Cultural classes coming to Sequoyah Birthplace Museum

BY STAFF REPORTS
03/24/2017 04:00 PM
VENORE, Tenn. – Various cultural classes will take place in April at the Sequoyah Birthplace Museum.
Cornhusk doll making taught by Tonya Dockery will begin at 10 a.m. on April 1. The fee is $15, and class size is limited to 15 to 18 people.

Eastern Band of Cherokee Indian enrolled citizens Mary Brown and Gil Jackson will teach a Cherokee language class from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. on April 3. The cost is $50 for four consecutive classes to be held on Monday evenings.

Sharon Ensminger will teach a finger weaving class from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on April 22 by. Cost is $25. Participants are asked to bring a small box and two skeins of heavy weight yarn of different colors (one light, one dark) and a bag lunch. Class size is limited to 15 people.

EBCI citizen Mary Thompson will teach a Cherokee basket weaving class from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on April 29. The cost of the class is $20 plus the cost of materials. Students should call for list of needed materials to bring to class. Participants are asked to bring a bag lunch. Class size limited to 12 people.

CHC to host 16th annual Cherokee Ancestry Conference

BY STAFF REPORTS
03/15/2017 12:45 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Discover your family history and Cherokee ancestry at the Cherokee Heritage Center’s 16th annual Cherokee Ancestry Conference June 9-10 at the Tribal Complex.

The event provides participants with the tools to research their ancestry with Cherokee historical records and features a variety of discussion topics, including historical events before and after the removal, inter-tribal relationships and advancements in social media and its effect on genealogy research.

Participants will also learn about various CN records available online as well as resources available in their local area for Cherokee ancestry research.

A discount is given to those who register before June 3. Pre-registration is $60 for Cherokee National Historical Society members and $75 for nonmembers. The deadline is June 3. Registrations after June 3 are $70 for CNHS members and $85 for nonmembers.

The Cherokee Ancestry Conference will be held in the Osiyo Room at the Tribal Complex. It is located at 17725 S. Muskogee Ave. in the same building as Restaurant of the Cherokees.
https://www.facebook.com/electrockytribalcouncil/

Cherokee Days returns to Washington, D.C.

BY STAFF REPORTS
03/09/2017 12:15 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Visitors to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C., have the opportunity to learn about the history and culture of the Cherokees from March 31 to April 2.
 
For the fourth consecutive year, the Cherokee Nation, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians are partnering to host Cherokee Days at the museum, which is free to attend.

“We have established an excellent partnership with the National Museum of the American Indian that annually celebrates the shared history and heritage of the Cherokee people,” Principal Chief Bill John Baker said. “This event is a unique showcase and educational opportunity focused on our tribal lifeways. Our artisans, culture keepers and historians from the federally recognized governments of the Cherokee are able to come together as family and share our rich story that is so prominent in America’s history.” 

Cherokee Days shares the history of the Cherokees through a timeline exhibit, live cultural art demonstrations and cultural performances. Among the art demonstrations are pottery making, basket weaving, carving and textiles.

“You will learn the tribal stories of the Cherokee Nation, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee. Our history is interwoven in the stories of survival, enrichment and the golden years,” UKB Principal Chief Joe Bunch said. “Cherokee Days at the Smithsonian promises to be a highly informative and enlightening learning experience. We have a wonderful opportunity to share our unique story and our culture with thousands of visitors in Washington, D.C.”

Double-weave basket making knowledge shared

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
03/07/2017 09:15 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Cherokee National Treasure Vivian Cottrell has shared her knowledge of basket making at the Cherokee Arts Center for the past two months. Specifically, she taught “the old Cherokee traditional basket style of double weave” using river cane.

“It’s our old traditional Cherokee style of weaving, and I am trying to teach it to others,” she said. “I’ve been weaving for approximately 45 years, since I was 13. My mother taught me, and she was also a (Cherokee) National Treasure. Her name was Betty Scraper Garner.”

Cottrell, of Flint Ridge, said for the past four or five years she has been studying river cane – how to split it, peel it and dye it – as her Cherokee ancestors did in the old Cherokee Nation in eastern Tennessee, northern Georgia and western North Carolina. There the cane was abundant along the region’s many rivers.

Her home is near the Illinois River, which allows her to walk to the river to gather cane and other basket-making materials.

“And over that time I’ve also been weaving it, and once I felt comfortable...then I was able to pass that on. It was very important for me...to pass that knowledge on to others,” she said.
Cherokee National Treasure Vivian Cottrell holds a double-weave, river cane basket she made as part of a basket weaving class she taught in January and February at the Cherokee Arts Center in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Cherokee double-weave or double-wall baskets are traditional baskets that were woven and used in the old Cherokee Nation. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX An example of a double-weave, river cane basket made during a basket making class held recently at the Cherokee Arts Center in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, and taught by Cherokee National Treasure Vivian Cottrell. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Two double-weave, river cane baskets made during a recent basket making class in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, sit on a table at the Cherokee Arts Center. Cherokee National Treasure Vivian Cottrell taught the class at the art center. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee National Treasure Vivian Cottrell holds a double-weave, river cane basket she made as part of a basket weaving class she taught in January and February at the Cherokee Arts Center in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Cherokee double-weave or double-wall baskets are traditional baskets that were woven and used in the old Cherokee Nation. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
https://www.facebook.com/Janees-Taylor-for-Tribal-Council-217063208698059/

45th annual Symposium on the American Indian set for April 10-15

BY STAFF REPORTS
03/06/2017 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Northeastern State University Center for Tribal Studies has set the 45th annual Symposium on the American Indian for April 10-15 in the University Center at NSU’s Tahlequah campus.

This years theme is “Indian Givers: Indigenous Inspirations,” and the event will include the return of the NSU Powwow.

According to the symposium’s website, the symposium “will focus on the many ways in which American Indians have contributed to mainstream, western culture through art, literature, government and other areas of the humanities.”

The symposium’s film series will kick off the week with two screenings. “Violet” will be shown at 6 p.m. on April 10 and “Medicine Woman” will be shown at 6 p.m. on April 11, both in the W. Roger Webb Educational Technology Center’s auditorium.

The opening ceremony is set for 9:30 a.m. on April 12 where the Native American Student Association will welcome guests with comments from Center for Tribal Studies Director Sara Barnett and NASA President and Cherokee Nation citizen Jacob Chavez.

Cherokee Speaker’s Bureau set for March 9

BY STAFF REPORTS
03/06/2017 09:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Speakers Bureau will be held Thursday March 9, 2017 from 12:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. We will meet in the Community Ballroom that is located behind the Restaurant of the Cherokee. All Cherokee speakers are invited to attend. If you want to bring a side dish or a dessert, feel free to bring it. Come speak Cherokee and enjoy food and fellowship.

For further information about the event, please contact the Language Program at (918) 453-5151; John Ross at (918) 453-6170; or Roy Boney Jr. (918) 453-5487.

Tsalagi aniwonisgi unadatlugv dodvnatlosi Nvgineiga Anvyi 9, 2017, ganvsulvi 12:30 p.m. adalenisgi 4 p.m. igohida. Na anitsalagi tsunalisdayetiyi tsigotlv unaditli wayvsdi onadilvyvi utani kanvsula dodvnatlosi. Nanivanitsalagi aniwonisgi otsitayohiha uniluhisdii. Alisdayvdi ayohisdi yodulia. Dodayotsadatlisani aledodayotsalisdayvna hilutsvi.

Ugodesdi tsadulihesdi tsadelayohisdi hiina wigehiyadvdi: Tsalagi Gawonihisdi Unadotlvsv (918) 453-5151; John Ross (918) 453-6170; or Roy Boney Jr. (918) 453-5487.

ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏓᏡᎬ ᏙᏛᎾᏠᏏ ᏅᎩᏁᎢᎦ ᎠᏅᏱ 9, 2017, ᎦᏅᏑᎸᎢ 12:30pm ᎠᏓᎴᏂᏍᎩ 4pm ᎢᎪᎯᏓ. Ꮎ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏧᎾᎵᏍᏓᏰᏘᏱ ᏥᎪᏢ ᎤᎾᏗᏟ ᏩᏴᏍᏗ ᎣᎾᏗᎸᏴᎢ ᎤᏔᏂ ᎧᏅᏑᎸ ᏙᏛᎾᏠᏏ. ᎾᏂᎥ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᎣᏥᏔᏲᎯᎭ ᎤᏂᎷᎯᏍᏗᎢ. ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎠᏲᎯᏍᏗ ᏲᏚᎵᎠ. ᏙᏓᏲᏣᏓᏟᏌᏂ ᎠᎴᏙᏓᏲᏣᎵᏍᏓᏴᎾ ᎯᎷᏨᎢ.

ᎤᎪᏕᏍᏗ ᏣᏚᎵᎮᏍᏗ ᏣᏕᎳᏲᎯᏍᏗ ᎯᎢᎾ ᏫᎨᎯᏯᏛᏗ: ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᏒ (918) 453-5151; John Ross (918) 453-6170; or Roy Boney Jr. (918) 453-5487.

NSU to host 2017 Inter-Tribal Language Summit

BY STAFF REPORTS
02/27/2017 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Inter-Tribal Council of the Five Civilized Tribes Language Committee will be hosting a two-day Language Summit April 12-13 at Northeastern State University.

The summit will run concurrently with NSU’s annual Symposium of the American Indian. The summit’s theme is “Breaking the Inhibitions” and topics will focus on overcoming inhibitions that stand in the way of successful language learning among tribal communities, challenges of creating adequate social spaces for language learners and dealing with generational trauma caused by government policies that suppressed Indigenous languages.

The keynote speaker for the summit will be Dr. Colleen Fitzgerald, professor of linguistics at the University of Texas at Arlington and National Science Foundation Program Director for Documenting Endangered Languages.

Entry to all summit sessions is free and open to the public. However, due to limited seating, attendance for the keynote luncheon will be capped at 70 attendees. Tickets are required for entry to the keynote. Tickets will be $20 each and include a BBQ buffet meal.

Melanie Frye, Seminole Nation language education specialist and president of the Inter-Tribal Council Language Committee, said she encourages all who can to attend.

ᏓᎵᏆ, ᎣᎦᎳᎰᎹ. – ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏓᏂᏍᏓᏢᎢ ᏗᏂᎳᏫᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᏍᎩ ᎢᏯᏂᎢ ᎤᎾᏓᏅᏘ ᏓᏂᏍᏓᏢᎢ ᏂᏓᏳᎾᏓᎴᏅᎢ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᎾᎵᏏᏅᏗᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏓᏡᎩ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᏂᏍᏆᎸᎡᎮᏍᏗ ᏔᎵ ᎢᎦ ᏱᎪᎯᏓ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᏳᏰᏟᏗ ᏓᎾᏠᏍᎨᏍᏗ ᎧᏬᏂ 12-17 ᎧᎴᏍᏗ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ ᎤᏴᏢᎢ ᎧᎸᎬᎢ ᏩᎦᎸᎳᏗᏴᎢ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ.

ᎾᏍᎩᏃ Ꮎ ᏓᎾᏠᏍᎬᎢ ᎢᏧᎳᎭᎢ ᏓᎢᏎᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ NSU’s ᏑᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᏳᏓᎵ ᏥᏓᎾᏠᏍᎪᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎹᏰᎵ ᎠᏁᎯ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏓᎾᏠᏍᎬᎢ ᏕᎦᏃᏣᏢᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎨᏎᏍᏗ “ᎠᏲᏍᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎾᏕᎰᏍᎬᎢ” ᎠᎴ ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏔᏅᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎾᎦᏎᏍᏗᏍᎨᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᎾᏓᎵᏁᎯᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎾᏕᎰᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏥᎩ ᎢᎬᏱᏗᏢ ᏥᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗᏍᎪᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎤᏂᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ ᏓᏂᏍᏓᏢᎢ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᏚᏙᏢᏩᏗᏒᎢ, ᎠᏓᏁᏄᎸᏗ ᎤᏙᏢᏅᏗᎢ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏧᎾᏟᏃᎮᏗᎢ ᎠᏟᏅᏓᏗᎠ ᎧᏁᎢᏍᏗ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ Ꮎ ᎠᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᎦᏛᎴᏏᏙᎲᎢ ᎠᎾᏓᏁᏟᏴᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᏂᏏᏴᏫᎭ ᎨᏒᎢ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᏩᏥᏂ ᏗᏍᏓᏩᏛᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏂᏐᎭᎾᎳᏛᎢ ᏅᏁᎯᏴᎢ ᏗᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗᎢ.

ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏄᎬᏫᏳᏒᎢ ᎦᏬᏂᏏᏙᎯ ᎥᎿ ᏓᎾᏠᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎨᏎᏍᏗ ᎠᎦᎾᎦᏘ Dr. Colleen Fitzgerald, ᏩᎦᎸᎳᏗᏴᎢ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᏗᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ University of Texas at Arlington ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᏊ ᎢᎬᎾᏕᎾ Science Foundation ᎤᏙᏢᏒᎢ ᎠᏓᏎᎮᎯ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏓᏂᏍᏂᎪᏗᎲᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏚᏂᏲᎱᏎᎲᎢ ᏗᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ.

ᎥᎿᏃ ᏓᎾᏠᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᏎᏭᏃ ᎠᏴᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏍᏚᎢᏎᏍᏗ ᎦᎪᏊ ᎡᏪᏓᏍᏗ. ᎠᏗᎾ, ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ ᎠᏛᏅᎢᏍᏕᏍᏗ ᎠᏗᎾ Ꮓ ᎠᎦᏲᏢᏃ ᎤᏟᏅᏛ ᎠᎵᏍᏛᏡᏍᏗᎢ, ᎠᎾᏓᏩᏛᎯᏙᎯᏃ ᎠᏁᏙᎲᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ 70 ᎢᏳᏂᏨᎢ ᏗᎵᏍᎪᏟᏔᏅᎢ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ. ᎪᏪᎵᏃ ᎠᏈᏱᏍᎩ ᎠᏎᎢ ᎦᏁᏍᏗ ᎩᎳ ᎬᏴᏍᏗ ᎥᎿ ᎤᎵᏍᎨᏓ ᏓᎾᏠᏍᎬᎢ. ᎪᏪᎵᏃ ᎠᏈᏱᏍᎩ $20 ᎠᏕᎳ ᏧᎬᏩᎶᏗ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏠᏯᏍᏕᏍᏗ BBQ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏰᏗ.

Melanie Frye, ᏏᎻᏃᎵ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎢᏳᏰᏟᏗ ᏧᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᎠᎴ ᏄᎬᏫᏳᏒᎢ Inter-ᎠᏂᏍᏓᏢᎢ ᏗᎦᎳᏫᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᎤᎾᏓᏡᎬᎢ, ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏕᎦᏂᎳᏕᎰᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏁᎳᏗᏓᏍᏗᎢ.

“ᏗᎦᏤᎵᏃ ᏗᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏂᏚᎵᏍᎨᏗᏴᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏕᎦᏂᏱᏍᎪᎢ ᎢᎦᏤᎵᎢ ᏱᎦᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎵᏍᏕᎵᏍᎪᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏏᏴᏫᎭᎢ ᎤᏂᏁᏉᎢᏍᏗᎢ. ᏗᎦᏤᎵᎢ ᏗᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᎢᎦᎵᏍᎪᏟᏓᏁᎰᎢ ᏗᎦᏟᏃᎮᏗᎢ, ᎢᎬᏌ ᏗᎫᎪᏔᏂᏓᏍᏗᎢ, ᏱᎦᏛᏁᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᏕᎦᏁᏟᏛᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏗᏕᏲᏗᎢ ᏗᎦᏤᎵᎢ ᏗᎾᏛᏍᎩ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᏂᏏᏴᏫᎭᎢ ᏓᏁᎲᎢ ᏧᏓᎴᎿᎢᎢ ᏓᏂᏍᏓᏢᎢ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏚᏙᏢᏒᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎨᎦᏓᏁᎳᏁᎸᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᎦᏎᏍᏗ ᎤᏂᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ. ᏂᎦᏓᏃ ᏗᎩᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎩᏩᏛᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏯᏛᏁᏗᎢ ᏗᎦᎵᏏᏅᏙᏗ ᏗᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏙᏣᏠᏏᎢᎭ ᎬᏂᎨᏒᎢ ᏱᏗᎬᏁᏗᎢ ᏂᏕᎵᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎪᏗ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏯᏛᏁᏗᎢ ᏗᎦᏟᏱᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎩᏲᎱᏎᎲᎢ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ ᏗᎦᏤᎵᎢ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏚᏙᏢᏒᎢ. ᏲᎦᏚᎳ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎢᏍᎩᏰᎳᏕᏗᎢ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ 2017 Inter-ᎠᏂᏍᏓᏢᎢ ᏓᏂᎳᏫᎬᎢ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᎢᏳᏰᏟᏗ ᏓᎾᏠᏍᎬᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ Frye.

ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᎪᏗ ᎠᏕᎶᎰᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᏲᏚᎵᎠ, ᎠᎾᎦᎵᏍᎩ ᎪᏪᎵ ᏱᏫᏅᏏ Teresa Workman, ᏥᎦᏌᎢ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎤᏙᏢᏒᎢ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᏳᏰᏟᏗ ᏗᎫᏔᏂᏙᎯ, ᏴᏩᏘ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ teresa.workman@chicksaw.net ᎠᎴᏱᎩ Melanie Frye ᎥᎿ ᏴᏩᏘ frye.m@sno-nsn.gov. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏗᎦᏃᏣᏢᏍᎦ ᎠᎴ ᎪᏪᎵ ᎠᎧᎵᏏᏐᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏓᎾᏠᏍᎬᎢ ᎢᏳᏰᏟᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏰᎵᎢ ᎡᎳᏗᎦᏟᏗ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ ᏴᏩᏘ www.fivecivilizedtribes.org. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᏕᎳ ᏗᏎᎯᏍᏗ ᏴᎪᏪᎸᎥᎦ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏂᏁᏍᏗ ᎥᎿ “ITC ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎢᏳᏰᏟᏗ.” ᎧᏃᎯᏍᏗᏃ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎧᎵᏏᏐᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏕᎳ ᏗᏎᎯᏍᏗ ᎾᎯᏳᎢ ᎢᎬᏱᏱ ᎢᎦ ᏓᎾᏠᏍᎬᎢ. ᎠᏈᏴᎲᎢ ᎪᎯᏳᏗᏍᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏛᎢᏍᏕᏍᏗ ᎾᎯᏳᎢ.

– Translated by David Crawler

NSU Center for Tribal Studies hosting silent auction and fundraiser

BY STAFF REPORTS
02/24/2017 12:30 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – In support of its rich, cultural heritage and quality programming, the Northeastern State University Center for Tribal Studies and the American Indian Heritage Committee will host its Annual Silent Auction and Luncheon Fundraiser from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 10 in the University Center Ballroom.

Tickets for the traditional meal can be purchased on site for $10; lunch will be served beginning at 11:30 a.m. People can come and browse and bid on silent auction items from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.

NSU takes great pride in its history and connection to American Indian education. Once dedicated to the education of Cherokee women, the institution currently has now enrolled more than 2,800 American Indian students. With this, comes a greater responsibility to provide opportunities for cultural enrichment, for both the students and the greater Tahlequah community.

Each year, the Center for Tribal Studies works in collaboration with offices such as the Center for Women’s Studies, the Sequoyah Institute and Diversity and Inclusion to offer programming related to our American Indian culture. These events include the Annual Symposium on the American Indian and a series of events in November in honor of American Indian Heritage Month.

For more information on upcoming programming, including the symposium, which runs April 17-22, contact the Center for Tribal Studies at 918-444-4350 or tribalstudies@nsuok.edu.

Cherokees honored at 30th annual GTIAF

BY JAMI MURPHY
Senior Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
02/23/2017 08:00 AM
GLENPOOL, Okla. – The Greater Tulsa Indian Art Festival honored 12 Native Americans who have had great influence in their lifetime. Two of the honored were Cherokee Nation citizens Principal Chief Bill John Baker and artist Eddie Morrison.

Baker was honored with the Outstanding Tribal Leader Award. According to the GTIAF program, Baker has devoted much of his life in service to the Cherokee people and CN.

“He spent 12 years as a member of the Cherokee Nation Tribal Council and was elected Principal Chief in 2011 and reelected in 2015,” the program states. “He has spearheaded historic changes in the Cherokee Nation government. He recently oversaw the first Hunting and Fishing Compact with the state, which allows Cherokee Nation citizens to hunt and fish anywhere in Oklahoma.”

Baker wasn’t present for the award ceremony, but CN Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. accepted it on his behalf and said Baker was humbled to be awarded by the GTIAF.

“It was an honor to represent Chief Baker and Cherokee Nation. Chief’s leadership in preserving and protecting our language and culture is admirable. The Greater Tulsa Indian Arts Festival is a great cultural asset to the entire region as well,” Hoskin Jr. said.
Cherokee Nation citizens Faye and Eddie Morrison look over sports memorabilia in an artist’s booth during the Greater Tulsa Indian Art Festival on Feb. 10 in Glenpool, Oklahoma. Eddie Morrison was given the Honored Elder Artist Award at the festival. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. accepts an award on behalf of Principal Chief Bill John Baker, who was honored as Outstanding Tribal Leader Award during the Greater Tulsa Indian Art Festival on Feb. 10 in Glenpool, Oklahoma. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizens Faye and Eddie Morrison look over sports memorabilia in an artist’s booth during the Greater Tulsa Indian Art Festival on Feb. 10 in Glenpool, Oklahoma. Eddie Morrison was given the Honored Elder Artist Award at the festival. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
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Culture

Adair County road project site studied by archeologist
BY JAMI MURPHY
Senior Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
02/21/2017 03:30 PM
BELL, Okla. – Christopher Cojeen, a contracted archeologist with the Cherokee Nation, and a two other CN departments recently performed three site visits in Adair County near where a new federally funded road will be built near the community of Bell.

Cojeen said during the last 20 to 25 years he has worked with the tribe to determine if there are homesteads or prehistoric sites located in the path of projects that use tribal or federal funds including road, community services buildings or housing projects.

“Initially, we went out and did an archeological survey of the road. Just visually looking at the surface, looking for homesteads, prehistoric sites like you saw or cemeteries like you saw,” he said. “The Cherokee Nation has a lot of cemeteries that aren’t fenced, right up adjacent to the road…and today we were just coming back out with the roads department and Sheila Bird to determine how significant the sites were and whether we can go ahead and get funding to go to a second stage.”

He added that the sites visited deserve to go to a testing level of recovery because there is so much lithic stone material on the surface as well as projectile points that are characteristic to a time period found at the sites.

Two cemeteries were viewed in an effort to see the condition and state of the sites. Upon departmental recommendations, additional testing will occur around both cemeteries to determine if any burials are close to where the road will be built. Additional testing is warranted to ensure burials will not be disturbed during the construction.

Another location visited he said would be an ideal location for a prehistoric site due to its location and relation to water tributaries.

“You’ve got a first terrace like we were standing on over the creek and occupation like that would’ve happened during the archaic period for as much as 1,000 to 2,000 years (ago),” he said. “This would start roughly at 0 A.D. going back 1,000 to 2,000 years B.C.”

At that age he said, it makes it difficult to determine a kind of “people” that may have inhabited the location.

“That’s old enough that you’re really just looking at a time period. Many people do have a good idea of what groups were in this area at the time obviously, the Cherokee Nation brought in on the Trail of Tears wouldn’t be one of the tribes that would probably lay claim to this area prehistorically,” Cojeen said.

Providing this type of service, he said, all people would benefit from with a better understanding of prehistory, but his involvement is due to a federal law protecting sites prehistoric and historic sites.

“Aside from that, you’ve got an area which has a great number of stone tool recovery, and if we can find it in a dateable sequence, and this being right above the creek probably did have a lot of deposition that got laid over time. We might find archaic tools on the surface and as we go back middle archaic tools and early archaic or maybe even Paleo-Indian material resting at the bottom of the whole thing. If we have a good stratigraphic situation like that, then we can learn a lot about the changes in occupation over time.”

Moving forward, Cojeen said, they’ll go into a testing phase of recovery where they’ll place areas in “one by one’s like you see on T.V.,” he said.

Check back with the Cherokee Phoenix for updates on this story.

Education

OU to host symposium on environmental issues on March 24
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/20/2017 04:00 PM
NORMAN, Okla. – The University of Oklahoma College of Law on March 24 will host the American Indian Law Review’s annual “Indigenous Peoples, Law, and Power Symposium.”

This year’s theme is “Oil and Water.” The symposium is co-sponsored in partnership with the OU’s College of Arts and Sciences’ Native American Studies Department. The event will begin at 10 a.m. in the Dick Bell Courtroom in Andrew M. Coats Hall.

Experts of Native American environmental issues will sit on two panels and give two keynote addresses. The speakers and their topics include:

Morning Panel: “The Chickasaw-Choctaw Compact in Context,” Sara Hill, senior assistant attorney general of the Cherokee Nation, and Taiawagi Helton, professor of law, University of Oklahoma College of Law.

Morning Keynote: “Water Sovereignty and Stewardship: The Historic Chickasaw-Choctaw Water Settlement,” Stephen Greetham, chief general counsel and special counsel on water and natural resources, Chickasaw Nation and Michael Burrage, managing partner, Whitten Burrage Law Firm;

Afternoon Panel: “Justice and Juxtaposition: Environmental Justice and Protest in Parallel,” Taiawagi Helton, professor of law, University of Oklahoma College of Law; and
Afternoon Keynote: “The Impact of Fracking on Indian Nations: A Case Study,” Walter Echo-Hawk, of counsel, Crowe & Dunlevy.

“This year’s “Indigenous Peoples, Law, and Power Symposium” builds upon several dedicated events we have held this year, all of which have focused on the intersection of Native American rights and environmental law,” said OU College of Law Dean Joseph Harroz Jr. “We are honored to host these discussions on such important issues and we’re pleased to have the partnership of OU’s College of Arts and Sciences’ Native American Studies Department as we do so.”

In December 2015, the OU Board of Regents unanimously voted to elevate Native American Studies from a program to department status at the request of OU President David L. Boren. Since 1994, OU’s Native American Studies focus has attracted and served students of diverse backgrounds who are committed to using distinctly Native American perspectives to place the sovereignty of Native nations and the cultures of Native peoples at the center of academic study. In addition to a graduate certificate in American Indian Social Work, the Department offers bachelor’s, master’s, and joint master’s and juris doctorate degrees.

“This is our sixth year to co-host this special event,” said Dr. Amanda Cobb-Greetham (Chickasaw), chair of the Native American Studies Department and director of the newly established Native Nations Center. “Our partnership grows out of our joint M.A./J.D. program, which makes all of our students uniquely competitive. This year’s symposium topic is of critical importance to Native nations and communities. The subject matter is dear to our hearts as it impacts our lands as well as our political and cultural identities.”

Council

Tribal Council accepts U.S. Forest Service apology
BY JAMI MURPHY
Senior Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
02/22/2017 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Tribal Councilors on Feb. 21 unanimously voted to accept an apology from the U.S. Forest Service Southern Region for damages to a Trail of Tears site in the Cherokee National Forest near Coker Creek, Tennessee.

In July 2015, U.S. Forest Service cultural resource managers notified higher-ranked Forest Service officials that they had discovered damage made in 2014 to a site on a Trail of Tears section. The damage consisted of holes dug by a bulldozer and other heavy equipment.

“At that site, 35 large holes were dug into the historic Trail of Tears to create large, earthen berms,” Sheila Bird, Cherokee Nation special projects officer, told the Cherokee Phoenix in 2016. “They used bulldozer and other heavy equipment, and this earthmoving resulted clear and extensive damage to the historic national trail.”

She added that Forest Service employees did the work and claimed that it was done for erosion control and to prevent areas of the Trail of Tears from washing out.

“This is a well-known and mapped Trail of Tears path, but it was not marked because it was privately owned. This land was purchased by Conservation Fund and held for the U.S. Forest Service,” she said. “The District Ranger failed to follow federal laws requiring consultation with Indian tribes. The Forest Service has acknowledged fault and committed to restoring the site.”

According to a Feb 21 resolution, the U.S. Forest Service-Southern Region “recognizes the cultural and historic significance held by the Cherokee Nation regarding the Trail of Tears historic site and extends an apology for the unfortunate and adverse effects that have occurred.”

It also states the “Cherokee Nation agrees to consult on a government to government basis with the U.S. Forest Service-Southern Region regarding the restoration and mitigation of these adverse effects to this Trail of Tears sacred site.”

It adds that as a “Good Faith Effort” and to commit to jointly pursue meaningful mitigation the Tribal Council accepts the apology.

Also during the meeting, Tribal Council voted 17-0 to support the nominations of Michael Doublehead and Steven Wilson as commissioners to the Tax Commission. They also voted Ceciley Thomason-Murphy onto the Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board.

Tribal Councilors voted to donate three surplus vehicles from the Cherokee Nation Marshal Service to the Nowata Police Department and Muskogee and Delaware counties sheriff’s offices.

Three CN citizens were also honored with the Cherokee Medal of Freedom – John Thomas Cripps III, who served in the U.S. Army, and John Paul Atkinson and Jesse James Collins, who served in the Oklahoma Army National Guard and were activated in 2011 to the RECON 1-279th 45th Infantry to Afghanistan.

Two budget modifications were also passed. The comprehensive capital budget was increased by $1.8 million for a total capital budget authority of $279.6 million. The tribe’s operating budget was also increased by $2.1 million for a total budget authority of $666.6 million. The changes consisted of a decrease in the general fund by $92,000 and increases in the indirect cost pool, motor vehicle tax, Department of Interior Self Governance and IHS Self Governance and budgets.

Health

Effective interventions prevent alcohol use among Native youth
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/16/2017 12:15 PM
ATLANTA, Ga. – Community-based and individual-level prevention strategies are effective ways to reduce alcohol use among American Indian and other youth living in rural communities, according to a new study supported by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, part of the National Institutes of Health.

The National Institute on Drug Abuse also provided support for the study.

“This important study underscores our commitment to finding evidence-based solutions for alcohol problems in American Indian and other underserved populations,” said NIAAA Director George F. Koob “This study is one of the largest alcohol prevention trials ever conducted with an American Indian population, and the first to demonstrate the effectiveness of screening and brief counseling intervention in significantly reducing youth alcohol use at a community level.”

Although American Indian teens drink at rates similar to other United States teens, they have early onset alcohol use compared to other groups and higher rates of alcohol problems. Rural youths, including those who are a racial minority relative to their community, are also at increased risk for alcohol misuse. Early prevention is critical in these populations, but both American Indians and rural communities have been underrepresented in studies aimed at finding effective solutions for underage drinking.

To address this gap, researchers led by Kelli A. Komro of the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University in Atlanta worked with the Cherokee Nation, the second-largest tribe in the U.S., to implement a rigorous research trial of two distinct strategies to reduce underage drinking and its consequences.

Communities Mobilizing for Change on Alcohol is a community-organizing intervention designed to reduce alcohol access, use and consequences among underage youths. The second strategy, called CONNECT, is an individually delivered screening and brief intervention delivered in schools. The study was conducted within the 14 counties of northeastern Oklahoma that comprise the CN jurisdictional area, which is home to about 40 percent of the tribe. While CN citizens constitute a significant proportion of the population, whites and other racial/ethnic minorities also live within this area. Results of the trial are reported in the March 2017 issue of the American Journal of Public Health.

“Community organizing has been used effectively in multiple other health intervention trials and appeared to be an optimal strategy to engage diverse citizens in these multicultural communities,” explained Dr. Komro. CMCA involves training teams of adults to implement policies and take actions to reduce youth access to alcohol through social and commercial sources. In the school-based intervention, a school social worker conducts a brief one-on-one health consultation with each student each semester to encourage healthy behavior change related to alcohol consumption. Students who report high risk drinking attend follow-up sessions and are referred to specialty treatment when appropriate.

Six communities, each served by a single high school, participated in the study. The student population in these communities was nearly 50 percent American Indian. The study population consisted of students who were in ninth or 10th grade when the study began and followed over three years through 11th or 12th grade.

By random assignment, students in two communities received both the community-organizing intervention and the individually delivered intervention. Students in two different communities served as controls, and received neither intervention. One of the remaining two communities used only the community-organizing intervention while the other used only the school-based individually administered intervention.

Over the course of the study, researchers found that self-reports of alcohol use, including any use and heavy drinking episodes (five or more drinks on at least one occasion) in the past 30 days, was significantly reduced among students receiving either or both interventions, compared with students in the control communities.

“The two distinct interventions alone and in combination resulted in similar patterns of effect across time,” said Komro, “but, interestingly, we found no evidence that the two interventions combined had significantly greater effects than either alone.”

Komro and her colleagues conclude that, while alcohol use among high school students remains a serious public health problem, and rural and American Indian youths are particularly vulnerable populations, the specific community and school-based interventions they examined are effective approaches for addressing alcohol problems in these diverse communities.

Additional alcohol research information and publications are available at: http://www.niaaa.nih.gov.

Opinion

OPINION: I’ll just leave this here
BY JAMI MURPHY
Senior Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
03/09/2017 04:00 PM
I'm going to share some “feels” with you. I'm not going to weep all over the page, but I will share with you what this job has meant to me, what it’s done for me and how I come to spend nearly 10 years doing it.

This job has shaped not only my career but also my life. I wasn’t one of those kids who had their tribal heritage shared with them as they grew up. I mean my story isn't that different from a lot of people. I was Cherokee. I knew that, but I missed out on the cultural aspect of being a tribal citizen. This job gave me the opportunity to not only grow and establish a career, but I grew to understand my culture, where I came from and what the Cherokee people have overcome. I learned of a tumultuous history that my ancestors faced as well as a personal history regarding my direct ancestor, Anderson Springston. I even wrote a column about it explaining the roles my people played in the killing of three prominent Cherokees: Major Ridge, John Ridge and Elias Boudinot. I also learned of the connection the son of that ancestor, John Leak Springston, had with the Cherokee Phoenix. He was known to be an Indian activist, an interpreter, newspaper editor, attorney and Keetoowah revivalist.

There have been so many stories that have left a mark on me. I’ve covered countless meetings, several tribal elections, as well as your basic health, education, cultural and people stories, and they all served a purpose of educating, entertaining and informing the Cherokee people.

It’s been nearly 10 years since I started here, and I have loved having the opportunity to work for such a historic newspaper. I’ve met some great people and made lasting relationships, but my most favorite aspect of working in this capacity has ultimately been helping people by both informing them of what their government is doing, as well as giving our Cherokee people a voice - something that has been taken from them time and again.

My concern for the Cherokee people and their involvement in the goings-on within their government is something that during the past several years I’ve noticed is most important. So I’ve tried to do that. It’s important to become educated in your government. You should want to have a say in what happens within your tribe. We’ve seen in our history what happens when we allow others to decide for us, and we’re a stronger people than that. I personally missed out on being involved with my tribe while growing up, but that will not be the case any longer and neither will it be for my children.

I buried the lede with this one friends, but on purpose, because once I’ve written it and once you’ve read it, it’s real. I have tendered my resignation from the Cherokee Phoenix effective April 8. I have accepted a job with the city of Tahlequah. Although I’m sad, scared and nervous for what is coming I know this is the best move for me.
This change will afford me the chance to reach for goals that working for the tribe will not allow. Although those goals may be far down the road, I need to give myself a true shot at accomplishing them. But new is always scary.

I hope the Cherokee Phoenix, a newspaper that has been at the forefront and example for excellent tribal journalism, will continue to be what it was created to be, what it should be – a true voice of the Cherokee people. One that stands up for what is right by its citizens and one that the Cherokee people can count on to be a real representation of the what happens within our tribe, not just what you need to know.

You are the Cherokee Nation. No voice is too big or small and at the end of the day the Cherokee Nation is not a thing, it’s a people and those people should be treated with respect and love like all people.

I wish all my fellow staffers, current and former, the best. You made me better, smarter and definitely more quick-witted.

So with that said, I bid you a fond farewell. Much love to anyone who played a part in the stories I’ve told over the years. This isn’t goodbye. If I can be of any help to someone in the future, you can email me at jamilynnmurphy@gmail.com. Do-na-da-go-hv-i.

People

Pettit thrives as radio show host
BY LINDSEY BARK
Staff Writer
03/16/2017 08:15 AM
SALLISAW, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen Justin Pettit grew up with a passion for radio broadcasting after listening to sports on the radio during his early years.

Pettit said he grew up listening to broadcasts of the University of Oklahoma Sooners and University of Arkansas Razorbacks basketball teams.

“Now, I do my own stuff. I do basketball or game of the week here on 105.1 (KXMX in Sallisaw). I do the play-by-play, the color (commentary), all my own stats, everything,” he said.

He initially thought about going into the radio broadcasting business in 2010 while working as realtor in Fayetteville, Arkansas.

“I always had a passion for radio, and I got a note from one of my friends about doing broadcasting school, and it was all online so I was able to do it,” Pettit said.

In 2011, he graduated from the American Broadcasting School and started with Cumulus Broadcasting Inc. in Fayetteville. While there, Pettit honed his skills as a radio broadcast host by covering local and college sports.

In 2015, he became a host at Mix 105.1 FM with a show called “JP in the Morning.” He is also the station’s sports director.

“I’m on the air 6 a.m. to 11 a.m. having a good time, getting people ready for the morning, getting them ready for their job or school or whatever it is they got going on,” Pettit said.

He said one of his favorite aspects of the job is interacting with listeners and fans.

“I love the interaction. That’s probably my favorite part. We’re a local radio station. We’re not owned by any big company. We get to do whatever we want. So if there’s a big event happening across town that involves the kids or anything, we’re there. We go out and interact with all the people. They love us,” he said.

He said the radio station provides more than just a show to its listeners.

“We play a mix of music. We play country, rock, Christian, all of it. They know any type of music they like they know they can listen to us and we’ll have it there for them,” he said. “They know if they need any kind of breaking weather, if there is any news happening in and around the area they tune to us. We’re live on the air. A lot of radio stations aren’t live anymore. So if there’s an accident or a road’s blocked off or anything, the people know they can tune to us or call us and we’ll let them know where to be and where not to be.”

He said to work in radio his personality has to come through in his voice.

“In radio you got to have a big personality, and a lot of guys have a radio voice. I don’t really have one. I don’t put it on because when I go out with the public, we have a lot of interaction. People say ‘well you sound just like you do on the radio.’ Well I don’t put the big…radio voice on so that’s kind one of my trademarks,” he said.

Pettit said though the radio station is only 3 or 4 years old, the ratings “are up there with the guys” who have been in the radio broadcasting business for 30 or 40 years.

His fellow employees praised Pettit for his work ethic.

Delanna Nutter, sales director, said Pettit steps up when they need him to do extra voice work and that he is “always right on point.”

“I’m just a normal guy working the job that I love and living the dream,” Pettit said.
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