http://www.cherokeephoenix.orgMagicians Bobby Neugin, left, and Jeramy Neugin, with his head in a box, perform the flaming head trick at Hulbert Public Schools in Hulbert, Okla. JAMI CUSTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Magicians Bobby Neugin, left, and Jeramy Neugin, with his head in a box, perform the flaming head trick at Hulbert Public Schools in Hulbert, Okla. JAMI CUSTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Lost City Magic incorporates Cherokee culture in shows

Hulbert (Okla.) Elementary School students Mackenzie Jackson, left, and Dylan Harman, middle, watch while Cherokee magician Jeramy Neugin, right, performs a hand trick. JAMI CUSTER/CHEROKEE PHONEIX Cherokee magician Jeramy Neugin, left, performs a light bulb trick using Hulbert fifth grade student Ty Schnee of Hulbert, Okla., during a magic show. JAMI CUSTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Hulbert (Okla.) Elementary School students Mackenzie Jackson, left, and Dylan Harman, middle, watch while Cherokee magician Jeramy Neugin, right, performs a hand trick. JAMI CUSTER/CHEROKEE PHONEIX
BY JAMI MURPHY
Former Reporter
04/11/2011 06:52 AM
Video with default Cherokee Phoenix Frame
HULBERT, Okla. – Oohs and ahs replace the chatter of children at Hulbert Public Schools when Lost City Magic, a father-son illusionist team, begin performing its Cherokee-influenced show.

Cherokees Bobby Neugin, the father, and Jeramy Neugin, the son, have been performing magic most of their lives.

They said it comes to them honestly, having ancestors who were also magically influenced.

“We’ve been practicing and doing this our whole lives. My father, he picked up from his grandfather. The magic’s has just been always in our family,” Jeramy said. (Our) family has always been amateur magicians. We have had medicine people in our background and an ancestor that was a rainmaker. So it’s stories like that growing up that has kind of put more and more influence of learning magic on our own.”

Bobby said he does not know of any other Cherokee magicians, and that it’s important his Cherokee heritage be in the shows in some way. He said a lot of the magic they learned came from North Carolina Cherokee while he and his son lived there.

“We were just checking the traditions of the Cherokee people and the legends and we have incorporated that into our magic,” he said.

One story used in their shows is of a legend of giant wasps from a mountain range.

“This mountain supposedly had giant waspers living there years ago. People lived there and these waspers would catch the kids and old people. We have dirt from that mountain and Jeramy produces live waspers from that dirt,” Bobby said.

Many of their tricks, Bobby added, come from books, videos and television.

“We have debates on magic tricks. We’ll see a magic trick on TV and I’ll ask him ‘can you do that?’ and he’ll say ‘yeah, I can do that’ and I’ll say ‘well I can too, but how would you do that?’ That’s how we come up with a lot of our tricks,” Bobby said.

He said another bonus of having a business with his son is the quality time he spends with him. He said Jeramy “is one of the best and he now beats him at magic all the time.”

Lost City Magic does all types of shows, including birthdays and weddings, but the duo’s specialties are stage shows, stage illusions and street magic.

“We have got enough knowledge incorporated that we can do just about any kind of setting for any group of people,” he said.

The most enjoyable part of a show is seeing the look on a person’s face when they see a trick that astonishes them, Bobby said.

“I just enjoy seeing people have fun with it,” he added. “We do a trick and it is just amazing to see the awe and amazement on people’s faces.”

The duo recently entered the Society of American Magicians, a prestigious society with past members such as Harry Houdini and Lance Burton.

Bobby said it is “kind of a big deal and you have to be nominated.”

jami-custer@cherokee.org • (918) 931-1564

Culture

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
06/20/2018 04:00 PM
WAYNESVILLE, Mo. – Autumn Lawless trained for the challenges she faced on June 15 as she fought the heat and hills of the Ozarks in south-central Missouri. The 21-year-old from Porum, Oklahoma, said the training the 10 Cherokee Nation “Remember the Removal” cyclists endured from January to May prepared them for the rigors of riding for three weeks through seven states. “Training was hard, but it was hard for a reason. We were all ready, and we’ve made it this far because of our training,” she said. She said through the “RTR” program, which started in 1984 for youth leadership, she’s gained more courage and knows “she can do anything.” “I saw a lot of our riders and how this ride changed them and how strong they were. They were more confident, they were better leaders, and I wanted to be a better leader. I know I can push myself...now. This ride has given me perseverance,” Lawless said. “The ride isn’t just what you see in videos. It’s not just people cheering you on and clapping for you. It’s the time you spend with your teammates on the road motivating each other to get up another hill or just checking on each other. It really is a family, and there’s a lot of behind-the-scenes work that goes into this ride.” Ahli-sha Stephens, 34, of Cherokee, North Carolina, said the main reason she wanted to ride was to experience some of the hardships her ancestors endured and “to be able to go where they had been and walk where they walked.” “It’s something you can tell someone about and they won’t understand it unless they’ve been there and felt it for themselves,” she said. Walking the now-preserved trails that Cherokee people walked 180 years ago was especially moving for her, she said. “It’s humbling knowing you walked where they walked, and you’re walking in their footsteps and are seeing things that they saw. It wasn’t easy, and I can’t imagine doing it the way they did it day after day.” Stephens added that riding the trail with other Cherokees created a bond that gets stronger daily. “We rely on each other. We help each other, and we’re there for each other. I think if we didn’t have each other’s backs, it would make this journey a whole lot harder.” Stephens said she’s also learned to be more patient and wants to use her abilities to help others and to “lead, listen and be a team player.” “Overall, I think I will be more knowledgeable about who our people were, what they did and what they went through, what they faced. I think I will just be a better person all around,” she said. Daulton Cochran, 21, of Bell, Oklahoma, said he wanted to ride to “connect” with his tribe better. “I had a lot of friends who did the ride, and it seemed like it changed a lot of people afterwards, and I craved that, I guess,” he said. Because of the constant strain of riding for two weeks, he said he couldn’t recall the exact spot that moved him the most, but it was a place in Tennessee where his Cherokee ancestors camped. “I guess it was the idea of campsites really being gravesites. It really gets to you to see stuff like that,” he said. He added that he’s appreciated taking on the riding challenge with his teammates. “The fellowship has been great. We all connect. We all hang out. It’s just a good thing. We’re a family now.” Seth Ledford, 18, of Cherokee North Carolina, said he saw how the ride was a “life-changing” experience for others and wanted to experience it. “It is a once-in-lifetime experience, and it will change you for the better. That’s what I heard about the ride,” he said. “So far the ride has been good. It has been tough at times, and emotional and physical. We’ve had a lot of tough times, but we make up and still like each other.” He said he would take away leadership skills and bonds he’s developed with fellow riders. He also has learned to work within a team. “When I wrestle (in high school) I’m by myself in everything. This is really helping me with my teamwork.”
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/14/2018 08:30 AM
FORT SMITH, Ark. – Cherokee artist Daniel HorseChief is designing the Lighthorse Monument for the U.S. Marshals Museum in Fort Smith after being selected by the Five Tribes InterTribal Council. HorseChief’s life-size bronze statue will reflect a Native law enforcement officer of the post-Civil War era patrolling Indian Territory. His attire will include a Native-designed hunting jacket and the base of the statue traditional Southeast Indian designs to honor the ancestral homelands of the Five Tribes that consist of the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee (Creek) and Seminole, prior to forced removal. The tribes referred to their law enforcement entities as lighthorsemen. Formed in some of the tribes as early as the late 18th century, the law enforcement companies remain on duty today under the title of marshals. “This design truly honors our Native law enforcement who historically and today serve as protectors of our tribal people and land,” Principal Chief Bill John Baker, who also serves as president of the Five Tribes InterTribal Council, said. “This monument is to honor the dedication and sacrifice of Choctaw, Chickasaw, Cherokee, Muscogee (Creek) and Seminole lawmen and Indian U.S. Marshals who worked tirelessly to bring peace and order to Indian Territory and its borders.” Leaders of the Five Tribes selected HorseChief’s design during this past April’s InterTribal Council gathering. It was presented on June 4 to the U.S. Marshals Museum board. HorseChief, of Sallisaw, Oklahoma, also designed statues for Sequoyah High School, Northeastern State University, the Cherokee Heritage Center and the Cherokee Nation Veterans Center in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. The Lighthorse Monument will be set at the center of a 40-foot square plaza outside the museum. A completion date has not been announced. “The United States Marshals Museum is honored to be the home of the Five Civilized Tribes Lighthorse monument,” Dr. R. Cole Goodman, chairman of the U.S. Marshals Museum board of directors, said. “Sculptor Daniel HorseChief’s ability to bring to life such beauty and movement in honoring the history of tribal law enforcement and their connectivity to the U.S. Marshals will enhance the museum’s guest experience. This is also an opportunity to showcase an understanding of the importance of the history of this city, this region and our country.” The U.S. Marshals Museum is slated to open in late 2019 and will highlight the 225-year history and achievements of America’s oldest federal law enforcement agency, from their creation in 1789 to the present.
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/11/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Speakers Bureau will be held Thursday June 14 from 12:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. We will meet in the Community Ballroom that is located behind the Restaurant of the Cherokee. All Cherokee speakers are invited to attend. If you want to bring a side dish or a dessert, feel free to bring it. Come speak Cherokee and enjoy food and fellowship. For further information about the event, please contact the Language Program at 918-453-5151. Tsalagi aniwonisgi unadatlugv dodvnatlosi Nvgineiga Dehaluyi 14 ganvsulvi 12:30 p.m. adalenisgi 4 p.m. igohida. Na Anitsalagi tsunalisdayetiyi tsigotlv unaditli wayvsdi onadilvyvi utani kanvsula dodvnatlosi. Naniv Anitsalagi aniwonisgi otsitayohiha uniluhisdii. Alisdayvdi ayohisdi yodulia. Dodayotsadatlisani ale dodayotsalisdayvna hilutsvi. Ugodesdi tsadulihesdi tsadelayohisdi hiina wigehiyadvdi Tsalagi Gawonihisdi Unadotlvsv 918-453-5151.
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/08/2018 05:15 PM
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – The Sequoyah National Research Center is offering the 2018 Sequoyah Chapbook Award for emerging American Indian and Alaska Native poets, with the winner receiving 250 copies of the chapbook that will be archived in the Center’s Tribal Writers Digital Library. The award is open to any enrolled citizen of a federally recognized tribe in the United States. Poetry manuscripts should be 20 to 36 pages in length and may be submitted in hard copy or digitally. Hard copy manuscript should be single-spaced, one poem per page, paginated, with a table of contents and bound with a binder clip. Digital submissions should be single-spaced, one poem per page (start each poem on a new page). Individual poems may have been published previously in a journal or magazine, but we will not accept work that has appeared as a whole (self-published or otherwise). A cover letter should include a short bio and identify the writer’s tribal affiliation along with name, mailing address, email and phone number. Those submitting paper copy should include a self-addressed stamped envelope for confirmation of receipt of the manuscript. Manuscripts will not be returned. Mail hard copy submissions to H.K. Hummel, Department of English, 501 Stabler Hall, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204. Manuscripts in hard copy must be postmarked by Sept. 1. Electronic submissions should reach the editor by noon, Central Standard Time, on Sept. 1. Digital submissions and questions regarding contest should be sent to <a href="mailto: dflittlefiel@ualr.edu">dflittlefiel@ualr.edu</a> and <a href="mailto: mevanslooten@ualr.edu">mevanslooten@ualr.edu</a>. The collections of the University of Arkansas at Little Rock Sequoyah National Research Center constitute the largest assemblage of Native American and Native Alaskan expression in the world. Its mission is to acquire and preserve the writings and ideas of Native North Americans.
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/07/2018 12:00 PM
CLAREMORE – An “Enhanced Tour” of Will Rogers Memorial Museums is bringing a new level of information to people visiting the memorial in Claremore and the Oologah Birthplace Ranch. The voice of Michael Wallis, author of “Rt. 66 – the Mother Road” and voice of the Sheriff in Disney Pixar movie “Cars,” narrates a tour of the museum starting in the west gallery through the final journey of the American cowboy philosopher. Using an electronic device, areas in both museums are marked with “Stop” numbers to provide audio information, images and other content. There are 16 enhanced features in the museum. The “Enhanced Tour” can also be accessed from the website, www.willrogers.com and people can take the tour anytime. Each month people come from most of the United States and foreign countries to learn more about Will Rogers. Now, through use of smart devices, they are able to see what he had to say about their state or country. “Will commented on about every state and many countries,” Tad Jones, museum executive director, said. “He was aware of their politics and their surroundings and shared them in his writings. The new ‘Enhanced Tour’ will allow visitors to search their state or country and read what Will had to say about them and hopefully have a new connection with him.” An “Enhanced Tour” brochure is available at the museum entry with a map and numbers for various galleries and stops. “This program will be ever-changing and expanding as we add more content to each page and visitors will really enjoy listening to Michael Wallis’ voice as he gives a personal tour,” Jones said. The museum and ranch are open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily and are closed Thanksgiving and Christmas. From Nov. 11 through Feb. 28, the museums are closed Monday and Tuesday. Visit <a href="http://www.willrogers.com" target="_blank">willrogers.com</a> for more information.
BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
06/06/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – During a March meeting, Cherokee speakers added 88 newly translated words to the tribe’s language. The new additions contain science, art and grammar terminology, which will be added to a terminology booklet. Since 2007, a Cherokee language consortium of fluent speakers from the Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band and Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians have translated more than 2,500 modern English words into Cherokee. “The reason we formed was because there are so many words that we did not have in Cherokee, for instance, ‘computer.’ All the newer stuff that we have in school and that we use in our homes, we didn’t have Cherokee words for that,” Anna Sixkiller, CN translator specialist, said. Kathy Sierra, language consortium chairwoman, said at each quarterly meeting, a new list of words is brought and translations begin by writing out the English version, looking at the definition and describing the words using the Cherokee language. “Just about everything that we say is described. We find the best description for that word,” she said. Sixkiller said one English word, such as balloon, could have a long Cherokee name because Cherokee is a descriptive language. She said the translation for balloon is “you put air in there and it goes out.” Also, laser printer when translated into Cherokee is described as “it lights up” and “it prints.” Sixkiller said the consortium looks at the linguistics of the English word in what it does, who does it and when in time someone does it. “The English language and the Cherokee language are two different languages. They don’t mix. I think the Cherokee language is unique, pretty and to the point,” Sixkiller said. Sierra said the EBCI’s Cherokee dialect differs from Oklahoma Cherokees’ dialect and that the group takes that into consideration when translating words. In the terminology booklet, Sixkiller said some words with two translations are marked with an (e) or (w) to denote eastern and western-style Cherokee. The next language consortium meeting is set for June 13-15 in Cherokee, North Carolina, home of the EBCI. To view the new words, <a href="http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/Docs/2018/6/42325__art_180518_88words_lb.pdf" target="_blank">click here</a>.