Cherokee Nation and Tahlequah Schools offer new Head Start
2/25/2010 7:07:22 AM
 
Maria
Ortega, 15, and her son, Miguel, decorate sugar cookies on Feb. 12 at a meeting
for teenage parents participating in the Oklahoma Parents As Teachers Program.
In Tahlequah, Okla. (Photo by Christina Good Voice)
Maria Ortega, 15, and her son, Miguel, decorate sugar cookies on Feb. 12 at a meeting for teenage parents participating in the Oklahoma Parents As Teachers Program. In Tahlequah, Okla. (Photo by Christina Good Voice)
By Christina Good Voice Staff Writer TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation and Tahlequah Public Schools are partnering to offer an Early Head Start class for children of teen parents attending Tahlequah High School. The class is set to begin this spring at THS. The class will care for nearly 50 children between the ages of 6 weeks to 3 years. THS will provide the on-campus facility, while the tribe will provide staff and other necessities. The facility will be located in the same building as the Tahlequah Central Academy, an alternative education program where many teen parents attend classes. “Tahlequah Public Schools is excited to be partnering with the Cherokee Nation Head Start to expand their program to serve our students who are teen parents,” said TPS Assistant Superintendent Billie Jordan. “We have recognized the need for this program for years and have searched for ways to provide this service so that teen parents can attend school and at the same time learn hands-on parenting skills while their babies receive quality child care.” Laura Baltazar, 19, said she’s excited the class is nearly open because it would give her peace of mind knowing her children, 3-year-old Elder and 7-month-old Eyzel, would be cared for. “It’ll be easier because they’ll just be right there,” she said. Bethany McDonald, who is with the Oklahoma Parents As Teachers at Central Academy, said the class would also allow parents to ease their minds about paying for daycare. Baltazar said she pays $400 a month for daycare, but with the class she can start saving that money. “This will help save a lot of money,” she said. “A lot of young moms, we want to come to school but we have our babies.” McDonald, who works daily with the teen parents on parenting skills, said she sees the class as removing an obstacle to their learning. “I see a great way for our (OPAT) program to partner with the Head Start,” she said. “I see it merging so well. We’re going to be able to have better access to our teen moms. They’re going to be right here.” Some teen moms said the class would also help them be able to concentrate more on school if they know their babies are in good hands. Maria Ortega, 15, said she’ll be able to focus better once the Head Start opens because her 10-month-old son Miguel will down the hall. “It’s going to be easier,” she said. “He’ll be closer to me.” Principal Chief Chad Smith said the CN created the program to be a good partner in the community, to keep teenage parents in school to finish their educations and get the fathers of the children involved in the children’s lives. “Through establishing this partnership with the school, we can help provide a way for the students to continue their education, which in turn will help the community,” he said. Tribal and school officials agreed that students have a better chance of attending college or another form of post-secondary education upon graduation from high school. Doing so will help the students better provide for their family later, Jordan said. “There is so much research showing what an effective program it is anyway and how well those babies do in school,” she said. “If we want to talk about really overcoming poverty, Head Start is a great way.” Reach Staff Writer Christina Good Voice at (918) 207-3825 or christina-goodvoice@cherokee.org
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