CNB earns Sikorsky Gold Supplier status

BY STAFF REPORTS
05/17/2017 08:00 AM
STILWELL, Okla. – Cherokee Nation Distributors, a company within the engineering and manufacturing segment of Cherokee Nation Businesses, has again been named one of the most prestigious suppliers in the aerospace industry.

Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin, recently awarded CND with its Gold Supplier status.

CND received the esteemed Gold Supplier status for its best-in-class performance in quality, delivery, lean techniques and customer satisfaction. The recent honor marks the company’s fourth year to receive the award since earning the Sikorsky Gold Supplier Certification in 2012.

The Supply Management Council for Lockheed Martin is recognizing CND for its superior operational performance in its manufacturing of main wiring harnesses for the MH-60S SEAHAWK and S-92 aircraft. CND is one of 13 companies selected from Sikorsky’s more than 300 vendor supply base.

“A commitment to excellence is imbedded in our company’s culture,” said Steven Bilby, president of CNB’s diversified businesses. “Our longstanding relationships with industry leaders such as Sikorsky and the growth and success of our diversified businesses are great testaments to our companywide dedication to first-class service.”

7 Clan Stand storefront opens after ‘high demand’

BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
05/12/2017 08:15 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – From her house to Tahlequah’s main street, Cherokee Nation citizen Alyssa Henson began her creative journey of fashioning clothes with Indigenous flair approximately three years ago.

On May 9, she held a grand opening for her brick and mortar shop on Muskogee Avenue.

Henson said she opened the shop because the demand on Facebook for custom orders was “too high.”

“The demand was too high on Facebook to just keep it running from my house, so it called for me to have a location that people can come to so that it would make it a lot easier,” she said.

Henson said when customers enter her shop they will see Native-inspired clothing made by her or purchased from vendors.
Cherokee Nation citizen Alyssa Henson flips a sign to “open” at the May 9 grand opening of her storefront 7 Clan Stand. Previously the store was online only. Her storefront offers original and customized Native-inspired pieces from Henson. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Two backpacks hang from a shelf at 7 Clan Stand located at 306 N. Muskogee Ave. in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Cherokee Nation citizen Alyssa Henson opened the storefront after the demand grew “too high” for her Facebook business. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Native-inspired baby clothes are some of the items offered at 7 Clan Stand in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Cherokee Nation citizen Alyssa Henson said her shop also offers Native-themed purses, backpacks, skirts, shirts, stuffed animals, jewelry and other items. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Family members and city officials surround Cherokee Nation citizen Alyssa Henson during the May 9 opening of her 7 Clan Stand storefront in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. 7 Clan Stand is located across from the Northeastern State University Jazz Lab. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen Alyssa Henson flips a sign to “open” at the May 9 grand opening of her storefront 7 Clan Stand. Previously the store was online only. Her storefront offers original and customized Native-inspired pieces from Henson. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
http://wherethecasinomoneygoes.com/

The Speckled Hen offers timeless treasures

BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
05/03/2017 08:15 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Opened in 1979, The Speckled Hen has changed ownerships throughout its nearly 40-year journey. But under Cherokee Nation citizens Bill Campbell and Cheryl Horn – along with help from family members, previous owners and those who rent space at the establishment – the antique flea market still is providing timeless treasures to the Tahlequah area.

Cheryl said her mother and stepfather purchased the business in 1999 and sold it in 2002.

“When they first bought it they added the booths. Then they added the, we call that the ‘add-on’ room. As the other buildings became available they added toward the north,” she said.

She said the business was later sold to Bob and Luella Lankford and her uncle and aunt Johnny and Carol Horn before eventually going to Cheryl’s cousin Robbie.

In March 2016, Campbell bought the business when Cheryl's cousin decided to pursue other interests. Cheryl said over the years the shop has expanded and now has five “rooms,” which includes the “add-on” room.
Cherokee Nation citizens Bill Campbell and Cheryl Horn operate The Speckled Hen, an antique flea market in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. The shop has been in the area for nearly 40 years with a portion of those years being run by Horn’s family. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX A booth with items including jewelry, wall hangings and glassware is located at The Speckled Hen in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Cherokee Nation citizens Bill Campbell and Cheryl Horn, who run the store, said there are approximately 140 “rentable spaces” for customers to browse. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX The Speckled Hen and its vendors offer various items such as Coca-Cola memorabilia. The Speckled Hen is comprised of five rooms and is located at 5227 S. Muskogee Ave. in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizens Bill Campbell and Cheryl Horn operate The Speckled Hen, an antique flea market in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. The shop has been in the area for nearly 40 years with a portion of those years being run by Horn’s family. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Credit scores mean more than people realize

BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
04/20/2017 08:15 AM
MONKEY ISLAND, Okla. – Credit scores act as buffers between consumers and banks or institutions from which they wish to borrow money. Whether it’s for daily items, a car or a house, credit scores play roles in many expenditures, so it’s important to know about them and how they affect consumers.

Cherokee Nation citizen Brian Hartley, an Oklahoma State Bank employee, offers a two-sheet guide that provides a look into credit scores and what they entail. He said it’s important to first know what exactly a credit score is.

“A credit score is a scoring system to let creditors know what type of past history you had,” he said. “Meaning that if you paid on time and have not been in any trouble you’ll have a high score, and it tells creditors like a bank or an institution that the likelihood of this person paying is very high compared to someone who may have a low score. It’s the possibility that the low score is a person that could be very non-paying or late-paying or have some other issues that may have came into their past.”

Hartley said a credit score is determined from various factors.

“It’s anywhere from paying your bills to getting credit lines or getting a car installment payment or any type of other credit out there as well as medical. I mean, your whole life is tied to your credit score almost,” he said.
Cherokee Nation citizen Brian Hartley, an Oklahoma State Bank employee, offers a two-sheet guide that provides a look into credit scores and what they entail. He said it’s important to first know what exactly a credit score is. CREDIT.COM Brian Hartley
Cherokee Nation citizen Brian Hartley, an Oklahoma State Bank employee, offers a two-sheet guide that provides a look into credit scores and what they entail. He said it’s important to first know what exactly a credit score is. CREDIT.COM
http://www.cherokeecasa.org/

Sierra gives ‘A Bright Start’ to childhood education

BY LINDSEY BARK
Staff Writer
04/12/2017 08:15 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen Ryan Sierra always dreamed of running his own business and educating children. That dream became reality when he opened an early childhood facility called A Bright Start Development Center.

It caters to children ages 0-12 years old with gross motor development and guided learning in a school-like atmosphere. “We try to run a routine similar to school. The kids (have) some group-setting experiences,” Sierra said.

He said he funded the business with his savings and help from family.

“A lot of the equipment we’ve been blessed to get donated…what could be thousands of dollars in equipment was donated,” Sierra said.

After working with the Oklahoma Department of Human Services in 2015 to ensure compliance, including having proper equipment and passing necessary inspections, the center opened in February 2016 with four babies. Enrollment eventually grew to 30 children.
Children look out the window at A Bright Start Development Center, which is located at 509 S. Muskogee Ave., in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Cherokee Nation citizen Ryan Sierra owns it and provides early childhood development skills and learning. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Cherokee Nation citizen Ryan Sierra helps a child during dramatic playtime on April 5 at A Bright Start Development Center in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Children learn early childhood skills such as piecing together puzzles and reading books on April 5 at A Bright Start Development Center in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Children look out the window at A Bright Start Development Center, which is located at 509 S. Muskogee Ave., in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Cherokee Nation citizen Ryan Sierra owns it and provides early childhood development skills and learning. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

FTW! Game Co. finds success in Pryor

BY JAMI MURPHY
Former Reporter
04/07/2017 08:00 AM
PRYOR, Okla. – For the past four months FTW! Game Co. – a video game, comic and novelty store – has operated in Pryor. And Cherokee Nation citizen Luke Nagel, who co-owns it with his wife Lori, said the business has been well received by the community and that people have expressed appreciation for the youth-oriented business.

“A lot of parents and mothers have come in and say that they’re really glad this is here because there wasn’t too many options left besides going all the way to Tulsa,” he said.

There were several locations they could have chosen, but Pryor, he said, was optimal.

“Because Hastings had just shut down and there’s only one Gamestop out here. There’s nothing really in the area besides driving to Tulsa…especially for retro games. We’re the only place in the area besides Claremore,” Luke said.

He and his family, including his mother, designed the store’s look from the ground up, including the logo. His daily activities include running the store and tracking inventory while Lori handles the marketing and finances.
Video with default Cherokee Phoenix Frame
Luke Nagel, Cherokee Nation citizen and co-owner of FTW! Game Co. in Pryor, Oklahoma, said his video game, comic and novelty store has been well received by the community. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Cherokee Nation citizen Luke Nagel places inventory on shelves at his store FTW! Game Co. in Pryor, Oklahoma. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Luke Nagel, co-owner of FTW! Game Co., explains to a potential customer the rareness of this Sega CD, a CD-ROM accessory for the Sega Genesis video game console released in the 1990s. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Luke Nagel, Cherokee Nation citizen and co-owner of FTW! Game Co. in Pryor, Oklahoma, said his video game, comic and novelty store has been well received by the community. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
http://www.billandtracirabbit.com/

Tribes economically thriving 30 years after Cabazon decision

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
03/22/2017 08:15 AM
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – Lindsay Robertson started his law career working on business development. He was familiar with laws regarding tribal sovereignty, but he was asked to combine the two areas starting in 1987.

On Feb. 25, 1987, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in favor of the Cabazon Band of Mission Indians in its lawsuit with the state of California. The decision ultimately allowed tribes to have gaming operations, even where states were given criminal jurisdiction over Indian tribes, The Journal Record reported.

California was a Public Law 280 state, which gave the state criminal jurisdiction over Indian lands. In the mid-1980s, the Cabazon and Morango Bands of Mission Indians operated bingo parlors on their lands. In 1986, the state tried to shut down the games, claiming they violated state regulations.

The Cabazon Band’s argument and the Supreme Court’s decision rested on the state not prohibiting gambling as a criminal act. The state did not have jurisdiction over the operations.

Robertson was working in Washington, D.C., at the time the decision was announced. He was one of the few attorneys familiar with Indian law. When the calls started coming in from tribes that wanted to open gambling operations, they were directed to him.
Patrons play electronic gaming machines at the Cherokee Nation’s Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa in Catoosa, Oklahoma. In 2016, Oklahoma collected a record $132 million in total tribal gaming exclusivity fees, a 3-percent increase from 2015. When the fees were first collected in 2006, only $14.2 million came into the state. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Patrons play electronic gaming machines at the Cherokee Nation’s Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa in Catoosa, Oklahoma. In 2016, Oklahoma collected a record $132 million in total tribal gaming exclusivity fees, a 3-percent increase from 2015. When the fees were first collected in 2006, only $14.2 million came into the state. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Ketchums open Fabric Notions crafts store

BY JAMI MURPHY
Former Reporter
02/13/2017 08:30 AM
BARTLESVILLE, Okla. – After learning how to crochet at age 7, the craft bug hit Cherokee Nation citizen Shelli Ketchum hard and has stuck with her throughout her adult life.

In 2016, she realized her dream of operating a craft-inspired business, calling it Fabric Notions, after her husband and fellow CN citizen Kristopher lost his job. He helps her operate the business.

Shelli, who learned to sew in high school, said she’s a crafter by blood and that it is in her genes. She learned crafting from her grandmother, and the idea of owning a fabric store was perfect for her interests.

“But we wanted it to be a fabric and notions store. We didn’t just wanna offer fabric,” she said. “We wanted to be able to be able to offer something for everybody – for the embroider, for the sewer, for the quilter, the hobby makers, the clothing makers – that type of thing. So we’ve tried really hard to offer a variety of products and we’re continuing to get things in every week.”

Fabric Notions offers cottons, flannels, fleece, tapestry, satins and upholstery fabric. It also offers accessories such as sewing machine thumb drives, embroidery threads and small spool cotton threads – things that can be used more by the hobbyist.
Video with default Cherokee Phoenix Frame
Husband and wife duo Kristopher and Shelli Ketchum opened their business Fabric Notions in November in Bartlesville, Oklahoma. Fabric Notions sells material as well as sewing and craft supplies. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Fabric Notions co-owner Kristopher Ketchum, right, helps Maryjane Mashunkashey seek material to use for possible gifts ideas. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Bolts of fabric line the walls of Fabric Notions, a store opened by Kristopher and Shelli Ketchum in November in Bartlesville, Oklahoma. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Husband and wife duo Kristopher and Shelli Ketchum opened their business Fabric Notions in November in Bartlesville, Oklahoma. Fabric Notions sells material as well as sewing and craft supplies. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

CNT supporting Millsite Dam rehabilitation efforts

BY STAFF REPORTS
01/31/2017 04:00 PM
EMERY COUNTY, Utah – According to a Cherokee Nation Businesses release, CNB subsidiary Cherokee Nation Technologies is supporting the Natural Resources Conservation Service in its efforts to rehabilitate the Millsite Dam.

CNT is using its experience in unmanned aerial systems to collect imagery and elevation data to advance the USDA-led project, the release states.

The release states the collaboration is expected to enhance the dam by ensuring it meets current safety regulations and engineering standards while extending its life by 50 to 100 years.

According to the release, UAS support is safe, efficient and the least invasive method of gathering data and protecting the area’s natural resources. The method gathers high-resolution infrared sensor and color imaging data.

The release states the NRCS previously assessed Millsite Dam and concluded it didn’t meet safety and engineering standards for a dam with such high-hazard potential, meaning improper operation or failure could result in a potential loss of life.
A photo from an unmanned aerial system in Emory County, Utah. Cherokee Nation Technologies is supporting the Natural Resources Conservation Service in its efforts to rehabilitate the Millsite Dam in the county. COURTSEY
A photo from an unmanned aerial system in Emory County, Utah. Cherokee Nation Technologies is supporting the Natural Resources Conservation Service in its efforts to rehabilitate the Millsite Dam in the county. COURTSEY

Culture

June 22, 1839: a bloody day in Cherokee Nation
BY TESINA JACKSON
Former Reporter,
WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez &
JAMI MURPHY
Former Reporter
06/22/2017 12:00 PM
This is an archive story that the Cherokee Phoenix is publishing on the anniversary of the day that three prominent Cherokees were killed.

DUTCH MILLS, Ark. – On the morning of June 22, 1839, three small bands of Cherokees carried out “blood law” upon Major Ridge, John Ridge and Elias Boudinot – three prominent Cherokees who signed a treaty in 1835 calling for the tribe’s removal to Indian Territory.

Tribal Councilor Jack Baker said he believes “blood law” was the basis for the men’s assassinations.

“Although they did not follow all of the procedures, I do believe that was the basis for the executions,” Baker said. “I believe the proper procedure should have been followed. They should have been brought to trial and that was not done.”

The Cherokee General Council put the law, which had existed for years, into writing on Oct. 24, 1829.

According to Thurman Wilkins’ “Cherokee Tragedy,” the law stated “if any citizen or citizens of this Nation should treat and dispose of any lands belonging to this Nation without special permission from the National authorities, he or they shall suffer death; Therefore…any person or persons who shall, contrary to the will and consent of the legislative council of this Nation…enter into a treaty with any commissioner or commissioners of the United States, or any officers instructed for that purpose, and agree to sell or dispose of any part or portion of the National lands defined in this Constitution of this Nation, he or they so offending, upon conviction before any of the circuit judges aforesaid are authorized to call a court for the trial of any such person or persons so transgressing. Be it Further Resolved; that any person or persons, who shall violate the provisions of this act, and shall refuse, by resistance, to appear at the place designated for trial, or abscond, are hereby declared to be outlaws; and any person or persons, citizens of this Nation, may kill him or them so offending, in any manner most convenient…and shall not be held accountable for the same.”

It is thought that John Ross Party members carried out this law in the killings of the Ridges and Boudinot.

Major Ridge

He was born in the Cherokee town of Great Hiwassee, later a part of Tennessee. He was initiated as a warrior early and known by several names including Nunnehidihi, meaning “He Who Slays The Enemy In His Path,” and Ganundalegi, which meant “The Man Who Walks On The Mountain Top” or “The Ridge.”

He received the name Major while fighting with U.S. Gen. Andrew Jackson at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend during the Creek War in 1814. He used Major as his first name the rest of his life.

According to the Oklahoma Historical Society, in the1820s gold sparked a demand to get rid of Cherokee titles to lands within Georgia.

“While the federal government tried to create inducements to convince the Southeastern Indians to leave their homes, the discovery of gold in Georgia led to more aggressive demands for immediate removal,” the OHS website states.

While Congress debated the issues with removal, several Cherokees negotiated a removal agreement with the United States, according to the OHS.

“Major Ridge, a Cherokee planter and soldier, his son John Ridge, and his nephew Elias Boudinot conducted these negotiations with the United States despite the expressed wishes of the majority of their nation. Most Cherokees, including Principal Chief John Ross, protested and tried to stop Ridge and his so-called Treaty Party,” the OHS site states. “On May 28, 1830, while Ridge and his supporters negotiated terms of removal with the United States, Congress passed the Indian Removal Act.”

This law provided $500,000 to establish districts west of the Mississippi River, to trade eastern tribal lands for those districts, to compensate the tribes for the cost of their removal and the improvements on their homesteads, and to pay one year’s worth subsistence to those who went west, the website states.

Armed with this authority, Andrew Jackson, who was now president, authorized agents to negotiate and enforce treaties.

Major and 56 other Cherokees signed the Treaty of New Echota on Dec. 29, 1835. Major, who could not write, made his mark on the treaty. That ultimately led to his death.

According to “Cherokee Tragedy,” one of three bands of Cherokees sought to kill Major on the same morning as John Ridge and Elias Boudinot.

“Having learned that he had left the previous day for Van Buren (Arkansas), where one of his slaves lay ill, they had followed him down the Line Road. They discovered where he had spent the night, beneath the roof of Ambrose Harnage, at Cincinnati, Arkansas, and they rode ahead to form an ambush,” the book states.

Five men hid in the brush of trees where the road crossed White Rock Creek, now Little Branch, near Dutchtown, now known as Dutch Mills.

“At ten o’clock, Major Ridge came riding down the highway with a colored boy in attendance. Several rifles cracked. The Ridge slumped in his saddle, his head and body pierced by five bullets,” according to the book.

Those thought to have fired upon him were James Foreman, Anderson Springston, Bird Doublehead, Isaac Springton, James Hair and Jefferson Hair.

Major’s body was recovered by nearby settlers and buried in a cemetery in what is now Piney, Okla. He was later moved and buried near his home on Honey Creek in northern Delaware County.

John Ridge

John was born in Georgia to Major and Susannah Wickett Ridge in 1802.

Growing up, John attended school at the Springplace Mission in Georgia and then Brainerd Mission in Tennessee. In 1819, he went to the Foreign Mission School in Cornwall, Conn., which existed until 1827.

While attending the Foreign Mission School, he met his wife, the daughter of the school’s steward, Sarah Bird Northrup. The couple married in 1824. The biracial union caused uproar from the town of Cornwall resulting in John and his wife leaving.

According to Robert J. Conley’s “A Cherokee Encyclopedia” later that year, John went with his father and Chief Ross to Washington, D.C. to protest the possible removal of Cherokees from all lands east of the Mississippi River.

In 1830, President Jackson pushed his removal bill through Congress and it passed into law. In 1832, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Rev. Samuel Worcester v. Georgia that Georgia’s laws over Cherokee territory were illegal and unconstitutional. It ruled that the Cherokee Nation had sovereign status, however Jackson refused to enforce the ruling in favor of the Cherokees, which caused John to change his position.

Feeling that the Cherokees had no other course of action, he began to speak in favor of negotiating a removal treaty with the United States and on Dec. 29, 1835, along with others known as the Ridge Party or Treaty Party, he signed the Treaty of New Echota.

Those who signed the treaty were Cherokee Nation citizens but were not elected officials. After signing, he moved with his family to present-day Oklahoma in 1837.

The U.S. Senate ratified the treaty and although Chief Ross and others protested it, it led to the removal in 1838-39 known as the Trail of Tears. The U.S. Army began forcing Cherokees and their slaves (for those who had them) out of their homes. On Aug. 23, 1838, the first removal detachment of Cherokees left, and on Dec. 5, 1838, the 13th detachment left. It arrived in Indian Territory on March 18, 1839. Approximately 4,000 Cherokees died along the trail.

According to the treaty, Cherokees who wished to remain in the East could do so but would be required to become U.S. citizens by giving up their tribal status, a provision that was ignored during the removal.

Because the treaty surrendered all Cherokee land, Ross supporters, the Ross or National Party, regarded the Treaty Party as traitors.
On June 22, 1839, John, his father Major and Boudinot were assassinated for having signed the treaty.

According to “Cherokee Tragedy,” 25 men reached John’s house in the morning and, while he was still in bed, fired a gun at John’s head. The gun failed to fire. He was then dragged outside and stabbed 26 times in the torso and neck. While still alive, he was then stomped on and kicked, all in front of his wife, mother and son, John Rollin Ridge.

John was buried about 150 yards to 500 yards from his home in Polson Cemetery, which is located southeast of Grove, Okla. near the Oklahoma/Missouri state line in Delaware County.

Elias Boudinot

The sentiments among the Cherokee people in June 1839 in Indian Territory could be said were of misery, mistrust and resentment.

The last detachment of Cherokees forcibly removed from the East had arrived three months before and they were attempting to rebuild their lives. However, Chief Ross wished to reunite the tribe’s three factions, which lived together in what is now northeastern Oklahoma.

He called a meeting at an Illinois River camp ground located a few miles southeast of where Tahlequah now sits, and tried to get the Old Settlers, Cherokees who had settled the territory in the early 1800s, and members of the Treaty Party, Cherokees who had signed away Cherokee lands in the East, to reunite with his party or faction.

Boudinot, the Cherokee Phoenix’s first editor, his uncle Major Ridge and Major’s son, John, were members of the Treaty Party.

The two smaller factions declined any union with Ross, and the meeting broke up on June 21. Based on an 1890 statement by Allen Ross, John Ross’ son, men who had signed the 1835 Treaty and opposed John Ross as chief caused the anti-union dissention.

“After several days of endeavor to get together and having failed, some of the leaders of the emigrants called a secret meeting without the knowledge or consent of my father John Ross at what is now known as Double Springs about four miles northwest of Tahlequah for the purpose of making plans to effect an act of union,” Allen’s statement reads.

The discussion turned to the blood law passed by the Cherokee National Council that stated that any Cherokee who agreed or signed an agreement to sell Cherokee lands should forfeit their lives.

“Believing that the same men who had made the Treaty of 1835 were responsible for the failure of the Cherokee people to get together, this meeting decided that these three men (Boudinot and the two Ridges) should be executed as provided by the law,” Allen wrote. “The meeting further decided that this meeting must be kept from their chief because he would prevent it as he had once before at Red Clay before their removal.”

A committee was appointed to arrange details. Numbers were placed in a hat for each person present. Twelve numbers had an X mark after them, which indicated the executioners. Allen wrote he was not allowed to draw and was tasked to go his father’s home the evening before the executions and to stay with him and if possible keep him from finding out what was being done.

According to a letter written on June 26 by Boudinot’s friend and confidant, Rev. Samuel Worcester, Boudinot was living with Worcester at Park Hill near Tahlequah and was building a home about a quarter mile away. Worcester was at the construction site the morning Boudinot was killed.

“There he was, last Saturday morning, when some men came up, inquiring for medicine. He set out with them to come and get it and had walked but a few rods when he was heard to shriek, and his hired men, at and near his house ran to his help, but before they could reach the spot, the deed was done,” Worcester wrote. “They seemed to have stabbed Mr. Boudinot in the back with a knife, and then finished their dreadful work with a hatchet, inflicting seven strokes, two or three of which sunk deep into his head. To me he was a dear friend, a most intimate companion, and a most valued helper.”

An act of union was formed the next month and the newly formed council pardoned all parties connected with the assassinations of the Ridges and Boudinot.

Boudinot is buried in the Worcester Cemetery in Park Hill, about a mile from where the Cherokee Phoenix is published.
The three assassinations are thought to have helped form the basis of the July 12, 1839, act of union that brought together the Old Settlers and the Ross and Treaty parties.

Baker said Emmet Starr’s “History of the Cherokee Indians and Their Legends and Folklore” states that the Eastern and Western Cherokees came together to form one body politic. This, Baker said, led to the CN constitution two months later.

Education

UKB, NSU officials sign MOU
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/21/2017 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – A new cornerstone for capacity building was put into place June 14 at the United Keetoowah Band John Hair Cultural Center & Museum with the signing of a memorandum of understanding for cooperation between Northeastern State University and the UKB.

“This memorandum solidifies the collaborative opportunities for both institutions. It will help to further our respective missions for developing learning opportunities and creating educational and economic success for the health and productive futures of our populations,” UKB Chief Joe Bunch. “Our tribe is honored to sign this MOU with the university. The alliance with NSU offers incredible resources, experiences and opportunities for both entities to forge new paths and grow together. The cooperative agreement with NSU, an outstanding regional university, represents new promise, hope and progress for enhancing and developing many of the important programs and services for the UKB going forward.”

UKB Assistant Chief Jamie Thompson said the UKB Tribal Council unanimously endorsed the dedicated relationship, honoring NSU’s standards of excellence, quality teaching, challenging curricula, research and scholarly activities – particularly its goal to provide immersive learning opportunities for their faculty and students in service to the local community.

“We envision the collaborative relationship to include capacity building areas of elder community services, sustainable language, kinesiology/recreation, Indian Child Welfare, child development, tribal libraries and technology and more. The tribe and university have also agreed to consider undertaking mutually beneficial, sanctioned research and grant-funded projects,” he said.

After signing the agreement, NSU President Steve Turner cited the rich educational heritage of the Cherokee people and the university’s respect for the UKB as two key elements that led to the partnership. He also acknowledged the UKB’s commitment to higher education and deep roots with the university and the Cherokee Nation.

“We seek collaborations such as this alliance with the UKB to advance or mission of helping all of our region to achieve professional and personal success in this multicultural and global society,” Turner said. “NSU continues to devote faculty and student services resources toward collaborative projects with the tribe and other American Indians that encourage, inspire and support tribal members to lead healthy and productive lives and to encourage the pursuit of post-secondary education at our institution.”

The memorandum will be supported by a joint committee comprised of individuals from both the university and the tribe who will provide oversight for the activities and projects included in the alliance.

Council

Council confirms Barteaux as District Court judge
BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
05/18/2017 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – At the May 15 Tribal Council meeting, Supreme Court Chief Justice John Garrett swore in T. Luke Barteaux as a District Court judge after legislators confirmed his appointment.

Barteaux is completing the late Bart Fite’s term, which expires on Feb. 10, 2018.

Fourteen Tribal Councilors voted to approve the appointment, while Tribal Councilors Shawn Crittenden, Harley Buzzard and Buel Anglen opposed it.

Barteaux, 33, of Bixby, said he considers the appointment the “pinnacle” of his career.

“It’s something that I never thought would happen within this amount of time, but I’m extremely honored to have been appointed by (Principal) Chief (Bill John) Baker and confirmed by the Tribal Council. I look forward to helping protect our Nation through the legal process,” he said.

He said prior to the appointment his only experience as a judge was serving on the Oklahoma Trial Advocacy Institute.

“I’m a faculty member at the Oklahoma Trial Advocacy Institute, which trains attorneys, and I have, basically judging their performances and things like that,” he said. “I’ve been a panel member for judging the mock trial competitions for, I think it’s out of Pryor, the last two years.”

Barteaux said he has been licensed and acting on his own as an attorney since 2012, with his legal career officially starting in 2009.

“My legal career started back in 2009, and I think around 2011 I started basically practicing under the supervision of another attorney here at my current firm (Fry & Elder),” he said.

Barteaux also addressed concerns about discrepancies on his résumé with dates regarding his time acting as an attorney.

“My current position, I believe it said the dates were June of 2011 to current, and underneath it it said attorney or trial attorney, and there was a question regarding whether or not I was an attorney that entire time,” he said. “The reason it had been worded that way, and kind of stepping back, the jobs underneath were done the same way and it was just the main job. I work at Fry & Elder now and those are the dates that I have worked here, and the position underneath it is the main job I’ve had and the current job. So it was more of me trying to fit a resume on one page and someone brought up, I guess, wanting more of a full job history instead of just what the final job or main job while I was there.”

Legislators also unanimously authorized the establishment of a CN conservation district.

Bruce Davis, management resources executive director, brought the resolution to the May 15 Resource Committee meeting after a trip to the United States Department of Agriculture where he and others learned of 47 programs available to the tribe and its citizens that are not being utilized.

“The first thing we’ve got to do before we can apply for these programs are pass this resolution to start our own conservation district, the Cherokee Nation Conservation District, before we can apply for these monies,” he said.

According to the Oklahoma Conservation Commission’s website, a conservation district serves “as the primary local unit of government responsible for the conservation of the renewable natural resources.”

Bryan Shade, CN chief special project analyst, said the resolution would “authorize” Principal Chief Bill John Baker to establish the conservation district that would allow tribal citizens to visit it rather than the state’s conservation district. He added that establishing the district would help the tribe “streamline” certain operations.

“It’s the exact same thing the state of Oklahoma’s doing, but this district will exist in our 14-county area,” Shade said. “By taking on this function, right now the Cherokee Nation has to go through those state offices, get our lands put in the database, in the system, before we can take advantage of these programs. By establishing this conservation district we’ll be able to do this ourselves and help us streamline things.”

In other business, legislators:

• Increased the tribe’s fiscal year 2017 concurrent enrollment fund by $87,000,

• Increased the FY 2017 capital budget by $857,848 to $279 million,

• Reappointed Amber Lynn George to the Cherokee Nation Foundation board,

• Approved Wilfred C. Gernandt III to the Cherokee Nation Comprehensive Care Agency governing board,

• Reappointed Dan Carter as a Cherokee Nation Businesses board member,

• Approved a resolution for Tribal Council to receive a confidential report monthly of all charitable donations and surplus equipment donations from all CN subsidiaries,

• Granted a right-of-way easement on an existing natural gas line to the Oklahoma Natural Gas Company for Cherokee Heights Addition in Pryor, and

• Authorized a sovereign immunity waiver for software agreement between Sequoyah Schools with Municipal Accounting Systems.

Health

CN Health Services earns Public Health Innovation Award
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/22/2017 08:00 AM
ANCHORAGE, Alaska – Cherokee Nation Health Services recently received the Public Health Innovation Award from the National Indian Health Board at a national conference in June.

The Public Health Innovation Award is given annually to the tribal government, individual, organization or program that best exemplifies the advancement of public health for Native Americans and Alaskan Natives.

The tribe was recognized for its efforts at the eighth annual National Tribal Public Health Summit in Anchorage.

“Cherokee Nation Health Services strives to be a leader in health care throughout Indian Country,” Connie Davis, CNHS executive director, said. “On behalf of our Cherokee Nation Health Services employees, I thank the National Indian Health Board for this honor. It’s truly humbling for our team to receive this recognition, and I commend each and every one of our employees who make Cherokee Nation Health Services a first-class department.”

The tribe’s Public Health department educates citizens on healthy eating and exercise habits, and also addresses common challenges such as alcohol and tobacco use awareness within the tribe.

Senior Director of Public Health Lisa Pivec accepted the award and spoke about building public health infrastructure.

“The most rewarding aspect of the recognition is knowing we are honoring those who have gone before us to ensure we have this great Cherokee Nation to protect and preserve,” Pivec said. “I believe that any successes are the result of the work of so many citizens over the years, people devoted to paving the way for our next generations.”

In 2016, Pivec was also recognized by the NIHB with its area impact award. The award highlighted her impact on the tribe’s growing public health program since 1994, when Pivec helped start the tribe’s Healthy Nation program.

“Lisa led the development of public health at Cherokee Nation from its infancy, and the tribal nation is now the first Public Health Accreditation Board-accredited tribal public health system,” the NIHB said in a statement about the nomination. “Now, Cherokee citizens consider the vast number of prevention programs she developed as a part of their daily activities. Along with her staff, Lisa has created great changes in health among the Cherokee people she serves.”

In addition to presenting awards for public health innovation and area impact, the NIHB works with tribes on advocacy, training and legislation to better Native health care.

“Public health is about addressing the social determinants of health and strengthening the environments where we live, work, play, learn and worship,” Pivec said. “I have been blessed to have had the opportunity to serve and do work that doesn’t feel like a job but more like a life purpose.”

Opinion

'Remember the Removal’ training has been rewarding experience
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
06/01/2017 04:00 PM
Some Cherokee Phoenix readers may have seen the “Remember the Removal” bicycle riders out on local roads the past two months training for the upcoming ride from New Echota, Georgia, to Tahlequah, Oklahoma, through seven states. I am one of 14 riders from the Cherokee Nation who will take part in this year’s ride.

For those of you not familiar with the ride, it is done annually to commemorate the forced removal of our Cherokee ancestors from their homelands in 1838-39. Most of our people left in the fall of 1838 in 13 organized detachments and endured a harsh winter in 1839 before reaching Indian Territory.

I was part of the group that did the first 1,000-mile ride in 1984, which was meant to educate people along the route about the forced removal and give students like me hands-on experiences that would foster leadership qualities, instill confidence and improve our self-esteem. A man named Michael Morris thought a bike ride from the old Cherokee homelands would be a good way to give us those experiences. He was right.

Because the ride was grueling and had never been attempted before, the 19 riders formed bonds that are still strong today. We survived two-lane mountain roads in North Carolina and Tennessee where some large trucks did not like sharing the road with us. I rode my bike into some weeds and bushes before a dump truck could nudge me into them on a mountain in Tennessee. We survived racism in Illinois and the patchy and hilly roads of Missouri before riding into northern Arkansas and taking on the Ozark Mountains. By then we were stronger. Our thighs were noticeably larger and much darker than that had been three weeks earlier, and we were confident we were going to finish strong.

I remember during the trip being excited about what view was over the next hill while riding with my small group of four riders nicknamed the “Coaster-Barelies” because we weren’t the fastest group, and we may have coasted a little too much going down hills when we had the opportunity. Jeff, Clayton and Marvin were like brothers to me when we finished, and it was hard to finish and go our separate ways.

For me the trip gave me confidence, and it showed me I am capable of a lot mentally and physically. It also gave me a hunger to seek out adventures, which has lasted to this day.

So, when I was asked last January if I would be the first official CN “Mentor Rider,” my sense of adventure wrestled with my common sense. I am now 50 and being around the bike ride the past few years I know the training is tough even for a 20-year-old. I thought about it for a couple of days and believed I could do it. My mind was going to drag my body along on another adventure. It has been great and tough as I imagined it would be. My legs seemed to remember what it is like to ride a bike for most of a day, but my left shoulder has been less cooperative. So, I keep a container of Icy Hot handy and hope the aroma of the liniment isn’t too strong for the other cyclists.

I’ve also had the pleasure of training with a good group of young people. These people from throughout the CN volunteered to take part in this ride, to put themselves through the pain riding a bicycle an average of 60 miles a day. They have already grown and changed during training, but they will grow and change even more before the ride is over. It happens every year. They might have varied reasons for doing the ride, but they all understand the most important reason is to honor our ancestors. Our tenacious ancestors. They would not give up on the trail and when they arrived here 178 years ago to rebuild.

Every year the riders are told they will not make this trip on their own. No matter how strong they are they will need the support of their fellow riders. It’s true, and we also need the support of the Cherokee people, so keep us in your thoughts and prayers.

I feel fortunate that I get to travel the trail again with some good people, and even though I’ve been down it before, I get to see what’s over the next hill with older and different eyes.

People

Turtle wins Miss Junior Indian Oklahoma crown
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/09/2017 08:00 AM
DURANT, Okla. – Former Junior Miss Cherokee Chelbie Turtle was recently crowned Junior Miss Indian Oklahoma by the Oklahoma Federation of Indian Women and will spend the next year as a goodwill ambassador for Oklahoma tribes.

The Junior Miss Indian Oklahoma competition was held in conjunction with the annual Miss Indian Oklahoma Scholarship Pageant in Durant.

As Junior Miss Indian Oklahoma, Turtle will promote the OFIW mission fostering friendship among Oklahoma’s Native American women, preserving culture and heritage, promoting education and uplifting younger Native women. Her platform is “The Value of Higher Education.”

“I believe education is important. Math, English, science, reading and writing – those core subjects – are important to younger children and really establish their future and how they view the world. I want to promote to kids that education is important,” Turtle, who served as the 2014-15 Junior Miss Cherokee, said.

Turtle said she learned the values of being a tribal ambassador from her mother, who is a former Miss Cherokee, Miss Indian Oklahoma and Miss Indian USA.

“It’s a great feeling to be honored with the title of Junior Miss Indian Oklahoma, and I’m especially honored to represent Cherokee Nation and every other tribe in Oklahoma,” Turtle said. “I look forward to promoting and sharing about the Cherokee Nation and our culture. During the Junior Miss Indian Oklahoma competition, each contestant learned a lot from each other. I look forward to doing more of that this year as I travel around to represent OFIW, and I appreciate the Cherokee Nation for the support and opportunities it has provided.”

This year’s OFIW pageant theme was “Honoring Our Indigenous Women Warriors: Protecting All That is Sacred.” Turtle competed against three other contestants who were judged on a written essay and personal interview with judges along with onstage presence, including a tribal introduction, tribal dress, talent, platform, contemporary dress and impromptu questions.

Turtle received her crown from Junior Miss Indian Oklahoma 2016 Chyna Chupco, who also attends Sequoyah High School in Tahlequah.

Turtle, 16, is the daughter of Jeff and Lisa Trice Turtle of Tahlequah. She will begin her 10th grade year at SHS in the fall.

The Cherokee Nation and Choctaw Nation were platinum sponsors for OFIW’s 2017 events.

To schedule an appearance by Junior Miss Indian Oklahoma, contact Faith Harjo at harjo.faith@yahoo.com.

Learn more about the OFIW, visit https://ofiwpageant.wixsite.com/ofiw.
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Call Justin Smith 918-207-4975

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