Cherokee Phoenix calls for 2018 homecoming T-shirt concepts

BY TRAVIS SNELL
Assistant Editor – @cp_tsnell
08/20/2017 10:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – With its 2017 annual homecoming T-shirt now for sale, the Cherokee Phoenix is calling for Cherokee artists to submit design concepts for the news organization’s 2018 T-shirt.

In 2016, the Cherokee Phoenix staff introduced a T-shirt to differ from the tribe’s Cherokee National Holiday T-shirt. Phoenix staff members contracted with artist Buffalo Gouge for the shirt’s initial design.

For this year’s homecoming shirt, Phoenix staff members selected Daniel HorseChief’s concept out of approximately 10 designs from artists. The Cherokee Phoenix then contracted with HorseChief to create the 2017 shirt.

HorseChief said his concept comes from a four-panel painting that features Selu, the Corn Mother in Cherokee lore.

The image shows the bust of Selu, who is looking down into a Southeastern art pattern. Behind her on the left side are seven ears of corn with water under it. Behind her on the opposite side is a phoenix with fire below it. Above the phoenix is the Cherokee seven-pointed star. Above the image, written in Cherokee, are the words “Cherokee Phoenix.” Below the image, in English, is “2017 CHEROKEE HOMECOMING.”
Cherokee artist Daniel HorseChief’s Selu, or Corn Mother, concept was selected as the Cherokee Phoenix’s 2017 homecoming T-shirt artwork. The shirt is on sale at the Cherokee Phoenix office and Cherokee Nation Gift Shop in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. ARCHIVE Cherokee artist Buffalo Gouge models the Cherokee Phoenix’s 2016 homecoming T-shirt, which sold out during the Cherokee National Holiday. The Cherokee Phoenix is currently seeking ideas from Cherokee artists for the 2018 homecoming T-shirt. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee artist Daniel HorseChief’s Selu, or Corn Mother, concept was selected as the Cherokee Phoenix’s 2017 homecoming T-shirt artwork. The shirt is on sale at the Cherokee Phoenix office and Cherokee Nation Gift Shop in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. ARCHIVE

Visitors get glimpse into CHC archives

BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
08/18/2017 12:45 PM
PARK HILL, Okla. – Cherokee Heritage Center visitors had the chance to get a glimpse into the CHC’s permanent archive collections with the “Preserving Cherokee Culture: Holding the Past for the Future” exhibit that was set to run Aug. 14-19.

“We want to just feature things that people don’t get to see very often. On average only about 1 percent of a museums holdings are on display at any given time, so this will give people a little inside look into more of the items that we have,” Callie Chunestudy, CHC curator, said.

Nearly 60 historical artifacts were selected for the exhibit, including Gen. Stand Waite’s bowie knife, a hand-written first draft of the Articles of Agreement between the Cherokee Nation and U.S. governments in 1866, photographs and more.

Chunestudy said the goal is to find a way to create a new archives and collections building.

“We are in need of a new archives and collections building, so we want to feature some of the rare and special items that we do hold so the people can understand that we really need updated housing for these,” she said. “We’ve outgrown our space immensely, and it’s time for an up-to-date archives and collections building that we’re hoping to raise money for.”
Video with default Cherokee Phoenix Frame
Cherokee Heritage Center Curator Callie Chunestudy shows a Bowie knife that once belonged to Cherokee Confederate Gen. Stand Watie. The knife is part of the archive collection held by the CHC in Park Hill, Oklahoma. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX The handle of Cherokee Confederate Gen. Stand Watie’s Bowie knife was inscribed with his name before it was given to him as a gift when he was a colonel in the Confederate army. During the American Civil War, Watie rose to rank of brigadier general. He commanded an Indian cavalry unit made up mostly of Cherokee, Muscogee (Creek) and Seminole men and was the only Native American general in the Confederate army. The knife is now held in the Cherokee Heritage Center’s archive collection in Park Hill, Oklahoma. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX A metal safe brought from Georgia to Indian Territory during the Cherokee removal in 1838-1839 is part of the archive collection held by the Cherokee Heritage Center in Park Hill, Oklahoma. During the removal, the safe fell into the Mississippi River but was fished out and eventually made it to Tahlequah, the capital of the Cherokee Nation. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX A metal safe brought from Georgia to Indian Territory during the Cherokee removal in 1838-1839 is part of the Cherokee Heritage Center archive collection in Park Hill, Oklahoma. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Heritage Center Curator Callie Chunestudy shows a Bowie knife that once belonged to Cherokee Confederate Gen. Stand Watie. The knife is part of the archive collection held by the CHC in Park Hill, Oklahoma. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Scott teaches shell jewelry art to further tradition

BY KENLEA HENSON
News Writer
08/16/2017 08:30 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – For more than 40 years, Cherokee National Treasure and Cherokee/Muscogee (Creek) artist Knokovtee Scott has transformed local purple mussel shells into jewelry. To keep the art form alive, he now teaches it at the Cherokee Arts Center.

“My goal is to establish a foundation of students that will get this type of jewelry to grow, and eventually it will be as well recognized as any jewelry from any region of the country,” he said.

The Rose native comes from an artistic family that enriched his life in Cherokee and Muscogee arts at an early age, which made him strive for an art career.

In 1972, while studying Southwest jewelry at the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico, he said he realized that people’s perspective of Native American jewelry was turquoise and silver.

“If you asked anybody there, ‘what was Indian jewelry?’ they’d say turquoise and silver. But what I was always wondering is how come people don’t have anything from the Southeast. Why isn’t our artwork as recognized as the Southwest?” Scott said.
Video with default Cherokee Phoenix Frame
Cherokee National Treasure and Cherokee Nation citizen Knokovtee Scott offers a traditional Cherokee shell jewelry making class at the Cherokee Arts Center in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Scott specializes in shell art, which dates back to the Mississippian period stretching from 800-1500 A.D. KENLEA HENSON/CHEROKEE PHEONIX Cherokee Nation citizen Candice Byrd cuts round pieces out of the Mankiller Pearl shell to shape into beads for jewelry during Knokovtee Scott’s shell jewelry making class at the Cherokee Arts Center in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. KENLEA HENSON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX 

Shell art made by Cherokee/Muscogee (Creek) artist Knokovtee Scott includes decorative gorgets and jewelry. To the left are the purple mussel shells Scott uses to make his art. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee National Treasure and Cherokee Nation citizen Knokovtee Scott offers a traditional Cherokee shell jewelry making class at the Cherokee Arts Center in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Scott specializes in shell art, which dates back to the Mississippian period stretching from 800-1500 A.D. KENLEA HENSON/CHEROKEE PHEONIX

Gonzales showcases interpretive Cherokee art

BY LINDSEY BARK
News Writer
08/09/2017 08:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen Keli Gonzales found joy in art as a child from watching her father and cousins draw and paint. As she grew, she developed her modernized art style using Cherokee culture.

Gonzales recently opened an online store called Keladi, her Cherokee name, to sell prints, original paintings and buttons that are affordable and “accessible” after realizing people wanted to buy her designs.

She said people who know Cherokee culture are intrigued by her drawings because they identify with it. “I think that a lot of people like to see the syllabary on stuff, and they like to own things that…(are) Cherokee-specific items.”

Gonzales incorporates Cherokee syllabary, stories, animals and sports into her art. Her drawing “Anejodi” portrays stickball players vying for a stickball in the air.

“In (the) stickball drawing, I was told that there’s a story about a guy; he cheated in stickball because he picked the ball up with his hands; and you’re not supposed to do that. And he threw the stickball really hard, and it got stuck in the sky and it became the moon. That’s like a reminder to not cheat. So in that drawing, it’s got little…moon bursts because of that story,” Gonzales said.
Cherokee artist Keli Gonzales recently opened an online store called Keladi, her Cherokee name, to sell prints, original paintings and buttons that are affordable and “accessible” after realizing how many people wanted to buy her designs. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Cherokee artist Keli Gonzales displays an original drawing titled “Anejodi” from her sketchbook. The drawing’s inspiration derives from the Cherokee sport of stickball and a story she once heard about stickball. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX This original comic drawn by Keli Gonzales is titled “Nigohilv” (Constant) and features two skeletons stuck in a never-ending conversation with the dialogue in Cherokee. COURTESY This original painting by Keli Gonzales titled “Digvyaluyv” (Pieces) symbolizes a fragmented Cherokee culture with the hope that the “pieces” can one day be reunited. COURTESY Cherokee artist Keli Gonzales designs buttons for sale that can be found at the Spider Gallery in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Shown are “Danawa Usdi” (Little War), left, and “Osdadv (Good). LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee artist Keli Gonzales recently opened an online store called Keladi, her Cherokee name, to sell prints, original paintings and buttons that are affordable and “accessible” after realizing how many people wanted to buy her designs. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

ᏓᎵᏆ, ᎣᎦᎳᎰᎹ. – ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎨᎳ Keli Gonzales ᎠᏲᏟᏃ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ ᎤᎵᏉᏕᎢ ᏗᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᎤᎦᏙᏍᏛᎢ ᎤᏙᏓ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎾᏓᏤᎵᎢ ᏓᎾᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏓᏂᏑᏫᏍᎬᎢ. ᎤᏛᏏᏗᏒᏃ, ᎤᏩᏌᏊ ᎤᏬᎷᏩᏛᎲᎢ ᏧᏟᎶᏍᏙᏗᎢ ᎢᏯᏛᏁᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ.

Gonzales ᎾᏞᎬᏭ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ ᎤᏍᏚᎢᏒᎢ ᎠᏏᎳᏕᏫᏒᎢ ᎠᏓᎾᏅᎢ ᎨᎳᏗ Ꮓ ᎤᏬᏎᏗ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎬᏗ ᏚᏙᎥᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᎾᏗᏅᏗ ᏗᏓᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ, ᎢᎬᏱᎢ ᏧᏑᏫᏒᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎦᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏰᎵᎢ ᏗᎬᏩᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ “ᎠᎯᏓ ᏗᎬᏩᏛᏗ” ᎤᏕᎶᎰᏏ ᏚᎾᏚᎵᎲᎢ ᏧᏩᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ.

ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᏃ ᎠᏂᏏᏴᏫ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᎦᏔᎭ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᏂᏍᏆᏂᎬᏓᏁᎰ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏃᏟᎬᎢ. “ᏂᎨᎵᏍᎬᏃ ᎤᏂᎪᏗ ᏴᏫ ᎤᏂᎸᏉᏙᎢ ᎤᏂᎪᏩᏛᏗᎢ ᏣᎳᎩ ᏕᎪᏪᎸᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎤᏂᎸᏉᏙᎢ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᎤᎾᏤᎵᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ... (ᏥᎩ) ᏣᎳᎩ-ᎤᏤᏟᏓᎭᎢ.”

Gonzales ᏓᏠᏯᏍᏗᏍᎪᎢ ᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᎪᏪᎵ, ᏗᎧᏃᎮᏗ, ᏅᎩ ᏗᏂᏅᏌᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏁᏦᏗ ᎥᎿ ᏓᏟᎶᏍᏗᏍᎬᎢ. ᎤᏤᎵᏃ ᏗᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ “ᎠᏁᏦᏗ” ᎬᏂᎨᏒᎢ ᏂᎬᏁᎭ ᎠᎾᎳᏍᎦᎵᏍᎩ ᎠᎾᏁᏦᏍᎩ ᏓᎾᎵᎪᏂᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᏁᏦᏗ ᎦᏃᎯᎵᏒᎢ.

“ᎥᎿᎾᏂ (ᎾᏍᎩ) ᎠᏁᏦᏗ ᏗᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ, ᎥᎩᏃᎯᏎᎸᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏏᏴᏫ ᎠᏍᎦᏯ ᎤᏂᎬᎮᏗ; ᎤᎶᏄᎮᏢᎢ ᎠᎾᏁᏦᏍᎬᎢ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᎤᏬᏰᏂᏊ ᎬᏗ ᎤᏟᏔᎩᏒᎢ ᎠᏁᏦᏙᏗ: ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎥᏝ ᎥᏍᎩ ᎢᏯᏛᏁᏗ ᏱᎩ. ᎠᎴ ᏍᏓᏱ ᏭᏗᎾᏒᎢ ᎠᏁᏦᏙᏗ, ᎠᎴ ᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᏗᎨᏒᎢ ᎬᏩᎬᏘ ᏫᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏅᏓ ᎤᏒᎢ ᎡᎯ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏁᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᏅᏓᏗᏍᏙᏗ ᎥᏝ ᎦᎶᏄᎮᏗ ᎢᎩ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ Ꮎ ᏗᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᏥᎩ, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏂᎤᏍᏗ ᎤᏍᏗᎢ...ᏅᏓ ᎤᏒᎢ ᎡᎯ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᏦᎩᎭ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎧᏃᎮᏗ,” Gonzales Z ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ.

Gonzales Ꮓ ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎥᏝ ᏳᎸᏉᏙᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ (ᎬᏂ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗ) ᎥᎿ ᏓᏟᎶᏍᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎦᏲᎵᏉ ᎧᏃᎮᏍᎪᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᏁᏟᏙᏗ ᎢᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏔᏅᏍᎬᎢ ᏓᏟᎶᏍᏛᎢ. “ᎠᎩᎸᏉᏙᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᎰᏩᏭᏊ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᎡᎵᏍᏗ ᏥᎨᏐᎢ, ᎢᏳᏃ ᎬᏰᎵᏍᏗ ᏱᎩ.

ᎾᏍᎩᏯᏃ ᏯᏁᏟᏔᏂ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᎰᏩ ᏱᎩ ᎠᏏᏅ ᎤᏣᏘᎾ ᏱᏮᎩᎠ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ. ᎠᎩᎸᏉᏙᎢ ᎠᏆᏁᏟᏙᏗᎢ.”
ᎾᏍᎩᎬ ᏧᏤᎵᎢ ᏧᏑᏫᏒᎢ “ᏗᎬᏯᎷᏴᎢ” (ᏗᎬᏯᎷᎨᎢ) ᎬᏂᎨᏒᎢ ᏂᏛᎬᏁᎲᎢ ᎥᏰᎸᎢ ᏂᏚᏍᏛᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏥᎩ ᏗᎧᏃᏱᎨ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎦᏅᏍᎨ ᎾᏍᎩ Ꮓ ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏥᎩ “ᎧᏁᎢᏍᏗᎭ ᎤᏲᏨᎢ ᏥᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏲᎦᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ” ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ “ᎤᏚᎩᏃ ᎬᏗ ᎠᏮᏐᎢ ᎢᎸᎯᏳᎢ ᏥᎨᏎᏍᏗ ᏌᏉᎢ ᏱᏗᎬᏩᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᎬᏯᎷᎨᎢ.”

Gonzales Ꮓ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᏅᏌᏁᏍᎪᎢ ᎰᏩᏭᏊ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᎠᎾᏛᏁᎵᏍᎩ - ᏗᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᏅᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ Ꮓ ᏧᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᏴᏫ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ. ᎥᏝ Ꮓ ᏱᏓᏁᏟᏗᏍᎪᎢ ᏗᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᎪᏪᎵ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᎾᏍᎩ Ꮎ ᎠᎪᎵᏰᏍᎩ ᎠᏎ ᎤᏩᏌ ᎤᏁᏟᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎯᎵᏒᎢ ᎤᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ.

ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ “ᏂᎪᎯᎸᎢ” (ᏂᎪᎯᎸᎢ) ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎾᏛᏁᎵᏍᎩ ᏥᎩ ᏧᎾ ᎪᎳᎭ ᎠᎾᏟᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎬᏗ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏁᎵᏍᎬᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎦᏛᎬᎢ ᏂᎪᎯᎸᎢ. ᎠᏂᏐᎢᏃ ᎨᏒ, ᎤᏛᎦᏅᏃ ᏄᏍᏛᎢ ᎦᏛᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᏂᎪᎯᎸᎢ ᏂᎬᏩᏍᏗᏗᏒᎢ ᎠᎴᏱᎩ ᎩᎶ ᎥᏝ ᎤᏛᏒᎢ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᎦᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᏔᎵᏁᏃ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎤᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗᎢ.

Gonzales Ꮓ ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᏄᏍᏛᎢ ᏓᏟᎶᏍᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏚᎵᏉᏛᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎾᏛᏁᎵᏍᎩ ᏥᎩ The Simpsons, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎧᏅᎦᎵ ᎠᎴ ᎦᏁᎯ ᏗᏙᏪᎵᏍᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏥᎩ ᏩᎦᏲᏢᎢ. ᎤᎪᏗᏃ ᏧᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᏅᎢ ᏂᏙᏳᏍᏗ ᏧᎵᏏᎩ ᏓᏍᏅᏅᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏧᏍᎪᏍᏗ ᏚᎵᏑᏫᏒᎢ.

“ᏓᎩᎸᏉᏙᎢ ᏧᎵᏑᏫᏓᎭ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᎾᏍᏗ ᏥᎩ The Simpsons ᎠᎴᏱᎩ ᎠᎾᏗᏁᎵᏍᎩᏭ ᎠᏓᏅᏖᏗᎢ. ᏓᎩᎸᏉᏙᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏊ ᏧᎵᏍᏓᏅᏂ ᏕᎦᏕᏱᏍᏛᎢ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ... (ᎠᎾᏛᏁᎵᏍᎩ) ᏙᏧᏓᎴᏅᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᏗᏆᏟᎶᏍᏙᏗᎢ, ᏧᏍᎪᏍᏗ ᏧᎵᏑᏣᏓ ᎠᎴ ᏧᎵᏏᎩ ᏧᎵᏍᏔᏅᏂ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.
Gonzales ᏃᏍᏊ ᏓᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᏍᎬᎢ ᏚᎸᏉᏙᎢ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᎾᏟᎶᏍᏗᏍᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᎾᏍᏗ Dan HorseChief, Roy Boney Jr. ᎠᎴ Joseph Erb ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᎾᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᎬᏂᎨᏒᎢ ᏂᎬᏁᎰᎢ “ᎪᎯᏴᎢ ᏥᎩ ᏥᏄᏍᏗᏓᏂ.”

ᏄᏍᏛᎢ ᎦᏓᏅᏖᏍᎬᎢ ᏂᎪᎯᎸᎢ ᏅᏁᎯᏯᎢ ᏗᎾᏟᎶᏍᏗᏍᎩ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᎤᏤᏟᏓ... ᎾᏍᎩ ᏳᏍᏗ ᎥᏍᎩᏓᏍᎬᎢᏗᎦᏂᏱᏍᎩ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ ᏂᎪᎯᎸᏃ ᏂᏥᏪᏍᎪᎢ ᎥᏝ ᎢᎸᎯᏳᎢ ᏗᎨᏥᎢᎸᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᏅᏃᎯ ᏚᎾᏠᎯᎢ ᎠᏑᏫᏒᎢ ᎤᎪᏙᏃ ᎾᏊ. ᎥᏝᏃ ᏯᏆᏚᎵᎰᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏆᎦᏎᏍᏙᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏄᏲᎢᏳᎢ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅᏅᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅᎢ, ᎣᎩᎦᏛᎴᏒᎢ. ᏙᎩᎾᏗᏫᏒᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎣᎩᏍᏆᏛᎢ. ᎣᎦᏟᏂᎩᏓ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏱᎬᏩᎵᏍᏔᏅ. ᎠᎩᎸᏉᏙᎢᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᏂᎨᏒᎢ ᎢᏯᏋᏁᏗᎢ ᎢᏤᎢ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎪᏙᎢ ᏃᏣᏛᏁᎭ ᎠᎴ ᏓᏤᏝ ᏃᏣᏛᏁᎭ.”

Gonzales Z ᎤᏁᏎᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏚᏍᏆᏛᎢ ᎪᏪᎵ ᎤᏁᏎᎢ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ ᎤᏴᏢᎢᎧᎸᎬᎢ ᏩᎦᎸᎳᏗᎬᎢ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏚᎩ ᎤᏌᏐᎢ ᎤᏁᏉᎢᏍᏗᎢ ᏓᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎲᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᏖᎳᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᏗᎾᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎲᏍᎩ ᎬᏂᎨᏒᎢ ᏂᏓᏅᏁᎲᎢ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᏚᎾᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ, ᎤᏖᎳᏗᏍᏗᎢ ᏗᎾᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎲᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏅᏔᏅᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎤᎪᏗ ᏄᏍᏛᎢ ᎠᏱᏙᎳᏛᎢ-ᏓᏂᎴᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎴᏅᏗᎢ ᏕᎦᎾᏕᏴᎢ ᏧᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᎥᎿ ᏗᎿᏬᎢ.

– Translated by David Crawler

http://cherokee.org/About-The-Nation/National-Holiday

Cherokee Phoenix to print its first Cherokee-written stories

BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
08/08/2017 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation’s Language Program is teaming up with the Cherokee Phoenix to offer readers a look at some of the first stories printed in the Cherokee language when the newspaper began publishing in 1828.

“A lot of people, when they talk about the Cherokee Phoenix they say that it was printed in English and Cherokee, but a lot of people don’t realize that it wasn’t a straight translation,” Roy Boney, Language Program manager, said. “So what was in English wasn’t in Cherokee. It was different content for different readers. So most of that stuff hasn’t ever been translated, or if it has, it’s been a real long time since anyone has ever actually read what it was.”

The idea stemmed from Translator David Crawler reading some of the paper’s old articles.

“At times when we’re not doing so much translations, I read them and thought, ‘these are real interesting,’” he said. “Well, some of the stories in there I thought was kind of funny, and then some of them were kind of serious talk. And I thought, ‘there’s nobody living today that’s actually read this piece,’ and I thought it would be good to maybe put that back into the Phoenix today so people would know what was going on back then.”

Brandon Scott, Cherokee Phoenix executive editor, said when he was approached about the project he “didn’t hesitate” to say yes.
David Crawler, a translator for the Cherokee Nation’s Language Program, works on a project with the Cherokee Phoenix that will feature translated Cherokee stories from the paper’s beginning in 1828. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
David Crawler, a translator for the Cherokee Nation’s Language Program, works on a project with the Cherokee Phoenix that will feature translated Cherokee stories from the paper’s beginning in 1828. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Cherokee Heritage Center hosts ‘Return from Exile’ print action

BY ROGER GRAHAM
Multimedia Producer – @cp_rgraham
08/04/2017 08:15 AM
PARK HILL, Okla. – The Cherokee Heritage Center hosted its first on-site print action and gallery tour on July 29, using artists who have work in the traveling “Return from Exile” Native American contemporary art exhibit, which opened May 13 at the CHC and ends Aug. 11.

“A print action is an event that you can attend where artists are screen-printing live,” CHC Curator Callie Chunestudy. “So you can bring items such as shirts or tote bags and they’ll print on those for you or we’ll be giving out paper prints of the images they’ve designed for us today.”

Participating artists were Bobby C. Martin (Muscogee Creek), Tony Tiger (Sac and Fox/Seminole), Margaret Roach Wheeler (Chickasaw/Choctaw), as well as Cherokee artists Toneh Chuleewah, Demos Glass and Roy Boney.

“It’s a chance for patrons to come out and meet the artists of the exhibit whose works they’ve seen over the summer. We’re also giving out free prints so it’s an opportunity for free art and to learn more about contemporary Native American art,” Chunestudy added.

Boney said he was proud to be a part of the traveling exhibit. “The ‘Return from Exile’ show has traveled across the country and features contemporary art of Southeastern tribal artists.”
Video with default Cherokee Phoenix Frame
Sac and Fox citizen and artist Tony Tiger displays work he created for the “Return from Exile” print action on July 29 at the Cherokee Heritage Center in Park Hill, Oklahoma. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Cherokee Heritage Center Curator Callie Chunestudy assists artists participating in the “Return from Exile” print action held July 29 at the CHC in Park Hill, Oklahoma. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Sac and Fox citizen and artist Tony Tiger displays work he created for the “Return from Exile” print action on July 29 at the Cherokee Heritage Center in Park Hill, Oklahoma. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
https://www.facebook.com/ScissorCutArtByTana/

Washington uses art as refuge from hardships

BY KENLEA HENSON
News Writer
08/02/2017 09:00 AM
SILOAM SPRINGS, Ark. – From a young age in Muskogee, Oklahoma, Cherokee Nation citizen Tana Washington always had a passion for art.

“I’ve been interested in art all my life. My dad was really good friends with Cherokee artists, so I remember being around that art all the time,” she said. “I also took art classes in school and entered art shows when I was kid, but I really just did it for fun.”

When Washington fell on hard times with her son’s death and an injury to her back that prevented her from working, art became her refuge.

“I lost my son in 2000, so I started drawing then for therapy. I probably didn’t take it seriously until four years ago though. I hurt my back, and I wasn’t able to work anymore, so I had the time to sit down and start creating,” she said.

With that free time, Washington wanted to stay productive. Her sister challenged her to create a piece of art every day as part of what she called “25 days of Christmas.”
Scissor-cut artist and Cherokee Nation citizen Tana Washington stands next to her award-winning artwork. Washington recently donated a clay mask and a scissor-cut print to the Cherokee Phoenix for its third-quarter drawing, which will take place on Oct 2. COURTESY  Cherokee artist Tana Washington recently donated this clay mask to the Cherokee Phoenix for its Oct. 2 giveaway. KENLEA HENSON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Cherokee artist Tana Washington recently donated this scissor-cut print to the Cherokee Phoenix for its quarterly drawing that will take place on Oct. 2. KENLEA HENSON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Scissor-cut artist and Cherokee Nation citizen Tana Washington stands next to her award-winning artwork. Washington recently donated a clay mask and a scissor-cut print to the Cherokee Phoenix for its third-quarter drawing, which will take place on Oct 2. COURTESY

Career Services hosts first youth cultural day

BY LINDSEY BARK
News Writer
07/26/2017 12:00 PM
PARK HILL, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation’s Career Services hosted the first Summer Youth Cultural Day for participants in its Summer Youth Employment Program on July 21 at the Cherokee Heritage Center.

Around 330 participants attended the event, taking tours of the Diligwa Village, Cherokee National Museum and Adam’s Corner Rural Village. Participants also played ancient Cherokee games such as stickball, marbles and chunkey; used blowguns and bow and arrows; and made small pinch pots, cornhusk dolls and mini stickball sticks for Make and Take projects.

The participants were divided into 11 groups, and from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. took turns rotating to different stations set up across the CHC grounds. Despite the heat, officials deemed the event successful.

“This is from our summer (employment) youth program. It’s our work program. They work for eight weeks, and we just incorporate this as part of it,” Jeff Vance, Career Services Director of Employment, said.

The Summer Youth Cultural Day is the first for the program. Career Services has hosted a Career Day for the past 10 years but opted for a cultural day this year.
Around 330 participants in the Cherokee Nation’s Summer Youth Employment Program gather for a photo in front of the Cherokee National Museum entrance at the first Summer Youth Cultural Day hosted by Career Services on July 21 in Park Hill, Oklahoma. More than 720 youth, ages 16 to 24, signed up for this year’s program. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Summer Youth Employment Program participants learn to play the ancient Cherokee game of chunkey at the at the first Summer Youth Cultural Day hosted by Career Services on July 21 at the Cherokee Heritage Center in Park Hill, Oklahoma. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Summer Youth Employment Program participants learn to make cornhusk dolls from Taleah Stand, center, at the first Summer Youth Cultural Day hosted by Career Services on July 21 at the Cherokee Heritage Center in Park Hill, Oklahoma. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Around 330 participants in the Cherokee Nation’s Summer Youth Employment Program gather for a photo in front of the Cherokee National Museum entrance at the first Summer Youth Cultural Day hosted by Career Services on July 21 in Park Hill, Oklahoma. More than 720 youth, ages 16 to 24, signed up for this year’s program. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

ᎠᏭᏂᏴᏍᏗ, ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ – ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᏗᏂᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ ᎤᏂᏍᏆᎸᎡᎸ ᎢᎬᏱ ᎪᎦ ᎨᎳ ᏗᎾᏛᏍᎩ ᏂᏧᎵᏍᏓᏅᏍᏔᏅ ᎢᎦ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏁᏙᎯ ᎾᎿ ᎪᎦ ᎬᎳ ᏗᎾᏛᏍᎩ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ ᎾᎿ ᎫᏰᏉᏂ ᏔᎵᏍᎪ ᏌᏊᎯᏁ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᏧᎾᏓᎴᏅ ᎠᏰᏟ.

ᏯᏛᎾ ᏦᎢᏧᏈ ᏦᏍᎪᎯ ᏯᏂ ᎤᎾᏖᎳᏛ ᎤᏁᏙᎸ ᎯᎠ ᎠᏍᏆᎵᏍᎬᎢ, ᎠᏂᎶᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᏗᎵᏆ ᎤᏍᏓ ᎦᏚᎲᎢ, ᏣᎳᎩ ᎬᎾᏕᎾ ᎤᏪᏘ ᎠᏍᏆᏂᎦᎪᏛᏅᎲᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏓᏫ ᎤᏅᏏᏗᏍᏛ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎦᏚᎲ. ᎠᏂᎦᏕᏃᎵᏙ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏓᎾᏁᎶᎲᏍᎪ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏪᏘ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏧᎾᏁᎶᏗ ᏯᏛᎾ ᎠᎾᎳᏍᎦᎵᏍᎬ, ᏗᎦᏓᏲᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ chunkey; ᏃᎴᏍᏊ ᏚᏇᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎦᎵᏣᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎦᏟᏓ; ᎠᎴ ᏚᏃᏢᏅ ᏧᏍᏗ ᎦᏓᎫᎫ, ᏎᎷ ᎤᏄᎶᏔᏅ ᏗᎪᏢᏔᏅ ᏗᏁᎶᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏧᏍᏗ ᏗᎳᏍᎦᎸᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏱᎪᏢᏅ ᎠᏫᏛᏓ.

ᎯᎠ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᎲᏍᎩᎨᎦᏗᎦᎴᏴ ᏌᏚ ᎢᏧᎾᏓᏡᎬ ᏂᏚᏅᏁᎸ, ᎠᎴ ᏂᏛᏁᎵᏍᎩ ᏐᏁᎳ ᏌᎾᎴ ᎾᎿ ᏅᎩ ᎢᎪᎯᏓ ᏒᎯᏱᏯ. ᏓᎾᏓᏁᏟᏴᏎᎬ ᎾᎿ ᏄᏓᎴ ᏧᏃᏢᏒ ᏩᏂᎷᎬ ᎾᎿ ᏗᎦᎾᏗᏫᏍᏗ CHC ᎦᏙᎢ.

ᏁᎳᎩ ᏄᏗᏢᎬᎢ, ᏗᎾᏓᏘᏂᏙ Ꮭ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᏯᏁᎵᏍᎦ ᏄᏗᏝᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏓᎾᏁᎶᎲᏍᎬ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅᎩ.

“ᎯᎢᎾ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎪᎦ (ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ) ᎨᎳ ᏗᎾᏛᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ. ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᎣᎩᎭ ᎣᎦᏙᏢᎯ. ᏚᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎰ ᏧᏁᎳ ᎢᏳᎾᏙᏓᏆᏍᏗ, ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᎣᏣᏠᏯᏍᏗᏍᎪᎢ,” ᎢᎬᏩᎾᏛᏗ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎨᏒᎢ ᏗᏎᎮᎯ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎯᎠ Jeff Vance ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᎪᎦ ᎨᎳ ᏗᎾᏛᏍᎩ ᏗᎩᎶᏒ ᎢᎦᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᎢᎪᎯ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎬᏱ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏃᏪᎸᎢ. ᎢᎬᏩᎾᏛᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎢᎦ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎬᏱ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎤᏙᏢᎯ. ᎢᎬᏩᎾᏛᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏍᏆᎵᏗᏍᎪ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᏯᎾᏛᏁᎯ ᎢᎪᎯ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏍᎪᎯ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎾᎪᎯᎸ ᎾᏍᏊ ᏂᏧᎾᏛᏁᎸᏍᏔᏅ ᎢᎪᎯ ᎯᎠ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏌᏓ.

Vance ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᏧᎪᏓ ᏓᏙᏢᏍᎪ ᎬᏩᎾᏖᎳᏗᏍᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎾᎿ ᏧᎾᏛᏒ ᏂᎦᏒᎾ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏂᎪᎲ ᏂᎦᏒᎾ ᎤᎪᏛ “ᏣᎳᎩ ᎤᎳᏂᏓᏍᏗ ᎨᏒᎢ.”

“ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᎠᏉᎯᏳ ᎦᏓᏅᏖᏍᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᏂᎦᏯᎢᏎᏍᏗ ᏛᏛᏏ. ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏠᏯᏍᏗ ᎯᎠ ᎤᏙᏢᎯ, ᎠᎴ ᎤᏠᏯᏍᏗ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ. ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏗᎾᏓᏘᏂᏙᎯ, ᏗᏂᎳᏫᎩᏅ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᏭᎵᏍᎨᏗᏴᎢ ᎯᎠ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ Vance.

ᎾᏍᎩ SYEP ᎾᎿ ᎤᏙᏢᎯ ᎾᎿ ᎢᎸᏍᎩ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎵᏍᎪᎸᏗᏍᎪ ᎤᎾᏖᎳᏗᏍᏗ, ᎢᏧᎾᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᏓᎳᏚ ᎾᎿ ᏔᎵᏍᎪ ᏅᎩ ᎢᏍᏗ, ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎠᏜᏅᏓᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᎿ ᎪᎦ ᎨᏒ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏕᎳ ᎬᏩᏂᏩᏛᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᎤᎾᏛᏁᏗᎢ ᎤᎾᏚᎵᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᎤᎾᏚᎵᏍᎬᎢ.

ᎯᎠ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏌᏛ ᎤᎪᏛ ᎾᏃ 720 ᎤᎾᏖᎳᏛ ᎯᎠ ᎤᏙᏢᏒᎢ, ᎠᎴ Isaacs ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏭᏂᎪᏛᎢ ᎤᎾᏓᏡᎦ ᎯᎠ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ ᎤᏂᎷᏨᎢ.

Jonathan Crittenden, ᎢᎬᏩᎾᏛᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎢᎦ ᎠᎾᎵᏏᎾᎲᏗᏍᎩ ᏗᏓᏘᏂᏙᎯ, ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏂᏃᎮᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏄᎾᏛᏁᎸ ᎾᎯᏳ ᎢᎦ ᎠᎴ “ᎣᏍᏓ” ᎨᏒᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎤᎾᏖᎳᏛ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎾᏛᏁᎰ ᎠᎴ “ᎤᏍᏆᏂᎪᏓ ᎤᏂᏱᎸᏒ” ᎾᎿ ᎾᎾᏛᏁᎲᎢ.

ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ ᎠᏓᎴᏂ ᎪᏪᎵ ᏓᏂᏁᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ SYEP ᎾᎿ ᎪᎨᏯ ᏥᏓᏯᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏧᏂᏁᏗ ᎠᏁᎳ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎤᏂᎶᏒ ᏄᏍᏛ ᎨᏥᏁᏤᎲᎢ, ᎾᎿ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᏂᎬᎾᏛ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎠᏟᎶᎥᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏧᏂᎳ ᎢᏳᎾᏙᏓᏆᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎪᎦ ᎨᏒᎢ.

“ᎣᏍᏓ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ. ᎨᎵᎠ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏬᏌᏂᏴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏥᎪᏢ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎨᏒ ᏥᎦᏓᏡᎦ, ᏕᏙᏢᏍᎪᎢ. ᎠᏎᏃ ᏙᏤᏲᎲᏍᎪ ᎨᎳ ᏗᎾᏛᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᏙᏥᏍᏕᎵᏍᎪ ᎯᎠ ᎨᏒᎢ, ᎢᎦᏃ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Isaacs.

Cherokee Heritage Center opens archives exhibit Aug. 14

BY ROGER GRAHAM
Multimedia Producer – @cp_rgraham
07/20/2017 09:00 AM
PARK HILL, Okla. – The Cherokee Heritage Center’s “Preserving Cherokee Culture: Holding the Past for the Future” exhibit will run from Aug. 14-19 and features nearly 50 historical artifacts.

Included in the exhibit are Gen. Stand Watie’s bowie knife, an 1866 handwritten draft of the Reconstruction Act between the U.S. government and the Cherokee Nation, stone and shell artifacts, photographs of notable Cherokees and portions of the CHC’s basket collection.

CHC Curator Callie Chunestudy said the Cherokee National Archives has more than 40,000 items in collections and 200,000 items in its archives dating back to pre-European contact.

“Our building was built in 1972 and was originally designed just as a museum,” Chunestudy said. “Throughout time we have developed into the premier cultural center for Cherokee history, culture and the arts, and with that evolution came immense growth. We are now at a point where we have to update and expand our facilities to accommodate our archives and ensure that these items remain available to preserve, promote and teach Cherokee culture for generations to come.”

CHC Archivist Jerry Thompson said the exhibit would showcase items most patrons never see.
An amber-type photo taken of Cherokee Stand Watie between 1847-50, more than a decade before Watie rose to the rank of brigadier general during America’s Civil War, will be on display Aug. 14–19 at the Cherokee Heritage Center’s “Preserving Cherokee Culture: Holding the Past for the Future” exhibit in Park Hill, Oklahoma. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
An amber-type photo taken of Cherokee Stand Watie between 1847-50, more than a decade before Watie rose to the rank of brigadier general during America’s Civil War, will be on display Aug. 14–19 at the Cherokee Heritage Center’s “Preserving Cherokee Culture: Holding the Past for the Future” exhibit in Park Hill, Oklahoma. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Culture

Cherokee National Holiday quilt show seeks entries
BY KENLEA HENSON
News Writer
07/18/2017 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee National Holiday quilt show coordinators are seeking entries for the annual event, which is set for 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sept. 1-2 and 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Sept. 3 in Sequoyah High School’s old gym.

The show began in the 1980s, and the Cherokee Nation sponsors it annually as part of the holiday.

Tammy Bigfeather, quilt show coordinator, took over the show’s coordination in 2016 and said more has been added to it than previous years.

“We have added a lot of fun and exciting things. We are now having demonstrations over quilting techniques and quilting crafts,” she said. “We have also added new categories to the quilt show for people to exhibit in.”

The show now has 18 categories, 17 of which requiring quilts to be made within the past five years. The “Quilts of the Past” category requires quilts to have been made from July 1998 to July 2012. All categories will receive first-, second- and third-place ribbons, on which viewers vote.

“We invite people to come out and help us determine the 2017 winners,” Bigfeather said. “Admission is free, and you get to enjoy some cool air while shopping and taking in the beauty of many different quilts and techniques.”

There will also be additional awards, including “Best of Show-Grand Prize,” “Chief’s Choice,” “Deputy Chief’s Choice,” “Chief’s Wife’s Choice,” “Deputy Chief’s Wife’s Choice” and the “Vintage Award.” The show’s committee will vote on the “Vintage Award,” which must be a quilt made before 1998.

In addition to the new categories and awards, the show will have vendors and quilting demonstrations for those interested from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Sept. 2 in the old gym.

“We hope everyone will join us for an afternoon quilting friends, fellowship and shopping,” Bigfeather said. “Our vendors will supply us with a wide variety of quilting fabrics and products.”

Betty Kirk, of Stilwell, entered the 2016 quilt show for her granddaughter with the quilt titled, “The Life of Christ.” It took Kirk nine months to complete its blocks and a year to complete the whole quilt.

“I took pages from Christian coloring books and traced it onto fabric and started embroidering away. I worked on it in my free time – on lunch breaks, after work and on weekends,” Kirk said. “Sewing is relaxing to me, but I wanted to make a quilt that is one of a kind and that is about something I believe in.”

For quilters like Kirk, the show is about showcasing their works and encouraging others to keep that tradition alive.

“I don’t think very many people are still quilting,” she said. “I am teaching my granddaughter to quilt so we can keep it going, and I am hoping she will enter hers this year, too.”

The quilt show is a free to enter, open to all ages and non-Native Americans are welcome. The application deadline is Aug. 25, but committee members ask that applications be sent in as early as possible.

For more information, call Bigfeather at 918-453-5536 or email tammy-bigfeather@cherokee.org. Entry forms can also be found on www.cherokee.org under the Cherokee National Holiday tab.

Quilt Show Categories

Quilts made within the last five years (July 2012 to July 2017).

Exception: Category 1200 – “Quilts of the Past” - Made between July 1998 to July 2012.

100-Hand Pieced/Hand Quilted

200-Hand Pieced/Machine Quilted

300-Machine Pieced/Hand Quilted

400-Machine Pieced/Machine Quilted

500-Mixed Technique

600-Specialty Technique

700-T-shirt

800-Embroidered 75% with piecework

900-Appliqued 75% with piecework

1000-Paper Pieced

1100-Baby Quilt

1200-Quilts of the Past: 6-19 yr. old quilts

1300-Youth Quilt-17 yrs. old and younger

1400-Youth Quilting Projects (under 12)

1500-Youth Quilting Projects (13-17)

1600-Wall Hanging

1700-Purse or Clothing

1800-Miscellaneous items

Vintage Award: Made before July 1998

Education

NSU Alumni Association honors 2 Cherokees
BY STAFF REPORTS
08/14/2017 12:00 PM
TAHELQUAH, Okla. – The Northeastern State University Alumni Association board of directors has chosen two Cherokee Nation citizens as 2017 honorees of the university’s Distinguished Alumnus awards.

CN Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden and Julie Erb-Alvarez were selected as distinguished alumni and will receive their honors on Sept. 29 at the Alumni Association Honors Dinner and again Sept. 30 at the homecoming Emerald Ball. Both events are open to the public.

Awards are presented annually to NSU alumni who, through personal achievement and service, have brought honor and distinction to both themselves and the university, a NSU release states.

Crittenden graduated from NSU in 1974 with a bachelor’s degree in accounting and business administration. Crittenden has previously served on the Tribal Council, as the Eastern Oklahoma vice president for the National Congress of American Indians and as a U.S. Postal Service postmaster. He is also a Navy veteran.

“It is an honor to receive this award from Northeastern State University,” Crittenden said. “It has been 43 years since I graduated from the university, and I still wear my gold NSU class ring every single day. I was an atypical college student, returning to school after serving in the U.S. Navy during Vietnam. However, I was blessed to receive an excellent education at NSU, and what I learned there helped guide me on a long career of public service.”

Crittenden has given back to NSU by supporting the tribe’s efforts to restore Seminary Hall and install modern classroom technologies. He also offers support and advice to youth in their pursuit of higher-education opportunities.

“I am proud to say I am an alum of a school that is so committed to Native students and developing leaders for Indian Country,” Crittenden said. “Cherokee Nation and NSU have established one of the most unique and successful collaborations between a tribal government and public higher education institution.”

NSU President Dr. Steve Turner said Crittenden was extraordinarily qualified to be recognized as a distinguished alumnus.

“His career path is highlighted by many years of service to the Cherokee Nation and to our country. I am so excited for Joe and his family and am honored to call him friend,” Turner said.

Erb-Alvarez is a distinguished epidemiologist and chief of patient recruitment for the National Institutes of Health’s National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute who graduated from NSU in 1993 with a bachelor’s degree in health and human performance.

She continued her education at the University of Oklahoma, earning a master’s degree in epidemiology. She has served as an epidemiologist for the Oklahoma Tribal Epidemiology Center, the Indian Health Service and the Bureau of Public Health, Ministry of Health in the Republic of Palau.

Erb-Alvarez was commissioned into the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps in 2010 and was deployed to Monrovia, Liberia in response to the Ebola crisis in West Africa in 2014-15. She is a life member of the NSU Alumni Association.

“I was truly honored when I received the call from NSU President Steve Turner. I was completely surprised and really excited when he told me I had been selected as one of the 2017 Distinguished Alumni. And then when explained who the other honorees were, it instilled another sense of pride and emotion. I am deeply grateful for this honor, and am completely humbled with the company I now keep, with those who are also being honored this year and those who have been honored in the past,” she said. “I look forward to NSU Homecoming Weekend in September when I can come back to my beloved alma mater and experience NSU all these many years later. I can’t wait to talk with students, educators, other professionals and friends – those who helped build my education – and share my post-graduation career and life experiences. I want them all to know and understand how much NSU has given me. I had a very solid foundation thanks to my years at NSU. It was easy for me to find my way and excel after an educational experience like that. Both of my parents are NSU graduates, and I was born while my parents were students and living at NSU married student housing. I have a long, long and wonderful history with NSU. The fact that NSU began as a Cherokee Seminary gives it all the more meaning to me as a Cherokee citizen.”

Turner said Erb-Alvarez has amassed an outstanding list of accomplishments since her time at NSU.”

“Her commitment to preserving the health of the nation and serving others through the National Institute of Health and the United States Public Health Service is admirable and makes her more than deserving of this honor,” he said.

Council

Dobbins takes aim at improving health care
BY LINDSEY BARK
News Writer
08/17/2017 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Dr. Mike Dobbins, of Fort Gibson, said he’s ready to serve his first term as the Dist. 4 Tribal Councilor and looks to improve the Cherokee Nation’s health care system.

Dobbins will take his councilor seat with 37 years of experience in health care, practicing dentistry for 20 of those years.

“I chose to run because from a distance I’ve become quite familiar with the Cherokee health system, and there are some great things about it. The framework’s in place…and a lot of good has transpired. With my experience I feel like I can lend some expertise to help improve the system. That was my primary motive in running for council...to see what I could do to improve the health care system,” Dobbins said.

He said he has more to learn about the CN Health Services and how it functions on a daily basis.

Dobbins is also involved in higher education, teaching at dental schools for the past 17 years and assisting Cherokee students interested in health care.

“I’ve assisted multiple Cherokee students with scholarship opportunities, not only with Cherokee scholarships, but with other Native American scholarships and try to help them go through college with little-to-no debt as possible,” he said.

He said in Dist. 4, he’s also heard concerns from CN citizens about housing issues.

“I’m also knowledgeable of the fact that there’s a lot of other Cherokee needs (including) infrastructure, housing, elder care. I’m also sensitive to those areas as well. I plan to be a multi-purpose councilman,” Dobbins said. “I’m on the outside right now, but I intend to see (and) get familiarized with the housing program and make sure that citizens of District 4 are considered for any housing possibilities.”

The 2017 Tribal Council election was Dobbins’ second attempt at becoming a CN legislator. He said he learned from his “mistakes” four years ago and that it was a “less stressful” campaign this time around.

“I ran four years ago and lost by two (votes) to an 18-year incumbent,” he said. “You learn by experience, and I enlisted more help, actually, this time. I tried to do a lot of myself four years ago. I’d say…most importantly I learned what not to do rather than what to do.”

Dobbins said he has an obligation to serve not only the CN citizens who helped or voted for him, but also those who did not.

“I’m their councilman now, and I feel a deep debt of obligation to fulfill that duty,” he said. “I just look forward to serving the Cherokee people on the council. I do have a busy schedule but I feel like I will be accessible. I have a busy schedule outside my councilman responsibilities, but my councilman responsibility will be my priority.”

Health

Casting for Recovery to hold retreat for Native women with breast cancer
BY STAFF REPORTS
08/08/2017 04:00 PM
AUSTIN, Texas – Casting for Recovery, a national nonprofit organization providing free fly fishing retreats for women with breast cancer, will hold a retreat exclusively for Native American women in October in Tahlequah, Oklahoma.

Set for Oct. 13-15, Native American women who reside in Oklahoma and have received a breast cancer diagnosis are eligible to apply. Up to 14 women will be randomly selected to attend the retreat at no cost. Meals, lodging, equipment and supplies will be provided for each participant. The deadline to apply is Aug. 11.

CfR officials said Native American women face numerous cultural and economic barriers to cancer care. By providing support, education and resources, CfR officials said they hope to improve the quality of life for Native American women, creating a ripple effect for health in their communities.

CfR officials said the program empowers women with educational resources, a new support group and fly fishing, which promotes emotional, physical, and spiritual healing. For more information or to apply for this retreat, visit https://castingforrecovery.org/breast-cancer-retreats/arkansas-oklahoma/ or call Susan Gaetz at 512-940-0246.

CfR is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit founded in 1996 featuring a program that combines breast cancer education and peer support with the therapeutic sport of fly fishing. Officials said its retreats offer opportunities for women to find inspiration, discover renewed energy for life and experience healing connections with other women and nature. CfR’s retreats are open to women of all ages, all stages of breast cancer treatment and recovery, and are free to participants.

?For more information, visit https://castingforrecovery.org.

Opinion

OPINION: Environmental efforts ensure fresh water, better future
BY BILL JOHN BAKER
Principal Chief
08/01/2017 12:00 PM
Protecting the environment and practicing conservation principles have always been important to the Cherokee people. It’s fitting that the 65th annual Cherokee National Holiday theme is “Water is Sacred.” It is something that resonates with all of us as Cherokees. Water is sacred to our people and has been forever. Water has been part of our ceremonies. Water has sustained us with food and an ability to grow our crops. Water is something we share and celebrate with our families. Our close relationship to water, the land and the traditional knowledge about our natural surroundings has always been part of who we are. Cherokee values and these historic ideas, established over multiple generations, about ecological preservation benefit all of northeast Oklahoma.

Over the past year, Cherokee Nation has put a focused effort to preserve water rights and natural resources. We have been active within our 14 counties and across Indian Country when it comes to conservation of our water. CN established the office of the secretary of Natural Resources to address a various environmental issues. Secretary Sara Hill oversees the programs and services related to preservation and conservation of our air, land, water and animal and plant life.

As a tribal government, and as Cherokees, we have a responsibility to protect the water we drink, the air we breathe, and the land we live on. We will unequivocally fight for the rights of our people to live safely in their communities. We have a right and a responsibility to protect our water. It is our duty for the next seven generations.

An excellent example of our renewed conservation efforts was a recent federal court decision naming CN the court-appointed steward of restoration efforts of Saline Creek in Mayes County. David Benham, a CN citizen originally from the Kenwood area and a property owner along the creek bank, personally sued Ozark Materials River Rock for the extreme damage done to the water. The company, which will pay for the restoration effort, mined at the foot of the creek, removing the gravel at the lower reaches. Erosion upstream redirected the creek and eroded vegetation, which in turn increased stream temperature and algae growth.

It is appropriate that the court appointed CN as the steward of Saline Creek and will manage the recovery of the damaged areas and easement. Saline Creek has spiritual as well as historical significance to CN citizens in that area. Additionally, it is one of the most beautiful creeks in northeast Oklahoma.

Earlier this year, Secretary Hill’s team defended the Arkansas and Illinois rivers, as CN played a critical role in preventing Sequoyah Fuels Corporation from disposing radioactive waste near important waterways. We are working with the company to find appropriate off-site disposal.

Recently, the tribe also earned a $75,000 grant from the Environmental Protection Agency that will help support the critical environmental work that we do at the local level. The partnership between CN and the EPA benefits our people, our environmental endeavors, and the health and beauty of northeast Oklahoma.

Together with the EPA’s federal dollars, we can sustain the environmental protection efforts that preserve our clean air, healthy land and fresh water. The CN created a five-person board, the Environmental Protection Commission, which works with Secretary Hill to help the tribe administer its environmental programs and develop community and education programs.

The CN is also a founding member of the Inter-Tribal Environmental Council, an organization that helps protect the health of Native Americans, tribal natural resources and the environment. This tribal organization was created to provide support, technical assistance, program development and training to member tribes nationwide. Today, almost 50 tribal governments are members and share best practices.

Our tribal government strives to build a better future for our people and fights for the rights of our people to live safely in their communities. Protecting the environment through CN’s active and progressive conservation programs is one of the most important things we can do to ensure we achieve that goal.

People

Flag football combine has large Native turnout
BY ROGER GRAHAM
Multimedia Producer – @cp_rgraham
08/17/2017 08:30 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Approximately 70 youths in first through fourth grades were athletically evaluated on Aug. 12 at the Boys and Girls Club of Tahlequah’s flag football combine held on the infield of Tahlequah High School’s track.

Testing included speed evaluations, route running as well as passing and catching a football.

Boys and Girls Club of Tahlequah CEO Dennis Kelley said the combine testing is crucial to selecting evenly matched league teams.

“It’s for all kids across the county. You don’t have to be a Boys & Girls Club member. We have 13 clubs throughout Cherokee County in almost every school except Hulbert and Shady Grove. Our club stats for Cherokee County show we’re at about 70 percent Native American. So anyone who wants to sign up can. Boys and girls are welcome.”

Kelley said the fee for joining is $45.

“We try to keep it as low as we can. Plus, if someone can’t afford it, we try to scholarship them in. Cherokee Nation helps us with some money throughout the year, so we try to use that money for scholarships for kids who can’t afford to pay,” he said.

Cherokee Nation citizen Julie Deerinwater Anderson said bringing her son to try out was a mutual decision.

“I brought my son out today because he was very interested in flag football. It’s an opportunity for him to be a part of a team. Plus it’s his first year, so he can learn some skills without the risk of tackle football,” she said. “It’s healthy and it’s outside. It’s important to me that my son has healthy options.”

For more information, call the Boys and Girls Club of Tahlequah at 918-456-6888.
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