Cherokee Nation administration officials, Tribal Councilors and AMO Salina Health Center employees gather April 28 for the opening of the tribe’s dental clinic in Salina, Okla. JAMI CUSTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Dental clinic offers shorter travel for citizens

Stefan Hacker, Cherokee Nation dental director, speaks during the April 28 opening ceremony of the tribe’s dental clinic in Salina, Okla. JAMI CUSTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Melissa Gower, Cherokee Nation Health Services group leader, speaks at an April 28 ceremony opening the tribe’s dental clinic in Salina, Okla. JAMI CUSTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Stefan Hacker, Cherokee Nation dental director, speaks during the April 28 opening ceremony of the tribe’s dental clinic in Salina, Okla. JAMI CUSTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
BY JAMI MURPHY
Senior Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
05/09/2011 06:47 AM
SALINA, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation celebrated the opening of its new dental clinic April 28 at AMO Health Center. The clinic will allow patients living in the area to receive dental care without having to travel long distances.

CN citizen Billie Ann Dry said she lives approximately 8-1/2 miles east of Salina and having the new clinic would help her family battle rising gas prices.

“It’s just a 15 minute drive from the house to here (AMO Health Center),” she said.

Dry said before the clinic, she and family members traveled to W.W. Hastings Hospital in Tahlequah for dental care.

“It was an hour’s drive over there,” she said.

According to CN Communications, the new facility brings additional staff and features eight patient chairs, electronic records and digital radiology for x-rays. Also, the recent construction made space for administrative offices, behavioral health services and a community room.

Stefan Hacker, CN dental director, said the grand opening of the clinic and community center has “definitely been a project we’ve been working on for a long period of time and it’s nice to see it come to fruition.”

Allen Summerlin, dental clinic supervisor and dentist, said his job would consist of managing the staff of assistants, hygienists and dentists, as well as performing dental services.

“At the Salina dental clinic, services will include exams, cleanings, operative treatment such as fillings, root canals, extractions and denture care as well,” he said.

He added that patients seeking dental care should call for an appointment, but if they have an emergency they can be seen as a walk-in.

“Walk-ins are available…basically what we are going to try to do is accommodate patients throughout the day,” he said. “We don’t want to put a time limit on it, but you know, we’re here to provide a service and we’re going to do our best to do that.”

The clinic has three dentists, a hygienist, eight assistants, one supervisor and two clerical positions.

The AMO Salina Health Center opened in 1996. William Smoke, who was a Tribal Councilor when the dental clinic legislation was approved, said the health center was built with a space for a dental clinic.

“Wilma Mankiller was in on plans for the dental clinic when the Salina Clinic was first built. For a while it was empty. There wasn’t anything but gravel in there on the floor. We tried back then (to get the dental clinic), but we never could get it,” he said.

He said the health center opening helped a lot of people in the area and that the dental clinic would build on that.

“A lot people get help down there. My sister goes there and plans to get her teeth worked on there. There’s a lot of people that can’t make it to Tahlequah for dental, so it’s good for the whole area,” he said.

According to the tribe, the AMO Salina Health Center had nearly 58,000 visits and that the dental clinics throughout the CN health system had more than 45,000 patient visits this past year.

jami-custer@cherokee.org • 918-453-5560
About the Author
Reporter

Jami Murphy graduated from Locust Grove High School in 2000. She received her bachelor’s degree in mass communications in 2006 from Northeastern State University and began working at the Cherokee Phoenix in 2007.

She said the Cherokee Phoenix has allowed her the opportunity to share valuable information with the Cherokee people on a daily basis. 

Jami married Michael Murphy in 2014. They have two sons, Caden and Austin. Together they have four children, including Johnny and Chase. They also have two grandchildren, Bentley and Baylea. 

She is a Cherokee Nation citizen and said working for the Cherokee Phoenix has meant a great deal to her. 

“My great-great-great-great grandfather, John Leaf Springston, worked for the paper long ago. It’s like coming full circle. I’ve learned so much about myself, the Cherokee people and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it.”

Jami is a member of the Native American Journalists Association, and Investigative Reporters and Editors. You can follow her on Twitter @jamilynnmurphy or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/jamimurphy2014.
jami-murphy@cherokee.org • 918-453-5560
Reporter Jami Murphy graduated from Locust Grove High School in 2000. She received her bachelor’s degree in mass communications in 2006 from Northeastern State University and began working at the Cherokee Phoenix in 2007. She said the Cherokee Phoenix has allowed her the opportunity to share valuable information with the Cherokee people on a daily basis. Jami married Michael Murphy in 2014. They have two sons, Caden and Austin. Together they have four children, including Johnny and Chase. They also have two grandchildren, Bentley and Baylea. She is a Cherokee Nation citizen and said working for the Cherokee Phoenix has meant a great deal to her. “My great-great-great-great grandfather, John Leaf Springston, worked for the paper long ago. It’s like coming full circle. I’ve learned so much about myself, the Cherokee people and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it.” Jami is a member of the Native American Journalists Association, and Investigative Reporters and Editors. You can follow her on Twitter @jamilynnmurphy or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/jamimurphy2014.

Health

BY STAFF REPORTS
09/29/2016 09:25 AM
CLAREMORE, Okla. – Claremore Indian Hospital officials want you to become a Kung Flu fighter as they start their “Flu Fighter” campaign on Oct. 3 at the hospital located at 101 S. Moore Ave. David Bales, Claremore Indian Hospital safety officer, said American Indians and Alaskan Natives are more likely than any other group in the general United States population to get sicker from the flu, be hospitalized and die from flu-related complications. He said he is advising people to get the influenza vaccine and that it’s safe and people cannot get the flu from vaccine. In the meantime, he said, people can help prevent getting or spreading the flu or colds by covering their mouths and noses when they sneeze or cough, washing their hands often, staying home if they are sick and not eating or drinking after people who are sick. For more information, call us at 918-342-6679 or email <a href="mailto: david.bales@ihs.gov">david.bales@ihs.gov</a>.
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Senior Reporter – @cp_wchavez
09/27/2016 08:15 AM
<strong>This is Part 1 of a multiple-part series about the opioid epidemic.</strong> TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The United States is undergoing an opioid epidemic, and Oklahoma is near the top of a nationwide list for drug-poisoning deaths. Cherokee Nation’s Behavioral Health defines an opioid as an umbrella term for a natural or synthetic drug derived from or related to the opium poppy plant. Opioids attach to receptors in the central nervous system reducing pain signals to the brain. According to takeasprescribed.org, a website provided by the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, in 2012 Oklahoma had the fifth-highest unintentional poisoning death rate in the nation (18.6 deaths per 100,000 population). Prescription painkillers were involved in nine out of 10 prescription drug-related deaths, with 460 opioid-involved deaths in 2012 alone. Anyone can be at risk of overdose if prescription drugs are not taken as directed and with a valid prescription, said Sam Bradshaw, CN Prevention “Partnership for Success” Project director, who is with a Behavioral Health group working against prescription drug abuse. Adults aged 35-54 had the highest death rate of any age group for prescription- and nonprescription-related overdoses, and men are more likely to die of an opioid-related overdose than women, according to takeasprescribed.org. “It’s a national epidemic. I think it’s really important to share that. It’s not just in northeast Oklahoma or a Cherokee problem. This is a national problem that is affecting our state and our 14-county Cherokee Nation service area,” Bradshaw said. He said when prescription drug abuse prevention is discussed, people in his field talk about opioids. Opioids are painkillers, and Bradshaw said many people live with chronic pain and need the painkillers. Commonly used opioids are oxycodone, morphine, codeine, heroin, fentanyl, methadone, opium Demerol, Percocet, Lortab and hydrocodone. “Now, there’s a whole bunch of different ones, but the most prescribed opioid is hydrocodone. The United States is the number one consumer of hydrocodone (99 percent) in the world,” he said. More overdose deaths involve hydrocodone or oxycodone than all illegal drugs and alcohol combined, said CN certified prevention specialist Coleman Cox, who educates people about opioid drug abuse in Wagoner County. National Vital Statistics System data from 2015 indicate that deaths in Oklahoma attributable to opioids have exceeded the national rate with rapid increases since 1999. In that period, death rates attributable to painkillers in at least half of the 14 counties in the CN’s jurisdiction exceed the state rate of 8.7 per 100,000. Those counties are Cherokee (13), McIntosh (11.6), Mayes (11.1), Muskogee (11.1), Rogers (8.9), Sequoyah (12.3) and Wagoner (12.5). Opioid overdose signs include no response to stimuli, shallow or stopped breathing, person can’t be woken up, unusual snoring or gurgling sounds, blue-grey lips or finger tips and floppy arms and legs. It is recommended to not assume a person is asleep if you cannot get a response from him or her and to not let a person at risk “sleep it off.” Also, with a suspected overdose, do not leave the person alone and do not give the person anything to eat or drink or induce vomiting. “People believe that medication that comes from a doctor is less harmful. So, what happens with that is that people become accidentally addicted,” Bradshaw said. “It is really important to say this is a non-discriminatory destroyer. It doesn’t matter what your economic background is, your social class doesn’t matter or race. It’s an equal opportunity destroyer. Anybody can get addicted.” Addiction sometimes occurs after a person has surgery and is prescribed an opioid painkiller, he added. Bradshaw said he is wary of how he talks about prescription painkiller addiction because he has had “some push back from people in chronic pain” that rely on prescribed painkillers to relieve their pain. “We are not trying to take them away from people who legitimately need these medications. We have to have a balanced approach. We recognize and know that there are people in chronic pain that need their pain medication,” he said. “They should not feel like they are being profiled as a drug addict to get what they need to survive. What we are tying to prevent is misuse and abuse and dependency of opioid painkillers.” He said painkillers should be used appropriately or “taken as prescribed.” Problems and addictions can occur when people take more than the amount prescribed. “If you can’t get through the day without it, you’re dependent. That’s what we see. The people that are overdosing and dying are usually dependent on them,” Bradshaw said. “They’re taking 10 to 40 to 50 Lortabs a day, and that’s not a stretch.” There is no single indicator for when opioid abuse became a problem, but the epidemic claimed 28,647 lives in 2014, a four-fold increase in opioid overdoses since 2000, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. To combat the epidemic, the CN received a $1 million Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration grant to strengthen drug misuse prevention efforts. A Department of Health and Human Services release states the grant program wants state and tribal entities to target prescription drug misuse, raise awareness about sharing medications and address the risks of overprescribing. It also seeks to raise community awareness and bring prescription drug misuse prevention activities and education to schools, communities, parents, prescribers and their patients.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
09/22/2016 05:30 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) - A recently released report states Oklahoma has the eighth-highest adult obesity rate in the nation. A report from the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation states almost 34 percent of adults in the state are obese. Louisiana is ranked No. 1, while West Virginia, Mississippi and Alabama tied for second place. Arkansas is ranked No. 6. The rankings are based on data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Adult obesity rates in Oklahoma remained stable since the last survey, The Oklahoman reports. Kansas and Kentucky saw their obesity rates increase. Richard Hamburg, Trust for America’s Health interim president and CEO, said “obesity remains one of the most significant epidemics our country has faced, contributing to millions of preventable illnesses and billions of dollars in avoidable health care costs.” According to the report, 17 percent of children in Oklahoman live in households that have limited access to adequate food and nutrition due to cost, proximity and other reasons. The report also said the 30 percent of high school students in the state reported drinking one or more cans of soda per day. To encourage fitness, 18 states, including Oklahoma, have set a minimum amount of time that elementary students must participate in physical education.
BY STAFF REPORTS
09/21/2016 05:00 PM
CLAREMORE, Okla. – The Claremore Indian Hospital will host an Affordable Care Act Outreach and Enrollment Fair from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Oct. 20, less than two weeks before the Nov. 1 open enrollment. “Nov. 1, 2016, will mark the beginning of the fourth Open Enrollment Period for the ACA Health Insurance Marketplace,” Sheila Dishno, patient benefit coordinator, said. “Even though members of federally recognized tribes have a special monthly enrollment status, it is important for American Indian and Alaska Native individuals and families to learn about their insurance options. Whether it’s purchasing insurance through the Marketplace or qualifying for SoonerCare, knowing that you have quality coverage provides peace of mind.” Dishno said people who attend the fair should bring their Social Security cards, pay stubs, W-2 forms or wage and tax statements, policy numbers for any current health insurance and information about any health insurance they or their families could get from an employer. Also Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Oklahoma will attend to assist patients with signing up for free-to-low-cost health insurance. The hospital is located at 101 S. Moore Ave. For more information, call 918-342-6240.
BY STAFF REPORTS
09/13/2016 12:00 PM
CLAREMORE, Okla. – The Claremore Indian Hospital on Sept. 29 will sponsor a U.S. Veterans Affairs Enrollment Fair to assist Native American veteran patients in applying for eligibility for health care services through the VA. The fair is slated for 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in its Large Conference Room as benefit coordinators and representatives from the VA and Disabled American Veterans assist with application processing. To enroll, veterans must bring financial information such as income and resources and their DD-214 military discharge papers. If already enrolled, call 918-342-6507, 918-342-6240 or 918-342-6559 to update your file. Also, the VA now requires all veterans to complete a MEANS test yearly. Veterans who have not completed tests in the past year, can complete them at the fair. The hospital is located at 101 S. Moore Ave.
BY STAFF REPORTS
08/29/2016 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation’s work creating healthier conditions for its citizens is now ranked among the best in the country, a first for any tribe. In late August, the CN Public Health received accreditation from the Public Health Accreditation Board. The PHAB serves as the national public health accrediting body. It is jointly supported by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. It sets standards for the nation’s nearly 3,000 governmental public health departments to improve the quality of their services and performance. Fewer than 200 public health agencies nationally have earned the title in the past five years. The CN is the first tribe to now hold that honor. “The Cherokee Nation joins the growing ranks of accredited health departments in a strong commitment to their public health mission,” PHAB President and CEO Kaye Bender said. “The peer-review process provides valuable feedback to inform health departments of their strengths and areas for improvement, so that they can better protect and promote the health of the people they serve in their communities. Residents of a community served by a nationally accredited health department can be assured that their health department has demonstrated the capacity to protect and promote the health of that community.” The Public Health team has worked on initiatives such as Zika Virus preparedness planning, launching community walking groups, funding school community gardens, implementing a cancer tumor registry database and conducting research with universities on issues such as triggers for childhood asthma. It also pays entry fees to 5K races and operates a gym with certified public health trainers for CN citizens and employees for free to promote healthier lifestyles. Public Health agencies, including the CN’s, promote healthy behavior; preventing diseases and injuries; ensuring access to safe food, water, clean air and life-saving immunizations; and responding to public health emergencies. The Oklahoma Department of Health, Oklahoma City-County Health Department, Tulsa Health Department, Comanche County Health Department and the CN are the only accredited entities statewide. “Our congratulations to the Cherokee Nation for achieving national public health accreditation,” Dr. Terry Cline, Oklahoma State Department of Health commissioner and Health and Human Services secretary, said. “As the first tribal nation in the country to achieve this accreditation, the Cherokee Nation continues a long tradition of excellence and quality in protecting and promoting health, and they are to be commended for this outstanding accomplishment.” According to the PHAB, a University of Chicago study found that more than 90 percent of health departments accredited for one year indicated that accreditation helped them better identify strengths and weaknesses and more than 80 percent found they improved accountability to stakeholders, while half reported it helped improve their chances for competitive funding. “Receiving national accreditation through the PHAB is a testament to the years of quality work by our public health team at the Cherokee Nation,” Connie Davis, Public Health executive director, said. “This seal of approval allows us to further improve upon our work in public health and on epidemiological issues.” Officials said Public Health leaders spent the past four years working on the accreditation, which involves meeting or exceeding a rigorous, peer-reviewed set of standards. “Achieving accreditation means we at the Cherokee Nation are cognizant of the crucial role of public health in our communities and demonstrates our ability to be a mutually-beneficial partner for all citizens,” Lisa Pivec, Public Health senior director, said. “We believe it communicates our serious commitment to both improving health and delivering quality public health services to all.”