium.”

This year’s theme is “Oil and Water.” The symposium is co-sponsored in partnership with the OU’s College of Arts and Sciences’ Native American Studies Department. The event will begin at 10 a.m. in the Dick Bell Courtroom in Andrew M. Coats Hall.

Experts of Native American environmental issues will sit on two panels and give two keynote addresses. The speakers and their topics include:

Morning Panel: “The Chickasaw-Choctaw Compact in Context,” Sara Hill, senior assistant attorney general of the Cherokee Nation, and Taiawagi Helton, professor of law, University of Oklahoma College of Law.

Morning Keynote: “Water Sovereignty and Stewardship: The Historic Chickasaw-Choctaw Water Settlement,” Stephen Greetham, chief general counsel and special counsel on water and natural resources, Chickasaw Nation and Michael Burrage, managing partner, Whitten Burrage Law Firm;

IWPC’s annual wild onion lunch set for March 25

BY STAFF REPORTS
03/20/2017 01:00 PM
CLAREMORE, Okla. – On March 25, the Indian Women’s Pocahontas Club will host its annual wild onion lunch complete with salt pork, fry bread, grape dumplings and sassafras tea.

“This season brings the cleansing of the body and the thinning of the blood and fond memories of going with my daddy in his old white Ford truck. Walking through the woods alongside the running creek water until we discovered the green tips of spring peeking through the blanket of autumn leaves,” said Debra West, IWPC president. “The Indian Women’s Pocahontas Club welcomes you to share our tradition.”

The lunch will be from noon to 2 p.m. at the Claremore Senior Citizen’s Center located at 475 E. Blue Starr Drive. Adult tickets are $15 and children 10 and under are $5. Tickets are available at the door.

For reservations, call Ollie Starr at 918-760-7499.

OILS, OCU law students partner to serve CN citizens

BY LINDSEY BARK
Staff Writer
03/20/2017 08:45 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Oklahoma Indian Legal Services, in partnership with Oklahoma City University law students, held a wills clinic March 14 in the Cherokee Nation’s Tsa La Gi Room to help CN citizens write wills and provide other services for free.

OILS Executive Director Stephanie Hudson said OILS attorneys not only help individuals with wills but also with advance directives, power of attorney and with anything to do with assets.

“At OILS we try to make an effort to reach out to every tribe in the state of Oklahoma. We’re not associated with any tribe. We’re funded by the Legal Services Corporation, and we’re nonprofit. We provide services to individual tribal members all over the state of Oklahoma who are having legal issues related to their status as an Indian,” Hudson said.

OILS also assists individual tribal citizens with Indian Child Welfare issues, probates on restricted lands, tribal housing issues and tribal court issues.

“The services are free. They’re based upon a person’s income, and we do an interview with them to make sure they meet the income guidelines,” Hudson said.
Mary Beth Williams, a Gallogly Family Foundation Public Interest fellow, left, and Yvonne Galey, Oklahoma Indian Legal Services law staff attorney, assist Cherokee Nation citizen William Deerinwater in applying for a “transfer on death” deed on March 14 during a wills clinic hosted by OILS and Oklahoma City University law students in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Mary Beth Williams, a Gallogly Family Foundation Public Interest fellow, left, and Yvonne Galey, Oklahoma Indian Legal Services law staff attorney, assist Cherokee Nation citizen William Deerinwater in applying for a “transfer on death” deed on March 14 during a wills clinic hosted by OILS and Oklahoma City University law students in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
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Culture

CHC to host 16th annual Cherokee Ancestry Conference
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/15/2017 12:45 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Discover your family history and Cherokee ancestry at the Cherokee Heritage Center’s 16th annual Cherokee Ancestry Conference June 9-10 at the Tribal Complex.

The event provides participants with the tools to research their ancestry with Cherokee historical records and features a variety of discussion topics, including historical events before and after the removal, inter-tribal relationships and advancements in social media and its effect on genealogy research.

Participants will also learn about various CN records available online as well as resources available in their local area for Cherokee ancestry research.

A discount is given to those who register before June 3. Pre-registration is $60 for Cherokee National Historical Society members and $75 for nonmembers. The deadline is June 3. Registrations after June 3 are $70 for CNHS members and $85 for nonmembers.

The Cherokee Ancestry Conference will be held in the Osiyo Room at the Tribal Complex. It is located at 17725 S. Muskogee Ave. in the same building as Restaurant of the Cherokees.

For more information, including accommodations and registration, call 918-456-6007, ext. 6162, or email ashley-vann@cherokee.org.

Education

NMAI accepting applications for Teacher Training Institute
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/13/2017 12:30 PM
WASHINGTON – The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian will host a Teacher Training Institute at the museum in Washington, D.C., this summer as a part of its national education initiative, Native Knowledge 360.

The weeklong teacher training experience will provide foundational information about American Indians and support effective use of a new online interactive lesson “American Indian Removal: What Does It Mean To Remove a People?”

The sessions will focus on the impact of removal on Native Nations before, during and after the passage of the Indian Removal Act in 1830 under Andrew Jackson’s presidency. Applications are open for middle and high school educators, including classroom teachers, librarians, curriculum or content coordinators and school administrators in the following states: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma and Tennessee – the region most affected by removal. Applications will be accepted through April 14.

Native Knowledge 360 inspires and promotes the improvement of teaching and learning about American Indians. The summer institute is a pilot project funded through a Smithsonian Institution Youth Access Grant.

The Teacher Training Institute will take place July 10-14. Each selected educator will receive an honorarium. Participants are responsible for arranging their own transportation and housing. Summer institute participants will take part in scholarly lectures and discussions, tour the museum’s collections and work with staff, Native scholars and education experts throughout the week.

For more information, http://nmai.si.edu/explore/education/summer-educator-institute/.

Council

Tribal Council accepts U.S. Forest Service apology
BY JAMI MURPHY
Senior Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
02/22/2017 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Tribal Councilors on Feb. 21 unanimously voted to accept an apology from the U.S. Forest Service Southern Region for damages to a Trail of Tears site in the Cherokee National Forest near Coker Creek, Tennessee.

In July 2015, U.S. Forest Service cultural resource managers notified higher-ranked Forest Service officials that they had discovered damage made in 2014 to a site on a Trail of Tears section. The damage consisted of holes dug by a bulldozer and other heavy equipment.

“At that site, 35 large holes were dug into the historic Trail of Tears to create large, earthen berms,” Sheila Bird, Cherokee Nation special projects officer, told the Cherokee Phoenix in 2016. “They used bulldozer and other heavy equipment, and this earthmoving resulted clear and extensive damage to the historic national trail.”

She added that Forest Service employees did the work and claimed that it was done for erosion control and to prevent areas of the Trail of Tears from washing out.

“This is a well-known and mapped Trail of Tears path, but it was not marked because it was privately owned. This land was purchased by Conservation Fund and held for the U.S. Forest Service,” she said. “The District Ranger failed to follow federal laws requiring consultation with Indian tribes. The Forest Service has acknowledged fault and committed to restoring the site.”

According to a Feb 21 resolution, the U.S. Forest Service-Southern Region “recognizes the cultural and historic significance held by the Cherokee Nation regarding the Trail of Tears historic site and extends an apology for the unfortunate and adverse effects that have occurred.”

It also states the “Cherokee Nation agrees to consult on a government to government basis with the U.S. Forest Service-Southern Region regarding the restoration and mitigation of these adverse effects to this Trail of Tears sacred site.”

It adds that as a “Good Faith Effort” and to commit to jointly pursue meaningful mitigation the Tribal Council accepts the apology.

Also during the meeting, Tribal Council voted 17-0 to support the nominations of Michael Doublehead and Steven Wilson as commissioners to the Tax Commission. They also voted Ceciley Thomason-Murphy onto the Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board.

Tribal Councilors voted to donate three surplus vehicles from the Cherokee Nation Marshal Service to the Nowata Police Department and Muskogee and Delaware counties sheriff’s offices.

Three CN citizens were also honored with the Cherokee Medal of Freedom – John Thomas Cripps III, who served in the U.S. Army, and John Paul Atkinson and Jesse James Collins, who served in the Oklahoma Army National Guard and were activated in 2011 to the RECON 1-279th 45th Infantry to Afghanistan.

Two budget modifications were also passed. The comprehensive capital budget was increased by $1.8 million for a total capital budget authority of $279.6 million. The tribe’s operating budget was also increased by $2.1 million for a total budget authority of $666.6 million. The changes consisted of a decrease in the general fund by $92,000 and increases in the indirect cost pool, motor vehicle tax, Department of Interior Self Governance and IHS Self Governance and budgets.

Health

Effective interventions prevent alcohol use among Native youth
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/16/2017 12:15 PM
ATLANTA, Ga. – Community-based and individual-level prevention strategies are effective ways to reduce alcohol use among American Indian and other youth living in rural communities, according to a new study supported by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, part of the National Institutes of Health.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse also provided support for the study.

“This important study underscores our commitment to finding evidence-based solutions for alcohol problems in American Indian and other underserved populations,” said NIAAA Director George F. Koob “This study is one of the largest alcohol prevention trials ever conducted with an American Indian population, and the first to demonstrate the effectiveness of screening and brief counseling intervention in significantly reducing youth alcohol use at a community level.”

Although American Indian teens drink at rates similar to other United States teens, they have early onset alcohol use compared to other groups and higher rates of alcohol problems. Rural youths, including those who are a racial minority relative to their community, are also at increased risk for alcohol misuse. Early prevention is critical in these populations, but both American Indians and rural communities have been underrepresented in studies aimed at finding effective solutions for underage drinking.

To address this gap, researchers led by Kelli A. Komro of the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University in Atlanta worked with the Cherokee Nation, the second-largest tribe in the U.S., to implement a rigorous research trial of two distinct strategies to reduce underage drinking and its consequences.

Communities Mobilizing for Change on Alcohol is a community-organizing intervention designed to reduce alcohol access, use and consequences among underage youths. The second strategy, called CONNECT, is an individually delivered screening and brief intervention delivered in schools. The study was conducted within the 14 counties of northeastern Oklahoma that comprise the CN jurisdictional area, which is home to about 40 percent of the tribe. While CN citizens constitute a significant proportion of the population, whites and other racial/ethnic minorities also live within this area. Results of the trial are reported in the March 2017 issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

“Community organizing has been used effectively in multiple other health intervention trials and appeared to be an optimal strategy to engage diverse citizens in these multicultural communities,” explained Dr. Komro. CMCA involves training teams of adults to implement policies and take actions to reduce youth access to alcohol through social and commercial sources. In the school-based intervention, a school social worker conducts a brief one-on-one health consultation with each student each semester to encourage healthy behavior change related to alcohol consumption. Students who report high risk drinking attend follow-up sessions and are referred to specialty treatment when appropriate.

Six communities, each served by a single high school, participated in the study. The student population in these communities was nearly 50 percent American Indian. The study population consisted of students who were in ninth or 10th grade when the study began and followed over three years through 11th or 12th grade.

By random assignment, students in two communities received both the community-organizing intervention and the individually delivered intervention. Students in two different communities served as controls, and received neither intervention. One of the remaining two communities used only the community-organizing intervention while the other used only the school-based individually administered intervention.

Over the course of the study, researchers found that self-reports of alcohol use, including any use and heavy drinking episodes (five or more drinks on at least one occasion) in the past 30 days, was significantly reduced among students receiving either or both interventions, compared with students in the control communities.

“The two distinct interventions alone and in combination resulted in similar patterns of effect across time,” said Komro, “but, interestingly, we found no evidence that the two interventions combined had significantly greater effects than either alone.”

Komro and her colleagues conclude that, while alcohol use among high school students remains a serious public health problem, and rural and American Indian youths are particularly vulnerable populations, the specific community and school-based interventions they examined are effective approaches for addressing alcohol problems in these diverse communities.

Additional alcohol research information and publications are available at: http://www.niaaa.nih.gov.

Opinion

OPINION: I’ll just leave this here
BY JAMI MURPHY
Senior Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
03/09/2017 04:00 PM
I'm going to share some “feels” with you. I'm not going to weep all over the page, but I will share with you what this job has meant to me, what it’s done for me and how I come to spend nearly 10 years doing it.

This job has shaped not only my career but also my life. I wasn’t one of those kids who had their tribal heritage shared with them as they grew up. I mean my story isn't that different from a lot of people. I was Cherokee. I knew that, but I missed out on the cultural aspect of being a tribal citizen. This job gave me the opportunity to not only grow and establish a career, but I grew to understand my culture, where I came from and what the Cherokee people have overcome. I learned of a tumultuous history that my ancestors faced as well as a personal history regarding my direct ancestor, Anderson Springston. I even wrote a column about it explaining the roles my people played in the killing of three prominent Cherokees: Major Ridge, John Ridge and Elias Boudinot. I also learned of the connection the son of that ancestor, John Leak Springston, had with the Cherokee Phoenix. He was known to be an Indian activist, an interpreter, newspaper editor, attorney and Keetoowah revivalist.

There have been so many stories that have left a mark on me. I’ve covered countless meetings, several tribal elections, as well as your basic health, education, cultural and people stories, and they all served a purpose of educating, entertaining and informing the Cherokee people.

It’s been nearly 10 years since I started here, and I have loved having the opportunity to work for such a historic newspaper. I’ve met some great people and made lasting relationships, but my most favorite aspect of working in this capacity has ultimately been helping people by both informing them of what their government is doing, as well as giving our Cherokee people a voice - something that has been taken from them time and again.

My concern for the Cherokee people and their involvement in the goings-on within their government is something that during the past several years I’ve noticed is most important. So I’ve tried to do that. It’s important to become educated in your government. You should want to have a say in what happens within your tribe. We’ve seen in our history what happens when we allow others to decide for us, and we’re a stronger people than that. I personally missed out on being involved with my tribe while growing up, but that will not be the case any longer and neither will it be for my children.

I buried the lede with this one friends, but on purpose, because once I’ve written it and once you’ve read it, it’s real. I have tendered my resignation from the Cherokee Phoenix effective April 8. I have accepted a job with the city of Tahlequah. Although I’m sad, scared and nervous for what is coming I know this is the best move for me.
This change will afford me the chance to reach for goals that working for the tribe will not allow. Although those goals may be far down the road, I need to give myself a true shot at accomplishing them. But new is always scary.

I hope the Cherokee Phoenix, a newspaper that has been at the forefront and example for excellent tribal journalism, will continue to be what it was created to be, what it should be – a true voice of the Cherokee people. One that stands up for what is right by its citizens and one that the Cherokee people can count on to be a real representation of the what happens within our tribe, not just what you need to know.

You are the Cherokee Nation. No voice is too big or small and at the end of the day the Cherokee Nation is not a thing, it’s a people and those people should be treated with respect and love like all people.

I wish all my fellow staffers, current and former, the best. You made me better, smarter and definitely more quick-witted.

So with that said, I bid you a fond farewell. Much love to anyone who played a part in the stories I’ve told over the years. This isn’t goodbye. If I can be of any help to someone in the future, you can email me at jamilynnmurphy@gmail.com. Do-na-da-go-hv-i.

People

Pettit thrives as radio show host
BY LINDSEY BARK
Staff Writer
03/16/2017 08:15 AM
SALLISAW, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen Justin Pettit grew up with a passion for radio broadcasting after listening to sports on the radio during his early years.

Pettit said he grew up listening to broadcasts of the University of Oklahoma Sooners and University of Arkansas Razorbacks basketball teams.

“Now, I do my own stuff. I do basketball or game of the week here on 105.1 (KXMX in Sallisaw). I do the play-by-play, the color (commentary), all my own stats, everything,” he said.

He initially thought about going into the radio broadcasting business in 2010 while working as realtor in Fayetteville, Arkansas.

“I always had a passion for radio, and I got a note from one of my friends about doing broadcasting school, and it was all online so I was able to do it,” Pettit said.

In 2011, he graduated from the American Broadcasting School and started with Cumulus Broadcasting Inc. in Fayetteville. While there, Pettit honed his skills as a radio broadcast host by covering local and college sports.

In 2015, he became a host at Mix 105.1 FM with a show called “JP in the Morning.” He is also the station’s sports director.

“I’m on the air 6 a.m. to 11 a.m. having a good time, getting people ready for the morning, getting them ready for their job or school or whatever it is they got going on,” Pettit said.

He said one of his favorite aspects of the job is interacting with listeners and fans.

“I love the interaction. That’s probably my favorite part. We’re a local radio station. We’re not owned by any big company. We get to do whatever we want. So if there’s a big event happening across town that involves the kids or anything, we’re there. We go out and interact with all the people. They love us,” he said.

He said the radio station provides more than just a show to its listeners.

“We play a mix of music. We play country, rock, Christian, all of it. They know any type of music they like they know they can listen to us and we’ll have it there for them,” he said. “They know if they need any kind of breaking weather, if there is any news happening in and around the area they tune to us. We’re live on the air. A lot of radio stations aren’t live anymore. So if there’s an accident or a road’s blocked off or anything, the people know they can tune to us or call us and we’ll let them know where to be and where not to be.”

He said to work in radio his personality has to come through in his voice.

“In radio you got to have a big personality, and a lot of guys have a radio voice. I don’t really have one. I don’t put it on because when I go out with the public, we have a lot of interaction. People say ‘well you sound just like you do on the radio.’ Well I don’t put the big…radio voice on so that’s kind one of my trademarks,” he said.

Pettit said though the radio station is only 3 or 4 years old, the ratings “are up there with the guys” who have been in the radio broadcasting business for 30 or 40 years.

His fellow employees praised Pettit for his work ethic.

Delanna Nutter, sales director, said Pettit steps up when they need him to do extra voice work and that he is “always right on point.”

“I’m just a normal guy working the job that I love and living the dream,” Pettit said.
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