Cherokees have used NSU optometry clinic for 39 years

BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
04/20/2018 08:30 AM
TAHLEQUAH – Northeastern State University’s Oklahoma College of Optometry goes back 39 years in its relationship with the Cherokee Nation and in providing Cherokees eye care.

NSUOCO works with nine CN clinics, also known as Rural Eye Programs, in Tahlequah, Sallisaw, Stilwell, Jay, Salina, Vinita, Nowata, Muskogee and Ochelata and services 40,000 to 60,000 patients annually.

Its first graduating class was in 1983 and has since averaged 28 graduates annually from its four-year doctorate program.

The NSU campus clinic contains 20 exam rooms and specialty clinics for dry eye, contact lenses, low vision, vision therapy and infant vision clinic. If a REP is unable to provide a type of eye care, patients are sent to the NSU clinic for further evaluation and treatment.

Nate Lighthizer, NSUOCO Continuing Medical Education director and doctor of optometry, said the college has seen patients from 2 months old to 102 years old.
Seth Rich, a Cherokee Nation citizen and fourth-year Northeastern State University optometry student, right, shows Tara Comingdeer Fields, a CN citizen and first-year student, how to operate a slit lamp on Nate Lighthizer, NSU Oklahoma College of Optometry director of Continuing Medical Education and doctor of optometry. The equipment can examine the eye’s interior using a beam of light. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Seth Rich, a Cherokee Nation citizen and fourth-year Northeastern State University optometry student, right, shows Tara Comingdeer Fields, a CN citizen and first-year student, how to operate a slit lamp on Nate Lighthizer, NSU Oklahoma College of Optometry director of Continuing Medical Education and doctor of optometry. The equipment can examine the eye’s interior using a beam of light. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
http://www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com/the-joint-tulsa/nanyehi/

NB3 Foundation opens mobile app competition for Native youth

BY STAFF REPORTS
04/19/2018 04:00 PM
SANTA ANA PUEBLO, N.M. – The Notah Begay III (NB3) Foundation, with a grant from the Comcast Foundation and in partnership with Cultivating Coders, is accepting applications for a national competition for Native youth to design a mobile app focusing on improving the health and nutrition of Native youth – designed by Native youth.

The competition is open to individuals or teams of Native youth, ages 13-18, experienced in coding, design and digital media and/or mobile technology.

Participants must submit a completed application with supporting documents that includes a four-page outline and video of the app. Contest applications will be accepted until July 1. Learn about the contest criteria, eligibility and application process at: http://www.nb3foundation.org/healthy-kids-healthy-futures-app-contest/.

“The NB3 Foundation recognizes that more and more Native youth are using their mobile devices and APPs to track their physical activity, nutrition and even water intake. This competition is an integral step for the Foundation in the direction of connecting youth with technology to build healthier lifestyles,” NB3 Foundation President and CEO Justin Kii Huenemann, said.

The contest’s intent is to engage and challenge creative and tech-savvy Native youth from across Indian Country to think creatively, culturally and digitally about their diet, nutrition, exercise and fitness; and turn that knowledge into a solution or problem-solving mobile app that may be used by the NB3 Foundation.

CN provides mental health first-aid training

BY STAFF REPORTS
04/17/2018 08:00 AM
VINITA – The Cherokee Nation’s Behavioral Health is using federal grants to train law enforcement, youth workers and health officials to better handle mental illness.

Behavioral Health special projects officer Tonya Boone, a certified instructor, has led eight classes, including her most recent adult mental health first-aid class at the CN Vinita Health Center.

“I was certified in August of 2017 and have since certified around 150 individuals,” Boone said.

More than 20 people from CN Health Services and surrounding health care agencies were involved in the most recent training in Vinita. During the eight-hour course, participants memorized a five-step action plan and were taught how to identify mental health risk factors, offer support and be effective communicators.

Only about 5,000 instructors nationwide are certified to teach mental health first aid, including six from the CN.
Cherokee Nation Sam Hider Health Center Administrator Mike Fisher, left, Vinita Health Center Assistant Administrator Arrahwanna Leake and Vinita Health Center dental assistants Chyenne Livingston and Kaleah Davis work on a puzzle as part of a Mental Health First Aid course at the Vinita Health Center. The tribe’s Behavioral Health is using federal grants to train law enforcement, youth workers and health officials to better handle mental illness. COURTESY
Cherokee Nation Sam Hider Health Center Administrator Mike Fisher, left, Vinita Health Center Assistant Administrator Arrahwanna Leake and Vinita Health Center dental assistants Chyenne Livingston and Kaleah Davis work on a puzzle as part of a Mental Health First Aid course at the Vinita Health Center. The tribe’s Behavioral Health is using federal grants to train law enforcement, youth workers and health officials to better handle mental illness. COURTESY
http://cherokeepublichealth.org

Grim named Health Services executive director

BY TRAVIS SNELL
Assistant Editor – @cp_tsnell
04/11/2018 02:30 PM
TAHLEQUAH – According to a Cherokee Nation email, Dr. Charles Grim has been promoted from interim executive director of the tribe’s Health Services to executive director.

“I am proud to announce that Dr. Charles Grim will assume the permanent duties as Cherokee Nation’s executive director of Cherokee Nation Health Services,” Principal Chief Bill John Baker stated in the April 9 email. “Without a doubt, Dr. Grim’s experience, leadership and expertise have paved the way for continued growth to better meet the diverse health care needs of the Cherokee Nation.”

Grim had been serving as the interim executive director since November after former Executive Director Connie Davis resigned to spend more time with her family. Davis had served in that role since 2012.

According to the email, Grim takes control of the largest health care system in Indian Country that services 14 counties in northeast Oklahoma and more than 1.2 million patient visits annually to eight health centers and the W.W. Hastings Hospital.

“I feel very honored to be appointed this role and for the opportunity to continue to lead a team that I have held close to my heart for a number of years,” Grim said. “As both an employee and a Cherokee Nation citizen, I appreciate Chief Baker and his vision for the future of the tribe’s health care system and I look forward to what we will all accomplish together for the health of our Cherokee Nation citizens.”
Dr. Charles Grim
Dr. Charles Grim

Oklahoma City Indian Clinic participates in ‘Diabetes Alert Day’

BY STAFF REPORTS
04/07/2018 12:00 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY – Oklahoma City Indian Clinic commemorated “Diabetes Alert Day” on March 27 to promote the seriousness of diabetes, particularly when it is left undiagnosed or untreated.

One-in-three American adults are at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes, a serious disease that can lead to complications like kidney failure, heart disease, stroke, blindness and amputations. Type 2 diabetes doesn’t have to be permanent. It can be prevented or delayed with healthy lifestyle modifications. The first step is learning about the disease’s risks.

“Early detection and treatment of diabetes decreases the risk of developing complications of diabetes," said Robyn Sunday-Allen, CEO of OKCIC.

A simple and quick 60-second test located on the American Diabetes Association website can help a person determine if he or she is at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes.

American Indian and Alaska Native adults are 2.3 times more likely to be diagnosed with diabetes compared with non-Hispanic whites. Because of this diabetes epidemic, OKCIC has a specific program titled “Special Diabetes Program for Indians,” to provide Native Americans with diabetes treatment and prevention services. Through this grant-funded program OKCIC is able to educate, diagnose and assist patients with their diabetes management through lifestyle changes and intervention.
https://www.facebook.com/CASA-of-Cherokee-Country-184365501631027/

Changing diets for 1- to 8-year-olds

BY STACIE BOSTON
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
04/04/2018 04:30 PM
SALINA – After passing the 1-year-old mark, children’s environments play a bigger role in eating patterns as diets alter. Tonya Swim, Cherokee Nation clinical dietitian, said as children reach “school age” well-rounded meals are important for muscle and brain growth.

1 to 5 years

Swim said children between 1 and 2 years old eat because of hunger, and at this time their palates change. Around the 2-year-old mark, Swim said children’s appetites “slow down.”

“Parents may be concerned at that age that their child’s not eating, but that’s just a normal part of the life stage at that point,” she said.

Swim said when children hit the 3- to 4-year-old mark their environments becomes “bigger” influences on their eating patterns.

Swedish researchers suggest 5 types of diabetes, not 2

BY BRITTNEY BENNETT
Reporter – @cp_bbennett
03/27/2018 08:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH – A new research article in the health journal “The Lancet: Diabetes & Endocrinology” claims there are five types of diabetes classifications, challenging the long-held idea of only two.

Researchers from Sweden’s University of Gothenburg and Lund University write that the new classifications pave the way “towards precision medicine in diabetes” and “individualize treatment regimens and identify individuals with increased risk of complications at diagnosis.”

Diabetes is classified into Type 1 and Type 2 and is the fastest-growing disease worldwide, making it a substantial threat to human health, according to an international network of health scientists.

Traditionally diabetes has been diagnosed only by measuring glucose, but the new study examined six variables in nearly 15,000 patients to determine cluster categories of diabetes including body mass index, age at diagnosis and glutamate antibodies.

Individuals with Severe Autoimmune Diabetes (SAID) were characterized with poor metabolic control and the presence of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA). Cluster 2 individuals with Severe Insulin-Deficient Diabetes (SIDD) were similar to cluster 1, but GADA negative.
Heidi Lyman, left, of Kansas, Oklahoma, receives instruction from Brenda Fowler, a registered nurse for W.W. Hastings Hospital’s Diabetes Management, on how to use a glucometer to test her blood sugar level in this 2013 photo. A new research article claims there are five types of diabetes classifications, challenging the long-held idea that there are only two. ARCHIVE
Heidi Lyman, left, of Kansas, Oklahoma, receives instruction from Brenda Fowler, a registered nurse for W.W. Hastings Hospital’s Diabetes Management, on how to use a glucometer to test her blood sugar level in this 2013 photo. A new research article claims there are five types of diabetes classifications, challenging the long-held idea that there are only two. ARCHIVE

OKCIC educates about risks of HIV/AIDS, encourages testing

BY STAFF REPORTS
03/23/2018 03:00 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY – The Oklahoma City Indian Clinic, a nonprofit clinic providing health and wellness services to American Indians in central Oklahoma, on March 20 recognized the impact HIV/AIDS has on Native Americans through the observance of National Native HIV/AIDS Awareness Day.

Although American Indians and Alaska Natives’ HIV infection is proportional to the rest of the United States population size, certain measures within the overall statistics of new HIV infections and diagnoses are disproportionate compared to other races or ethnicities. Of the 39,513 people with a HIV diagnoses in the United States in 2015, more than 200 were American Indians and Alaska Natives. Of those, 73 percent were men and 26 percent were women.

“The topic of HIV/AIDS remains a serious health threat to the Native American community,” OKCIC CEO Robyn Sunday-Allen said. “It is crucial that prevention programs be tailored to the specific needs of this population.”

American Indians and Alaska Natives are statistically more likely to face challenges associated with risk for HIV infection, which includes high rates of sexually transmitted disease; substance abuse leading to engaging in risky behaviors, such as unprotected sex; and issues related to poverty, such as lower education levels and limited access to health care.

The OKCIC encourages the Native community to get educated, get tested and get involved in HIV prevention, care and treatment. It recommends that all adults and young adults get tested for HIV at least once as a routine part of medical care. Those who are at a higher risk should get tested every year.

Alternatives lead to healthier wild onion recipes

BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
03/22/2018 12:00 PM
SALINA – Every year when spring arrives, so do the sprouts of bright green stems in the woods and hollows known to Cherokees as wild onions.

Wild onions are often cooked with grease or lard and are boiled or pan-fried. Cherokee Nation clinical dietitian Tonya Swim said there are healthier alternatives for preparing the plant.

“A lot of people use lard or bacon grease and that’s a flavor enhancer. So an option that you can do instead using some sort of bacon grease or high-fat product would be to add some sort of stock, like vegetable stock, that would be able to add flavor without the extra fat,” she said.

Swim said wild onions could also be cooked using vegetable oil when pan-fried.

“If you’re going to pan fry with eggs, then using a vegetable oil instead of the bacon grease or lard would be a healthier choice,” she said.
Dirt is shaken off of wild onion stalks after they are dug out of the ground in Delaware County. Cherokee Nation clinical dietitian Tonya Swim says there are healthier alternatives for preparing the plant than cooking in grease or lard. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Green wild onion stalks can be seen growing in Delaware County. Traditionally, Cherokee people gather wild onion in February, March and April. After they are cleaned and cut, the onions are traditionally mixed with eggs and cooked in a skillet. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Gathered wild onions are seen in a plastic bucket. The plants were taken to a water source where excess dirt was washed away and the onions’ roots cut off. The cleaned onions were then chopped and cooked. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX After being cleaned, wild onions are chopped into smaller pieces and usually mixed with eggs to be cooked. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Dirt is shaken off of wild onion stalks after they are dug out of the ground in Delaware County. Cherokee Nation clinical dietitian Tonya Swim says there are healthier alternatives for preparing the plant than cooking in grease or lard. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Culture

Five Tribes Ancestry Conference set for June 7-9
BY STAFF REPORTS
04/22/2018 04:00 PM
SULPHUR – Explore your Native American heritage at the Five Tribes Ancestry Conference on June 7-9 at the Chickasaw Cultural Center.

The Inter-Tribal Council of the Five Civilized Tribes, whose mission is to unite the governments of the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee Creek and Seminole nations, has endorsed this first-of-its-kind conference.

“The Five Tribes have a shared history due to the creation of the Dawes Rolls at the turn of the last century,” Cherokee Heritage Center Executive Director Dr. Charles Gourd said. “The vast majority of our visitors at CHC are interested in researching their family heritage, but they just aren’t sure where to start. Working with the Five Tribes, we have created a one-of-a-kind conference that will provide a better understanding of genealogical methodology and introduce available records to aid individuals in their family research.”

The three-day event is expected to provide tools to research Native American ancestry and discussion topics with guest speakers, including keynote speaker Dr. Daniel F. Littlefield Jr., director of the Sequoyah Research Center at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock.

“Archives, historical societies and other genealogical institutions, especially in the south-southeast, have all seen an increase in the number of people seeking information about their family ancestry,” Littlefield said. “The majority of researchers are focused on validating their family’s claim to Indian ancestry and, thus, tribal citizenship. It is our responsibility to assist these individuals to the best of our ability while educating the public about the realities of the search.”

The cost to attend is $150 and includes a conference bag and flash drive with digital copies of presentation materials. Registration forms are available at www.CherokeeHeritage.org. The deadline to register is May 31.

The CHC is presenting the Five Tribes Ancestry Conference, but it will take place at the Chickasaw Cultural Center at 867 Charles Cooper Memorial Road.

For more information, including accommodations and registration, call 918-456-6007, ext. 6162 or email ashley-vann@cherokee.org or gene-norris@cherokee.org.

Education

Tribe: Ruling could reform U.S. agency for Native education
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
04/20/2018 12:00 PM
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) – Stephen C. has been taught only math and English at a U.S.-run elementary school for Native American children deep in a gorge off the Grand Canyon. Teachers have left midyear, and he repeatedly faces suspension and arrest for behavior his attorneys say is linked to a disability stemming from traumatic experiences.

The 12-year-old is among children from Arizona’s remote and impoverished Havasupai Reservation who are a step closer to their push for systematic reform of the U.S. agency that oversees tribal education, alleging in a lawsuit it ignored complaints about an understaffed school, a lack of special education and a deficient curriculum.

The students’ attorneys say they won a major legal victory recently when a federal court agreed that childhood adversity and trauma can be learning disabilities, a tactic the same law firm used in crime-ridden Compton, California. They say the case could have widespread effects for Native children in more than 180 schools nationwide overseen by the U.S. Bureau of Indian Education and in schools with large Native populations.

“Education is our lifeline and our future for our kids – and all students, not just down here, but nationally,” Havasupai Chairwoman Muriel Coochwytewa said. The BIE has “an obligation to teach our children. And if that’s not going on, then our children will become failures, and we don’t want that.”

Havasupai students face adversity and generational trauma from repeated broken promises from the U.S. government, efforts to eradicate Native culture and tradition, discrimination and the school’s tendency to call police to deal with behavioral problems, attorneys say.

U.S. District Judge Steven Logan wrote in a late March ruling that the students’ lawyers adequately alleged “complex trauma” and adversity can result in physiological effects leading to a physical impairment. He moved the case forward, denying Justice Department requests to dismiss some of the allegations but agreeing to drop plaintiffs from the lawsuit who no longer attend Havasupai Elementary School.

Noshene Ranjbar, an assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of Arizona, said medical literature has expanded in the past 20 years to include trauma that isn’t linked only to singular events.

In Native communities she’s worked with in the Dakotas and Arizona, “they agree the root of everything they suffer with is this unresolved grief, loss, trauma, anger, decades of disappointment on a huge scale,” she said.

When students act out, schools too often turn to suspension, expulsion or arrest instead of finding what’s driving the bad behavior, she said. Usually, it’s “a hurt human being that is using the wrong means to cope,” Ranjbar said.

The Public Counsel law firm pressing the Havasupai case also sued the Compton Unified School District – which is majority black and Latino – in 2015 over disability services for students with complex trauma. A judge said students with violent and traumatic pasts could be eligible for such services but didn’t apply the ruling to all who experience trauma.

The U.S. Justice Department did not respond to a request for comment on the Havasupai ruling.

Government attorney Cesar Lopez-Morales said at a hearing in 2017 that while trauma could result in a disability, federal agencies cannot assume every Native student with shared experiences is disabled. They would need specifics of individuals’ impairments and how those affect their lives.

He said attorneys also failed to show the students were denied benefits solely because of disabilities.

Havasupai Elementary School has three teachers for kindergarten through eighth grade on a remote reservation home to about 650 people and world-renowned for its blue-green waterfalls.

The village of Supai can be reached only by mule, foot or helicopter, making it the most isolated of the BIE’s schools in the Lower 48 states. The reservation doesn’t have a high school.

The students’ attorneys say the area is beset with high levels of poverty, unemployment, substance abuse, family violence and low literacy levels. All 70 elementary school students qualify for free or reduced lunch and most are limited in English and math proficiency, and have special education needs.

“What we know from the science is that, particularly unaddressed, the impact of trauma can impact the ability to learn, read, think, concentrate and communicate,” public counsel attorney Kathryn Eidmann said.

The lawsuit seeks to force the government to provide services for special needs, a thorough curriculum, culturally relevant education and staff training to respond to trauma.

Stephen C., whose full name is not listed in court documents, enrolled as a kindergartner but can hardly read or write now that he’s in seventh grade. His attorneys say he has an attention deficit disorder and experiences trauma from witnessing alcohol abuse at school and from his relatives being forced into boarding schools.

At one point, he pulled a plug out of a computer monitor and faced a federal indictment, the lawsuit says.

Some Havasupai parents have sent their children to boarding schools off the reservation rather than deal with inadequate educational services.

Stephen’s guardian has considered it, too. But he said in a statement that tribal members want children with them in the canyon, to watch them grow and be a part of the community.

Council

Smith, Golden honored with CN Patriotism medals
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/20/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation honored U.S. Army and Navy veterans with the tribe’s Medal of Patriotism during the March 12 Tribal Council meeting.

Principal Chief Bill John Baker and Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden acknowledged Fields Smith, 84, of Vian, and Kenneth Golden, 68, of Stilwell, for their service to the country.

Sgt. Smith was born in 1933 and drafted into the Army in 1955. He completed basic training at Fort Chaffee in Arkansas and trained to become an infantryman. Later, he completed Fire Directing Control School and was sent to Fort Polk in Louisiana where he spent the remainder of his two-year service term. During his service, Smith completed non-commission school and received a sharpshooter medal for his rifle skills. Smith received an honorable discharge in 1957.

“I want to thank the Chief, the Deputy Chief and the Tribal Council for all of the good work that they do for our people,” Smith said.

Sgt. Golden was born in 1949 and enlisted in the Navy in 1968. Golden completed basic training in Chicago. After basic training, he was transferred to the Naval Air Station Cecil Field in Jacksonville, Florida, where he served as an aviation boatman mate. During his service, Golden was awarded the National Defense Service Medal and received an honorable discharge in 1972.

Each month the CN recognizes Cherokee service men and women for their sacrifices and as a way to demonstrate the high regard in which the tribe holds all veterans.

To nominate a veteran who is a CN citizen, call 918-772-4166.

Health

Hastings Hospital CEO named ACHE fellow
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/15/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – Cherokee Nation W.W. Hastings Hospital CEO Brian Hail was recently named a fellow of the American College of Healthcare Executives, an honor that has been awarded to less than 10,000 health care executives around the world.

The American College of Healthcare Executives has more than 40,000 health care professionals whose mission is to achieve excellence in the health field. Members who achieve a high level of excellence and complete a set list of requirements are named a fellow of the college.

“The health care management field plays a vital role in providing high-quality care to the people in our communities, which makes having a standard of excellence promoted by a professional organization critically important,” ACHE President and CEO Deborah J. Bowen, said. “By becoming an ACHE Fellow and earning the distinction of board certification from ACHE, health care leaders demonstrate a commitment to excellence in serving their patients and the community.”

The board certification is a more than two-year process of meeting academic criteria, having health care experience, maintaining a high-level of character and professionalism and passing a comprehensive exam.

“I believe that the FACHE credential represents the commitment to excellence in healthcare for our stakeholders,” Hail said. “Meeting the requirements and maintaining the credential helps to assure a commitment to ongoing development and learning in the healthcare landscape that is constantly changing.”

In addition to serving as chief executive officer of W.W. Hastings Hospital for five years, Hail worked in the aeromedical field as a flight nurse for 13 years. He completed his master’s degree in business administration at Northeastern State University.

For more information about ACHE, visit http://www.ache.org/.

Opinion

OPINION: The Information Super Highway
BY KEITH AUSTIN
Tribal Councilor
04/03/2018 12:30 PM
In today’s world, the term “information super highway” refers to the internet. While this term is modern, the idea behind it is as old as civilization. The idea is to create the shortest and most efficient route to move information. For as long as a thousand years, Indigenous people have used a route of travel not far from here because it was the most efficient route to deliver information and supplies. This route has been referred to at various times as the Osage Trail, the Seminole Trail, the Texas Road and the Military Highway.

A decade before the Trail of Tears, the Cherokee Nation’s first Supreme Court Justice, John Martin, brought his family from their home in New Echota, Georgia, to Indian Territory. His son, Joe, was only 8 years old in 1828 when they settled on the Grand River. He took to his new home quickly. In 1840 when he was just 20, he had already established a ranch that would become known as Greenbrier near the community of Strang.

To call Greenbrier a ranch is a bit of an understatement. By the time the Civil War started in 1861, the Martin family ranch and the river beside it both could be referred to as Grand. It consisted of around 100,000 acres of leased Cherokee land, about the size of what is now Mayes County. On this land was a good portion of the route then referred to as the Texas Road or the Military Highway. Before the war, the route saw many cattle drives from Texas to Kansas.

As the war progressed, it was described as “a critical route for information and supplies” for troops of both the North and the South. It was the shortest route from Fort Scott, Kansas, to Fort Gibson, Indian Territory, and Fort Worth, Texas. Two battles during the war were fought on the route. The North was the victor of the first battle. A year later the South had a much bigger victory by capturing hundreds of mules and wagons. This victory also interrupted supplies bound for Fort Gibson valued at over $1.5 million.

After the War Between the States ended, Greenbrier never regained its former glory. Today there is little more than a few historical markers to prove it once was there. Within a few years of the end of the war, the KATY Railroad followed the route from Kansas to Texas. In the early years of statehood the route developed into what is now known as U.S. Highway 69 and remained a critical route for information and supplies.

In recent years, technology giant Google established a data center complex in Mayes County. This data center could be described as a key component of the “information super highway.” It is fitting that the data center sits a short distance from the Grand River, within sight of Highway 69 and the railroad once known as the KATY. Now, as then, this route can accurately be described as “a critical route for information and supplies.”

People

Haggard helps his NSU fishing team win Texas tournament
BY STAFF REPORTS
04/12/2018 12:00 PM
DENISON, Texas – Cherokee Nation citizen Blayke Haggard of Gans, Oklahoma, made up one half of the winning fishing team from Northeastern State University to win the YETI FLW College Fishing event on Lake Texoma on April 8.

Haggard and his teammate Cody Metzger of Wagoner, Oklahoma, caught their five-bass limit for a winning weigh to 19 pounds, 4 ounces.

The victory earned the Riverhawk bass club $2,600 and a spot in the 2019 FLW College Fishing National Championship.

The duo said that they spent the day targeting smallmouth bass on main-lake points, about 5 to 8 miles away from the takeoff ramp at Highport Marina.

“We focused on the points where the wind was blowing the hardest, fishing the mid to southeastern areas of the lake,” Haggard, a sophomore majoring in cellular and molecular biology, said. “We had five or six points that we rotated through that all looked very similar, fishing in 4 to 10 feet.”

The Riverhawk club cited citrus shad-colored Bandit 200 crankbaits and a prototype Bandit squarebill crankbait as its most productive lures. Club members said that they caught 10 to 12 keepers.

“We had great execution,” Haggard said. “I caught a 4-pounder early, then three casts later Cody put a 3½-pounder in the boat. Those early fish clued us in that we were doing the right thing. It also helped that we didn’t lose any fish all day.”
Click To Subscribe

Call Justin Smith 918-207-4975

Cherokee Phoenix Daily
Digital Newsletter