Judge rules against Douglass’ challenge

BY STAFF REPORTS
12/11/2014 10:03 AM
BY STAFF REPORTS

OKLAHOMA CITY – Judge Bernard Jones ruled on Dec. 11 to deny Oklahoma City Douglass High School’s request to replay the final minutes of their playoff game against Locust Grove High School.

Douglass filed the challenge in Oklahoma County District Court after the Oklahoma Secondary School Activities Association voted against its request for a replay earlier this month.

Douglass lost to Locust Grove in a playoff game in November after a referee enforced a penalty incorrectly.

The court filing put a hold on part of the Class 3A playoffs until a decision could be made.

Sequoyah quarterback nominated for Mr. Football

BY STAFF REPORTS
10/22/2012 03:20 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Sequoyah High School senior and football quarterback Brayden Scott has been nominated for the national Mr. Football competition presented by VYPE magazine and State Farm.

Scott has attended Sequoyah Schools since the eighth grade and is expected to sign an official letter of intent in February to play football at the University of Memphis.

While at Sequoyah, Scott was the starting quarterback on Team USA, and he holds Sequoyah Schools’ records for the most passing yards, 6,497, and 99 total touchdowns. As of press time, he had four games left in the regular season.

One hundred players have been nominated for this honor. In October, that list was expected to be narrowed to 50 players with the top 20 getting an automatic advance to the semi-finals. Finalists will be selected in November.

Anyone can go online to vote for a player. The number of votes that each player receives determines the winner. Each person can vote once daily until the contest ends. The winner will be announced in January.

Goodrich's 27 leads Kansas past Delaware 70-64

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
03/21/2012 08:59 AM
BY KURT VOIGT
Associated Press

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Even Elena Delle Donne couldn't stop Kansas' improbable NCAA tournament run.

Delle Donne scored 34 points, but Angel Goodrich answered with 27 of her own for the 11th-seeded Jayhawks, who rallied in the second half for a 70-64 win over the Blue Hens on Tuesday night.

Delaware's (31-2) only other loss this season was to No. 5 Maryland on Dec. 29. The school entered the tournament having never won an NCAA game before its opening-round win over Arkansas-Little Rock, in which Delle Donne scored 39 points in 30 minutes of action.

http://www.notchietownhardwoods.com

Goodrich leads Kansas past Nebraska 57-49

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
03/19/2012 09:34 AM
BY KURT VOIGT
Associated Press

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Nebraska's return to the NCAA tournament was a short one.

The sixth-seeded Huskers suffered through a dismal shooting performance and fell 57-49 to former Big 12 rival and 11th-seeded Kansas in the first round of the Des Moines Regional on Sunday.

Nebraska (24-9), which left the Big 12 for the Big Ten after last season, was making its return to the tournament after a one-year absence. The school had performed well in reaching the Big Ten Tournament championship game against Purdue, but it hadn't played since that double-overtime loss to the Boilermakers on March 4.

Cherokee woman wins pro boxing debut

BY MARK DREADFULWATER
Multimedia Editor – @cp_mdreadfulwat
02/28/2012 08:05 AM
OKLAHOMA CITY – From childhood aspirations of becoming a professional wrestler to years of competing in local Toughman Contests, one Cherokee Nation citizen has reached her goal of becoming a professional heavyweight boxer.

Paula Soap, 43, said she always wanted to fight professionally, so she began entering area Toughman Contests.

“I started in Toughman in 2001,” she said. “I continued on there, and they told me I couldn’t fight anymore because I won too many in Muskogee. That was my limit from what they said.”

With area contests closed to her, she competed in the Toughman World Championships, where she finished eighth out of 32 competitors.

Despite her success with a record of 5-1 and world championship appearance, Soap never formally trained in the sweet science of boxing. Melissa Drywater, trainer and owner of Dawg Pound Fight Academy in Tahlequah, said Soap’s success at the Toughman Contests is unheard of with no formal training.
Video with default Cherokee Phoenix Frame
Cherokee Nation citizen Paula Soap throws a punch during a sparring match with a Dawg Pound Fight Academy employee during a training session in Tahlequah, Okla. MARK DREADFULWATER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Cherokee Nation citizen Paula Soap spars with a Dawg Pound Fight Academy employee during a training session in Tahlequah, Okla. MARK DREADFULWATER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen Paula Soap throws a punch during a sparring match with a Dawg Pound Fight Academy employee during a training session in Tahlequah, Okla. MARK DREADFULWATER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Live racing returns to Will Rogers Downs

BY STAFF REPORTS
02/23/2012 08:20 AM
CLAREMORE, Okla. – Cherokee Casino Will Rogers Downs will open its horse racing season on March 5 and run it through May 19.

Coming off its most successful year in five years of operation, WRD officials said they believe they have a new equation to make 2012 even better.

The thoroughbred spring meet will run at 12:30 p.m. every Saturday, Monday and Tuesday. Each race day features 10 races.

In addition to a stakes schedule that features two new races bringing the total to eight, racing officials moved four of the stakes to Mondays and Tuesdays to benefit from a bigger worldwide simulcast audience.

“Our simulcast signal goes through the roof on weekdays,” Kelly Cathey, Cherokee Casino Will Rogers Downs racing secretary, said. “We are up to nearly 700 locations showing our races, including tracks in Europe, Mexico and Canada. The more tracks that show our races, the bigger the handle, which means more money for the horsemen and more money for us to reinvest into our track.”
Horses break from the gate during a race at Will Rogers Downs in Claremore, Okla. The track’s spring meet is scheduled to begin March 5. COURTESY PHOTO
Horses break from the gate during a race at Will Rogers Downs in Claremore, Okla. The track’s spring meet is scheduled to begin March 5. COURTESY PHOTO

Nike Air Native N7 shoe available via tribal wellness programs

BY STAFF REPORTS
02/14/2012 08:01 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – On Feb. 1 Nike launched the 2012 Air Native Temp+ N7 shoe, the second generation of Air Native footwear designed specifically for Native American and Aboriginal consumers.

The Nike Air Native N7 is the result of years of collaborative research development and fit testing in partnership with the American Indian community, which determined that Native people on average have a wider and taller foot than most non-Natives.

Since its initial launch in 2007, the Nike Air Native N7 has been updated annually with new and improved features ultimately comprising today’s latest incarnation, the Tempo+ N7.

Nike Air Native Tempo+ N7 features include, outsole trail specific traction elements for enhanced traction, grip and performance over a variety of surfaces and conditions, design details and graphics such as a whip stitch around the Nike swoosh and embroidered eyelets for a hand crafted look and feel, a mid-foot lockdown system with interwoven overlays for custom fit and feel, laces made with 100 percent recycled material and colored aglets, pull tabs on the back of the shoe for ease of entry and reflective pill for visibility in the dark and the original Nike Air Native N7 shoe width.

The Nike Air Native Tempo+ N7 is only available through tribal wellness programs that are more specifically identified as health disease prevention programs, urban Indian health center and in Canada First Nation health centers, urban Aboriginal health centers and Aboriginal community wellness programs.
The Nike Air Native N7 is the result of years of collaborative research development and fit testing in partnership with the American Indian community, which determined that Native people on average have a wider and taller foot than most non-Natives. COURTESY PHOTO
The Nike Air Native N7 is the result of years of collaborative research development and fit testing in partnership with the American Indian community, which determined that Native people on average have a wider and taller foot than most non-Natives. COURTESY PHOTO

Luper sets Summit League career scoring record

BY STAFF REPORTS
02/08/2012 08:13 AM
FARGO N.D. – Kevi Luper, a Cherokee Nation citizen and Oral Roberts University junior guard, scored 41 points in ORU’s 84-75 win over North Dakota State University on Feb. 4 at the Bison Sports Arena.

The 41-point effort allowed the Adair, Okla., native to finish the game with 2,120 career points, surpassing the Summit League record of 2,105 points, which was held by former ORU Golden Eagle Krista Regan.

Luper’s game-high point total also set the single-game scoring record for the arena, which had been intact for 27 years.

According to ORU’s website, Luper is just 72 points shy of former Golden Eagle Vivian Herron’s all-time ORU career scoring record of 2,192 points.

Sequoyah senior signs to play college baseball

BY STAFF REPORTS
02/02/2012 08:44 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Sequoyah Schools senior Eric Kirkpatrick has signed a letter of intent to play baseball at Connors State College in Warner.

Kirkpatrick, who has played catcher since age 4, said playing at the college level is the next practical step in his baseball career.

“I’ve played in other positions but always came back to catcher,” the Cherokee Nation citizen said.
Connors baseball coach Keith Perry said he expects Kirkpatrick to fill an immediate need.

“He will be able to play for us and help us out as soon as he gets there,” Perry said. “I am looking forward to having him on the team.”

Sequoyah Schools senior Eric Kirkpatrick throws a pitch for the Indians baseball team. Kirkpatrick, who plays many different positions on the baseball field, signed with Connors State College as a catcher. COURTESY PHOTO Sequoyah Schools senior Eric Kirkpatrick has signed a letter of intent to play baseball at Connors State College in Warner. COURTESY PHOTO Sequoyah Schools senior Eric Kirkpatrick has signed a letter of intent to play baseball at Connors State College in Warner. COURTESY PHOTO Sequoyah Schools senior Eric Kirkpatrick signs a letter of intent with Connors State College in Warner, Okla. PHOTO COURTESY OF SEQUOYAH SCHOOLS
Sequoyah Schools senior Eric Kirkpatrick throws a pitch for the Indians baseball team. Kirkpatrick, who plays many different positions on the baseball field, signed with Connors State College as a catcher. COURTESY PHOTO

Culture

Cherokee Phoenix calls for 2018 homecoming T-shirt concepts
BY TRAVIS SNELL
Assistant Editor – @cp_tsnell
12/09/2017 10:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – With its 2017 annual homecoming T-shirt now for sale, the Cherokee Phoenix is calling for Cherokee artists to submit design concepts for the news organization’s 2018 T-shirt.

In 2016, the Cherokee Phoenix staff introduced a T-shirt to differ from the tribe’s Cherokee National Holiday T-shirt. Phoenix staff members contracted with artist Buffalo Gouge for the shirt’s initial design.

For this year’s homecoming shirt, Phoenix staff members selected Daniel HorseChief’s concept out of approximately 10 designs from artists. The Cherokee Phoenix then contracted with HorseChief to create the 2017 shirt.

HorseChief said his concept comes from a four-panel painting that features Selu, the Corn Mother in Cherokee lore.

The image shows the bust of Selu, who is looking down into a Southeastern art pattern. Behind her on the left side are seven ears of corn with water under it. Behind her on the opposite side is a phoenix with fire below it. Above the phoenix is the Cherokee seven-pointed star. Above the image, written in Cherokee, are the words “Cherokee Phoenix.” Below the image, in English, is “2017 CHEROKEE HOMECOMING.”

The limited-quantity, black shirts are short-sleeved, ranging in sizes small to 3XL and sell for $20 plus tax. The shirts are available at the Cherokee Phoenix office in Room 231 of the Annex Building (Old Motel) on the Tribal Complex. For more information, call 918-453-5269.

They are also available at the Cherokee Nation Gift Shop, als0 on the Tribal Complex, or online at http://cherokeegiftshop.com.

Phoenix staff members will also have shirts available at the Cherokee Phoenix booths at the W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex and Capital Square during the Cherokee National Holiday in September.

The Cherokee Phoenix is accepting concept ideas from artists who are Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band or Eastern Band citizens until midnight on Jan. 1. Artist can email detailed concepts to travis-snell@cherokee.org.

For artists contemplating submitting design ideas, please note that if your concept is chosen and you sign a contract, the Cherokee Phoenix will own the artwork because we consider it a commissioned piece. As for what Phoenix staff members look for in a concept, we ask that artists “think Cherokee National Holiday” and include a phoenix.

Education

4 graduate from Cherokee language program
BY KENLEA HENSON
Reporter
12/08/2017 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – On Dec. 2, the Cherokee Language Master Apprentice Program graduated four students at a graduation ceremony in the Armory Municipal Center.

Larry Carney, of Tulsa; Ronnie Duncan, of Bell; Lisa O’Field, of Hulbert; and Toney Owens, of Rocky Mountain received a certificate of completion, copper gorget and Pendleton blanket.

Operated through the Cherokee Nation’s Community and Cultural Outreach, participants are taught the Cherokee language by master speakers Doris Shell, Cora Flute and Gary Vann. The program is geared towards teaching CN citizens to be proficient conversational Cherokee language speakers and teachers.

Howard Paden, CLMAP manager, said the program stemmed from a “need” for the language.

“This program gets people speaking our language again. You know, we seen a need for it because a lot of the (Cherokee) Immersion (Charter) School parents seen a need to not only push their kids to learn the language but to learn themselves and start having Cherokee speaking households,” Paden said.

Students spend two years and typically 40 hours a week learning the Cherokee language in a classroom from the master speakers. Students are also encouraged to visit with fluent Cherokee-speaking elders to practice and learn from them. However, to ensure individuals are able to dedicate the needed time to the program, they each receive a $10 an hour stipend.

“They learn a lot of Cherokee. From when they first walk into the classroom to probably two months they already learn about 5,000 words,” Paden said. “The first year is primarily learning as much as they can, and by the second year we expect them to start teaching. Of course they have a master speaker there that can assist them, but they begin to teach phrases to the next group that comes in. So every January we get a new group, so the people that are in their last year will begin teaching in January to the new group that we have coming in.”

Since its inception nearly three years ago, the program has graduated six students and is expected to graduate six more in 2018 and eight in 2019.

Gary Vann, CLMAP master speaker, said he’s seen an increase in applicants since the program’s first year.

“When we first started out there was only a handful of applicants, this past application process we saw 100 applications come in,” Vann said. “It makes me feel good because there are people out there that still want to learn our language and that are interested in speaking our language again, especially the younger generations.”

Owens, 30, said the program has influenced his life and set him on a path of teaching the Cherokee language.

“I’ve always wanted to learn Cherokee, and I heard about the program, and I couldn’t believe it was real. Now it kind of comes in to your everyday life you start to think about things different and naturally you start speaking Cherokee instead of English, so it just becomes your life, it becomes a part of who you are,” Owens said. “Since I will no longer be employed by the program I will have to find a form of income, but I will continue to pursue a teaching degree at Northeastern State University to hopefully teach Cherokee. My goal is to one day teach at the immersion school because it has the most chance of forming Cherokee speakers.”

Owens said he believes the program has helped him so much to become a proficient speaker that it’s the most effective way to acquire the language. He suggests the program to those who are interested in learning to speak the Cherokee language.

For more information, call 918-453-5445.

Council

Byrd builds on 18-year legacy of serving CN
BY KENLEA HENSON
Reporter
08/22/2017 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – With 18 years of experience serving the Cherokee people, Tribal Councilor Joe Byrd looks forward to serving another four years as the representative for Dist. 2, which consists of most of northern Cherokee County.

“I love serving the Cherokee people. They’ve got somebody that’s going to work for them again for the next four years, and I’m really looking forward to that,” said Byrd.

Originally from Belfonte/Nicut, Byrd was the youngest Cherokee Nation legislator to be elected. He served on the Tribal Council from 1987-95, followed by term as principal chief from 1995-99. In January 2012, he won a special election to replace Bill John Baker on the Tribal Council. Baker had taken office as the principal chief on Oct. 19, 2011, after a contentious and lengthy principal chief’s race against incumbent Chad Smith.

In 2013, Byrd was re-elected to serve his first full term under the tribe’s 1999 Constitution, which limits elected officials to two consecutive four-year terms before having to sit out a term. He was also named speaker of the Tribal Council in 2015 after then-Speaker Tina Glory Jordan termed out.

When he first ran for office in 1987, Byrd said he felt the need to help the Cherokee people with the issues they were facing.

“Our government didn’t begin serving our people until the 1970s. When I first moved to Northeastern (State University) in 1972 to get an education, it really opened my eyes to a lot of the issues our people were facing,” he said. “In the rural areas there were a lot of people who weren’t self-efficient, and I saw right then we still had many people out in the rural areas that needed help and needed an awareness that there is a tribe out there that should have a responsibility to take care of our people.”

As for his current term, deciding to run again for the Dist. 2 seat was an easy decision, he said, because of his love for serving the Cherokee people and because of his constituents who asked him to continue.

He spoke of elderly women who continues to set an example of how his constituents have not forgotten their Cherokee culture or who they are as a people.

“When people like that come up to me and ask me to run, it’s a real honor to have people with that kind of stature to say, ‘you need to run another time,’” he said. “The people will let you know when it’s time to run. You don’t have to consult them, they’ll let you know.”

During his time as Dist. 2 representative, Byrd has helped with projects to improve services for CN citizens, including the passing of a $900 million budget, a $100 million investment in Cherokee health care as well as a $200 million dollar expansion of the W.W. Hastings Hospital.

For this term, Byrd said he would continue working with the tribe to ensure rural area schools have shelter for inclement weather and that elders and veterans are taken care of.

“Our veterans seem to not be taken care of like they should,” he said. “When we give speeches and talks we all say, ‘we respect our elder’s and we respect our veterans,’ but we have many that are still homeless and not being served. I want to do anything I can to assist in making sure our elders and veterans are taken care of.”

Health

CN doctor awarded American College of Physicians Mastership
BY STAFF REPORTS
12/08/2017 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Cherokee Nation physician Dr. James H. Baker was recently awarded a Mastership through the American College of Physicians for his contributions.

According to ACP, “Election to Mastership recognizes outstanding and extraordinary career accomplishments and achievements, including the practice of internal medicine, academic contributions to our specialty, and service to the College.”

During review of candidates, the ACP’s Awards Committee considers several qualities, including strength of character, perseverance, leadership, compassion and devotion. Clinical expertise and commitment to advancing the art and science of medicine are also taken into account by the committee.

“I am so honored to receive this award from my peers and colleagues at the American College of Physicians,” Bake said. “I thank our Oklahoma ACP Chapter of 1,000 internal medicine physicians and medical students for nominating me.”

Baker, of Muskogee, is a general physician with more than 30 years of experience. He serves as medical director for CN Three Rivers Health Center and the tribe’s Wilma P. Mankiller Health Center.

Baker completed medical school at the University of Oklahoma in 1982 and completed his internal medicine residency at Kansas University in 1987.

The mastership is the third award Baker has received from the ACP, including the Meritorious Service Award in 2014 and the Laureate Award in 2015. He is a former governor of the Oklahoma chapter of ACP and a current member.

The ACP will honor 2017-18 master recipients at the organization’s annual convention in April 2018 in New Orleans.

For more information, visit www.acponline.org.

Opinion

OPINION: ‘Mashu White Feather’ isn’t Cherokee
BY LIANNA COSTANTINO
Cherokee Nation citizen
12/01/2017 05:00 PM
In his response to Luke Mason’s apology (August 2017 issue), Larry J. Lewis, aka “Mashu White Feather,” using his Two Feathers International Consultancy public relations officer Daris Reno Blickman, who is also not a Cherokee Nation citizen, made this statement: “He (Luke Mason) is certainly not privy to Mashu’s family history or genealogy.”

While Mason may not have the skills to determine Lewis’ family history or genealogy, a team of genealogical researchers does have the skills to trace Lewis’ genealogy using public information, a lot of it that Lewis placed in the public forums.

In researching Lewis, genealogical researchers found that this was one of four names used by the same person. His birth name was Larry J. Lewis. His “papered name” now is Larry J. White Feather. Then there is the TFIC, which is a 501(c)3 nonprofit of which he is the founder and board chairman. A Google search for “Mashu White Feather” gave the name Larry White Feather. This gave the name of his parents, Jo Marie and James Orville Lewis. This was verified by the obituary for Jo Marie Lewis, which lists Larry White Feather as one of her sons. It also lists the names of her parents. More verification was given in a post by Doreen Bennett, in which she talks about the loss of their mother and names “Mashu White Feather” and his siblings listed in the obituary.

As “Mashu White Feather,” Larry Lewis claimed he is a Cherokee elder and his mother and her family raised him as a Cherokee traditionalist. But the genealogical research of Jo Marie Johnson Lewis found no connection to the Cherokee people. Her family consists of white people who came to Boone County, Missouri, from Kentucky, Virginia and Europe. Larry Lewis also claimed he is part Osage. Since his mother’s side consisted of all white people, he must be making that claim off his father’s side. But like his mother, his father’s side is also white people who came to Missouri from Kentucky, Virginia, and Europe. His father’s maternal grandmother was born in Osage County, Missouri, from parents who were born in France. So both of these claims are proven false by his family records.

Also, there are pictures of Jo Marie and James Orville in a house in Columbia, Missouri. The house’s address was listed as an address for Larry White Feather and the TFIC. This information is public. This evidence is available to view at the web address below, where it will be archived for public view, as well as in a blog away from Facebook. It is enough information for any genealogist to find Larry Lewis’ ancestors. Researchers worked on this information independently and each found the same results.

In researching Jo Marie Johnson’s family and that of her husband James O. Lewis, researchers found one consistent fact about each generation: each generation were people that were honest, hardworking people who ensured the survival of their family no matter how tough the times were. They were the type of people who anyone would be proud to call their ancestors. One can only wonder why Larry Lewis saw fit to recreate them into something they were not.

TFIC claims that Larry Lewis has never claimed to be a Cherokee elder, but a photo appearing on the TFIC page online is proof otherwise, as he certainly has control of what is printed about him there.

He claims to be a Cherokee elder and has traveled around the world dressed as a Cherokee speaking about Cherokee history, culture and current events when he is not a tribal citizen, has never lived among us, is not involved in any of our communities, has not contributed anything towards the betterment of our lives, is not a member of any of our ceremonial grounds, is not a fluent Cherokee language speaker, cannot vote in our elections and is claimed by none of us. This man takes selfies at the United Nations dressed in regalia when, as a non-tribal citizen, he has no voice there.

According to Manta.com, the TFIC had estimated revenue of $108,862 in 2016, employs a staff of five and shows an North American Industry Classification System code of 813211, “Grantmaking Foundations.”
“When these frauds ‘teach’ who we are to non-Cherokees, they are implementing the final stages of our genocide. “People see the fake history and perverted culture and then have no room to learn or respect what is real and so it is pushed that much more out of the way,” CN citizen Jared Edens said.

To view the facts of Lewis’ genealogy, visit: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1609142732471453/?ref=br_rs

People

Bradley crowned 2018 Miss Northeastern
BY STAFF REPORTS
12/10/2017 02:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen Carrigan Bradley, of Fort Gibson, recently won the 2018 Miss Northeastern scholarship pageant.

Bradley, who also won the pageant’s talent competition, is a biochemistry major expected to graduate in 2020. She said she that after graduation she plans to continue her education with a doctorate in pharmacy.

Bradley said she’s looking forward to representing Northeastern State University and her platform “Words have P.O.W.E.R.” The idea for the platform began when Bradley auditioned for the “X-Factor” at age 15, and the harsh critique from judge Simon Cowell that prompted online backlash.

“My hope in creating this platform is to advocate for people in being kind to themselves with positive self talk, as well as being kind to others in their day-to-day conversations,” Bradley said. “As a titleholder, we get to be a voice and a role model for children of all ages to look to. I hope by speaking out about my experience and urging people to be kind and intentional with their words, I'll be able to change the way we speak to one another.”

CN citizen Kayse Stidham, of Grove, was named second runner-up and crowd pleaser. Stidham is an early childhood education major expected to graduate in 2018. After graduation, she said she plans to teach pre-kindergarten and continue volunteering in her Girl Scout Service unit.

During the pageant, more than $5,500 in scholarships and tuition waivers was awarded to contestants.

For more information about Miss Northeastern, email Kirsti Cook at cookk@nsuok.edu.
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