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Cherokee Southwest Township celebrates culture

BY CHRISTINA GOODVOICE
08/12/2009 07:10 AM
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. – Cherokee citizen Nick Nail hasn’t lived in the Cherokee Nation for more than 60 years, but he and about 100 other Cherokees celebrate their heritage thanks to the Cherokee Southwest Township.

The township is one of 12 CN-recognized organizations designated as an “official” Cherokee community outside the tribe’s jurisdiction in Oklahoma. In 2008, the CSWT became the first recognized community under the Cherokee Nation Community Association, which designates satellite groups as official Cherokee communities.

“We were very enthused to become the first satellite community,” said Nail, who is the CSWT’s meeting facilitator. “We’ve always felt we were an embassy anyway for the Cherokee Nation, so we were able to put this all together … it was a real honor for us.”

The CSWT was established in 1999 as a way for Cherokee citizens and their families to explore their heritage, nurture their Cherokee roots and learn more about Cherokee history and traditions, Nail said.

CSWT members consist of enrolled and non-enrolled Cherokees and their families. The group’s activities include monthly meetings and potluck meals with guest speakers and programs. The group also publishes a monthly newsletter, The Cherokee Compass, which includes Cherokee news and articles on history, culture, traditions and general interest.

Nail said his family moved from Oklahoma in 1943, but that hasn’t stopped him from returning to the CN once a year for the Cherokee National Holiday.

“(I) still have family in Oklahoma,” he said. “(I) used to compete in the blowgun competition.

“I’ve always enjoyed my Cherokee heritage and sharing with other Cherokees. We’ve always found it nice to find other families that are Cherokee. We just have a really good time together.”

CSWT member Sue Sleeper, who was born and raised in Santa Fe, said she has always held her Cherokee roots close.

“It’s very dear to my heart to be able to visit with other Cherokees for so many years,” she said. “You end up thinking you’re the only one. When we found this group it just brought our whole heritage to life, and it has just become a special integrated part of our lives.”

Patti Rawls, who was born in Tahlequah, Okla., said her heritage remains important to her and that she is happy to be a CSWT member. “(The group) keeps us all connected,” she said. “Kind of keeps us in touch with relatives back home.”

Charter CSWT member Gwen Forrester said both of her parents are on the Dawes Roll and had land in Oklahoma and that she’s proud of her Cherokee heritage.

“This group, Cherokee Southwest Township, has really enhanced my memories. I’ve taken the language classes…it’s just a wonderful part of my husbands life and my life, and our grandchildren’s lives,” she said.

At-Large Tribal Council Julia Coates said the reason people start satellite groups is because nearly 70 percent of Cherokee citizens don’t live in the tribe’s boundaries and they want to connect with the CN. She said satellite communities are a way to do that.

Along with celebrating the Cherokee culture with themselves, CWST members also receive periodic visits from CN officials and dignitaries, including the Principal Chief Chad Smith.

“We really appreciate the visits from the Cherokee Nation, Chad Smith and (his wife)Bobbie, At-Large (Tribal) Councilors, Julia (Coates) and (Jack) Baker,” Forrester said.

Communities wanting to apply for official CN recognition must meet requirements, including having had six months worth of meetings, established bylaws and permanent officers seated. Also, a majority of officers must be CN citizens.

Once those requirements are met, the group can submit an application to the CNCA board for chapter consideration. Once a community is chaptered under the CN’s non-profit umbrella, they are regarded as one of the CN’s official communities.

News

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08/29/2014 04:09 PM
The Cherokee Phoenix will be selling subscriptions and merchandise Sat. Aug. 30, 2014 during the 62nd Annual Cherokee National Holiday. Come visit with staff members from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Courthouse Square and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. inside the Cherokee Nation Tribal Complex during it's annual open house. Scroll through the photos to see when and where each staff member will be.
BY STAFF REPORTS
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BY BRYAN POLLARD
08/29/2014 10:23 AM
The Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board will be meeting via conference call at 9 a.m. CDT, September 10, 2014. To attend, please use the conference call information listed below. The meeting agenda is <a href="http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/Docs/2014/8/8480_140910_EB_Agenda.pdf" target="_blank">here</a>. Dial-in: 866-210-1669 Entry code: 4331082
BY JOSH NEWTON
08/29/2014 08:31 AM
Tahlequah Daily Press TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Authorities with the Cherokee Nation Marshal Service and Ontario Provincial Police in Canada say that until last month, a man living in Tahlequah had been presumed dead as a result of a 1977 barn fire. “The Cherokee Nation Marshal Service, acting on a tip, did locate Ronald Stan alive and living in Tahlequah on Aug. 5,” said Amanda Clinton, the Cherokee Nation communications director. She said the tribe would make no other comment about the discovery. Authorities in Canada say Stan, who has been living in Tahlequah under the alias of Jeff Walton, disappeared from his home in Ontario nearly 37 years ago. According to media reports out of Canada, Stan lived in the former Township of East Williams in Middlesex County, but was reported missing when a barn caught fire on Sept. 29, 1977. Witnesses reportedly saw Stan near the barn before it broke out into a blaze. Remnants of a body were never found, but in 1986, Stan was declared legally dead in Canada. He had reportedly left behind a wife and children there. But authorities in Canada say a recent audit of Stan’s disappearance somehow connected the supposedly missing person to a man living near Tahlequah, 69-year-old Jeff Walton. According to some media reports, police used Facebook connections to pinpoint Walton in Cherokee County. Authorities have not said what Stan’s motives might have been for disappearing 37 years ago, nor whether the barn fire thought to have taken his life was or is now considered to have been suspicious. But Canadian officials have suggested Stan faces no criminal charges there. Stan’s 35-year-old son, Jeff Walton Jr., told the Toronto Star that his family is “still trying to put all the puzzle pieces together.” He said family members from Stan’s U.S. life learned of the former life last month. Stan reportedly has grandchildren in the U.S. as well. On April 23, 2000, Stan, under the name of Walton, married Cherokee County resident Debra E. Proctor in Eureka Springs, Arkansas. Court records show Proctor and Stan divorced earlier this month – according to Walton Jr., because of the revelation of his father’s secret Canadian past. In Proctor’s petition for divorce, she cites “incompatibility” between herself and Stan. Walton Jr. told the Toronto Star that his father now suffers from vascular dementia and heart disease, and was in a nursing home when authorities began to uncover Stan’s past. According to court documents, Stan has also gone by the name of Jeff Winton, and reportedly spent some time in Louisiana after leaving Canada. “It’s been tough on me, but he’s still my father,” Walton Jr. told the Toronto Star. “It doesn’t change the man I knew for 35 years. Hopefully one day, he can sit down and write a book and remember all the stuff he’s been through in his life. It’d be a damn good book, I’ll tell you that, just from what I’ve heard.” Canadian media also reported that the Ontario Provincial Police have closed their case. – REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION
BY STAFF REPORTS
08/28/2014 01:21 PM
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BY ROGER GRAHAM
08/26/2014 02:28 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Cherokee Nation department employees are completing work in preparation for the Cherokee National Holiday. The annual event begins on Aug. 29 and ends Aug. 31. A listing of holiday event times and locations can be found <a href="http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/Docs/2014/8/8400_HolidayGuide2014.pdf" target="_blank">here</a>. The task of preparing for nearly 100,000 visitors requires multiple departments to work together to complete the variety of improvements to event locations. Cherokee National Holiday Director Lou Slagle acknowledged CN Facilities Dept. for taking on the majority of the physical labor.