Garrison brings ‘country princess’ to life in ‘Maybelle Jean’

BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
02/22/2017 08:15 AM
OWASSO, Okla. – Originally from Bethel Acres near Shawnee, Cherokee Nation citizen Jessica Jean Garrison spent a majority of her life living on a farm.

Her experiences on her family’s farm and her love for writing led her to creating “Maybelle Jean,” a children’s book that tells the story of a “country princess” who learns life lessons through resolving conflicts.

“This is the first one (in the series), and it’s about a little girl that is a country princess but not like the princesses she reads about. It’s definitely more of a country side of the princess trying to take the roots of our Oklahoma values,” she said.

She said growing up on a farm inspired her for some of the story’s concepts. “I grew up on a farm, and I’ve always lived in Oklahoma, so I just wanted to bring some of those concepts for other people to read especially in other areas.”

Garrison said in the book something always happens to Maybelle, and as the story progresses she learns life lessons through conflicts.
Cherokee Nation citizen Jessica Jean Garrison shows a page from her children’s book “Maybelle Jean.” Garrison’s book came out in July and focuses on Maybelle’s life on her parents’ farm and teaches life lessons. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX “Maybelle Jean” is the first installment of a series of books that will focus on Maybelle’s adventures as a “country princess.” Cherokee Nation citizen Jessica Jean Garrison hopes her book series will get children reading. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Jessica Jean Garrison
Cherokee Nation citizen Jessica Jean Garrison shows a page from her children’s book “Maybelle Jean.” Garrison’s book came out in July and focuses on Maybelle’s life on her parents’ farm and teaches life lessons. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Water Spider Creations: Preservation through creation

BY JAMI MURPHY
Senior Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
02/14/2017 08:15 AM
MUSKOGEE, Okla. – During the past several years, Cherokee Nation citizen Jules Brison has tried to preserve Cherokee culture through her art. That preservation has evolved into a business that shares culturally significant art to people from all over.

Brison owns and operates Water Spider Creations. She makes textiles art such as finger-woven belts, moccasins, ribbon shirts and tear dresses.

“I originally started doing art at a very young age. In some areas I’m self-taught, and some others I’ve had great influence from various other artists. My uncle Robert Lewis was probably my biggest influence along with my grandmother,” she said.

Lewis started her focus in textiles, she said. With regards to her sewing, both of Brison’s grandmothers were seamstresses, and they both shared their knowledge with her, which allowed her to create and wear items she had a hand in making.

“When I was Miss Cherokee and Junior Miss Cherokee, I actually helped create my tear dresses. When I ran for Miss Indian Summer my cousin Terri Fields and I and Cierra Fields actually helped make my entire regalia set to compete,” she said.
Cherokee Nation citizen Jules Brison looks over a white feather cape she’s making for her wedding this summer. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Water Spider Creations owner Jules Brison, a Cherokee Nation citizen, produces various types of art including moccasins, finger-woven items and 18th-century regalia. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Jules Brison uses several colors of yarn for her finger-woven belts. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen Jules Brison looks over a white feather cape she’s making for her wedding this summer. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
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Will Rogers great-niece dies at 97

BY STAFF REPORTS
02/10/2017 08:00 AM
BARTLESVILLE, Okla. – Doris Lane (Coke) Meyer, 97, of Bartlesville and great-niece, and perhaps the last of Will Rogers’ relatives who personally knew him, died on Jan. 29.

Born Nov. 12, 1919, in Chelsea, she spent a great deal of her childhood in Chelsea with her paternal grandmother, Maud Ethel Rogers Lane, Will’s sister.

Among her fondest memories of her great-uncle were the things he did to make his sister more comfortable when she was ill and before her death in 1925, when Doris was 6 years old and living with her grandparents.

Perhaps her most vivid occurred on Aug. 15, 1935, when the Lane family lived in Bartlesville. The Bartlesville newspaper called their home to tell her father that his uncle Will had been killed in a plane crash in Alaska.

She said when her uncle came to Bartlesville he “ate with us, but stayed at Woolaroc in the main lodge (Rogers was a friend of the Phillips family). His room was on the mezzanine.”
Doris Lane (Coke) Meyer
Doris Lane (Coke) Meyer

NSU prof’s book wins Linguistic Society of America award

BY STAFF REPORTS
02/02/2017 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Northeastern State University associate professor of English Dr. Bradley Montgomery-Anderson was awarded with the Linguistic Society of America’s Leonard Bloomfield Book Award for 2017 for his work “Cherokee Reference Grammar.”

The award was presented Jan. 7 at the LSA Annual Meeting in Austin, Texas.

First presented in 1992, this award recognizes a volume that makes an outstanding contribution of enduring value to our understanding of language and linguistics.

In the recommendation for the award, the Leonard Bloomfield Book Award Committee noted that “Cherokee Reference Grammar” is the first major reference work in more than 35 years on the Cherokee language. They described the reference grammar book as carefully structured to be accessible to students and scholars engaged in language revitalization regardless of formal background.

Montgomery-Anderson said the book was originally his doctoral dissertation when he was a student at the University of Kansas.
Dr. Bradley Montgomery-Anderson, Northeastern State University associate professor of English, receives the Linguistic Society of America’s Leonard Bloomfield Book Award for 2017 for his work “Cherokee Reference Grammar.” COURTESY
Dr. Bradley Montgomery-Anderson, Northeastern State University associate professor of English, receives the Linguistic Society of America’s Leonard Bloomfield Book Award for 2017 for his work “Cherokee Reference Grammar.” COURTESY

WE SERVED: Brown spends 2 decades as medic

BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
01/31/2017 08:15 AM
CHEROKEE, N.C. – After growing tired of welding, Cherokee Nation citizen Alva Brown wanted to do something more. So he enlisted in the U.S. Army.

Originally from Oklahoma, he joined in June 1982 with paratrooper ambitions.

“My dad use to jump out of airplanes, so I wanted to be a paratrooper and jump out of airplanes. So that’s why I joined the 82nd (Airborne Division), to become a paratrooper,” he said.

Brown said he didn’t know what to expect when he enlisted.

“The only thing I knew about the Army is what you see on TV,” he said. “I was 21 years old. I wasn’t in any kind of shape. When I joined the Army I was just like, I kind of did it on a whim anyhow. I always wanted to but then I just decided to.”
Cherokee Nation citizen Alva Brown, left, with a security force team in 2003 along the Euphrates River near (An) Nasiriyah, Iraq. Brown, an Army veteran, retired in 2011 after 22 years of active service. COURTESY Alva Brown
Cherokee Nation citizen Alva Brown, left, with a security force team in 2003 along the Euphrates River near (An) Nasiriyah, Iraq. Brown, an Army veteran, retired in 2011 after 22 years of active service. COURTESY

Hannah creates competitive softball league

BY LINDSEY BARK
Staff Writer
01/23/2017 09:30 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – For the past three years Cherokee Nation citizen Dr. Leslie Hannah has ramped up competitive softball in the state as the Northeastern Oklahoma Softball Association’s founder and president.

Hannah has been involved in softball for 38 years as a certified professional umpire, but he founded NOKSA after his daughter joined Tahlequah’s recreational softball league.

After elected as league president, Hannah made changes with the league’s affiliation to play competitive softball.

“They (parents of league players) said they wanted a competitive league where we played for trophies and bids to state championship tournaments and things like that,” Hannah said. “That’s where Northeastern Oklahoma Softball Association was born, at that point. Back then it was called Cherokee County Girls Softball League.”

He said before NOKSA there were no leagues or organizations in northeast Oklahoma where youths could play competitive softball. Teams had to travel to other areas to play.
Cherokee Nation citizen Dr. Leslie Hannah looks on as a coach for an 8-and-under coach-pitch team in 2012 at the state championship tournament in Durant, Oklahoma. Hannah, the founder of the Northeastern Oklahoma Softball Association, has been involved in softball for 38 years. COURTESY Jennie Finch, center, a former professional softball player and Olympic gold medalist, talks with players at one of her camps featured on the Jennie Finch Softball camp tour. Her camp is slated to come to Tahlequah, Oklahoma, in October courtesy of the Northeastern Oklahoma Softball Association. COURTESY Information regarding a Nike Softball camp coming in June to Tahlequah, Oklahoma, courtesy of the Northeastern Oklahoma Softball Association. Cherokee Nation citizen Dr. Leslie Hannah serves as president for the association. COURTESY
Cherokee Nation citizen Dr. Leslie Hannah looks on as a coach for an 8-and-under coach-pitch team in 2012 at the state championship tournament in Durant, Oklahoma. Hannah, the founder of the Northeastern Oklahoma Softball Association, has been involved in softball for 38 years. COURTESY

ᏓᎵᏆ, ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ. – ᎤᎶᏒᏍᏓ ᏦᎢ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎨᎳ Dr. Leslie Hannah ᏚᏩᏛᎭ ᎤᎾᏚᎵᏍᎩ ᏍᏆᏞᏍᏗ ᏧᎾᏳᎶᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎤᏴᏢᎧᎸᎬ ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ ᏍᏆᏞᏍᏗ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᎲᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᎵᎪᏒ ᎤᏩᏛᏓ ᎠᎴ ᏄᎬᏫᏳᏒᎢ.

Hannah ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎨᎳᏗᏙᎰ ᎠᎾᎳᏍᎦᎵᏍᎩ ᎾᎿ ᏦᏍᎪ ᏧᏁᎳ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎪᏪᎵ ᎤᎾᎢ ᏗᎫᎪᏗᏍᎩ, ᎠᏎᏃ ᎤᏩᏛᎮᎢ NOKSA ᎣᏂ ᎦᏳᎳ ᎬᏩᏖᎳᏛ ᎤᏪᏥ ᎠᎨᏳᏣ ᎾᎿ ᏓᎵᏆ ᏍᏆᏞᏍᏗ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᎲᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ.

ᎣᏂ ᎦᏰᎦᏑᏱᏗ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᏒ ᎤᎬᏫᏳᎯ, Hannah ᎤᏁᏟᏴᏒ ᎢᎦᏓ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᏒ ᎤᎾᎵᎪᏗ ᏧᎾᏁᎶᏗ ᎤᎾᏚᎵᏍᎩ ᏧᎾᏁᎶᏗ ᏍᏆᏞᏍᏗ.

“ᎾᏍᎩ (ᏧᎾᏓᎦᏴᎵᎨ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᎲᏍᎩ) ᎤᎾᏛᏅ ᎤᎾᏚᎵᏍᎩ ᏂᎪᎯᎸ ᏧᎾᏁᎶᏗᎢ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏌᏛ ᎤᎾᏓᏠᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏧᏂᎬᏩᎶᏗ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎤᏂᏍᎦᏎᏍᏗ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏔᏅᏍᎬᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Hannah. “ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᏴᏢᎧᎸᎬ ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ ᏍᏆᏞᏍᏗ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᎲᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᎵᎪᏒ ᎤᏕᏅᎢ, ᎯᎠ ᎨᏒᎢ. ᎾᎯᏳ ᏥᎨᏒ ᎯᎠ ᎾᏂᏪᏎᎲ ᏣᎳᎩ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎠᏂᎨᏳᏣ ᏍᏆᏞᏍᏗ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᎲᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ.”

ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Ꮟ NOKSA ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᏥᎨᏒ Ꮭ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ ᎠᎴ ᏧᎾᏙᏂᏢᎯ ᏱᎨᏎ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏴᏢᎦᎸᎬ ᎢᏗᏢ ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ ᎾᎿ ᏗᎾᏛᏍᎩ ᏗᎬᏩᎾᏁᎶᏗ ᏓᎾᏓᎪᏂᏍᎩ ᏍᏆᏞᏍᏗ ᏓᎾᏁᎶᎲᏍᎬᎢ. ᏗᎾᏁᎶᎯᏍᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏓᏁᎪᎢ ᏗᏐᎢ ᏚᏙᏢᏒ ᏗᎬᏩᎾᏁᎶᏗ.

“ᏓᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬ ᎨᏛᎬᎢ ᎠᏌᏍᏛ ᏣᏚᎵ ᏣᎩᏍᏗᎢ ᏣᏓᏒᎲᏍᏗᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᏝᏃ ᏱᏙᏥᎲᏍᎪ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏓᏒᎲᏍᏗ.

ᎯᎢᏃ ᏙᏥᏅᏁᎰ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬ ᎤᏂᏴᏍᏙᏗ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎤᏂᏍᎦᏎᏗ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᎲᏍᎩ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏱᏣᏓᏠᏏ ᎯᎠ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ ᏓᎾᏁᎶᎲᏍᎬ, ᎠᏯ ᏱᎦᏈᏯ ᏣᏴᏍᏙᏗ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎤᎾᏓᎵᏁᎯᏛᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

NOKSA ᎤᎾᎵᎪᎯ ᎾᏍᎩ USA ᏍᏆᏞᏍᏗ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᎲᏍᎩ ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ ᎾᎿ 2014, ᎠᎴ Hannah ᏔᎵᏁ ᎠᎴᎲᏍᎩ ᎠᎧᎷᏏᏂ ᎾᎿ ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ ᎤᏴᏢᎧᎸᎬ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ. USA ᏍᏆᏞᏍᏗ ᎠᏓᏅᏖᎵᏙ ᎤᎭ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎹᏱᏟ Olympic ᏍᏆᏟᏍᏗ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᎲᏍᎩ.

ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎢᏤ ᏧᎾᎵᎪᎯ, ᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬ ᏚᏭᎪᏓ ᎠᎭᏂ ᎤᏍᏆᎶᏗ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎤᎾᏓᎵᏁᎯᏛᎢ ᎠᏂᏓᎨ ᎤᏟᏍᏗ ᎤᏕᎦ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎾᎳᏍᎦᎵᏍᎩ ᎠᏍᏆᎵᏍᎬ ᎾᎿᎢ 2017 ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩ ᏕᎭᎷᏱ ᎧᎸ, ᏛᏍᏆᎵᎯ ᏅᎩ ᎢᎦ Nike ᏍᏆᏞᏍᏗ camp ᎠᏍᏆᎵᏍᎨᏍᏗ, ᎠᎴ ᏚᏂᎬᏗ ᎧᎸ ᏐᎢ ᏛᎠᏍᏆᎵᎯ ᏔᎵ ᏧᏙᏓᏆᏗ Jennie Finch ᏧᏙᎩᏓ ᏍᏆᏞᏍᏗ camp ᎠᏍᏆᎵᏍᎨᏍᏗ.

“ᎯᎠ ᎤᏔᎾ ᎠᏍᏆᎵᏍᎨᏍᏗ ᎯᎠ Ꮭ ᎢᎴᎯᏳ ᏓᎵᏆ ᎤᏍᏆᎸᏓ ᏱᎩ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏂᎦᏓ ᏧᏂᏒᏍᏗ ᏕᎪᏢᏒ ᏙᏓᏲᏥᎧᎵᎳ ᎾᎿ ᏓᎵᏆ….. ᏒᎾᏙᏓᏆᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ Nike ᎠᎴ weekend ᎾᎿ Finch,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Hannah. “ ᎠᎩᎪᎯ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᏧᏃᏪᎳᏅᎯ ᎢᏧᎳ. ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎾ ᏂᏙᏓᏳᎾᏂᎩᏓ ᏐᎢ ᏙᏗᎦᎶᎨᏒ ᏯᏛᎾ ᏍᏆᏂᏯ ᎯᎠ ᏧᎾᏁᎶᏗᎢ. ᎢᎦᏓᏃ ᎾᏍᎩ Australia ᎾᏍᎩ Finch camp. ᎤᏔᏂ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ ᏛᏍᏆᎸᎯ.”

ᎢᏧᎳ ᏚᏙᏢᏒ ᏓᎾᏘᏃᎯᎮᏍᏗ ᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᏧᎾᏘᏂᏙᎯ, ᎾᏍᎩᏃᏊ ᎠᏂᏏᎾᏍᏗ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᎲᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎾᏘᏂᏙᎯ ᎾᏍᎩ 2008 USA Olympic ᏍᏆᏞᏍᏗ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᎲᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ. ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᎲᏍᎩ. ᎯᎠ camp ᏙᏛᏍᏕᎸᎯ ᎨᎳ ᏗᎾᏛᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᎨᏳᏣ ᎤᎪᏛ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏍᏆᏞᏍᏗ ᏧᎾᏁᎶᏙᏗᎢ, ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

Hannah ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᏚᏭᎪᏛ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎾᎳᏍᎦᎵᏍᎩ ᏧᏂᏃᏩᏛᏗ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏗᎾᏘᏂᏙᎯ ᎬᏩᏂᎪᏩᏛᏗ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᎲᏍᎦ ᎨᏒ ᎠᎴ ᎬᏩᎾᏑᏰᏍᏗ ᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏧᎾᏁᎶᏗᎢ.

“ᎤᎪᏛᎯ ᎯᎠ, ᎤᏓᎴᏅᎲᎢ ᎾᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎠᏆᏤᎵ ᎠᎨᏳᏣ ᎤᏚᎵᏍᎬ ᏧᏁᎶᏗ ᏍᏆᏞᏍᏗ…. ᎡᎵᏊ ᎠᏂᏐᎢ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎦᎦᏥᏍᏕᎸᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏇᏥ ᏥᏍᏕᎵᏍᎬᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᏂᎦᏛᏁᎯ ᎯᎠ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ᎠᏆᎵᏐᏯᏍᏛ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᏥᏌᏙᏯᏍᏗ ᎯᎠ ᎠᏂᎨᏳᏣ ᏧᎾᏁᎶᏗ ᏍᏆᏞᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ, ᎠᏎᏃ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᎲᏍᎬ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗ.”

ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Olympic silver medalist Monica Abbott ᎤᏬᏪᎳᏅ ᎾᎿ ᎢᎬᏱ million—dollar ᏚᎾᏓᏁᏤᎸ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏃᏪᎳᏅ ᏧᏁᎶᏗ ᏍᏆᏞᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ 2016 ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ. “ᏃᏊ ᎾᎿ ᎢᎵᏊ millionaire ᏱᎾᎵᏍᏓ ᏕᎭᏁᎶᎲᏍᎬ ᎤᏠᏯ ᎠᏂᏧᏣ. ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᏄᏍᏛ ᏓᏊᎪᏔᏅ ᎾᏍᏳ ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎠᏇᏣ ᎠᎨᏳᏣ…… ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏠᏯ ᎤᏜᏅᏓᏛ ᎾᏃ ᎠᏂᏧᏣ…. ᎤᏂᎲᎢ.”

Hannah ᎤᏛᏅ NOKSA ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎾᎵᏍᎪᎸᏗᏍᎪ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᎪᏍᏩᏙᏗ ᎬᏩCᏅᏓᏗᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᎠᎾᎳᏍᎦᎵᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᎾᎵᏍᏙᏗᎢ.

“ᎢᏳᏍᏓᏊ ᎦᎦᏥᏍᏕᎸᏗ ᎤᎾᏂᎩᏍᏗ ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᎠᎾᎳᏍᎦᎵᏍᎩᏅ, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏄᏍᏗ ᎦᎦᏎᏍᏗᎬᎢ.”

ᎾᏍᎩ Nike ᏍᏆᏞᏍᏗ camp ᎠᏍᏆᎵᏍᎨᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ June 5---8 ᎢᎪᎯᏓ ᎾᎿ CN Sports Complex ᎾᎿ ᎢᏧᎾᏕᏘᏴᏓ 8—18. ᏚᏂᎬᏩᎶᏛ $235. ᎠᏂᏏᏴᏫᎭ ᎾᎿ ᏅᎩ ᏧᏙᏓᏩᏗ. ᎪᏪᎶᏗ ᎡᎵᏊ ᎠᏩᏛᏗ ussportscamps.com.

ᎾᏍᎩ Jennie Finch ᏧᎾᏁᎶᏗᎢ ᏚᏂᏃᏗ 21—22 ᎾᎿ CN Sport Complex ᎾᎿ ᏦᎢᏁ ᏗᏂᏂᏙᎯ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᎦᎸᎳᏗᏟ ᏗᏂᏂᏙᎯ. ᏚᏂᎬᏩᎶᏛ ᎾᎿ 205. ᎠᏏᏴᏫᎭ ᎾᎿ ᏔᎵ ᏧᏙᏓᏆᏗ. ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏗ ᎡᎵᏊ ᎠᏩᏛᏗ jenniefinch.com.

ᎤᎪᏛ ᎠᏕᎶᎰᎯᏍᏗ ᏲᏚᎵ ᎾᎿ NOKSA, visit www.noksa.org, email northeasteroksoftball@gmail.com or visit www.facebook.com/Northeastern--Oklahoma---Softball-Association.

Ross receives award for promoting horseshoes

BY LINDSEY BARK
Staff Writer
12/29/2016 04:00 PM
STILLWATER, Okla. - Cherokee Nation citizen Al Ross received the “Charlie Brewer Award” on Dec. 3 at the Oklahoma Horseshoe Pitchers Association Hall of Fame banquet at the Stillwater Senior Citizen’s Center.

As a member of the OHPA for 12 years, Ross received the award for promoting, fostering and building the sport of horseshoes in the northeast area of the state.

Ross said he was “surprised” and did not expect to receive any type of recognition for his love of horseshoes.

“The ‘Charlie Brewer Award’ is given to people who promote horseshoes and foster…try to keep horseshoes going, try to recruit members,” Ross said.

Charlotte Bowen, OHPA Secretary, said the award is given in memory of horseshoe pitcher Charlie Brewer of Yukon, Oklahoma, “who was a tremendous promoter of horseshoes in that area and the state of Oklahoma.” The award was established in 2013.
Cherokee Nation citizen Al Ross displays his awards and recognitions he received on Dec.3 at the Oklahoma Horseshoe Pitchers Association Hall of Fame banquet in Stillwater, Oklahoma for helping to enhance the sport of horseshoes in northeastern Oklahoma. He received the “Charlie Brewer Award,” a certificate of appreciation as tournament director and a patch for pitching 10 World Tournaments in a row. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen Al Ross displays his awards and recognitions he received on Dec.3 at the Oklahoma Horseshoe Pitchers Association Hall of Fame banquet in Stillwater, Oklahoma for helping to enhance the sport of horseshoes in northeastern Oklahoma. He received the “Charlie Brewer Award,” a certificate of appreciation as tournament director and a patch for pitching 10 World Tournaments in a row. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Stillwater, ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ.--- ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᎨᎵ ᎨᎳ Al Ross ᎤᎩᏒ ᎾᎿ “Charlie Brewer Award” ᎾᎿ ᎥᏍᎩᏱ ᏦᎢᏁᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ ᏐᏈᎵ ᎤᎾᎳᏑᏤ ᎤᎾᏕᎩ ᎤᎾᏓᏡᎬᎢ Hall of Fame ᏚᎾᏓᏟᏌᎯ ᎾᎿ Stillwater ᎠᏂᎦᏴᎵ ᎤᎾᏓᏟᏐᏗ ᎠᏱᏟ.
ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎨᎳ Ꮎ OHPA ᏔᎳᏚ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ, Ross ᎤᎩᏒ ᎤᎾᏌᏍᏛ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏚᏍᏕᎸᎲ, ᎤᎵᏍᏕᎸᎲ ᏗᎦᏎᏍᏔᏅ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎢᎬᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᏓᎾᏁᎶᎲᏍᎬ ᏐᏈᎵ ᎤᎾᎳᏑᎶ ᎤᎾᏕᎬᎢ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏴᏢᎧᎸᎬ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ.

Ross ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ “ᎤᏍᏆᏂᎪᏎ” ᎠᎴ Ꮭ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎦ ᎤᏚᎦ ᏳᏩᏎ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᎤᎩᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏥᏁᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᏂ ᎤᎸᏉᏛ ᎨᏒ ᏧᏁᎶᏗᎢ.

ᎾᏍᎩ ‘Charlie Brewer ᎤᎾᏓᏁᏗ’ ᎾᎿ ᏓᏂᏁᎰ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎤᏂᎫᏍᏓᎥ ᏐᏈᎵ ᎤᎾᎳᏑᎶ ᎤᎾᏕᎩ ᎠᎴ ᏓᏂᏍᏕᎵᏍᎬᎢ……… ᎠᎾᏁᎶᏗᏍᎬ ᏐᏈᎵ ᎤᎾᎳᏑᎶ ᎤᎾᏕᎩ ᏂᎦᏯᎢᏒ ᏂᎪᎯᎸ, ᎠᎴ ᎠᎾᏖᎳᏗᏍᎩ ᏚᏂᏲᎰᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Ross.

Charlotte Bowen, OHPA ᏗᎪᏪᎵᏍᎩ, ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᏥᏁᎸ ᎠᎾᎵᎮᎵᎬ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎾᏅᏓᏗᏍᎬ ᎨᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏐᏈᎵ ᎤᏕᎦ Charlie Brewer ᎾᎿ Yukon, ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ ᎡᎯ,” ᎾᎿ ᎤᏟᏂᎩᏓ ᎤᏩᎫᏍᏓᎢ ᏐᏈᎵ ᎤᎳᏑᎶ ᎤᎾᏕᎩ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ ᎠᎴ ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ ᏍᎩᏚᎩ.” ᎾᎿ ᎠᎾᏓᏠᏍᎬ ᎤᏓᎴᏅᎲ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏦᎦᏚ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ.

ᎾᏍᎩ ᎾᏛᏁᎲ Ross ᎾᎿ “ᏧᏂᎩᏍᏗᏓ ᏐᏈᎵ ᎤᎾᎳᏑᎶ ᎤᏕᎦ” ᏚᏍᏕᎸᎲ ᎪᏢᏅ ᏐᏈᎵ ᎤᎾᎳᏑᎶ ᎤᎾᏗᏅᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏦᎢ---ᏗᏍᎦᏚᎩ (Ꮃelling, Eldon, ᎠᎴ Briggs) ᎾᎿ Briggs ᎨᏒ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏂᎦᏚ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ.

ᎾᏍᎩ ᏐᏈᎵ ᏧᎾᎳᏑᎶ ᎤᎾᏕᏅᏗ ᎤᏚᏢᏅ ᎬᏩᏂᏍᏕᎸᎲ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ. Ross ᎤᎴᏅᎲ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏄᏩᎾᏕᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏐᏈᎵ ᎤᎾᏕᏅᏗᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏓᏍᏆᎸᏗᏍᎬ ᏓᏓᏂᎸᎬ ᏐᏈᎵ ᎤᎾᎳᏑᎶ ᎤᎾᏕᎩ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏓᏅᏖᎵᏙᎯ ᎠᏂᎧᎲᏍᎬᎢ.

Ross ᎾᏍᏊ OHPA ᎨᎳ ᏗᎾᏛᏍᎩ ᏗᏎᎮᎵᏙᎯ ᎨᏐ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏁᎶᏗᏍᎪ ᎾᎿ ᎨᎳ ᏗᎾᏛᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏠᏯᏍᏙᏗ ᎤᏚᎵᏍᎪ ᏐᏈᎵ ᎤᎾᎳᏑᎶ ᎤᎾᏕᎬ ᏄᏂᏤᎲ ᎢᎦ, ᎾᏍᏃ ᎤᏠᏯᏍᏗ ᎤᏂᎩᏍᏗ “Charlie Brewer Award.” ᏧᎵᏏᏃ ᎠᏁᎳᏗᏙᎰ, ᎠᎴ ᏌᏊ ᎤᎵᏏ ᎾᎿ ᎡᎶᎯ ᏂᎬ ᎤᏍᎦᏎᏗ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅ ᎾᎿ 2016 (World Tournment in Montgomery, Alabama, in July.) ᏛᎶᎯ ᏂᎬᎢ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᎿ Montgomery, Alabama, ᎾᎿ ᎦᏰᏉᏂ ᎧᎸᎢ.

ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᎦᎵᏆᏚ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ, Ross ᎤᏚᎩ ᎤᏩᎯ ᏭᎷᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᏎᎸ ᎯᎠ ᎤᏙᏢᏗ ᎯᎠ ᏐᏈᎵ ᎤᎳᏑᎶ ᎤᎾᏗᏅᏗᎢ.

ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎤᏚᎵᏍᎬ ᎤᏂᎪᏛ ᎤᎾᏕᎩ ᎤᏁᎳᏗᏓᏍᏗ ᎯᎠ ᏓᎾᏁᎶᎲᏍᎬ ᏓᎾᏓᏂᎸᎬ ᎯᎠ ᏗᏁᎶᏗ ᎾᎿ Tri-community (W.E.B) ᏧᎾᏓᏱᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏚᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎲ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏴᏢᎤᏕᎵᎬ Arkansas ᏐᏈᎵ ᎤᎳᏑᎶ ᎤᎾᏕᎩ Association league ᎾᎿ Fayetteville, Arkansas, ᎾᎿ ᎢᎬᏱ ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ--- Arkansas ᎤᏁᏄᏢ ᏐᏈᎵ ᎤᎳᏑᎶ ᎤᎾᏕᎬ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

Ross ᎤᏚᎵ ᏧᏂᎳᏕᏗ ᎤᏂᎪᏛ ᎨᎳ ᏗᎾᏛᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏕᎦ ᎢᏳᎾᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎨᎳ ᏗᎾᏛᏍᎩ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎤᏓᎴᏅᏗ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᏗᎪᏪᎵ. ᏃᎴᏍᏊ ᎤᏚᎩ ᎤᏩ ᎤᏂᎪᏛ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏧᎾᏁᎶᏗᎢ ᏧᎾᏓᏂᎸᏍᏗᎢ ᎤᎾᏕᎬ ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ “ᎣᏍᏓ ᎤᎾᏕᎦ ᎠᏁᎭ.”

Ross ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎯᎠ ᏂᏓᏛᏁᎲ ᏐᏈᎵ ᎤᎾᎳᏑᎶ ᎤᎾᏕᎦ Ꮭ ᏱᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏏᏓᏁᎸ ᏂᎬᎩᏍᏕᎵᏍᎬᎾ ᏱᎩ.

“ᎢᏳᏃ ᏏᏓᏁᎸ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᏱᎩ, Ꮭ ᎡᎵ ᏱᏂᎦᎦᏛᎦ ᎯᎠ ᏥᏂᎦᏛᏁᎰᎢ. ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎤᎾᏓᏍᏕᎸᏗ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎢᎦ ᎤᎵᏍᎨᏓ ᎾᎿ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎠᏂᎩᏍᏙᏗ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Ross.

Bowen ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏓᏒᎲᏍᏗ Ross ᏧᏁᏒ ᎤᎵᏍᎨᏓ ᎾᎿ ᏓᏍᏕᎵᏍᎬ ᏐᏈᎵ ᎤᎾᎳᏑᎶ ᎤᎾᏕᎦ ᎠᎾᎢᏒ ᎤᏛᎯᏍᏗᎢ, ᎠᎴᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᎠᏛᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᎿ Hall of Fame ᎨᎳ ᎤᎬᏩᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎤᏩᎫᏗᏗᏒᎢ.

Ross ᎾᏍᏊ ᎤᏁᏒ ᎬᏂᎨᏒ ᎢᎬᏁᎯ ᎠᎦᎵᎡᎵᎬ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬ ᏗᏎᎮᎵᏙᎯ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎾᏕᎬ “ᏍᎪᎯ ᎢᎦᏯᎢ” ᎡᎶᎯ ᏂᎬᎾᏛ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ Hall of Fame ᎠᏁᎳ ᎤᎾᏓᏟᏌᎲᎢ.

“ᏂᎦᏛᏁᎰ ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎠᎩᎸᏉᏓ ᏐᏈᎵ ᎤᎾᎳᏑᎶ ᎤᎾᏕᎦ. ᎠᏆᏚᎵ ᎤᏂᎪᏓ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎤᏂᎷᎯᏍᏗ. ᎠᎩᎸᏉᏓ ᎤᎾᎳᏑᎶ ᎠᏆᏗᏅᏗᎢ.

ᏂᎦᏛᏁᎰ ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᏍᎪ ᎠᎩᎸᏉᏓ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏯᏆᏛᏗᎢ. ᎠᏆᏚᎵ ᎤᏂᎪᏓ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎤᏂᎷᎯᏍᏗᎢ. ᎠᎩᎸᏉᏓ ᎠᏆᏗᏅᏗᎢ. ᎠᏎᏃ ᎠᎩᎸᏉᏔᏅ ᎤᎾᏓᏅᏖᎴ ᎨᎳ ᎠᎭᏂ ᎢᏴ ᎡᎯ ᎠᏁᎸᏗᏍᎬ ᎤᏂᎩᏍᏙᏗᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Ross.

ᎤᎪᏛ ᎠᏕᎶᎰᎯᏍᏗ ᏲᏚᎵ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ OHPA, visit www.oklahomahorseshoes.org.

Glory-Jordan receives national housing conference honors

BY STAFF REPORTS
12/12/2016 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Former Tribal Councilor Tina Glory-Jordan received the National American Indian Housing Council Lawyer of the Year Award on Dec. 7 at the organization’s symposium in Las Vegas.

Glory-Jordan, of Hulbert, has devoted more than 22 years to Indian housing programs, most recently as the Housing Authority of the Cherokee Nation’s counsel.

“To receive such a prestigious honor is truly humbling,” Glory-Jordan said. “A person doesn’t enter public service in search of accolades, but rather to better their community. My goal, whether as legal counsel for Indian housing programs, speaker of Tribal Council or district judge, has always been to work to improve the lives of our Native people. To have that service acknowledged and honored is just amazing and unexpected. It has been an honor serving my Cherokee people and other tribes throughout my life.”

Glory-Jordan has served in the position since August 2015 but worked in the same position from 1983 to 2004. She also previously served as contract legal counsel for the Osage Nation Tribal Housing Department, the United Keetoowah Band Housing Authority and the Delaware Housing Authority.

“Tina Glory-Jordan has been and continues to be a truly great asset to the Cherokee Nation and Indian Country,” HACN Executive Director Gary Cooper said. “Her vision, expertise and willingness to serve have only enhanced our housing authority since she rejoined us in 2015. I’m thankful for her service and congratulate her on a well-deserved honor.”
Tina Glory-Jordan
Tina Glory-Jordan

Fine to lead North Texas in Heart of Dallas Bowl

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
12/09/2016 08:00 AM
(AP) – North Texas University has accepted an invitation to play in the Heart of Dallas Bowl against Army.

The Mean Green improved from one win last season to 5-7 this season under first-year head coach Seth Littrell.

Quarterback and Cherokee Nation citizen Mason Fine has completed 59.4 percent of his passes this season for 1,572 yards and six touchdowns.

Since there weren’t enough bowl-eligible teams to fill all the spots, North Texas was one of the teams allowed to advance to a bowl based on Academic Progress Rate scores.

Army is 6-5 with its annual regular-season finale against Navy left to play next Saturday.
Cherokee Nation citizen Mason Fine has completed 59.4 percent of his passes this season for 1,572 yards and six touchdowns for the Mean Green. COURTESY
Cherokee Nation citizen Mason Fine has completed 59.4 percent of his passes this season for 1,572 yards and six touchdowns for the Mean Green. COURTESY

Culture

First Nations to expand Native Arts Initiative
BY STAFF REPORTS
02/10/2017 12:00 PM
LONGMONT, Colo. – First Nations Development Institute, a national Native American nonprofit organization that works to improve Native economies and communities, on Feb. 2 announced it has received a $2.7 million grant for a three-year Native arts project.

This award will position First Nations to expand its Native Arts Initiative, formerly known as the “Native Arts Capacity Building Initiative,” into 2019.

Launched in early 2014, the purpose of the Native Arts Initiative is to support the perpetuation and proliferation of Native American arts, cultures and traditions as integral to Native community life. It does this by providing organizational and programmatic resources to Native-led organizations and tribal government programs that have existing programs in place that support Native artists and traditional arts in their communities.

Since 2014, First Nations has awarded more than $600,000 in grant funds to various eligible Native-led nonprofit organizations and tribal programs in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin to bolster the sustainability of their organizational and programmatic infrastructure as well as the professional development of their staff and leadership.

Under the expansion, First Nations will continue to offer competitive funding opportunities to Native-led nonprofit organizations and tribal programs in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin. First Nations will begin to offer competitive funding opportunities to Native-led nonprofit organizations and tribal programs in two new regions – the Southwest, including Arizona, New Mexico and Southern California, and the Pacific Northwest, including Washington and Oregon.

First Nations expects to release a request for proposals in the coming days and will award approximately 45 Supporting Native Arts Grants of up to $32,000 each over the next three years to eligible Native-led nonprofits and tribal government programs in these regions.

NAI recipient organizations and programs will utilize their grants to strengthen their organizational and programmatic infrastructure and sustainability, which will reinforce their support of the field of Native American artists as culture bearers and traditional arts in their communities. In addition to financial support, the NAI will offer individualized training and technical assistance opportunities for grantees as well as competitive professional development opportunities for staff members of eligible Native-led organizations and tribal programs.

For a list of current and former NAI grantees, visit http://www.firstnations.org.

Education

Connors State’s Native center focuses on success, cultures
BY LINDSEY BARK
Staff Writer
02/17/2017 08:15 AM
WARNER, Okla. – In August, Connors State College opened the doors to its Native American Success and Cultural Center that features Native American art, a computer lab, language repository and study group rooms for students, faculty, staff and the public.

The center is part of a Title III grant program that Connors received in 2014.

“This was a $5 million dollar grant spread over five years. This particular one has two focus areas. It has the Native American Success Center area, and it also has another focus for online hybrid course development,” Gwen Rodgers, Connors Title III project director, said.

Rodgers said Connors developed a “pride model” to help Native students with retention, help them learn about their respective cultures and be “inclusive” of all cultures.

“The center is open to anybody. It is not exclusive to Native Americans. There’s a rumor going around that only Native American students can utilize the center, and we’re trying to dispel that,” Colleen Noble, NASCC director, said. “We want students, the public, faculty, staff to feel comfortable to come and learn about the history, culture, literature, artwork of the Five Civilized Tribes. That’s our focus. We are reaching out to school districts for them to come and be a part of field trips.”

The Cherokee, Choctaw, Muscogee (Creek), Chickasaw and Seminole nations were labeled as the Five Civilized Tribes.

Noble said in the center’s cultural section artwork is featured with a majority of it being Cherokee, but it also has Muscogee, Seminole, Choctaw, Chickasaw, Pawnee and Osage artwork. For the grant’s remainder, NASCC officials plan to acquire more art pieces from the Muscogee, Seminole, Chickasaw, Choctaw and Cherokee tribes in Oklahoma.

The center also offers cultural activities throughout the year by inviting presenters from different tribes to teach classes such as basket making and moccasin making.

Noble said Connors has a high population of Native American students, and the center is a “stop gap” for them to learn more about their respective cultures and heritages without having to travel to places such as Tulsa, Tahlequah and Muskogee to visit museums.

“We are currently 38 percent Native American students, which is a really good percentage for this area. We are one of the highest Native American populations for the state of Oklahoma for a higher learning institute. The biggest percentage of our students are Cherokee. We have over 900 students who are Native American and out of that over 600 are Cherokee,” Noble said. “We’re able to partner with Cherokee Nation and bring in some really wonderful cultural experts to share their knowledge and skills with our students.”

In the NASCC’s success center section, students learn styles in audio, visual and kinesthetic areas. Kinesthetic learning or tactile learning is where students learn by carrying out physical activities rather than listening to a lecture or watching demonstrations.

Noble said the computers labs have headphones, study rooms have marker and art boards and students can utilize a “spinning chair” to de-stress and re-focus on college studies.

“It is a five-year grant, but it is developed and designed for continuation so that at the end of the five years this doesn’t all stop. It’s institutionalized throughout so that everything we’re doing now will keep going. So Connors will just be stronger because of it. We’re excited to be a part of it,” Rodgers said.

For more information, visit connorsstate.edu or call 918-463-6364.

Council

Tribal Council amends capital, operating budgets
BY LINDSEY BARK
Staff Writer
01/26/2017 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – During its Jan. 16 meeting, the Tribal Council unanimously amended the tribe’s fiscal year 2017 capital and operating budgets, increasing both funds.

With Tribal Councilors Curtis Snell and Wanda Hatfield absent, legislators added $76,837 to the capital budget for a total budget authority of $277.8 million. Officials said the increase came from a carryover environmental review for roads projects.

Legislators also increased the FY 2017 operating budget by $132,762 for a total budget authority of $664.5 million. Officials said the increase stems from grants received and authorized carryover reconciliation, new funding awards and an ending grant.

In other business, Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden honored three Cherokee veterans with Cherokee Warrior Awards for their military service.

Dale Leon Johnson was drafted in 1967 and sworn into the Army at Fort Polk, Louisiana. In 1968 he was transferred to Fulda, Germany, serving with Company C 19th Maintenance Battalion USAUR as a tank mechanic. He was honorably discharged as Specialist 4 in 1973. He and his wife Patricia have been married for 51 years and he recently retired from AEP/PSO after 37 years working as a lineman.

Shad Nicholas Taylor enlisted in the Oklahoma Army Guard in 1983 while still in high school. After basic and advanced training in Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, he spent almost 10 years working at Camp Gruber near Muskogee. His duty included tours to Panama and Jamaica for hurricane relief. In 2003 he was deployed for 12 months to Fallujah, Iraq, for Operation Iraqi Freedom. Days before being sent home from Fallujah, he was wounded, sent to Bagdad, Kuwait, and Germany before finally going Fort Sill in Lawton to heal. He said he takes pride in all the commendations he has received and was honored to receive the awards and medals for his 20-plus years of service.

Jimmy Donald Quetone is a graduate of Northeastern State University. He served as a teacher and basketball coach for East Central High School in Tulsa before being drafted by the Army in 1954. He was stationed at Fort Knox in Kentucky and Fort Sam Houston in Texas. He served in the 97th Machine Record Unit where he was responsible for keeping records for personnel and equipment in the 4th Army Area. He was honorably discharged in 1956 and returned to the education field. He retired working as the CN director of Education in 2001. Quetone is also an inductee of the NSU Athletic Hall of Fame and continues to serve others by volunteering at the Tahlequah Senior Citizens center.

In reports, Cherokee Nation Businesses CEO Shawn Slaton recognized the CNB and CN Entertainment Community Impact Teams for raising $21,406.67 for the “Heart of a Nation” campaign, which will be used to help buy needed medical equipment for tribal citizens.

A check was presented to Principal Chief Bill John Baker and Crittenden for the campaign.

“All across the board we’ve got a very giving company both in terms of time and money,” Slaton said. “What it’s intended to do is impact in a positive way, helping Cherokee people.”

Health

Claremore Indian Hospital to host ACA fair
BY STAFF REPORTS
02/15/2017 04:00 PM
CLAREMORE, Okla. – The Claremore Indian Hospital will host an Affordable Care Act Outreach and Enrollment Fair from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on March 1 in Conference Room 1.

“We will be hosting another ACA Outreach and Enrollment Fair here at Claremore,” Sheila Dishno, patient benefit coordinator, said. “Even though members of federally recognized tribes have a special monthly enrollment status, it is important for American Indian and Alaska Native individuals and families to learn about their insurance options. Whether it’s purchasing insurance through the Marketplace or qualifying for SoonerCare, knowing that you have quality coverage provides peace of mind.”

Dishno said people who attend the fair should bring their Social Security cards, pay stubs, W-2 forms or wage and tax statements, policy numbers for any current health insurance and information about any health insurance they or their families could get from an employer.

Also Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Oklahoma will attend to assist patients with signing up for free-to-low-cost health insurance.

The hospital is located at 101 S. Moore Ave. For more information, call 918-342-6240, 918-342-6559 or 918-342-6507.

Opinion

OPINION: Creating new Cherokee speakers
BY BILL JOHN BAKER
Principal Chief
02/01/2017 12:15 PM
The Cherokee language is one of the most vital elements of our tribal culture. We have invested in preservation efforts and youth education endeavors, including the Cherokee Immersion Charter School, which is a renowned global example for developing youth speakers.

Today, there are an estimated 2,000 to 4,000 fluent Cherokee speakers, and many others who are conversational second-language learners of Cherokee. While we have elders who are fluent and the emerging youth who will be, there was a void in the development of young adults.

That is why, two years ago, we launched the Cherokee Language Master-Apprentice Program. The goal of this program is to create new adult Cherokee language teachers. We selected four young adults to be the first class, and I am proud to say two of the students recently graduated and one of them will soon be teaching at the Immersion School.

When the selected students came into the program, they had little to no knowledge of the Cherokee language. However, upon graduating two years later, they have achieved high conversational levels. That is truly amazing.

The Master-Apprentice Program is an everyday effort. The students perform general, everyday activities but speak nothing but Cherokee. No English is spoken all day. They cook, look for wild onions and mushrooms and have general daily conversations in Cherokee. The approach is to do the everyday things, simple activities that are second nature to speak about in English, but do so only in Cherokee. The Cherokee language immersion environment is eight hours each day, five days per week.

The students are paid an hourly wage to attend the program and are selected through an essay and interview process. The students are referred to as apprentices, and these activities and classes are led by fluent, first-language speakers called masters. The program tries to identify young adults and older learners.

This method has been adopted by many tribes in California and has proven to be effective in producing fluent second-language learners. The evidence-based strategy integrates the Cherokee language and our staff has secured multiple grants to help fund the Master-Apprentice Program. Our success in the past year reinforces this effective learning method. Language immersion may be difficult and disorienting initially, but through perseverance and patience, students begin to grasp and learn Cherokee communication structures. Our mission is to develop Cherokee speakers who will have the knowledge to continue learning and teaching throughout the student’s life and ensure language preservation.

A third class of eight participants was selected in late 2016, bringing our total to 16 students. Increasing our number of speakers means preserving our unique culture. Our goal is to provide a seamless path for Cherokee language achievements that result in cultural preservation and eventually finding employment utilizing the Cherokee language.

With this effort, coupled with our Cherokee Immersion Charter School and the work of our Cherokee translation department, which has helped develop the Cherokee language for new technology that our citizens can use to text and email in Cherokee, we have set the bar for what it means to invest in language development. Cherokee Nation is a leader in Indian Country, and we are committed to preserving and growing our language. The tribe is proving we can cultivate more Cherokee speakers and enhance our language programs.

For more information on the Master-Apprentice Program, contact the program’s manager, Howard Paden, at Howard-Paden@Cherokee.org.

People

Smith win IHS peer award
BY STAFF REPORTS
11/30/2016 04:00 PM
EL RENO, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen Gary Smith was recently given a Peer Recognition Award from the Indian Health Service’s Oklahoma City Area director for his work at the El Reno Indian Health Center.

Smith serves as the sole housekeeper at the El Reno Indian Health Center.

He has worked for the El Reno facility for more than a year and with IHS for 12 years. Prior to Smith’s hire as a full-time housekeeper for the El Reno facility in March 2015, he served seven years with Lawton IHS and five years with W. W. Hastings in Tahlequah. Aside from his daily duties, Smith takes on additional tasks such as repainting the facility, grounds maintenance and ensuring patient and staff safety as the facility safety officer.
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