CherokeeNation Youth Leadership Councilors in the back row, left to right, are EricBudder, Isaiah Soap, Corey Still, Carter Londagin and J.C. Lowe. Councilors inthe front row, left to right, are Kinsey Shade, Danielle Culp, Jackie Eagle andLexi Tollefsen. Councilors not shown are Christina Hanvey, Reuel Shaver andGarrett Reed. COURTESY PHOTO

CN Youth Leadership Council prepares tomorrow's leaders

BY JAMI MURPHY
Senior Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
05/26/2010 07:06 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Each year 15 students ranging in ages 15-19 are appointed to the Cherokee Nation Youth Leadership Council to learn tribal history, values, attributes and governance so they may one day lead the tribe.

“This experienced-based learning is focused on preparing the youth for leadership roles in their families, communities and ultimately the Nation,” Todd Enlow, CN Leadership group leader, said. “It is our goal, our focus, to prepare these young men and women to lead our Nation.”

Enlow said councilors discuss operations of tribal businesses, service delivery and how to build productive citizens. He said they are also introduced to parliamentary procedures and public speaking.

Dist. 3 Councilor Jason Carter Lowe said he joined to learn about tribal government.

“As a result of being on this council, I have been able to travel to places from North Carolina to Montana, talking about Cherokee people, as well as speak our language,” he said. “I have learned the governmental process and have been able to provide a voice for the Cherokee youth.”

Fellow Dist. 3 Councilor Jackie Eagle said the council provides learning and growing with like-minded individuals.

“It’s a place to work and achieve things you never would have thought you could achieve with people who eventually become like your second family,” he said.

Enlow said councilors also look for students interested in getting involved with the tribe.
“We hope to inspire understanding of Cherokee history and culture, and ultimately inspire leadership,” he said. “Each member is a leader in training.”

Each representative is appointed through an application process. Applications, which are due in September, are available online and sent to schools within the tribe’s jurisdiction. After the deadline, CN officials review the applications for selection.

Enlow said councilors were historically elected, but the selection process now includes a committee of Youth Council alumni, group leaders and CN Tribal Councilors. If selected, students can serve two one-year terms. However, Enlow said councilors must attend monthly meetings and participate in community service projects.

Currently the council has 12 members and three vacancies.

Dist. 8 Councilor Lexi Tollefsen said she recommends other students to get involved with the student body.

“Not only does it make the student well-versed in the fundamentals of a meeting, it gives the student a stronger sense of identity when they are encouraged to structure and present their opinions often in a group setting,” she said.

Dist. 1 Councilor Corey Still, who is attending the University of Oklahoma, said serving on the council is a privilege.

“I have made lifelong friends and have been able to meet a variety of wonderful youth and leaders,” he said. “I have also been fortunate to have been able to meet with leaders of our tribe to share with them the concerns that we as youth have. And in return, they have engraved in me wisdom and knowledge about, not just the future, but the past and present as well.”
About the Author
Reporter

Jami Murphy graduated from Locust Grove High School in 2000. She received her bachelor’s degree in mass communications in 2006 from Northeastern State University and began working at the Cherokee Phoenix in 2007.

She said the Cherokee Phoenix has allowed her the opportunity to share valuable information with the Cherokee people on a daily basis. 

Jami married Michael Murphy in 2014. They have two sons, Caden and Austin. Together they have four children, including Johnny and Chase. They also have two grandchildren, Bentley and Baylea. 

She is a Cherokee Nation citizen and said working for the Cherokee Phoenix has meant a great deal to her. 

“My great-great-great-great grandfather, John Leaf Springston, worked for the paper long ago. It’s like coming full circle. I’ve learned so much about myself, the Cherokee people and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it.”

Jami is a member of the Native American Journalists Association, and Investigative Reporters and Editors. You can follow her on Twitter @jamilynnmurphy or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/jamimurphy2014.
jami-murphy@cherokee.org • 918-453-5560
Reporter Jami Murphy graduated from Locust Grove High School in 2000. She received her bachelor’s degree in mass communications in 2006 from Northeastern State University and began working at the Cherokee Phoenix in 2007. She said the Cherokee Phoenix has allowed her the opportunity to share valuable information with the Cherokee people on a daily basis. Jami married Michael Murphy in 2014. They have two sons, Caden and Austin. Together they have four children, including Johnny and Chase. They also have two grandchildren, Bentley and Baylea. She is a Cherokee Nation citizen and said working for the Cherokee Phoenix has meant a great deal to her. “My great-great-great-great grandfather, John Leaf Springston, worked for the paper long ago. It’s like coming full circle. I’ve learned so much about myself, the Cherokee people and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it.” Jami is a member of the Native American Journalists Association, and Investigative Reporters and Editors. You can follow her on Twitter @jamilynnmurphy or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/jamimurphy2014.

News

BY STAFF REPORTS
08/24/2016 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation administration and Tribal Council issued statements of support for the Standing Rock Sioux Nation in its effort to halt the development of the Dakota Access Pipeline. In Cannon Ball, North Dakota, Standing Rock Sioux citizens and supporters are protesting the construction of the pipeline that would carry crude oil through four states. The pipeline would be built through that tribe’s land, and its tribal citizens are concerned that if the pipeline fails it will contaminate their water supply and surrounding sacred sites. In July, the Standing Rock Sioux sued to stop construction of the pipeline, and it has been halted for now. “The Cherokee Nation stands in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in its effort to halt the development of the Dakota Access Pipeline, and I applaud our Tribal Council for showing the support of the legislative body of the Cherokee Nation as well,” said Principal Chief Bill John Baker in a statement. “The Standing Rock people have an inherent right to protect their homelands, their historic and sacred sites, their natural resources, their drinking water and their families from this potentially dangerous pipeline.” Baker said the CN supports safe and responsible energy development, and energy development in Indian Country is only responsible if it respects the sovereign rights of tribal governments and includes meaningful consultation with tribal officials. “As Indian people, we have a right to protect our lands and protect our water rights. That’s our responsibility to the next seven generations. The Standing Rock Sioux should be allowed a place at the table to express their legitimate concerns on a pipeline plan that could be detrimental to their tribe for many future generations,” Baker said. On Aug. 19, the 17-member CN Tribal Council also stated its standing in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux Nation in its peaceful opposition to the pipeline project as the $3.8 billion, 1,172-mile-long pipeline would cross Lake Oahe and the Missouri River, and would disturb burial grounds and sacred sites on ancestral treaty lands, states a press release from the Tribal Council. Tribal Councilor Jack Baker, CN a noted historian, said the company constructing the pipeline has failed to recognize environmental and historical preservation issues. “I am opposed to the Dakota Pipeline,” Jack Baker said. “They have refused to comply with an environmental assessment and have refused to consult with the tribal nations including the Cherokee Nation under Section 106 for Historic Preservation. They will be crossing the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail in southern Illinois. Without a consultation, it is not known what effect it could have on our forced removal route.” Joe Byrd, Tribal Council speaker and vice president of the Eastern Oklahoma Region of the National Congress of American Indians, pointed out the lack of consultation infringes on the tribe’s sovereignty as a nation. “They have not respected the Standing Rock Sioux as a federally-recognized tribe, with all the rights the treaties they have signed affords them as a sovereign nation,” said Byrd. “The pipeline could present both environmental hazards to native people, as well as possibly having a harmful impact on ancestral lands.”
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Senior Reporter – @cp_wchavez
08/24/2016 08:15 AM
SALLISAW, Okla. – In March, the U.S. Department of Energy announced its participation in the development of Clean Line Energy’s Plains & Eastern project, a 700-mile, high-voltage transmission line expected to transfer wind energy from western Oklahoma to Tennessee. A study shows the line would deliver 4,000 megawatts of power from the panhandle to utilities and customers in Arkansas, Tennessee and the Mid-South and Southeast areas. One county the line would traverse is Sequoyah County. Many residents there are Cherokee Nation citizens, and the proposed route would run near and parallel to the historic Trail of Tears and Sequoyah’s Home, a site where the noted Cherokee linguist lived. Residents who could be affected by the line recently met to discuss opposition to it. Kathryn Wilburne, who lives near Sallisaw, said she and her husband James would have a clear view of the line from their living room. They bought their property about 12 years ago and built a home on it in 2008 when they retired. “This has been a dream for decades to come back (from California) and have a farm and be in a beautiful historical area that we have here,” she said. “It is so precious what is here. It can be found nowhere else. It’s an honor to be here. It’s an honor to be a steward here. We love our farm.” Kathryn, a Sequoyah County Historical Society member, said she’s concerned about the potential loss of hidden historic places. She said the lands were Cherokee allotments and that Cherokee families have plots and cemeteries throughout the county. Surveyors have worked to document the historic aspects and discoveries in the area, she said, and those would be key to developments. “There are also Indian signal trees here (trees bent to mark routes or significant sites), and there are also paths people have found designating where wagons have gone through,” she said. “We have to be respectful of what is here. We know that there are people buried here, and as such, the landowners know it, and they are very protective of these people that are buried here even if they’re not related to them.” Tribal Councilor Bryan Warner said he’s listened to citizens living in areas where the line would pass. “What I’m hearing from this group overall is about the lack of transparency, the disgraceful tactics and the other things that have come from Clean Line. I feel if there was big need, this group (landowners) would consider letting this thing come through, but from the research they have done they believe there is not that great of need at this moment,” he said. He said the Tribal Council stands behind its 2015 resolution objecting to the line going through the CN. “I’ve talked with (Principal) Chief (Bill John) Baker. I’ve talked with the Attorney General Todd Hembree. I’ve talked with Sara Hill, secretary of Natural Resources, and we all still are a go to help these individuals and do what we can to help stop this transmission line,” Warner said. He said because the CN owns part of the Arkansas Riverbed, it may be able to stop Clean Line from crossing the river in western Sequoyah County. Clean Line Energy Executive Vice President Mario Hurtado said the CN resolution contains information that is “not factually true.” It states the line would cross ceremonial grounds, however, Hurtado said Clean Line has worked hard not to do that and “has absolutely no knowledge” it would. The resolution suggests the project would go “across the Stokes Smith Ceremonial Ground” near Vian, but Hurtado said the DOE obtained locational details about the ground from the CN. “The route is more than 0.5 miles to the south of the Stokes Smith Ceremonial Grounds, along an existing transmission line. Extensive analysis was done on this location and there is no visual or other impact from locating the new transmission line along the south side of the existing line in that area,” reads a company statement. Hurtado said crews have been active along the right-of-way for the line gathering data on wetlands, rivers and other waters regulated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Crews are also conducting surveys to ensure cultural resources are not harmed. He said crews are also working to acquire easements along the route, which would contain 150-foot towers. “We are working with a couple of Oklahoma-based companies that do this kind of work a lot for all kinds of infrastructure projects. We’ve done training with those agents. We’re going to make sure they are going to be following the code of conduct. We’ve got to work with landowners to make sure they are respectful and treat people correctly,” Hurtado said. The agents are also there to ensure landowners understand they will get 100 percent of the market value of the right-of-way, he said, and that Clean Line is paying for property structures that would need removed. “People can get annual payments for structures on their property. Even if they don’t have structures on their property they can still get annual payments,” he said. Steve Parish, who lives near Gore, said the proposed line “takes out” his 20 acres, which includes his home. “If there was a need for this power to come through, if it was helping everybody, I would sacrifice. I probably would just go ahead with the deal, but it’s not. It just takes away, and we worked too hard for that,” he said. Parish said he learned of the line in 2013 and met with a Clean Line official who showed him where the line would cross in relation to his property. “It does affect me quite a bit. The 200-foot easement they are looking at is right next to my house, and I told them that’s pretty close,” he said. He said the representative offered to move the line about 200 feet from his home. He said the representative also told him “it would still be in his backyard” and that Parish “wouldn’t get two cents.” In July, Parish said Clean Line representatives returned for an environmental survey. He said he questioned whether they had already performed it on his property. Parish said his wife intervened and told them they did not have permission for the survey. “They said, ‘we see that you’re going to be a little bit difficult. We’ll send somebody else out.’ I haven’t heard from them since,” he said. Hurtado said if a landowner does not want to talk to a representative that wish is respected and the representative leaves and does not knock on their door again. “If the result of that conversation is ‘I just don’t want an agent from Clean Line contacting me,’ then we take note of that, and we try to be respectful of that, but we have to be able to at least try. In fact, we are obligated to talk to people about the project, about easements,” he said. “People can always contact us. If they have an issue about how a land agent is acting towards them or they feel they haven’t been treated fairly, we want to know about that.” People can call 1-855-466-1021 or email land@plainsandeastern.com to voice concerns, Hurtado said. Projects like the transmission line take much time and planning, Hurtado said, and that it’s important to recognize the benefits that can come from the $2 billion endeavor. “If folks have issues we want to be able to work through those. Our job is to do this in the best way possible. We really want to do right by the communities where the project is going to be located,” he said. “I think it’s important for people to know that it’s going to provide very economic, low-cost energy to well over a million homes, and it’s going to provide economic development and jobs to thousands and thousands of people.” Hurtado said Clean Line wants to begin construction in late 2017 and for the line to be operational in 2020.
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Senior Reporter – @cp_wchavez
08/23/2016 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Attorneys for former Cherokee Nation Foundation Executive Director Kimberlie Gilliland filed a motion in the tribe’s District Court on Aug. 17 requesting the court stay a civil case filed against her on July 27 by the CNF. The stay is requested pending the disposition of a criminal case against Gilliland filed by the CN attorney general’s office on July 28 alleging embezzlement and fraud during her time as CNF executive director. In the civil case, Gilliland faces 22 counts that stem from a more-than-two-year investigation involving irregularities in her salary, travel expenses, spending and awarding of CNF scholarships. Gilliland was appointed to serve as CNF executive director in August 2009 and served until July 2013. Gilliland has called the court filings “baseless.” Her request for a stay states that eight of the nine counts in the criminal case “are based upon the same allegations” in the civil case and that she would face a dilemma of self-incrimination in the criminal case if she chooses to defend herself against the civil charges. The motion also states a stay pending a final resolution of the criminal case “would further the interests” of the court and “would not harm the public.” Her civil case attorney, James Proszek of the law firm Hall, Estill, Hardwick, Gable of Tulsa, signed the motion. Also on Aug. 17, her attorney in the civil suit filed a motion to dismiss embezzlement and conversion claims by CNF attorney Ralph Keen. The motion claims the embezzlement and conversion claims were filed two years after the claims accrued and exceed statute of limitations and should be dismissed. District Judge Bart Fite had not responded to the two motions as of publication.
BY JAMI MURPHY
Senior Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
08/23/2016 08:15 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – At an Aug. 19 press conference, Tahlequah Police Chief Nate King said he believed his officers were justified in shooting 49-year-old Cherokee Nation citizen Dominic Rollice while responding to an Aug. 12 disturbance. Rollice was transported to Northeast Health System where he was pronounced dead. At the press conference, King released the incident’s 911 call as well as body camera footage from one officer that showed the shooting. According to the 911 call, at about 9:35 p.m. Rollice was “drunk” at the caller’s home in the Shawnee Court vicinity. The caller said she was afraid the situation was going to “get ugly real quick.” King said Rollice was at the home, in which he did not live, and would not leave. Lt. Brandon Vick and Officers Josh Girdner and Chase Reed arrived at the home shortly after the call, King said. Reed’s body camera footage shows the three policemen speaking to Rollice and then following him into a garage. After Rollice retreats to the back of the garage, he pulls a claw hammer from a tool bench area and holds it above his head. The footage shows the officers ordering him to drop the hammer several times. Rollice says “no” and states that he’s in his house and he’s doing “nothing wrong.” Video shows Reed stating that he’s going to use his Taser and Rollice making a quick movement with the hammer. Girdner and Vick then fire six gunshots at Rollice at the same time Reed fires his Taser. After falling to the floor, the footage shows Reed performing CPR until emergency responders arrive. King said the footage shows a “violent encounter which resulted in the loss of a human life” and that the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation is investigating the shooting. He said the OSBI interviewed the three officers on Aug. 18 and that the officers were on paid administrative leave until the investigation is complete. King added that the OSBI would provide the investigation’s results to the district attorney, who would then determine whether the shooting was justified. Although, the shooting is under investigation, King said he felt the officers followed procedure and were justified in how they handled the situation. The Cherokee Phoenix contacted Rollice’s parents for comment, but they declined. Court records show Rollice pleaded no contest to a 2015 child sexual abuse charge in Cherokee County and was serving a suspended sentence.
BY STAFF REPORTS
08/22/2016 08:15 PM
The Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board will meet at 9:30 a.m. CST, Sept. 1, 2016, inside the Tribal Services conference room in the Cherokee Nation complex. It is an open meeting and the public is welcome to attend. <a href="http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/Docs/2016/8/10560__9.1.16CherokeePhoenixEditorialBoardMeetingAgenda.pdf" target="_blank">Click here to view</a>the agenda.
BY STAFF REPORTS
08/22/2016 04:00 PM
TULSA, Okla. – The Alzheimer’s Association Oklahoma Chapter will hold its 2016 Walk to End Alzheimer’s on Oct. 22 at the Guthrie Green located at 111 E. Mathew B. Brady St. Registration begins at 8 a.m. with a ceremony at 9 a.m. and the walk at 9:30 a.m. The walk’s length is 1.5 miles. “Alzheimer’s is an epidemic devastating our families, our finances and our futures. The disease is all around us, but the power to stop it is within us. Join us for the Alzheimer’s Association Walk to End Alzheimer’s and be inspired by all the footsteps that fall into place behind yours. Together, we can end Alzheimer’s,” Nellie Windsor, Alzheimer’s Association Oklahoma Chapter communications director, said. According to the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America, Alzheimer’s is a progressive, degenerative disorder that attacks the brain’s nerve cells, or neurons, resulting in loss of memory, thinking and language skills and behavioral changes. For more information, call Leeanna Tomah at?918-392-5010 or email <a href="mailto: ltomah@alz.org">ltomah@alz.org</a> or visit <a href="http://www.tulsawalk.org" target="_blank">tulsawalk.org</a>.