CherokeeNation Youth Leadership Councilors in the back row, left to right, are EricBudder, Isaiah Soap, Corey Still, Carter Londagin and J.C. Lowe. Councilors inthe front row, left to right, are Kinsey Shade, Danielle Culp, Jackie Eagle andLexi Tollefsen. Councilors not shown are Christina Hanvey, Reuel Shaver andGarrett Reed. COURTESY PHOTO

CN Youth Leadership Council prepares tomorrow's leaders

BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter
05/26/2010 07:06 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Each year 15 students ranging in ages 15-19 are appointed to the Cherokee Nation Youth Leadership Council to learn tribal history, values, attributes and governance so they may one day lead the tribe.

“This experienced-based learning is focused on preparing the youth for leadership roles in their families, communities and ultimately the Nation,” Todd Enlow, CN Leadership group leader, said. “It is our goal, our focus, to prepare these young men and women to lead our Nation.”

Enlow said councilors discuss operations of tribal businesses, service delivery and how to build productive citizens. He said they are also introduced to parliamentary procedures and public speaking.

Dist. 3 Councilor Jason Carter Lowe said he joined to learn about tribal government.

“As a result of being on this council, I have been able to travel to places from North Carolina to Montana, talking about Cherokee people, as well as speak our language,” he said. “I have learned the governmental process and have been able to provide a voice for the Cherokee youth.”

Fellow Dist. 3 Councilor Jackie Eagle said the council provides learning and growing with like-minded individuals.

“It’s a place to work and achieve things you never would have thought you could achieve with people who eventually become like your second family,” he said.

Enlow said councilors also look for students interested in getting involved with the tribe.
“We hope to inspire understanding of Cherokee history and culture, and ultimately inspire leadership,” he said. “Each member is a leader in training.”

Each representative is appointed through an application process. Applications, which are due in September, are available online and sent to schools within the tribe’s jurisdiction. After the deadline, CN officials review the applications for selection.

Enlow said councilors were historically elected, but the selection process now includes a committee of Youth Council alumni, group leaders and CN Tribal Councilors. If selected, students can serve two one-year terms. However, Enlow said councilors must attend monthly meetings and participate in community service projects.

Currently the council has 12 members and three vacancies.

Dist. 8 Councilor Lexi Tollefsen said she recommends other students to get involved with the student body.

“Not only does it make the student well-versed in the fundamentals of a meeting, it gives the student a stronger sense of identity when they are encouraged to structure and present their opinions often in a group setting,” she said.

Dist. 1 Councilor Corey Still, who is attending the University of Oklahoma, said serving on the council is a privilege.

“I have made lifelong friends and have been able to meet a variety of wonderful youth and leaders,” he said. “I have also been fortunate to have been able to meet with leaders of our tribe to share with them the concerns that we as youth have. And in return, they have engraved in me wisdom and knowledge about, not just the future, but the past and present as well.”
About the Author
Reporter

Jami Murphy graduated from Locust Grove High School in 2000. She received her bachelor’s degree in mass communications in 2006 from Northeastern State University and began working at the Cherokee Phoenix in 2007.

She said the Cherokee Phoenix has allowed her the opportunity to share valuable information with the Cherokee people on a daily basis. 

Jami married Michael Murphy in 2014. They have two sons, Caden and Austin. Together they have four children, including Johnny and Chase. They also have two grandchildren, Bentley and Baylea. 

She is a Cherokee Nation citizen and said working for the Cherokee Phoenix has meant a great deal to her. 

“My great-great-great-great grandfather, John Leaf Springston, worked for the paper long ago. It’s like coming full circle. I’ve learned so much about myself, the Cherokee people and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it.”

Jami is a member of the Native American Journalists Association, and Investigative Reporters and Editors. You can follow her on Twitter @jamilynnmurphy or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/jamimurphy2014.
jami-murphy@cherokee.org • 918-453-5560
Reporter Jami Murphy graduated from Locust Grove High School in 2000. She received her bachelor’s degree in mass communications in 2006 from Northeastern State University and began working at the Cherokee Phoenix in 2007. She said the Cherokee Phoenix has allowed her the opportunity to share valuable information with the Cherokee people on a daily basis. Jami married Michael Murphy in 2014. They have two sons, Caden and Austin. Together they have four children, including Johnny and Chase. They also have two grandchildren, Bentley and Baylea. She is a Cherokee Nation citizen and said working for the Cherokee Phoenix has meant a great deal to her. “My great-great-great-great grandfather, John Leaf Springston, worked for the paper long ago. It’s like coming full circle. I’ve learned so much about myself, the Cherokee people and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it.” Jami is a member of the Native American Journalists Association, and Investigative Reporters and Editors. You can follow her on Twitter @jamilynnmurphy or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/jamimurphy2014.

News

BY CN COMMUNICATIONS
Cherokee Nation
07/01/2015 06:22 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. — At-Large Tribal Council candidate Shane Jett submitted a formal recount request Wednesday to the Cherokee Nation Election Commission after certified General Election results showed Jett finished third to candidates Wanda Hatfield and Betsy Swimmer. After Election Commission officials tabulated challenge ballots Sunday, results had Jett with 717 votes to Hatfield’s 1,057 votes and Swimmer’s 770 votes. Hatfield and Swimmer are scheduled for a run-off election Saturday, July 25, since no candidate garnered more than 50 percent of the vote, pending the outcome of the requested recount. Election Commission officials are now waiting on a formal order from the Cherokee Nation Supreme Court to begin preparation for the recount. Officials must have the recount completed by Friday, July 3. A recount for the District 14 race was ordered by the Supreme Court on Tuesday after candidate Keith Austin submitted a formal request late Monday. District 14 candidates Keith Austin and William Pearson were separated by one vote in the certified election results.
BY STAFF REPORTS
07/01/2015 02:14 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Oklahoma Fire fastpitch softball team will face girls from all across the country when they travel July 13-18 to Gulf Shores, Alabama, to compete in the USSSA National World Series. The team is comprised of 14 girls, 12 of which are Cherokee, from the Tahlequah area. They reserved their spot for the series on June 21 by capturing the Oklahoma State 12u Rec/All-Stars Championship in Bixby. The team is also fundraising for the trip. It created a GoFundMe page with a goal of raising $15,000. To visit the page, go to <a href=" http://www.gofundme.com/okfire" target="_blank">http://www.gofundme.com/okfire</a>. The team is also holding an Indian taco sale from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on July 3 at the Oklahoma American Legion Post 135 In Tahlequah. Tickets can be purchased in advance from parents, players and team partner O’Reilly Auto Parts.
BY STAFF REPORTS
07/01/2015 12:00 PM
TULSA, Okla. – Jonathan Powell, director of marketing and business development for Cherokee Nation Industries, was recently named to the Federal Communications Commission’s Communications Security, Reliability and Interoperability Council. “It is an honor to receive this nomination and to have the opportunity to serve as a voice for rural and tribal communities while influencing advancements in our nation’s communications systems,” said Powell. “My focus is providing the best services to all citizens, continuing to bridge interoperability gaps and ensuring rural and tribal land is a consideration when making recommendations to the FCC.” A CN citizen and Pryor native, Powell has more than 20 years of experience in the telecommunications industry. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Northeastern State University in finance and a master’s degree in business administration from Oklahoma City University. Powell will join the fifth charter of the CSRIC, which provides guidance, expertise and recommendations to the FCC to ensure optimal security and reliability of the nation’s communications systems. The council addresses the availability of communications during natural disasters, terrorist attacks and other events that result in exceptional strain on the communications infrastructure, as well as the rapid restoration of communications services in the event of widespread or major disruptions. “Mr. Powell is a valuable asset at CNI, leading teams in the areas of market strategy and research, partnership development, sales planning and business development,” said Chris Moody, CNI president. “As a leader within a tribally owned business, he provides a unique and valuable insight to the CSRIC that will be crucial for the future of communications in tribal entities and Indian Country.” Members of the CSRIC are appointed by the chairman of the FCC and selected from public safety agencies, consumer or community organizations or other nonprofit entities and the private sector to balance various expertise and viewpoints.
BY STAFF REPORTS
07/01/2015 08:37 AM
In this month's issue: • Baker, Crittenden win 2nd terms • 6 Tribal Council candidates win, 2 are incumbents • Dist. 6, At-Large council races head to runoffs • Chief, governor sign hunting, fishing compact ...plus much more. <a href="http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/Docs/2015/7/9402_2015-07-01.pdf" target="_blank">Click here to view</a>the July 2015 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix.
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/30/2015 04:21 PM
WASHINGTON, D.C. – Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs Kevin Washburn announced June 16 that Indian Affairs offices and bureaus have hired nearly 600 American Indian and Alaska Native veterans in fiscal year 2015. Those numbers exceed the goal set last year to increase the number of Native American veterans employed by these agencies from nine percent of the workforce to 12.5 percent. “Our intent to build a 21st century Indian Affairs workforce depends upon attracting and retaining experienced and motivated personnel, and we know that America’s veterans are among the most capable, dedicated and well-trained individuals we need,” Washburn said. “I am very proud that we have not only met, but exceeded our goal of hiring American Indian and Alaska Native vets. We will continue to provide those veterans with opportunities to use their knowledge and skills in our mission of serving Indian Country.” On June 14, 2014, Washburn announced the launch of a new initiative to hire more American Indian and Alaska Native veterans throughout Indian Affairs, which includes the Office of the Assistant Secretary, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the Bureau of Indian Education. The initiative targets veterans prior to their discharge from the U.S. Armed Forces and actively seeks members of the National Guard and reserves who are looking for careers that serve Indian Country. Indian Affairs bureaus, regional offices and agencies provide a wide range of direct services to 566 federally recognized American Indian and Alaska Native tribes and thousands of Indian Trust beneficiaries. Almost all Indian Affairs positions are filled with American Indians and Alaska Natives under a congressionally approved Indian Preference policy. In total, Indian Affairs employees number approximately 7,940. They work throughout the United States not just with tribes, but also with state, local and other federal agencies in matters ranging from public safety, family and child welfare, and education to infrastructure maintenance, environmental protection, land and natural resources management, and other areas. For more information about Indian Affairs’ Hire American Indian and Alaska Native Veterans Initiative, visit <a href="http://www.bia.gov/Jobs/Veterans/" target="_blank">www.bia.gov/Jobs/Veterans/</a> or call Nancy Nelson, Human Resources Specialist, Indian Affairs Office of Human Capital Management, at 202-208-6175.
BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter
06/30/2015 11:10 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Tribal Council candidate Keith Austin filed a request with the Cherokee Nation Election Commission on June 29 to have the Dist. 14 election recounted. According to his request, Austin wants the recount to include “all in-district ballots, early voting ballots and absentee ballots.” According to certified general election results, William “Bill” Pearson defeated Austin by one vote to win the Dist. 14 Tribal Council seat. Results show that Pearson received 534 votes for 50.05 percent of the ballots, while Austin received 533 votes for 49.95 percent. Both Austin and Pearson declined to comment about the recount request. Recount requests can be made up to 5 p.m. on July 1. EC officials said recounts cost $750 per district and $750 for absentee ballots. EC officials said the tribe’s Supreme Court justices would be present during the recount, which is slated for Thursday, July 2. The EC has July 2-3 to complete any recounts. Election appeals can be filed through July 6, according to the EC’s timeline.