Public celebration slated for Lady Indians’ state hoops title

BY STAFF REPORTS
03/23/2018 10:15 AM
TAHLEQUAH – A public celebration for the 2018 Class 3A state champion Sequoyah Lady Indians basketball team will be held at 6 p.m. on March 27 at The Place Where They Play.

Fans and media are welcomed and encouraged to attend. The Lady Indians have won back-to-back state championships and three in the past four years (2015, 2017, and 2018).

http://cherokeepublichealth.org/

Judge rules against Douglass’ challenge

BY STAFF REPORTS
12/11/2014 10:03 AM
BY STAFF REPORTS

OKLAHOMA CITY – Judge Bernard Jones ruled on Dec. 11 to deny Oklahoma City Douglass High School’s request to replay the final minutes of their playoff game against Locust Grove High School.

Douglass filed the challenge in Oklahoma County District Court after the Oklahoma Secondary School Activities Association voted against its request for a replay earlier this month.

Douglass lost to Locust Grove in a playoff game in November after a referee enforced a penalty incorrectly.

The court filing put a hold on part of the Class 3A playoffs until a decision could be made.

Sequoyah quarterback nominated for Mr. Football

BY STAFF REPORTS
10/22/2012 03:20 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Sequoyah High School senior and football quarterback Brayden Scott has been nominated for the national Mr. Football competition presented by VYPE magazine and State Farm.

Scott has attended Sequoyah Schools since the eighth grade and is expected to sign an official letter of intent in February to play football at the University of Memphis.

While at Sequoyah, Scott was the starting quarterback on Team USA, and he holds Sequoyah Schools’ records for the most passing yards, 6,497, and 99 total touchdowns. As of press time, he had four games left in the regular season.

One hundred players have been nominated for this honor. In October, that list was expected to be narrowed to 50 players with the top 20 getting an automatic advance to the semi-finals. Finalists will be selected in November.

Anyone can go online to vote for a player. The number of votes that each player receives determines the winner. Each person can vote once daily until the contest ends. The winner will be announced in January.
https://www.facebook.com/CASA-of-Cherokee-Country-184365501631027/

Goodrich's 27 leads Kansas past Delaware 70-64

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
03/21/2012 08:59 AM
BY KURT VOIGT
Associated Press

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Even Elena Delle Donne couldn't stop Kansas' improbable NCAA tournament run.

Delle Donne scored 34 points, but Angel Goodrich answered with 27 of her own for the 11th-seeded Jayhawks, who rallied in the second half for a 70-64 win over the Blue Hens on Tuesday night.

Delaware's (31-2) only other loss this season was to No. 5 Maryland on Dec. 29. The school entered the tournament having never won an NCAA game before its opening-round win over Arkansas-Little Rock, in which Delle Donne scored 39 points in 30 minutes of action.

Goodrich leads Kansas past Nebraska 57-49

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
03/19/2012 09:34 AM
BY KURT VOIGT
Associated Press

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Nebraska's return to the NCAA tournament was a short one.

The sixth-seeded Huskers suffered through a dismal shooting performance and fell 57-49 to former Big 12 rival and 11th-seeded Kansas in the first round of the Des Moines Regional on Sunday.

Nebraska (24-9), which left the Big 12 for the Big Ten after last season, was making its return to the tournament after a one-year absence. The school had performed well in reaching the Big Ten Tournament championship game against Purdue, but it hadn't played since that double-overtime loss to the Boilermakers on March 4.

Cherokee woman wins pro boxing debut

BY MARK DREADFULWATER
Multimedia Editor – @cp_mdreadfulwat
02/28/2012 08:05 AM
OKLAHOMA CITY – From childhood aspirations of becoming a professional wrestler to years of competing in local Toughman Contests, one Cherokee Nation citizen has reached her goal of becoming a professional heavyweight boxer.

Paula Soap, 43, said she always wanted to fight professionally, so she began entering area Toughman Contests.

“I started in Toughman in 2001,” she said. “I continued on there, and they told me I couldn’t fight anymore because I won too many in Muskogee. That was my limit from what they said.”

With area contests closed to her, she competed in the Toughman World Championships, where she finished eighth out of 32 competitors.

Despite her success with a record of 5-1 and world championship appearance, Soap never formally trained in the sweet science of boxing. Melissa Drywater, trainer and owner of Dawg Pound Fight Academy in Tahlequah, said Soap’s success at the Toughman Contests is unheard of with no formal training.
Video with default Cherokee Phoenix Frame
Cherokee Nation citizen Paula Soap throws a punch during a sparring match with a Dawg Pound Fight Academy employee during a training session in Tahlequah, Okla. MARK DREADFULWATER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Cherokee Nation citizen Paula Soap spars with a Dawg Pound Fight Academy employee during a training session in Tahlequah, Okla. MARK DREADFULWATER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen Paula Soap throws a punch during a sparring match with a Dawg Pound Fight Academy employee during a training session in Tahlequah, Okla. MARK DREADFULWATER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Live racing returns to Will Rogers Downs

BY STAFF REPORTS
02/23/2012 08:20 AM
CLAREMORE, Okla. – Cherokee Casino Will Rogers Downs will open its horse racing season on March 5 and run it through May 19.

Coming off its most successful year in five years of operation, WRD officials said they believe they have a new equation to make 2012 even better.

The thoroughbred spring meet will run at 12:30 p.m. every Saturday, Monday and Tuesday. Each race day features 10 races.

In addition to a stakes schedule that features two new races bringing the total to eight, racing officials moved four of the stakes to Mondays and Tuesdays to benefit from a bigger worldwide simulcast audience.

“Our simulcast signal goes through the roof on weekdays,” Kelly Cathey, Cherokee Casino Will Rogers Downs racing secretary, said. “We are up to nearly 700 locations showing our races, including tracks in Europe, Mexico and Canada. The more tracks that show our races, the bigger the handle, which means more money for the horsemen and more money for us to reinvest into our track.”
Horses break from the gate during a race at Will Rogers Downs in Claremore, Okla. The track’s spring meet is scheduled to begin March 5. COURTESY PHOTO
Horses break from the gate during a race at Will Rogers Downs in Claremore, Okla. The track’s spring meet is scheduled to begin March 5. COURTESY PHOTO

Nike Air Native N7 shoe available via tribal wellness programs

BY STAFF REPORTS
02/14/2012 08:01 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – On Feb. 1 Nike launched the 2012 Air Native Temp+ N7 shoe, the second generation of Air Native footwear designed specifically for Native American and Aboriginal consumers.

The Nike Air Native N7 is the result of years of collaborative research development and fit testing in partnership with the American Indian community, which determined that Native people on average have a wider and taller foot than most non-Natives.

Since its initial launch in 2007, the Nike Air Native N7 has been updated annually with new and improved features ultimately comprising today’s latest incarnation, the Tempo+ N7.

Nike Air Native Tempo+ N7 features include, outsole trail specific traction elements for enhanced traction, grip and performance over a variety of surfaces and conditions, design details and graphics such as a whip stitch around the Nike swoosh and embroidered eyelets for a hand crafted look and feel, a mid-foot lockdown system with interwoven overlays for custom fit and feel, laces made with 100 percent recycled material and colored aglets, pull tabs on the back of the shoe for ease of entry and reflective pill for visibility in the dark and the original Nike Air Native N7 shoe width.

The Nike Air Native Tempo+ N7 is only available through tribal wellness programs that are more specifically identified as health disease prevention programs, urban Indian health center and in Canada First Nation health centers, urban Aboriginal health centers and Aboriginal community wellness programs.
The Nike Air Native N7 is the result of years of collaborative research development and fit testing in partnership with the American Indian community, which determined that Native people on average have a wider and taller foot than most non-Natives. COURTESY PHOTO
The Nike Air Native N7 is the result of years of collaborative research development and fit testing in partnership with the American Indian community, which determined that Native people on average have a wider and taller foot than most non-Natives. COURTESY PHOTO

Luper sets Summit League career scoring record

BY STAFF REPORTS
02/08/2012 08:13 AM
FARGO N.D. – Kevi Luper, a Cherokee Nation citizen and Oral Roberts University junior guard, scored 41 points in ORU’s 84-75 win over North Dakota State University on Feb. 4 at the Bison Sports Arena.

The 41-point effort allowed the Adair, Okla., native to finish the game with 2,120 career points, surpassing the Summit League record of 2,105 points, which was held by former ORU Golden Eagle Krista Regan.

Luper’s game-high point total also set the single-game scoring record for the arena, which had been intact for 27 years.

According to ORU’s website, Luper is just 72 points shy of former Golden Eagle Vivian Herron’s all-time ORU career scoring record of 2,192 points.

Culture

CN hosts inaugural ‘Sequoyah Day'
BY ROGER GRAHAM
Multimedia Producer – @cp_rgraham
05/22/2018 04:00 PM
AKINS – Visitors to the first “Sequoyah Day” event held May 20 experienced all things Cherokee such as art, music, lectures, performances, demonstrations and National Treasures all on the grounds of the historic Sequoyah’s Cabin Museum where the Cherokee syllabary creator lived.

“This is a chance to celebrate Sequoyah’s life and his legacy,” Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism Director Travis Owens said. “We’ve had a flute-playing performance, the Cherokee National Youth Choir performed. We had the Girty Family Singers and presenters on our language today.”

Others attending the event included Cherokee National Treasures Lorene Drywater and David Scott, as well as Cherokee artists Roy Boney, Jeff Edwards and Mary HorseChief. Tribal Councilors Bryan Warner and E.O. Junior Smith, and 2017-18 Miss Cherokee Madison Whitekiller also attended.

Another highlight was the Traditional Native Games competition. CN citizen and games coordinator Bayly Wright said “Sequoyah Day” was a great place to hold Cherokee marbles, cornstalk shoot, horseshoes, blowgun, a hatchet throw and chunky competitions.

“Today is the second of the five competitions leading up to the championships, which will be held on Aug. 25, the weekend before the Cherokee National Holiday,” she said.

For more information on cultural events, visit www.visitcherokeenation.com or call 1-877-779-6977.

Education

Cherokee College Prep Institute registration now available
BY STAFF REPORTS
05/23/2018 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – Cherokee Nation Foundation is accepting applications until June 1 for the seventh annual Cherokee College Prep Institute taking place on July 15-20 at Northeastern State University.

The weeklong camp will connect students with admissions counselors from across the U.S to analyze, prepare and complete college applications, identify scholarship opportunities and explore schools of interest.

Participating universities include the University of Arkansas, Bacone College, University of California-Los Angeles, University of Central Oklahoma, Duke University, NSU, University of Notre Dame, Oklahoma State University, Pomona College, Rogers State University, Stanford University, Swarthmore College, and Yale University.

CCPI’s curriculum, developed in conjunction with College Horizons and other participating university faculty, includes interactive sessions focusing on ACT strategies, essay writing, interview skills and time management.

CCPI is free to CN citizens who are preparing to enter their junior or senior years of high school. Lodging, meals and testing expenses are also provided by CNF, Cherokee Nation Businesses and NSU.

Applications are available at cherokeenation.academicworks.com.

For more information, email Jennifer Sandoval at j.sandoval@cherokeenationfoundation.org or call 918-207-0950.

Council

Smith, Golden honored with CN Patriotism medals
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/20/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation honored U.S. Army and Navy veterans with the tribe’s Medal of Patriotism during the March 12 Tribal Council meeting.

Principal Chief Bill John Baker and Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden acknowledged Fields Smith, 84, of Vian, and Kenneth Golden, 68, of Stilwell, for their service to the country.

Sgt. Smith was born in 1933 and drafted into the Army in 1955. He completed basic training at Fort Chaffee in Arkansas and trained to become an infantryman. Later, he completed Fire Directing Control School and was sent to Fort Polk in Louisiana where he spent the remainder of his two-year service term. During his service, Smith completed non-commission school and received a sharpshooter medal for his rifle skills. Smith received an honorable discharge in 1957.

“I want to thank the Chief, the Deputy Chief and the Tribal Council for all of the good work that they do for our people,” Smith said.

Sgt. Golden was born in 1949 and enlisted in the Navy in 1968. Golden completed basic training in Chicago. After basic training, he was transferred to the Naval Air Station Cecil Field in Jacksonville, Florida, where he served as an aviation boatman mate. During his service, Golden was awarded the National Defense Service Medal and received an honorable discharge in 1972.

Each month the CN recognizes Cherokee service men and women for their sacrifices and as a way to demonstrate the high regard in which the tribe holds all veterans.

To nominate a veteran who is a CN citizen, call 918-772-4166.

Health

Children 9-12, teens must establish diets that provide for development
BY BRITTNEY BENNETT
Reporter – @cp_bbennett
05/25/2018 08:30 AM
SALINA – Proper diets reflecting the onset of puberty and growth for children ages 9-12 and teenagers should be a critical focus for parents, said Cherokee Nation Clinical Dietitian Tonya Swim.

“Encouraging healthy choices to help provide adequate energy for growth and development should be the focus,” Swim said. “There is a change that not getting adequate nutrients can result in deficiencies, which could lead to loss of height, osteoporosis and delayed sexual maturation.”

Swim recommends establishing healthy habits early for children, including breakfast. “Having a healthy breakfast enhances brain function related to memory, testing and school attendance. Having a high-fiber breakfast with protein, fruit and a low-fat dairy is a great way to start the day off. An example of this could be a whole-grain English muffin with an egg patty prepared using a cooking spray and sliced avocado – the perfect quick breakfast sandwich.”

As children mature into teenagers, Swim said they need diets that provide proper nutrients and fuel. “Many teens will double their weight and can add up to 20 percent in height, and they need to make sure and get enough nutrients like calcium to support healthy bone growth. Teens will continue to have growth spurts, and it’s important for them to remember that their body needs food to help fuel healthy growth, especially if they are an athlete. But food for fuel is also important for those active with music or art. Their brains are working to hardwire their ability to process the skills needed for all activities.”

Parent should keep taste and appearance in mind when preparing meals, Swim said, as they seem to be important factors to teens. “Health and energy needs don’t matter so much to (teens), so as parents we need to provide those healthy choices in a way that is pleasing to eat and look at.”

Staying hydrated is also important as children and teenagers begin participating in sports and other activities. Swim recommends drinking two, 8-ounce glasses of water two hours before an event, as well as sports drinks during and after an event as a way to stay hydrated.

“Sports drinks provide fluid, carbohydrates and electrolytes during extreme exercise,” she said. “This helps provide fuel for muscles, help maintain blood sugar levels and quench thirst. They also help to prevent dehydration. For specifics on what you or your student-athlete need contact a registered dietitian who is a board-certified specialist in sports nutrition.”

For families on the go to, Swim said planning is a way to keep eating healthy. “Every sporting event has a schedule. Take time once a week to map those out on a calendar and then sit down with the family to see who can help out where. Also, think about preparing extra on nights that you can cook. Then you just need to heat something up. Using the crockpot can be a lifesaver, then dinner is ready when you get home.”

For late night events, she said prepare sandwiches when possible and keep snacks handy such as whole fruit, apples, bananas, oranges, walnuts, almonds and skim mozzarella string cheese.

Swim said parents must also keep in mind that males and females mature differently and to alter their diets accordingly. “Because girls and boys mature at different ages and their growth spurts occur at different times, there are separate calorie needs. For example, as girls mature one place to focus would be on getting enough iron. The body uses iron to make hemoglobin, the part of the red blood cells that carry oxygen.”

Swim said multi-grain rice with salmon and dark green salads are ways to add iron into meals, but recommends contacting a pediatrician or registered dietitian for diet needs.

Opinion

OPINION: Is it time for a technology detox?
BY TRAVIS SNELL
Assistant Editor – @cp_tsnell
05/01/2018 02:00 PM
According to a recent Time magazine article, every day we check our smartphones about 47 times – about every 19 minutes – while spending approximately five hours on them.

It states there’s “no good consensus” about what that does to our “children’s brains” or “adolescents’ moods.” It also states the American Psychological Association has found that 65 percent of people believe “periodically unplugging would improve our mental health,” and a University of Texas study has found the “mere presence of our smartphones, face down on the desk in front of us, undercuts our ability to perform basic cognitive tasks.”

It further states that it’s not just us being weak for not getting away from our screens; our brains are being engineered to keep looking. Silicon Valley’s business model relies on us looking at their apps and products. The more “eyeball time” we give, the more money they make by selling our personal data. The article states we “are not customers of Facebook or Google, we are the product being sold.”

This is persuasive technology, the study of how computers are used to control our thoughts and actions. It “has fueled the creation of thousands of apps, interfaces and devices that deliberately encourage certain human behaviors (keep scrolling) while discouraging others (convey thoughtful, nuanced ideas),” the article states.

The article adds that Facebook “designers determine which videos, news stories and friends’ comments appear at the top of your feed, as well as how often you’re informed of new notifications.” The goal is to keep us looking longer, thus getting more personal info on us to their real customers – companies that buy this information.

It also states when our brains gets an “external cue, like the ding of a Facebook notification, that often precedes a reward,” there’s a burst of dopamine, a powerful neurotransmitter linked to the anticipation of pleasure.” This “trigger, action and reward” process strengthens the brain’s habit-forming loop.

“If you’re trying to get someone to establish a new behavior…computer engineers can draw on different kinds of positive feedback, like social approval or a sense of progress, to build on that loop,” the article states. “One simple trick is to offer users a reward, like points or a cascade of new likes from friends at unpredictable times. The human brain produces more dopamine when it anticipates a reward but doesn’t know when it will arrive…Most of the alluring apps and websites in wide use today were engineered to exploit this habit-forming loop.”

Pinterest works slightly different. It features pictures arranged so that users see partial images of what’s next. This piques the curiosity and has no “natural” stopping point, the article states, while offering endless content.

Not too many years ago, I could go most places without my cell. Nowadays I usually have it with me. Am I going to miss a call or text? What’s happening on Facebook? I need to text my buddy about the game I just saw, or that photo I just took needs posting.

Recently I read an article (again in Time) about a museum that annually holds an exhibit in which famous pieces of art are recreated with flowers. The museum considered banning cell phones because people would push and shove trying to get pictures. One woman said she felt guilty for simply looking at the art because she thought she was in the way of people trying to take pictures with their phones.

I don’t want to be one of those people who views life through a smartphone or tablet. Nor do I want my kids to be. But I can’t tell them to put down the screens if I can’t do it. I guess it’s time for a “tech detox” as Time magazine called it. I’ve decided to limit my screen time and start getting the bulk of my news again from print. (I can’t stand TV news.) I subscribe to Time, Runner’s World, Men’s Health and will most likely go back to a daily newspaper. I like the feel of pages between my fingers. I like how I can read it at any pace, set it down and come back to it. True, it’s delivered at a slower pace than digital news, but it’s usually more in-depth with better design.

I need to unplug for a while. I think my kids are at that point, too, and probably my wife. Maybe it’s time for a lot of us to re-evaluate our screen time and break those habit-forming loops.

People

4 CN employees graduate OU Economic Development Institute
BY STAFF REPORTS
05/24/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – Four Cherokee Nation employees recently graduated from the University of Oklahoma Economic Development Institute held in Fort Worth, Texas.

Career Services Executive Director Diane Kelley, Career Services Special Projects Officer Hunter Palmer, Commerce Entrepreneur Development Manager Stephen Highers and Jobs Business Development Coordinator Travis Gulley graduated on May 3.

OU EDI is a 117-hour certificate program that provides advanced education for economic development professionals.

“I’m excited that the Cherokee Nation now has four new graduates from the University of Oklahoma’s Economic Development Institute,” Kelley said. “This is a prestigious program, and the knowledge and training we received will improve many of the services we provide to tribal citizens and businesses.”

OU EDI classes focus on business retention and expansion, real estate and credit analysis, as well as areas of concentration in marketing, strategic planning, entrepreneurship and managing economic development organizations. Students typically take one to two years to complete the program through a series of in-person seminars, workshops and discussion groups.

“OU EDI is the premier organization dedicated to training economic development professionals,” Mary Ann Moon, dean, said. “These graduates represent some of the finest economic development practitioners in the U.S. working to support their local communities. My congratulations to them.”

OU EDI began in 1962 and is celebrating its 56th year of service to the economic development community. Fully accredited by the International Economic Development Council, the program has trained more than 5,000 graduates and remains the world’s leading economic development teacher.
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