Cherokee Phoenix calls for 2018 homecoming T-shirt concepts

BY TRAVIS SNELL
Assistant Editor – @cp_tsnell
06/25/2017 10:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – With its 2017 annual homecoming T-shirt now for sale, the Cherokee Phoenix is calling for Cherokee artists to submit design concepts for the news organization’s 2018 T-shirt.

In 2016, the Cherokee Phoenix staff introduced a T-shirt to differ from the tribe’s Cherokee National Holiday T-shirt. Phoenix staff members contracted with artist Buffalo Gouge for the shirt’s initial design.

For this year’s homecoming shirt, Phoenix staff members selected Daniel HorseChief’s concept out of approximately 10 designs from artists. The Cherokee Phoenix then contracted with HorseChief to create the 2017 shirt.

HorseChief said his concept comes from a four-panel painting that features Selu, the Corn Mother in Cherokee lore.

The image shows the bust of Selu, who is looking down into a Southeastern art pattern. Behind her on the left side are seven ears of corn with water under it. Behind her on the opposite side is a phoenix with fire below it. Above the phoenix is the Cherokee seven-pointed star. Above the image, written in Cherokee, are the words “Cherokee Phoenix.” Below the image, in English, is “2017 CHEROKEE HOMECOMING.”
Cherokee artist Daniel HorseChief’s Selu, or Corn Mother, concept was selected as the Cherokee Phoenix’s 2017 homecoming T-shirt artwork. The shirt is on sale at the Cherokee Phoenix office and Cherokee Nation Gift Shop in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. ARCHIVE Cherokee artist Buffalo Gouge models the Cherokee Phoenix’s 2016 homecoming T-shirt, which sold out during the Cherokee National Holiday. The Cherokee Phoenix is currently seeking ideas from Cherokee artists for the 2018 homecoming T-shirt. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee artist Daniel HorseChief’s Selu, or Corn Mother, concept was selected as the Cherokee Phoenix’s 2017 homecoming T-shirt artwork. The shirt is on sale at the Cherokee Phoenix office and Cherokee Nation Gift Shop in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. ARCHIVE

June 22, 1839: a bloody day in Cherokee Nation

BY TESINA JACKSON
Former Reporter,
WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez &
JAMI MURPHY
Former Reporter
06/22/2017 12:00 PM
This is an archive story that the Cherokee Phoenix is publishing on the anniversary of the day that three prominent Cherokees were killed.

DUTCH MILLS, Ark. – On the morning of June 22, 1839, three small bands of Cherokees carried out “blood law” upon Major Ridge, John Ridge and Elias Boudinot – three prominent Cherokees who signed a treaty in 1835 calling for the tribe’s removal to Indian Territory.

Tribal Councilor Jack Baker said he believes “blood law” was the basis for the men’s assassinations.

“Although they did not follow all of the procedures, I do believe that was the basis for the executions,” Baker said. “I believe the proper procedure should have been followed. They should have been brought to trial and that was not done.”

The Cherokee General Council put the law, which had existed for years, into writing on Oct. 24, 1829.
Elias Boudinot The first editor of the Cherokee Phoenix, Elias Boudinot, is buried in the Worcester Cemetery in Park Hill, Okla., not far from where he was killed in 1839, and about a mile from where the Cherokee Phoenix is published today. COURTESY For signing the Treaty of New Echota, which called for the sale of all Cherokee lands east of the Mississippi River and the removal of all Cherokees to west of the river, John Ridge was assassinated at his home on June 22, 1839, in front of his family. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX John Ridge was buried about 500 yards to 1,000 yards from his home in Polson Cemetery, which is located southeast of Grove, Okla., in Delaware County. His father, Major, was later moved to the cemetery and buried next to him around 1853. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Tribal Councilor Jack Baker points to where he believes the assassins of Major Ridge would have hidden to ambush him on June 22, 1839. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKE PHOENIX Major Ridge’s tombstone in Polson Cemetery in Delaware County. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Elias Boudinot
http://wherethecasinomoneygoes.com/

Miss Cherokee applications available online

BY STAFF REPORTS
06/16/2017 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. —Applications for the 2017-18 Miss Cherokee Leadership Competition, as well as for Junior Miss Cherokee Leadership and Little Cherokee Ambassador competitions, are available at www.cherokee.org.

To download the applications, visit the website and click on the Cherokee Ambassadors link in the Education section of the Services tab. Applications are also available at the Cherokee First desk inside the W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex.

The deadline for all applications is July 12. The Miss Cherokee Leadership Competition will be Aug. 26, with the Junior Miss Cherokee Leadership Competition on Aug. 19 and Little Cherokee Ambassador Competition on Aug. 12.

“The competitions for Miss Cherokee, Junior Miss Cherokee and Little Cherokee Ambassadors provide an opportunity for contestants to share their knowledge of Cherokee history, culture and language,” Lisa Trice-Turtle, Miss Cherokee sponsor and 1986-87 Miss Cherokee, said. “As an ambassador and messenger of the Cherokee people, the representative is a role model and is expected to exemplify the best qualities of Cherokee youth.”

Miss Cherokee contestants must be ages 17- 22 as of Aug. 26. Candidates cannot have previously served as Miss Cherokee and must be Cherokee Nation citizens living in the tribal jurisdiction.
Miss Cherokee 2016-17 Sky Wildcat
Miss Cherokee 2016-17 Sky Wildcat

‘Mankiller’ premieres June 19 at LA Film Festival

BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
06/15/2017 01:15 PM
CULVER CITY, Calif. – The “Mankiller” documentary highlighting former Principal Chief Wilma P. Mankiller’s life was slated to premiere on June 19 during the 2017 LA Film Festival at the ArcLight Cinemas.

Valerie Red-Horse Mohl, producer and director of the documentary, said she is “thrilled” the documentary will be premiered during the festival.

“We’re thrilled that Los Angeles Film Festival offered us a slot in their competition and also to premiere it as a world premiere,” she said.

Red-Horse Mohl said the approximately hour-long documentary focuses on the late chief’s life from her early years until her death on April 6, 2010. Mankiller served as principal chief from 1985-95.

“I think the meat of the documentary is the (19)60s, (19)70s and (19)80s, and when you look at how her life evolved through that timeframe. Her family was relocated to San Francisco from Oklahoma on pretty much a forced removal program,” she said. “It was such a negative for her that she was crying and everyone was upset but as you see the film evolve you come to understand that San Francisco became so important to her development. She actually embraced the movement of the San Francisco of the (19)60s.”
Valerie Red-Horse interviews former Principal Chief Chad Smith in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, for the documentary “Mankiller.” The documentary will cover former Principal Chief Mankiller’s life from her early years until her death on April 6, 2010. EVAN TAYLOR PHOTOGRAPHY
Valerie Red-Horse interviews former Principal Chief Chad Smith in Tahlequah, Oklahoma, for the documentary “Mankiller.” The documentary will cover former Principal Chief Mankiller’s life from her early years until her death on April 6, 2010. EVAN TAYLOR PHOTOGRAPHY

Culver City, Calif. – ᎾᏍᎩ “Mankiller” ᎪᏪᎳᏅᎯ ᎠᏥᏃᎮᏍᎬ ᎤᎬᏫᏳᎯ ᏥᎨᏒ Wilma P. Mankiller ᎤᎴᏂᏙᎸ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏃᏪᎳ ᎤᎾᏓᏴᎳᏙᏗ ᏕᎭᎷᏱ 19 ᎾᎿ 2017 LA Film ᏓᎾᏓᏴᎳᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᎿ ArcLight Cinemas.

Valerie Red-Horse Mohl, ᏗᎪᏢᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎧᏃᎯᏎ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎴᏂᏙᎸ ᎪᏪᎵ, ᎠᏗᏍᎬ “ᎠᎵᎮᎵᎬ” ᎾᏍᎩ ᎪᏪᎵ ᎾᎿ ᏛᎾᏓᏴᎳᏔᏂ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᎤᏂᏍᏆᎸᎡᎲᎢ.

“ᎢᎦ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎣᎩᏰᎸ ᎾᎿ Los Angeles Film Festival ᎣᎦᏛᏛᏅᎯ ᏲᎦᏚᎵ ᎯᎠ ᎤᏠᏅᏛ ᎯᎠ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᎴ ᏃᎴᏍᏊ premiere ᎠᎴ ᏂᎬᎾᏛ ᎨᏒᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

Red-Horse Mohl ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᏑᏟᎶᏓ ᎢᎪᎯᏓ ᎠᏓᏴᎳᏛᏍᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎬᏫᏳᎯ ᏥᎨᏒ ᎤᎴᏂᏙᎸ ᎤᎳᏂᏙᎸ ᎢᎬᏱᎯᎨᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏧᎶᏐᎯ ᎢᎪᎯᏓ ᎧᏬᏂ ᏑᏓᎵᏁ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏍᎪᎯ ᎢᎪᎯᏓ. Mankiller ᎤᎬᏫᏳᎯ ᎨᏒ 1985—95 ᎢᎪᎯᏓ.

“ᎨᎵᎠ ᏙᎯᏳ ᎨᏒ ᎯᎠ ᎪᏪᎵ ᎾᏍᎩ (19)60’s, (19)70’s ᎠᎴ (19)80s, ᎠᎴ ᏱᏣᎦᏎᏍᏔᎾ ᎤᎴᏂᏙᎸ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᏥᏕᎶᏪᎳ ᎨᏒᎢ. ᎠᏂᏏᏓᏁᎸ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏂᎩᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ San Francisco ᏭᏂᎶᏒ ᏂᏓᏳᎾᏂᎩᏓ ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ ᏙᎯᏳ ᎨᏒ ᏫᎨᏥᏌᏙᏴ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎯᎠ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ᎢᎦ Ꮭ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏱᎨᏎ ᎤᎴᏅᎮ ᎠᏠᏱᎲᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏂᎦᏓ Ꮭ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏳᏂᏰᎸᏎ ᎯᎠ ᏥᏔᎦᏙᏍᏔᏂ ᏘᎪᎯ ᎠᎴ ᏙᎵᏣ ᎾᏍᎩ San Francisco ᎤᏓᎴᏅᎲ ᎤᎵᏍᎨᏓ ᏄᎵᏍᏓᏁᎲᎢ ᎾᎿᎢ. ᎢᎦᏃ ᎤᎴᏅᎲ ᎦᎸᏉᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᎿ San Francisco ᎾᏍᎩ ᏐᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏑᏓᎵᏍᎪ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ.”

Red-Horse Mohl ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᏂᎨᏒ ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗᎭ ᎯᎠ Mankiller ᎠᏥᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎪᏪᎳᏅᎢ ᎯᎠ ᎤᏃᏪᎳᏅᎯ.

“ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎤᏍᏆᏂᎪᏓ ᎨᏒ ᎯᎠ ᎧᏃᎮᏢᏍᎩ ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏓᏙᏪᎳᏅᎢ,” ᎠᏯ ᎠᏉᏪᎳᏅᎯ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏚᏳᎪᏛ ᏥᏃᎮᏍᎬ ᎾᏍᎩᏯ ᎤᏠᏯ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ, ᏣᎳᎩ ᎧᏃᎮᏢᎢ.’ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎢᏛᏍᎪᎢ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎧᏃᎮᎷᎢ ᎢᏧᎳᎭ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎠᎴᏂᏙᎲᎢ ᎾᏍᏊ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

Red-Horse Mohl ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᏚᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎮ ᎾᏍᎩ producer Gale Anne Hurd, ᎾᏍᎩ Valhalla Entertainment, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎦᏅᏛᎢ “First Lady of Sc-Fi” ᎠᎴ ᎤᏪᎧᎲ ᏗᎪᏢᏍᎩ ᏗᏓᏴᎳᏙᏗ ᏯᏛᎾ “The Terminator,” “Aliens” ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏄᎬᏫᏳᏒ ᏗᎪᏢᏍᎦ “The Walking Dead.”

Red- Horse Mohl ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᎪᏪᎳᏅᎢ ᏚᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎴ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏪᎧᎯᏴ Mankiller’s ᎤᎾᏁᎳᏛᎢ, Charlie Soap; ᏧᏪᏣ ᎠᏂᎨᏯ Gina ᎠᎴ Felicia Olaya, ᎣᎦᎳᎰᎹ ᎠᏁᎯᏨ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏂᎪᏓ ᎬᏬᎵᎦ ᎨᏒ ᎯᎠ ᎾᏍᏊ ᎤᎬᏫᏳᎯ Bill Clinton ᎠᎴ ᎠᎨᏯ Gloria Steinem ᏧᏙᎩᏓ.

“ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎢᎦ ᎧᏃᎮᏓ ᎨᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏃᏢᏅᎢ ᎯᎠ ᎠᎴᏂᏙᎲ ᎠᎴ ᏗᏩᏛᏓ ᎢᎦ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎬᏩᏟᎦ ᎨᏒᎢ, ᎢᏧᎳᎭ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎸ ᏏᏓᏁᎸ ᎠᏣᎳᎩ ᏱᎩ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎹᏱᏟ ᎠᏓᏅᏖᎵᏙᎯ ᏱᎩ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ᏕᎭᏛᎩᏍᎪ, ᎠᎴ ᎦᏥᎨᏳ ᎯᎠ, ᎠᏂᏔᎵᎭ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎠᏂᏁᎳ ᎤᎭᎸᏃ, ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎹ ᏧᏓᎴᏅᎢ. ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎢᎬᏱ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏕᎶᎰᎯᏍᏗ ᎤᏃᎯᏳ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎠᎴ ᏍᏚᏯ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏂ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎹ ᏧᏂᎾᏦᏢᎢ. ᎾᎯᏳ ᎠᏛᎪᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎤᎬᏫᏳᎯ Bill Clinton ᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬ ᎯᎠ ᎠᎨᏯ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏓᏁᎴ ᎯᎠ ᎠᏯᏠᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏙᎯ ᎠᎦᏁᎴᎢ.”

ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᏧᎦᏙᏍᏕᎯᎠ ᎪᏪᎳᏅ ᎤᎾᎦᏙᏍᏗ ᎡᎵᏊ ᏯᏂᎪᏩᏔ ᎾᏍᎩ Mankiller ᎤᎴᏂᏙᎸ ᏗᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅ ᎤᎬᏫᏳᎯ ᏥᎨᏎ ᎠᎴ ᎢᎦᏓ ᏣᎦᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅ ᎠᎭᏂ ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ ᏯᏛᎾ ᏓᎵᏆ, ᏔᎳᏏ ᎠᎴ ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ ᎤᏔᎾ ᎦᏚᎲᎢ, ᏃᎴᏍᏊ San Francisco.

Red-Horse Mohl ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ Mankiller’s ᎤᏬᏂᏏ ᎾᏍᎩ “ ᏚᏳᎪᏛ ᎨᏒᎢ”.

“ᎣᏂᏃ ᏬᎩᏴᏟ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏓᎴᏅᎯ ᎤᏠᏯ ᎹᏒᎩ ᏴᎦᏁᎦᎵ ᎠᎴ ᎪᏢᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏍᏆᏂᎪᏛ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏣᏘ ᎠᏓᎪᎵᏱᏍᎩ ᎨᏒ ᎤᎦᏛᎴᏒ ᎠᏎᏃ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎨᏒ ᎠᎴ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎤᏬᏂᏏ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏫᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅ ᎠᏙᎩᏯᏛ ᎾᏍᏊ ᎠᎴ ᎧᎵᏬᎯ. ᏂᎦᏓ ᏧᏓᎴᏅᏓ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎤᏟᎢᎸᏒ, ᎠᎴ ᎠᏆᏕᎶᎰᏒ ᎤᎪᏓ ᎠᏆᏓᏅᏖᏗ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏓᏅᏖᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏳᏍᏛ ᎤᎴᏂᏙᎸ, ᎠᏎᏃ Ꮭ ᎧᏃᎮᏢᏊ ᎢᎦᎢ, ᎤᎪᏛ ᎤᎾᏛᎪᏗ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ ᎨᎵᏍᎬ ᏙᎯᏳ ᎠᏓᏱᏍᏗᏍᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎡᎶᎯ ᏫᏚᏳᎪᏛᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎢᏧᎳᎭ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏗᎩᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗᎢ. Ꮭ ᎠᏎ ᏍᏓᏯ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᏱᎩ, ᎠᎴ Ꮭ ᏔᎵ ᎢᏗᎦᏓᏗᏍᏗ ᏱᎩ. ᎠᏯ ᎨᏒ ᎢᎦ ᎤᎵᏍᎨᏗ ᎯᎠ.”
Red-Horse Mohl ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᎯ ᎪᏪᎳᏅ PBS ᏛᏓᏴᎳᏔᏂ Ꮭ ᏳᎾᏅᏓ ᎢᏳ ᎨᏒᎢ ᎧᏃᎮᏗ ᎨᏒᎢ.

ᎤᎪᏛ ᎠᏕᎶᎰᎯᏍᏗ ᏲᏚᎵ ᎯᎠ ᎪᏪᎳᏅᎢ, Visit www.mankillerdoc.com.

http://www.cherokeecasa.org/

Exhibit, lunchtime discussion focuses on lives of pardoned prisoners

BY STAFF REPORTS
06/15/2017 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Learn about the lives of pardoned prisoners from the Cherokee National Prison with an exhibit beginning June 16.

“The Pardoned” exhibit, which runs through Jan. 1, discusses the pardoning process used in the Cherokee Nation and features stories about various prisoners and how their lives were affected by imprisonment and release.

In addition, a lunchtime discussion led by Dr. Julie Reed will be held on June 20 from noon to 1 p.m. Reed is a CN citizen and an assistant professor in the department of history at the University of Tennessee.

The lunchtime discussion is open to the public and free to attend. Guests are encouraged to bring a brown bag lunch. The museum will offer free admission throughout the day.

The Cherokee National Prison was the only penitentiary building in Indian Territory from 1875 to 1901. It housed sentenced and accused prisoners from throughout the territory. The interpretive site and museum give visitors an idea about how law and order operated in Indian Territory. The site features a working blacksmith area and reconstructed gallows, exhibits about famous prisoners and daring escapes, local outlaws and Cherokee patriots, jail cells and much more. The Cherokee National Prison Museum is located at 124 E. Choctaw St.

‘Stories on the Square’ returns in June

BY STAFF REPORTS
06/02/2017 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism is offering free, family friendly storytelling events on Wednesdays in June. The one-hour program is hosted at 10 a.m. under the gazebo at the Cherokee National Capitol.

“Storytelling is such an important part of Cherokee culture and a great way for us to share our history with others,” Travis Owens, director of cultural tourism for Cherokee Nation Businesses, said. “This series features a variety of stories and speakers and promises to be both fun and engaging for all ages.”

Each week “Stories on the Square” will conclude with a different hands-on activity or craft. The make-and-take activity schedule is below:

June 7 – Clay medallions

June 14 – Syllabary coloring sheets and Cherokee garden rocks
http://www.billandtracirabbit.com/

CHC hosts Traveling “Return from Exile” exhibit

BY STAFF REPORTS
05/31/2017 12:00 PM
PARK HILL, Okla. – The works of more than 30 contemporary Southeastern-influenced Native American artists are on display until Aug. 11 in the “Return from Exile” exhibit at the Cherokee Heritage Center.

The traveling exhibition showcases works from Creek, Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw and Seminole artists.

For more information about the traveling exhibit and featured artist videos, visit www.returnfromexile.org. The CHC is located at 21192 S. Keeler Drive.
Video with default Cherokee Phoenix Frame
“The Age of Sacrifice” by Seminole/Shawnee artist Benjamin Harjo Jr. is one of the contemporary works of art on display in the Cherokee Heritage Center’s “Return From Exile” exhibit, which runs until Aug. 11. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
“The Age of Sacrifice” by Seminole/Shawnee artist Benjamin Harjo Jr. is one of the contemporary works of art on display in the Cherokee Heritage Center’s “Return From Exile” exhibit, which runs until Aug. 11. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

SHS students learn Cherokee booger-mask making

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
05/24/2017 09:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – In May, Cherokee National Treasure Roger Cain visited Cherokee languages classes at Sequoyah High School to teach students how to make booger masks.

“I’ve been bringing a cultural component to the language class. (Language teacher) Chris (Holmes) has been gracious to invite me over to share some knowledge,” Cain said. “We’ve got more stuff planned for next year as well.”

Cain, a CNT for his mask-making skills, said the class came about thanks to the Cherokee National Treasure Mentoring Program, which provides funds for CNTs to teach classes in communities and schools. CNTs are artists recognized by the Cherokee Nation for their artistry and for sharing their knowledge with others to prevent the loss of Cherokee arts.

Thirteen Cherokee Language Class II students made large dance masks, some with exaggerated features such as large noses, while 20 students in Cherokee Language Class I made smaller masks.

“They will actually be able to wear them (large masks), and eventually next year we’ll be able to go into the song and dance of the booger dance as well to not just make the mask but also learn the song and dance that goes with it,” Cain said.
Video with default Cherokee Phoenix Frame
Student Maggie Sourjohn cuts rawhide for a booger mask she is making in Cherokee Language Class II at Sequoyah High School in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Cherokee National Treasure Roger Cain visited the class in May to teach students how to make booger masks. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Cherokee booger masks that were made by Sequoyah High School students in a Cherokee Language Class. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX An example of a Cherokee booger mask made by Sequoyah High School students with the assistance of Cherokee National Treasure Roger Cain. COURTESY
Student Maggie Sourjohn cuts rawhide for a booger mask she is making in Cherokee Language Class II at Sequoyah High School in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Cherokee National Treasure Roger Cain visited the class in May to teach students how to make booger masks. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Online classes, new texts helping revitalize Cherokee language

BY STAFF REPORTS
05/10/2017 08:15 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Research of Native American languages and how they are taught is helping revitalize the Cherokee language, in part, through online courses and textbooks the Cherokee Nation developed.

Using these methods, the CN’s Cherokee Language Program has up to 3,000 students taking online courses and around 400 students in community classes annually. Participating students represent all ages and parts of the world.

“There are so many people interested in preserving the language,” Ed Fields, a CLP online instructor who has taught courses for more than a decade, said.

Fields teaches a 10-week online course each spring and fall, with participants convening two hours weekly. His spring course started in April, and fall class will start Sept. 11 with registration opening Aug. 28.

Via a camera, students see Fields as he uses his curriculum and life experiences to teach Cherokee. Online language classes are offered for free at www.cherokee.org.
Ed Fields, a Cherokee Nation online Cherokee language course instructor, uses a live video stream to reach thousands of students across the world each year. COURTESY
Ed Fields, a Cherokee Nation online Cherokee language course instructor, uses a live video stream to reach thousands of students across the world each year. COURTESY

Culture

Artesian Arts Festival to feature more than 100 Native artists
BY STAFF REPORTS
05/08/2017 02:00 PM
SULPHUR, Okla. – More than 100 esteemed artists representing 25 Native American tribes throughout the U.S. and Canada will be featured on May 27 during the Artesian Arts Festival.

Hosted by the Chickasaw Nation at the Artesian Plaza, the festival is one of the fastest growing arts markets in the U.S.

A live paint by distinguished Chickasaw artist Mike Larsen will begin at 10:30 a.m., in the ARTesian Art Gallery. Other noteworthy artists giving demonstrations and discussing their craft include Jimmie Harrison, Venaya Yazzie, Daniel Worcester, Kimberly Ponca, Merlin Little Thunder, Buddy Parchcorn, J. Nicole Hatfield, Tyra Shackleford and Josy Thomas.

The fourth annual Memorial Day weekend event features diverse art media and various visual art such as painting, basketry, jewelry, sculpture, metalworking, bead work, photography, textiles and pottery.

Open to artists from all federally recognized tribes, a total of 116 Indian artists selected for the juried show will compete in as many as 21 categories.

Artists scheduled to participate include Chickasaw jewelry designer and California native Kristen Dorsey; national award-winning Cherokee ceramicist Troy Jackson; E. Dee Tabor, a Chickasaw artist who specializes in 3D art and is inspired by nature and her Chickasaw heritage; and contemporary Comanche artist J. Nicole Hatfield, a native Oklahoman who draws inspiration from historical photos of proud tribal women.

Artwork will be displayed in dozens of booths along the length of Muskogee Street.

Various musical entertainment is planned, as well as tribal dance demonstrations and regalia. Bands will provide continuous entertainment on two stages.

The musical lineup for the event includes a range of entertainment, including children’s music, alternative rock, pop, Latin pop, country and more.

A 10 a.m. opening ceremony and demonstration by the Chickasaw Nation Dance Troupe kicks off the entertainment on the main stage, followed by performances by “Injunuity,” “Sugar Free Allstars,” “Highwater Gamble,” “John Bomboy and the Underscores,” “Boyd Street Brass,” “Tequila Azul,” and the “Conner Hicks Band.”

Bands scheduled for the Plaza stage include “Overdrive,” “Conflict of Interest,” “Church of the Saturday Saints,” “The Hideouts,” “Billy K. Band,” and “Right Place, Right Time.”

The Chickasaw Nation Stomp Dance troupe, Aztec Dancers and Magic Circle Entertainment are scheduled to demonstrate Native dances on both stages.

Several food trucks and food booths will be serving festival fare such as Indian Tacos, corndogs, barbecue, funnel cakes, roasted corn, kettle corn, fried Oreos, pie, ice cream and more.

A special area for children’s activities and a senior citizens’ arts and crafts booth are also planned for the day.

Open to the public at no charge, the Artesian Arts Festival welcomed more than 6,500 to the 2016 festival.

Cash awards will be presented for first, second and third place in each category, as well as “Best of Show.”

Festivities begin at 10 a.m. and end at 6 p.m.

For more information about the Artesian Arts Festival, call the Chickasaw Nation Arts & Humanities at 580-272-5520 or email artistinfo@chickasaw.net.

The Artesian Plaza is located adjacent to the Artesian Hotel and Spa at 1001 W. First St.

2017 Artesian Arts Festival artists

Absentee Shawnee/Seminole?Ben Harjo, Jr.

Caddo?Wayne Earles, Chase Earles, Chad Earles, Yonavea Hawkins

Cherokee?Verna Bates, Karen Berry, Martha Berry, Eva Cantrell, Toneh Chuleewah, Melvin Cornshucker, Vivian Cottrell, Mike Dart, J. Ross Davis, Gary Farris, Matthew Girty, Bill Glass Jr., Daniel Horsechief, Troy Jackson, Dino Kingfisher, John Knotts, Tonya Lowrance, Ron Mitchell, Jane Osti, Buddy Parchcorn, Traci Rabbit, Tama Roberts, Jerry Sutton, Mary Beth Nelson-Timothy, Kristie Vann, Karin Walkingstick, Tana Washington, Jeffrey Watt, Bryan Waytula

Cherokee/Otoe Missouria?Tom Farris

Cheyenne?Merlin LittleThunder

Chickasaw?Steve Adamietz, Mary Ruth Barnes, Melvin Burris, Misti Butler, Larry Carter, Margaret Dillard, Kristen Dorsey, Linda Edgar, Wayne Edgar, Sr., Ellen Etzler, Sue Fish, Garry Harrison, Billy Hensley, Lisa Hudson, Tyson Hudson, Peggy Immohotichey, Elihu Johnson, Stephanie Kauffman, Brian Landreth, Paula Loftin, Dustin Mater, Doneeta Nowlin, Tyra Shackleford, Rena Smith, Vicki Somers, Jetawn Spivey, Lance Straughn, E. Dee Tabor, Richard Thomas, Ben Trosper, Jim Trosper, Joanna Underwood, Jeremy Wallace, Ashley Wallace, Ben White, Daniel Worcester

Chickasaw/Choctaw?Tracie Davis, Norma Howard

Chickasaw/Choctaw/Cherokee?Courtney Parchcorn

Chickasaw/Choctaw/Creek?Danielle Fixico

Chickasaw/Mississippi Choctaw?Nancy Johnson, Uriah Looney

Chickasaw/Pueblo Jemez?Marcella Yepa

Choctaw?Dylan Cavin, Paul Hacker, Doug Maytubbie, Candace Shanholtzer, Brenda Mackey-Musgrave

Comanche?Rita Heath

Comanche/Kiowa?J. Nicole Hatfield

Creek?Jon Tiger

Creek/Euchee?Les Berryhill

Dine/Hope?Venaya Yazzie, Jicarilla Apache, Damon Neal?

Laguna Pueblo?LuAnne Aragon

Mississippi Choctaw?Randy Chitto?Gene Smith

Mississippi Choctaw/Laguna Pueblo?Hollis Chitto

Muscogee (Creek)?Leslie Deer, Johnnie Diacon, John Timothy II, Jimmie Fife(Stewart), Sandy Fife-Wilson

Navajo?Esther Belin, Norris Chee, Suzanne Hudson

Navajo/Dine?Jimmie Harrison

Northern Arapaho?Jackie Sevier

Onondaga?Josy Thomas

Osage?Clancy Gray, Anna Jefferson, K (Wendy) Ponca

Otoe Missouria/Kiowa?Lester Harragarra

Otoe-Missouria?Regina Waters, Rhonda Williams

Ponca?Sid Armstrong

Prairie Band Potawatomi/Chickasaw?Mitch Battese

Sac and Fox?Tony Tiger?

San Felipe Pueblo?Jennifer Garcia, Ray Garcia

Education

UKB, NSU officials sign MOU
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/21/2017 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – A new cornerstone for capacity building was put into place June 14 at the United Keetoowah Band John Hair Cultural Center & Museum with the signing of a memorandum of understanding for cooperation between Northeastern State University and the UKB.

“This memorandum solidifies the collaborative opportunities for both institutions. It will help to further our respective missions for developing learning opportunities and creating educational and economic success for the health and productive futures of our populations,” UKB Chief Joe Bunch. “Our tribe is honored to sign this MOU with the university. The alliance with NSU offers incredible resources, experiences and opportunities for both entities to forge new paths and grow together. The cooperative agreement with NSU, an outstanding regional university, represents new promise, hope and progress for enhancing and developing many of the important programs and services for the UKB going forward.”

UKB Assistant Chief Jamie Thompson said the UKB Tribal Council unanimously endorsed the dedicated relationship, honoring NSU’s standards of excellence, quality teaching, challenging curricula, research and scholarly activities – particularly its goal to provide immersive learning opportunities for their faculty and students in service to the local community.

“We envision the collaborative relationship to include capacity building areas of elder community services, sustainable language, kinesiology/recreation, Indian Child Welfare, child development, tribal libraries and technology and more. The tribe and university have also agreed to consider undertaking mutually beneficial, sanctioned research and grant-funded projects,” he said.

After signing the agreement, NSU President Steve Turner cited the rich educational heritage of the Cherokee people and the university’s respect for the UKB as two key elements that led to the partnership. He also acknowledged the UKB’s commitment to higher education and deep roots with the university and the Cherokee Nation.

“We seek collaborations such as this alliance with the UKB to advance or mission of helping all of our region to achieve professional and personal success in this multicultural and global society,” Turner said. “NSU continues to devote faculty and student services resources toward collaborative projects with the tribe and other American Indians that encourage, inspire and support tribal members to lead healthy and productive lives and to encourage the pursuit of post-secondary education at our institution.”

The memorandum will be supported by a joint committee comprised of individuals from both the university and the tribe who will provide oversight for the activities and projects included in the alliance.

Council

Council confirms Barteaux as District Court judge
BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
05/18/2017 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – At the May 15 Tribal Council meeting, Supreme Court Chief Justice John Garrett swore in T. Luke Barteaux as a District Court judge after legislators confirmed his appointment.

Barteaux is completing the late Bart Fite’s term, which expires on Feb. 10, 2018.

Fourteen Tribal Councilors voted to approve the appointment, while Tribal Councilors Shawn Crittenden, Harley Buzzard and Buel Anglen opposed it.

Barteaux, 33, of Bixby, said he considers the appointment the “pinnacle” of his career.

“It’s something that I never thought would happen within this amount of time, but I’m extremely honored to have been appointed by (Principal) Chief (Bill John) Baker and confirmed by the Tribal Council. I look forward to helping protect our Nation through the legal process,” he said.

He said prior to the appointment his only experience as a judge was serving on the Oklahoma Trial Advocacy Institute.

“I’m a faculty member at the Oklahoma Trial Advocacy Institute, which trains attorneys, and I have, basically judging their performances and things like that,” he said. “I’ve been a panel member for judging the mock trial competitions for, I think it’s out of Pryor, the last two years.”

Barteaux said he has been licensed and acting on his own as an attorney since 2012, with his legal career officially starting in 2009.

“My legal career started back in 2009, and I think around 2011 I started basically practicing under the supervision of another attorney here at my current firm (Fry & Elder),” he said.

Barteaux also addressed concerns about discrepancies on his résumé with dates regarding his time acting as an attorney.

“My current position, I believe it said the dates were June of 2011 to current, and underneath it it said attorney or trial attorney, and there was a question regarding whether or not I was an attorney that entire time,” he said. “The reason it had been worded that way, and kind of stepping back, the jobs underneath were done the same way and it was just the main job. I work at Fry & Elder now and those are the dates that I have worked here, and the position underneath it is the main job I’ve had and the current job. So it was more of me trying to fit a resume on one page and someone brought up, I guess, wanting more of a full job history instead of just what the final job or main job while I was there.”

Legislators also unanimously authorized the establishment of a CN conservation district.

Bruce Davis, management resources executive director, brought the resolution to the May 15 Resource Committee meeting after a trip to the United States Department of Agriculture where he and others learned of 47 programs available to the tribe and its citizens that are not being utilized.

“The first thing we’ve got to do before we can apply for these programs are pass this resolution to start our own conservation district, the Cherokee Nation Conservation District, before we can apply for these monies,” he said.

According to the Oklahoma Conservation Commission’s website, a conservation district serves “as the primary local unit of government responsible for the conservation of the renewable natural resources.”

Bryan Shade, CN chief special project analyst, said the resolution would “authorize” Principal Chief Bill John Baker to establish the conservation district that would allow tribal citizens to visit it rather than the state’s conservation district. He added that establishing the district would help the tribe “streamline” certain operations.

“It’s the exact same thing the state of Oklahoma’s doing, but this district will exist in our 14-county area,” Shade said. “By taking on this function, right now the Cherokee Nation has to go through those state offices, get our lands put in the database, in the system, before we can take advantage of these programs. By establishing this conservation district we’ll be able to do this ourselves and help us streamline things.”

In other business, legislators:

• Increased the tribe’s fiscal year 2017 concurrent enrollment fund by $87,000,

• Increased the FY 2017 capital budget by $857,848 to $279 million,

• Reappointed Amber Lynn George to the Cherokee Nation Foundation board,

• Approved Wilfred C. Gernandt III to the Cherokee Nation Comprehensive Care Agency governing board,

• Reappointed Dan Carter as a Cherokee Nation Businesses board member,

• Approved a resolution for Tribal Council to receive a confidential report monthly of all charitable donations and surplus equipment donations from all CN subsidiaries,

• Granted a right-of-way easement on an existing natural gas line to the Oklahoma Natural Gas Company for Cherokee Heights Addition in Pryor, and

• Authorized a sovereign immunity waiver for software agreement between Sequoyah Schools with Municipal Accounting Systems.

Health

CN Health Services earns Public Health Innovation Award
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/22/2017 08:00 AM
ANCHORAGE, Alaska – Cherokee Nation Health Services recently received the Public Health Innovation Award from the National Indian Health Board at a national conference in June.

The Public Health Innovation Award is given annually to the tribal government, individual, organization or program that best exemplifies the advancement of public health for Native Americans and Alaskan Natives.

The tribe was recognized for its efforts at the eighth annual National Tribal Public Health Summit in Anchorage.

“Cherokee Nation Health Services strives to be a leader in health care throughout Indian Country,” Connie Davis, CNHS executive director, said. “On behalf of our Cherokee Nation Health Services employees, I thank the National Indian Health Board for this honor. It’s truly humbling for our team to receive this recognition, and I commend each and every one of our employees who make Cherokee Nation Health Services a first-class department.”

The tribe’s Public Health department educates citizens on healthy eating and exercise habits, and also addresses common challenges such as alcohol and tobacco use awareness within the tribe.

Senior Director of Public Health Lisa Pivec accepted the award and spoke about building public health infrastructure.

“The most rewarding aspect of the recognition is knowing we are honoring those who have gone before us to ensure we have this great Cherokee Nation to protect and preserve,” Pivec said. “I believe that any successes are the result of the work of so many citizens over the years, people devoted to paving the way for our next generations.”

In 2016, Pivec was also recognized by the NIHB with its area impact award. The award highlighted her impact on the tribe’s growing public health program since 1994, when Pivec helped start the tribe’s Healthy Nation program.

“Lisa led the development of public health at Cherokee Nation from its infancy, and the tribal nation is now the first Public Health Accreditation Board-accredited tribal public health system,” the NIHB said in a statement about the nomination. “Now, Cherokee citizens consider the vast number of prevention programs she developed as a part of their daily activities. Along with her staff, Lisa has created great changes in health among the Cherokee people she serves.”

In addition to presenting awards for public health innovation and area impact, the NIHB works with tribes on advocacy, training and legislation to better Native health care.

“Public health is about addressing the social determinants of health and strengthening the environments where we live, work, play, learn and worship,” Pivec said. “I have been blessed to have had the opportunity to serve and do work that doesn’t feel like a job but more like a life purpose.”

Opinion

'Remember the Removal’ training has been rewarding experience
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
06/01/2017 04:00 PM
Some Cherokee Phoenix readers may have seen the “Remember the Removal” bicycle riders out on local roads the past two months training for the upcoming ride from New Echota, Georgia, to Tahlequah, Oklahoma, through seven states. I am one of 14 riders from the Cherokee Nation who will take part in this year’s ride.

For those of you not familiar with the ride, it is done annually to commemorate the forced removal of our Cherokee ancestors from their homelands in 1838-39. Most of our people left in the fall of 1838 in 13 organized detachments and endured a harsh winter in 1839 before reaching Indian Territory.

I was part of the group that did the first 1,000-mile ride in 1984, which was meant to educate people along the route about the forced removal and give students like me hands-on experiences that would foster leadership qualities, instill confidence and improve our self-esteem. A man named Michael Morris thought a bike ride from the old Cherokee homelands would be a good way to give us those experiences. He was right.

Because the ride was grueling and had never been attempted before, the 19 riders formed bonds that are still strong today. We survived two-lane mountain roads in North Carolina and Tennessee where some large trucks did not like sharing the road with us. I rode my bike into some weeds and bushes before a dump truck could nudge me into them on a mountain in Tennessee. We survived racism in Illinois and the patchy and hilly roads of Missouri before riding into northern Arkansas and taking on the Ozark Mountains. By then we were stronger. Our thighs were noticeably larger and much darker than that had been three weeks earlier, and we were confident we were going to finish strong.

I remember during the trip being excited about what view was over the next hill while riding with my small group of four riders nicknamed the “Coaster-Barelies” because we weren’t the fastest group, and we may have coasted a little too much going down hills when we had the opportunity. Jeff, Clayton and Marvin were like brothers to me when we finished, and it was hard to finish and go our separate ways.

For me the trip gave me confidence, and it showed me I am capable of a lot mentally and physically. It also gave me a hunger to seek out adventures, which has lasted to this day.

So, when I was asked last January if I would be the first official CN “Mentor Rider,” my sense of adventure wrestled with my common sense. I am now 50 and being around the bike ride the past few years I know the training is tough even for a 20-year-old. I thought about it for a couple of days and believed I could do it. My mind was going to drag my body along on another adventure. It has been great and tough as I imagined it would be. My legs seemed to remember what it is like to ride a bike for most of a day, but my left shoulder has been less cooperative. So, I keep a container of Icy Hot handy and hope the aroma of the liniment isn’t too strong for the other cyclists.

I’ve also had the pleasure of training with a good group of young people. These people from throughout the CN volunteered to take part in this ride, to put themselves through the pain riding a bicycle an average of 60 miles a day. They have already grown and changed during training, but they will grow and change even more before the ride is over. It happens every year. They might have varied reasons for doing the ride, but they all understand the most important reason is to honor our ancestors. Our tenacious ancestors. They would not give up on the trail and when they arrived here 178 years ago to rebuild.

Every year the riders are told they will not make this trip on their own. No matter how strong they are they will need the support of their fellow riders. It’s true, and we also need the support of the Cherokee people, so keep us in your thoughts and prayers.

I feel fortunate that I get to travel the trail again with some good people, and even though I’ve been down it before, I get to see what’s over the next hill with older and different eyes.

People

Turtle wins Miss Junior Indian Oklahoma crown
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/09/2017 08:00 AM
DURANT, Okla. – Former Junior Miss Cherokee Chelbie Turtle was recently crowned Junior Miss Indian Oklahoma by the Oklahoma Federation of Indian Women and will spend the next year as a goodwill ambassador for Oklahoma tribes.

The Junior Miss Indian Oklahoma competition was held in conjunction with the annual Miss Indian Oklahoma Scholarship Pageant in Durant.

As Junior Miss Indian Oklahoma, Turtle will promote the OFIW mission fostering friendship among Oklahoma’s Native American women, preserving culture and heritage, promoting education and uplifting younger Native women. Her platform is “The Value of Higher Education.”

“I believe education is important. Math, English, science, reading and writing – those core subjects – are important to younger children and really establish their future and how they view the world. I want to promote to kids that education is important,” Turtle, who served as the 2014-15 Junior Miss Cherokee, said.

Turtle said she learned the values of being a tribal ambassador from her mother, who is a former Miss Cherokee, Miss Indian Oklahoma and Miss Indian USA.

“It’s a great feeling to be honored with the title of Junior Miss Indian Oklahoma, and I’m especially honored to represent Cherokee Nation and every other tribe in Oklahoma,” Turtle said. “I look forward to promoting and sharing about the Cherokee Nation and our culture. During the Junior Miss Indian Oklahoma competition, each contestant learned a lot from each other. I look forward to doing more of that this year as I travel around to represent OFIW, and I appreciate the Cherokee Nation for the support and opportunities it has provided.”

This year’s OFIW pageant theme was “Honoring Our Indigenous Women Warriors: Protecting All That is Sacred.” Turtle competed against three other contestants who were judged on a written essay and personal interview with judges along with onstage presence, including a tribal introduction, tribal dress, talent, platform, contemporary dress and impromptu questions.

Turtle received her crown from Junior Miss Indian Oklahoma 2016 Chyna Chupco, who also attends Sequoyah High School in Tahlequah.

Turtle, 16, is the daughter of Jeff and Lisa Trice Turtle of Tahlequah. She will begin her 10th grade year at SHS in the fall.

The Cherokee Nation and Choctaw Nation were platinum sponsors for OFIW’s 2017 events.

To schedule an appearance by Junior Miss Indian Oklahoma, contact Faith Harjo at harjo.faith@yahoo.com.

Learn more about the OFIW, visit https://ofiwpageant.wixsite.com/ofiw.
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Call Justin Smith 918-207-4975

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