Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa hosts ‘Twisted Nightmare’ Oct. 28

BY STAFF REPORTS
10/20/2017 12:00 PM
CATOOSA, Okla. – The spookiest night of the year is happening Oct. 28 at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa with its “Twisted Nightmare” Halloween Party.

A one-of-a-kind meet and greet with Twisted Sister’s Dee Snider kicks off the night followed by a light show and an elaborate costume contest with $10,000 in cash prizes.

Snider is best known as the lead singer in the 1980s band, Twisted Sister. His success propelled him into stardom that led to appearances on reality TV shows, including “The Celebrity Apprentice,” “Gone Country with John Rich,” MTV’s “Rock the Cradle” and “Growing Up Twisted.” He’s also an accomplished radio host, voiceover artist and film producer.

The “Twisted Nightmare” Halloween Party opens at 8 p.m. in the Sequoyah Convention Center. DJ Sally and DJ Miguel, two of Las Vegas’ leading DJs, will be teaming up on the turntables to create a world-class dance party.

Guests are encouraged to wear their most creative, daring and frightening costumes and enter this year’s costume contest where $10,000 is up for grabs. The first place winner receives $5,000. Second place takes home $3,000, and third place is awarded $2,000. Judging for the costume contest is slated between 10:45 p.m. and 11:30 p.m. Winners will be announced at midnight and must be present to win.
A one-of-a-kind meet and greet with Twisted Sister’s Dee Snider is set for Oct. 28 at the Hard Rock & Hotel Tulsa’s “Twisted Nightmare” Halloween Party. COURTESY
A one-of-a-kind meet and greet with Twisted Sister’s Dee Snider is set for Oct. 28 at the Hard Rock & Hotel Tulsa’s “Twisted Nightmare” Halloween Party. COURTESY

‘Million Dollar Quartet’ jams out on Dec. 2

BY STAFF REPORTS
09/29/2017 02:00 PM
CATOOSA, Okla. – “Million Dollar Quartet,” the Tony Award-winning Broadway musical based on one of the greatest rock ‘n’ roll jam sessions in history, is heading to The Joint on Dec. 2 inside the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa.

Tickets start at $29 and go on sale Oct. 12.

“Million Dollar Quartet” tells the story of the twist of fate that brought young icons Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis, Carl Perkins and Elvis Presley together at Sun Records on Dec. 4, 1956, in in Memphis, Tennessee. The performance brings to life a story of broken promises, secrets, betrayal, humor and celebration.

The musical features classic hits such as “Blue Suede Shoes,” “Fever,” “That’s All Right,” “Sixteen Tons,” “I Walk the Line,” “Great Balls of Fire,” “Folsom Prison Blues,” “Whole Lotta Shakin’ Goin’ On” and “Hound Dog.”

Oklahoma native and Oklahoma City University alum Tiffan Borelli will perform on stage as a singer and Elvis’ girlfriend Dyanne. Borelli has performed in regional theater, including Lyric Theatre of Oklahoma, and most recently performed in NYC Theatre in productions such as “Kiss Me Kate” and “Emma: The Musical.” “Million Dollar Quartet” also stars Daniel Durston as Elvis Presley, Taylor Gray as Jerry Lee Lewis, Austin Hohnke as Carl Perkins and Peter Oyloe as Johnny Cash.
From left are Taylor Gray as Jerry Lee Lewis, Austin Hohnke as Carl Perkins, Daniel Durston as Elvis Presley, Peter Oyloe as Johnny Cash and Tiffan Borelli as Elvis’ girlfriend Dyanne in the Tony Award-winning musical “Million Dollar Quartert.” The show will run Dec. 2 at The Joint inside the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. COURTESY
From left are Taylor Gray as Jerry Lee Lewis, Austin Hohnke as Carl Perkins, Daniel Durston as Elvis Presley, Peter Oyloe as Johnny Cash and Tiffan Borelli as Elvis’ girlfriend Dyanne in the Tony Award-winning musical “Million Dollar Quartert.” The show will run Dec. 2 at The Joint inside the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. COURTESY
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Bad Company returns to The Joint: Tulsa

BY STAFF REPORTS
09/27/2017 04:00 PM
CATOOSA, Okla. – Super group Bad Company will perform its legendary hits Oct. 26 at The Joint inside Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa.

Tickets start at $75 and go on sale July 27.

Bad Company’s stop at The Joint: Tulsa is the band’s only U.S. appearance before heading to Mexico for a series of performances.

Bad Company was formed by Free’s Paul Rodgers (vocals/multi-instrumentalist) with Mott The Hoople’s Mick Ralphs (guitar) plus Free’s Simon Kirke (drums) and King Crimson’s Boz Burrell (bass), who passed away in 2006.

Six albums in nine years yielded tens of millions of copies sold and massive success in both the United Kingdom and the United States. The band is known internationally for hits such as “Can’t Get Enough,” “Bad Company,” “Feel Like Makin’ Love,” “Rock ‘n’ Roll Fantasy” and “Shooting Star.”
Bad Company’s stop at The Joint: Tulsa is the band’s only U.S. appearance before heading to Mexico for a series of performances. COURTESY
Bad Company’s stop at The Joint: Tulsa is the band’s only U.S. appearance before heading to Mexico for a series of performances. COURTESY

Terry Fator brings comedy act back to Hard Rock

BY STAFF REPORTS
09/14/2017 02:00 PM
TULSA, Okla. – Terry Fator, comedian, celebrity impressionist and one of Las Vegas’ best ventriloquists, is bringing his show back to The Joint inside Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa.

Tickets start at $55 and go on sale Sept. 14.

Fator will bring puppets to life, including Winston the Impersonating Turtle, Monty Carlo the lounge singer and country legend Walter T. Airdale. He can impersonate countless voices, singing everything from Nat King Cole, Garth Brooks, Roy Orbison, Elvis, Louis Armstrong and Bruno Mars.

After performing at countless county fairs and other venues, the Dallas native got his big break after winning “America’s Got Talent” in 2007. Later that year, he signed a deal to perform at the Las Vegas Hilton before signing to headline the show “Terry Fator: The VOICE of Entertainment,” at The Mirage Hotel & Casino.

His 2014 DVD, “Terry Fator: Live in Concert,” was launched at the same time as an updated version of his Las Vegas show. “Terry Fator: The VOICE of Entertainment” has also had the honor of being recognized by The Best of Las Vegas Awards for Best Show, Best All-Around Performer, Best Impersonator and Best Overall Show.

Micky Dolenz brings musical showcase to Hard Rock

BY STAFF REPORTS
09/14/2017 12:00 PM
CATOOSA, Okla. – Former Monkees member Micky Dolenz will give fans a glimpse into his lengthy music career on Nov. 5 at The Joint inside Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa.

Tickets start at $25 and go on sale Sept. 14.

Dolenz starred as the drummer in the Emmy Award-winning 1960s show “The Monkees,” a show he describes as “a half-hour Marx Brothers musical on TV.” Dolenz’s career skyrocketed as The Monkees sold more than 65 million records.

From there, Dolenz went on to continue his acting career in the United Kingdom with a role in Harry Nilsson’s “The Point.” He also added writing, directing and producing to his résumé, including writing and directing credits for “Bugsy Malone.”

A musical theater career was next for the actor. He starred in the Nat Tour/West End production of “Hairspray,” the Nat Tour/Broadway production of Elton John and Tim Rice’s “Aida,” as well as the Broadway production of “Grease.” He also participated in a Monkees revival and recorded an album called “Justus.”

Clark, Tillis and Bogguss bring trio of hits to Hard Rock

BY STAFF REPORTS
08/23/2017 08:00 AM
CATOOSA, Okla. – Country performers Terri Clark, Pam Tillis and Suzy Bogguss on Oct. 29 will present their “Chicks with Hits” tour at The Joint inside Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa.

Tickets start at $29 and go on sale Aug. 31.

The trio will showcase dozens of songs as they share the stage, bringing together decades of hits.
Clark is an eight-time Canadian Country Music Association’s Entertainer of the Year and has earned CCMA Female Vocalist of the Year five times. She is the only Canadian female artist to be a member of the Grand Ole Opry.

Clark has sold more than 5 million albums and is known for dozens of singles, including “Better Things To Do,” “Poor Poor Pitiful Me,” “Girls Lie Too” and “I Just Wanna Be Mad.”

Country performers Terri Clark, Pam Tillis and Suzy Bogguss on Oct. 29 will present their “Chicks with Hits” tour at The Joint inside Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. COURTESY
Country performers Terri Clark, Pam Tillis and Suzy Bogguss on Oct. 29 will present their “Chicks with Hits” tour at The Joint inside Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. COURTESY

Boz Scaggs rolls into Tulsa Sept. 27

BY STAFF REPORTS
08/03/2017 12:00 PM
CATOOSA, Okla. – Longtime singer, songwriter and guitarist Boz Scaggs will perform Sept. 27 at The Joint inside the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa.

Tickets start at $35 and went on sale Aug. 1.

Scaggs is known for his effortless soul, laser-focused direction and intense playing. His lengthy career first saw success during his time in the late 60s with the Steve Miller Band, where he contributed to two studio albums.

Since then, his solo career has skyrocketed with albums such as “Silk Degrees,” “Middle Man,” “Some Change,” “Dig” and “Memphis.”

His latest album, “A Fool to Care,” is considered relaxed and easy. Twelve tracks make up the record, including contributions by well-known artists such as Bonnie Raitt and Lucinda Williams. Scaggs credits influences from Oklahoma, Louisiana and Texas as his inspiration.

Cole Swindell heading to Hard Rock on Sept. 21

BY STAFF REPORTS
07/31/2017 12:00 PM
TULSA, Okla. – Record-breaking country singer and songwriter Cole Swindell is bringing his collection of hits on Sept. 21 to The Joint inside the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa.

Tickets start at $39 and go on sale Aug. 1.

Swindell’s stop at The Joint comes after his 2017 tour with Dierks Bentley and a successful sold-out headlining tour in 2016.

During the past two years, Swindell has taken country music by storm with career-defining singles like “Let Me See Ya Girl,” “Hope You Get Lonely Tonight,” “Ain’t Worth The Whiskey” and “Chillin It,” to name a few. One of his latest, “You Should Be Here,” has more than 100 million streams and is platinum-certified.

Writing three No. 1 hits in one year earned Swindell his second CMA Triple Play Award earlier this year. In 2016, he was named NSAI Songwriter/Artist of the Year and nominated as a CMA New Artist of the Year. He was the only artist to earn the CMA Triple Play Award in 2015 and during the same year was named ACM New Artist of the Year and one of Billboard’s Top New Country Artists.

Bad Company returns to The Joint on Oct. 26

BY STAFF REPORTS
07/24/2017 12:00 PM
TULSA, Okla. – Rock’s super-group Bad Company will perform its legendary hits on Oct. 26 at The Joint inside Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa.

Tickets start at $75 and go on sale July 27.

Bad Company’s stop at The Joint: Tulsa is the band’s only U.S. appearance before heading to Mexico for a series of performances.

Bad Company was formed by Free’s Paul Rodgers (vocals/multi-instrumentalist) with Mott The Hoople’s Mick Ralphs (guitar) plus Free’s Simon Kirke (drums) and King Crimson’s Boz Burrell (bass), who passed away in 2006.

Six albums in nine years yielded tens of millions of copies sold and massive success in both the United Kingdom and the United States. The band is known internationally for hits like “Can’t Get Enough,” “Bad Company,” “Feel Like Makin’ Love,” “Rock ‘n’ Roll Fantasy” and “Shooting Star.”

Culture

NSU Center for Tribal Studies to host Indigenous Arts Education Series
BY STAFF REPORTS
10/19/2017 08:15 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Thanks in part from an Oklahoma Arts Council grant, the Northeastern State University Center for Tribal Studies will host the Indigenous Arts Education Series in November for American Indian Heritage Month.

The series will include the following:

Nov. 2
Marcus Harjo (Pawnee/Seminole) will present “Creative Writing and Music Production Workshop” from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the University Center Redbud Room. Harjo uses writing, music production and live performances to promote his passions of youth outreach, cultural awareness and promoting healthy, drug-free lifestyles, specifically among American Indian populations. His workshop will focus on teaching participants how to use writing and music composition skills to enhance the delivery of their message. His workshop will conclude with a live performance.

Nov. 8
Sandy Fife Wilson (Muscogee Creek) will present “Shell Carving Demonstration” from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. in the University Center Redbud Room. Wilson is an experienced artist having learned her art techniques through both formal education and traditional means as she comes from a long line of family artists. Wilson specializes in Southeastern design shell carvings, finger-woven items and Creek basketry. She will host a demonstration that will educate the audience on this traditional form of art and lead participants through the process using a direct, hands-on approach to instruction.

Nov. 14
Yatika Starr Fields (Muscogee Creek/Osage/Cherokee) will present “Becoming a Mural Artist” from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the University Center Redbud Room. Fields’ presentation will highlight his experience and work as a mural artist and provide attendees with some insight into the highly specialized field of mural art. This event will include a live art demonstration.
The Oklahoma Arts Council is the official state agency for the support and development of the arts. The agency’s mission is to lead in the advancement of Oklahoma’s thriving arts industry. Additional information is available at arts.ok.gov.

Education

GPI offers Native women journalistic opportunity
BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
10/12/2017 10:00 AM
WASHINGTON – The Global Press Institute is offering Native American women an experience with its Tribal Nations training-to-employment program, which allows women who are enrolled citizens in a tribe the opportunity to become journalists even if they have no prior experience in the field.

Cristi Hegranes, GPI founder and executive director, said in 2016 GPI conducted a pilot of the Tribal Nation’s program and are “excited” to expand the program and accurately tell the Native American story with hopes to get women from Oklahoma involved.

“So much of the coverage that makes it to the national scale is so stereotypically driven, and it really demonstrates a lack of understanding of so much of what happened within communities, tribal governments,” she said. “So we are expanding Global Press Tribal Nations to work with women from a variety of different tribes and communities across the United States to join the Global Press program.”

Hegranes said the program includes “rigorous” training and “long-term” employment.

“Anyone who graduates from our training program will receive long-term employment to cover their community over the long-term working for Global Press Journal,” she said.

Those who are accepted into the program would take part in a weeklong training in Washington, D.C., before reporting in their communities.

“We’ll be bringing women from all different tribes together to spend a week together learning what we call the principals and the practice of Global Press Journalism,” she said. “Then everyone will go back to their communities and they spend a couple of months doing three to six stories working with Global Press editors and fact checkers and copy editors to produce really unique coverage from the community.”

Hegranes said it’s important to highlight that no prior journalism experience or basic education limit is required and that applicants must be 18 or older.
“Really the only thing that is required is a natural curiosity and passion for storytelling and really the time to commit to the training and the long-term story production from the communities,” she said. “On average we work with our reporters for more than five years after the training. So we’re really looking for people who want to make an investment in their future as journalists.”

Hegranes said this “extraordinary” opportunity offers these future journalists the chance to play a “pivotal” role in changing the narrative for their community.

“Global Press news stories reach about 20 million people around the world every month. So this is a huge opportunity to really increase accurate information, to really dive in beyond the stereotypes and tell really authentic, true, important stories that might otherwise never be told,” she said.

Hegranes said GPI has been developing independent news bureaus in under-covered parts of the world for the past 11 years.

“The way that our program works is we identify local women from these communities and we put them through a rigorous training process. Teaching them to be ethical, accurate, investigative, feature journalists,” she said.

The deadline to apply is Oct. 15. To apply, visit http://bit.ly/2yF7fqP.

Council

Byrd builds on 18-year legacy of serving CN
BY KENLEA HENSON
News Writer
08/22/2017 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – With 18 years of experience serving the Cherokee people, Tribal Councilor Joe Byrd looks forward to serving another four years as the representative for Dist. 2, which consists of most of northern Cherokee County.

“I love serving the Cherokee people. They’ve got somebody that’s going to work for them again for the next four years, and I’m really looking forward to that,” said Byrd.

Originally from Belfonte/Nicut, Byrd was the youngest Cherokee Nation legislator to be elected. He served on the Tribal Council from 1987-95, followed by term as principal chief from 1995-99. In January 2012, he won a special election to replace Bill John Baker on the Tribal Council. Baker had taken office as the principal chief on Oct. 19, 2011, after a contentious and lengthy principal chief’s race against incumbent Chad Smith.

In 2013, Byrd was re-elected to serve his first full term under the tribe’s 1999 Constitution, which limits elected officials to two consecutive four-year terms before having to sit out a term. He was also named speaker of the Tribal Council in 2015 after then-Speaker Tina Glory Jordan termed out.

When he first ran for office in 1987, Byrd said he felt the need to help the Cherokee people with the issues they were facing.

“Our government didn’t begin serving our people until the 1970s. When I first moved to Northeastern (State University) in 1972 to get an education, it really opened my eyes to a lot of the issues our people were facing,” he said. “In the rural areas there were a lot of people who weren’t self-efficient, and I saw right then we still had many people out in the rural areas that needed help and needed an awareness that there is a tribe out there that should have a responsibility to take care of our people.”

As for his current term, deciding to run again for the Dist. 2 seat was an easy decision, he said, because of his love for serving the Cherokee people and because of his constituents who asked him to continue.

He spoke of elderly women who continues to set an example of how his constituents have not forgotten their Cherokee culture or who they are as a people.

“When people like that come up to me and ask me to run, it’s a real honor to have people with that kind of stature to say, ‘you need to run another time,’” he said. “The people will let you know when it’s time to run. You don’t have to consult them, they’ll let you know.”

During his time as Dist. 2 representative, Byrd has helped with projects to improve services for CN citizens, including the passing of a $900 million budget, a $100 million investment in Cherokee health care as well as a $200 million dollar expansion of the W.W. Hastings Hospital.

For this term, Byrd said he would continue working with the tribe to ensure rural area schools have shelter for inclement weather and that elders and veterans are taken care of.

“Our veterans seem to not be taken care of like they should,” he said. “When we give speeches and talks we all say, ‘we respect our elder’s and we respect our veterans,’ but we have many that are still homeless and not being served. I want to do anything I can to assist in making sure our elders and veterans are taken care of.”

Health

Health Services introduces antibiotic guidelines
BY STAFF REPORTS
10/19/2017 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation’s Health Services is introducing a program to educate patients on alternative ways other than antibiotics to heal common illnesses.

According to recent information released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, antibiotics are often misused for illnesses such as influenza and the common cold, and like other medications, they could have side effects.

According to the CDC, antibiotic resistance is a growing problem in the United States and across the world. The CDC states the main driving factors behind antibiotic resistance are the overuse and misuse of antibiotics.

Using the CDC guidelines, the tribe will more closely monitor antibiotic prescriptions and the use of antibiotics by patients throughout all CN health facilities.

Leadership at Health Services’ nine health centers and W.W. Hastings Hospital is also working to further educate staff on the proper use of antibiotics.

“We strive to educate our citizens and our doctors about the possible dangers of over prescribing medications and of building antibiotic resistance,” Health Services Executive Director Connie Davis said. “Throughout Cherokee Nation Health Services, we treat more than a million patients per year, and it is so important that we stay vigilant and educated when prescribing.”

In 2012, Hastings Hospital began the antibiotic stewardship program within its inpatient care, and this year the program will expand to the tribe’s nine health centers, positively impacting the health and treatment of even more CN citizens.

“Antibiotics can be a life-saving or life-threatening intervention depending on how they are used,” Health Services nurse practitioner Whitney Essex said. “We are committed to improving patient outcomes by using antibiotics responsibly.”

The CN operates the largest tribal health system in the country. In fiscal year 2016, the tribe had more than 1.1 million patient visits. For more information, visit https://www.cdc.gov/getsmart/community/index.html.

Opinion

OPINION: October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month
BY BRANDON SCOTT
Executive Editor - @cp_brandonscott
10/01/2017 04:00 PM
As you may have noticed, this month’s cover is a bit more colorful than usual. October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and we here at the Cherokee Phoenix wanted to help raise awareness about the importance of screening and early detection.

The probability of a woman being diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime is 1 in 8, and breast cancer is the second-leading cause of mortality among women in the United States. Within the Cherokee Nation, Breast cancer is the second-most frequently diagnosed cancer and the leading cancer among women. These statistics, coupled with the fact that Native American women have some of the lowest breast cancer screening rates of any ethnic group, is a sobering reality.

Breast cancer cannot be prevented, but early detection is key to successful treatment. Women whose breast cancer is caught at an early stage have a 93 percent survival rate. A Breast Self Exam or BSE, Clinical Breast Exam or CBE and mammogram are all effective early detection methods. CBE and BSE instruction occurs at all CN health centers, and mammograms are performed at the Wilma P. Mankiller Health Center, Vinita Health Center, Three Rivers Health Center, A-Mo Health Center, Sam Hider Health Center and the Claremore Indian Hospital.

Additionally, the Cherokee Nation Comprehensive Cancer Control was established to ensure CN citizens were receiving quality treatment, access to clinical trials, patient advocates and instructions on screening and detection. In 2015, more than 2,000 women participated in the screening and early detection program provided by the CNCCC. It is my hope that the number of participants in this program continues to grow year over year.

Today, a pink ribbon is synonymous with breast cancer awareness. But I urge you to take more than just a passing glance at all of the pink you will see this month. I encourage you to take time to learn about the early warning signs, receive instruction on self-exams and make a plan to utilize the resources available through CN Health Services for clinical exams. And men, we should take an active role in the fight against breast cancer as well. Encourage the women you love to take the time for breast cancer screening. It just might save their life.

People

Scott fiddles her way closer to Cherokee culture
BY KENLEA HENSON
News Writer
10/17/2017 08:00 AM
TULSA, Okla. – For some it’s traditional games such as stickball or marbles. For other Cherokees it may be weaving baskets with traditional materials that bring them closer to their culture. But for 15-year-old Regina Scott, it’s the love for the fiddle and fiddle music that brings her in tune to Cherokee culture.

“I think it’s really cool that I am Cherokee and that I play the fiddle because the fiddle was part of the Cherokee culture,” Cherokee Nation citizen said. “I know there are a lot of people that are Cherokee that probably don’t have a direct connection to their culture, so I am really proud that I have the fiddle because I feel like it brings me closer to my Cherokee culture.”

The Tulsa native found an interest in the bowed-string musical instrument at age 5 when she began taking classical violin lessons from longtime violinist Jody Naifeh. However, it was hearing her cousin play the fiddle that sparked her curiosity for the instrument.

“My cousin was the only one that fiddled, and she doesn’t anymore. It was kind of a brief thing. But it’s really amazing that I even got into it because really no one in my family is musical. My mom told me that both of her grandmothers were musical...but really I’m the only one,” she said.

Scott continued taking violin lessons and began studying fiddling.

“I started off with classical violin from Mrs. Naifeh, which I am still with her today. The cool thing about her is a lot of classical teachers don’t really do fiddling and aren’t super into that side of music. But she took me to my first fiddle contest, and so because of her I kind of got started in fiddling,” she said.

Although fiddle and violin appear the same, Scott said the styles are different.

“The violin and fiddle are very different styles, but both benefit each other. The violin is classical music and is technically difficult and you sight-read the music to learn it. But fiddling you learn by ear, so it’s more like reading a book versus storytelling,” Scott said. “Violin helps the intonation and technical aspect of fiddling, whereas the fiddling helps me to put feeling into the classical music and make it more than just the notes on the page”

As early as 7 years old, Scott traveled statewide to fiddling contests and performances, learning and watching some of the best fiddle players. Now she plays among them, continuing to make her mark. She has also competed in fiddling contests in surrounding states and as far as Idaho.

“I have competed all over. I do the Oklahoma state fiddle contest, the Colorado state fiddle contest, and there is a fiddle contest in Grove called the Grand Lake National Fiddle Contest, and I actual won that a couple of years ago. I am the youngest person to ever win it,” she said. “I have probably been to, I would say, over 50 competitions.

For her accomplishments, CN officials proclaimed Feb. 10 as “Regina Scott Day.” Tribal Councilor Keith Austin presented Scott with the proclamation after her performance at the National Fiddler Hall of Fame Ceremony and Concert in Tulsa in front of an audience of celebrated fiddlers and country musician Vince Gill.

“The National Fiddler Hall of Fame inducts people every year, so I got to play for Randy Howard who was being inducted. So I was on stage and I had just finished and it was a really great moment, and one of the Cherokees came on stage and he said ‘wait, don’t go yet,’ and I was very confused, but then he read a proclamation from the chief that basically said that the day Feb. 10, 2017, was a day dedicated to me and my accomplishments,” she said. “I was thinking ‘is this real?’ like, ‘is this a prank?’ but it was amazing and I have it framed at home.”

As for her violin, Scott still plays. She is part of the Tulsa Youth Symphony, the Holland Hall Orchestra and Honors Orchestra, in which she is first chair violin. She also teaches a beginner’s orchestra class to help her violin teacher.

She advises young musicians who are pursuing their dreams to keep practicing.

“Practice, practice because sometimes you don’t feel like practicing or it’s just not in your schedule, but if you really like it you can make time for it. You know, if you really want to be good at it and it’s something you are really passionate about that’s the only way to get good,” she said.

Scott will be the featured entertainment during the annual Will Rogers birthday celebration reception. The reception begins at 4:30 p.m. on Nov. 4 at Cherokee Casino Will Rogers Downs in Claremore.
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