Council's program helps with emergency housing repairs

BY TRAVIS SNELL
Assistant Editor – @cp_tsnell
11/07/2003 04:10 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. - In the latter part of fiscal year 2003, the Tribal Council appropriated money from the tribe's Motor Fuels Tax Fund to help tribal citizens in need of emergency home repair who may fall through the bureaucratic cracks of the Housing Authority of the Cherokee Nation.

Doug Evans, council certified public accountant, said councilors appropriated $150,000 in April to establish the Disaster Housing Relief Program. The council program helps tribal citizens repair their homes damaged by emergencies once they have expended all efforts through the HACN.

"The way I understand how they (councilors) wrote those procedures is that it (a repair request) has to not fit within the emergency program within the Housing Authority," Evans said. "In other words, these requests will be falling through the crack. It comes over here, and council approves it in the (Emergency Housing) sub-committee per incident. It's a tribal subsidy to a federal grant."

"The HACN emergency policy is limited to $2,500, and occasionally there is a need for funding in excess of $2,500," said David Southerland, HACN executive director. "The Cherokee Nation Tribal Council emergency program allows for additional funding to assist tribal citizens."

For example, Evans said, if a tribal citizen's home suffers $5,000 worth of flood damage, then the tribal citizen would apply to the HACN for minor emergency repairs. If the HACN spends its per-home maximum of $2,500 in minor emergency repairs, then the HACN could send a repair request to the Emergency Housing Sub-Committee hoping it would pick up the tab for the other $2,500 worth of damage.

"They (HACN) will do it with the block grant monies first, and if there is something else that still needs to be done or it's a little more than that, they will use this fund to pick up the difference," Evans said. "The money is already appropriated, but they set the policy up where it's not a carte blanche, where every incident has to come before the council for approval, before that committee."

Evans said most of the Disaster Housing Relief funds have rolled into FY 2004 and that council won't appropriate any more money into the program until funds are expended and if it has high enough priority over other needs. Even though the funds rolled over into the new fiscal year, most of the funds are already obligated to tribal citizens but not yet expended, he said.

According to the HACN's Web site, emergency repair work is offered to privately owned homes to low-income Cherokee Nation citizens when property conditions create a hazard to the life, health or safety of the occupants, or if there is risk of property damage if the condition is not corrected and has occurred in the last 72 hours. This also includes winterization activities.

The HACN's eligibility guidelines state that the applicant must be the legal owner of the home or a direct descendent of the homeowner. The applicant, spouse or a household family member must have a tribal membership card (blue card) and must live within the tribe's jurisdictional boundaries. Assistance will also be provided to original Dawes Commission enrollees who live in Oklahoma. The family's combined gross income must also be below the 50 percent mark of the national median income guidelines.

For more information, contact the HACN at 1-800-837-2869.
About the Author
Travis Snell has worked for the Cherokee Phoenix since 2000. He began as a staff writer, a position that allowed him to win numerous writing awards from the Native American Journalists Association, including the Richard LaCourse Award for best investigative story in 2003. He was promoted to assistant editor in 2007, switching his focus from writing to story development, editing, design and other duties.

He is a member of NAJA, as well as the Society of Professional Journalists, Investigative Reporters and Editors, and Society for News Design.

Travis earned his journalism degree with a print emphasis in 1999 from Oklahoma City University. While at OCU, he served as editor, assistant editor and sports reporter for the school’s newspaper.

He is married to Native Oklahoma publisher Lisa Snell. The couple has two children, Sadie and Swimmer. He is the grandson of original enrollee Swimmer Wesley Snell and Patricia Ann (Roberts) Snell.
TRAVIS-SNELL@cherokee.org • 918-453-5358
Travis Snell has worked for the Cherokee Phoenix since 2000. He began as a staff writer, a position that allowed him to win numerous writing awards from the Native American Journalists Association, including the Richard LaCourse Award for best investigative story in 2003. He was promoted to assistant editor in 2007, switching his focus from writing to story development, editing, design and other duties. He is a member of NAJA, as well as the Society of Professional Journalists, Investigative Reporters and Editors, and Society for News Design. Travis earned his journalism degree with a print emphasis in 1999 from Oklahoma City University. While at OCU, he served as editor, assistant editor and sports reporter for the school’s newspaper. He is married to Native Oklahoma publisher Lisa Snell. The couple has two children, Sadie and Swimmer. He is the grandson of original enrollee Swimmer Wesley Snell and Patricia Ann (Roberts) Snell.

News

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BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
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OOLOGAH, Okla. – For more than 20 years, the Will Rogers Memorial Museum in Claremore has paid homage to Will Rogers and Wiley Post with an annual fly-in at the Will Rogers Birthplace Ranch. Rogers, a Cherokee Nation citizen, and Post, a famed aviator, died in a plane crash on Aug. 15, 1935, in Point Barrow, Alaska. Tad Jones, the museum’s executive director, said this year commemorates the 82nd anniversary of their passing. “His (Rogers) character is what we want to try to keep alive. He was a guy that respected everybody, which I think it’d be great for our entire nation now to show that respect towards others,” he said. “I know Will Rogers, if he was here, he would love it because he was a man that just loved action activities, and this event has just gotten to be huge over the last number of years.” The event kicked off at 7:30 a.m. Jones said people and planes began arriving as early as 6:45 a.m. The free event offered more than 100 planes, a car show, Cherokee storytelling, 19th century games for children and the opportunity to tour Rogers’ birthplace home. The planes landed on an airstrip adjacent to the Will Rogers Birthplace Ranch allowing visitors to get an up-close look at them. “You get to walk around with the planes, so it’s not just looking at them from a distance. But when they land you can walk out among the planes, and sometimes they’ll let you sit in the cockpits,” Jones said. Rogers’ great-granddaughter, Jennifer Rogers-Etcheverry, said the event is a great way to continue Rogers’ legacy while helping others learn his story. “This is what I love the most is seeing these young children out here with a mixture of older generations because that’s who needs to learn about Will Rogers is these up-and-coming children,” she said. “I am just so grateful that people want to continue his legacy, and to bring their families out to something that’s a tradition like this. And what better place than his actual birth home.” Rogers-Etcheverry said seeing people honor Rogers’ means “everything” to her. “There’s nothing negative when you talk to people who remember him or have heard about him, it’s always positive,” she said. “He was such a role model to so many people, so that means everything to me.” Tribal Councilor Keith Austin said the tribe annually contributes to the museum and ranch to ensure they remain “healthy and strong.” This year the CN gave $25,000. “This is a state of Oklahoma facility, and they are really struggling with their budget,” he said. “It’s important to us as Cherokee people to support this and make sure that it remains healthy and strong.” For the past three years there has also been a National Day of Remembrance during the fly-in for those who have died in small airplane crashes. “We have Will and Wiley who died in a small airplane crash, and so we want to honor anyone who has died in a small airplane crash. You hear a tragedy with the big airplanes, but there is a lot of people who have passed away in small airplane crashes,” Jones said. “At 10 o’clock (a.m.) we have a National Day of Remembrance that we put on Facebook all over the country, and we honor those that have died in small airplane crashes. We have a 35 second moment of silence, which is for 1935 when Will Rogers and Wiley Post died.” For more information, visit <a href="http://www.willrogers.com" target="_blank">www.willrogers.com</a>.