Cherokee chef Don McClellan speaks to judges during an Iron Chef-style competition July 24 at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. McClellan created two appetizers, three entrees and two desserts for the competition. COURTESY PHOTO

Cherokee chef competes in Iron Chef-style competition

Cherokee chef Don McClellan prepares a dish during an Iron Chef-style competition July 24 at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. McClellan lost the competition by one point. COURTESY PHOTO
Cherokee chef Don McClellan prepares a dish during an Iron Chef-style competition July 24 at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. McClellan lost the competition by one point. COURTESY PHOTO
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Senior Reporter
07/29/2011 07:07 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen and chef Don McClellan stepped out of his comfort zone July 24 to compete in an Iron Chef-style competition as part of the 2011 “Living Earth Festival” at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian.

The annual Washington, D.C, festival celebrates Native contributions to protecting the environment, promoting sustainability and using indigenous plants for health and nutrition.

McClellan, 34, originally of Nowata, said he was invited to compete by his mother Carolyn McClellan, who is the NMAI assistant director of community and constituent services.

“With my education and experience, she thought it would be a great opportunity for me to come to D.C. and showcase all my talent,” McClellan said.

His competition was Chef Richard Hetzler, the executive chef for the NMAI’s Mitsitam Café, who won the 2010 inaugural competition.

McClellen has been a chef for 17 years and is the executive chef at Atria Vista del Rio in Albuquerque, N.M. He describes his dishes as “flavorful New Mexican.”

He said he prefers to keep his preparations simple and flavorful and that his Southwestern style meshed well with the competition’s ingredients of corn, beans and squash – the traditional “Three Sisters” among Native farmers.

He said having worked with the main ingredients for the past six years as a chef in Albuquerque prepared him the competition. He also said he was able to use the derivatives of corn, beans and squashes in addition to the actual ingredients.

“I can use squash blossoms as opposed to using zucchini or yellow squash…Corn tortillas would constitute use of the corn,” he said before the competition. “It’s going to be challenging for the simple fact that corns, beans and squash have to be in each dish.”

For the competition, each chef and his assistants had to prepare two appetizers, three entrees and two desserts using the main ingredients. They also had fresh salmon, duck and buffalo meat available.

McClellan said creating dessert pastries is not one of his strengths and that he was concerned about his desserts. To prepare for the competition, he said he ate New Mexican-style food, read cookbooks and studied various ways “the Three Sisters” can be prepared.

He said one of the strengths he brought to the competition was his ability to flavor foods to make them multi-dimensional in taste. He takes pride, he said, in flavoring and seasoning food so that his customers don’t feel the need to flavor it after it reaches their tables.

The competition was judged on taste, color and presentation and included a time limit. The chefs had one hour for prep work and one hour to prepare their dishes before serving.

The competition was held in the museum’s outdoor amphitheater, and McClellan said during the competition the temperature was around 102 degrees, with a heat index of about 115 degrees.

He said he knew he had to focus in the heat and “cook with his heart” and that he was capable of winning because he had a good menu.

“It’s an opportunity I don’t want to walk away from and say, ‘oh well, I could have done this or I should have done this.’ I want to leave it all out there in the competition,” he said.

Judgment was handed down by a group of local chefs. The panel consisted of Scott Drewno, executive chef at “The Source by Wolfgang Puck” and last year’s Washington, D.C., Chef of the Year; Brian Patterson, Hetzler’s opponent from 2010; and Pati Jinich, executive chef at D.C.’s Mexican Cultural Institute and host of the cooking show “Pati’s Mexican Table.”

A report from the competition states McClellan was the crowd favorite. However, he lost by one point, 629-628.

McClellan said he “loved the competition,” networking and getting out of his “comfort zone” and believes it will help his career.

He said it was a learning experience and that it confirmed he could keep up with the “big boys.”

“I know that I can cook, and I’ve been doing it for a long time. People love my food,” he said.

will-chavez@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961

ᏣᎳᎩ
ᏓᎵᏆ, ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎻ.--- ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎩᎳ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎦ Don McClellan ᎤᎳᏍᎬᏒ ᎾᏃ ᏂᎪᎯᎸ ᎤᏪᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᎦᏰᏉᎾ ᏔᎵᏍᎪᏅᎩᏁᎢ ᎤᏖᎳᏛ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬ ᏧᎾᏓᏃᏣᏟ ᎠᎾᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏔᎵᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏌᏚ “ᎠᏕᏗ ᎡᎶᎯ ᎠᎾᎵᎮᎵᎬᎢ” ᎾᎿ Smithsonian’s ᎬᎾᏕᎾ ᎤᏂᏍᏆᏂᎪᏔᏅᎲᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎹᏱᏟ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯᎢ ᎤᏃᏢᏒᎢ.

ᎾᎿ ᏑᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎢᏳᏓᎵ ᎠᏍᏆᎵᎰ ᏩᏒᏓᏃ, D. C, ᎠᎾᎵᎮᎵᎬ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏁᎯᏯ ᎠᎾᎵᏍᎪᎸᏗ ᎠᎾᎵᏏᏅᏗᏍᎩ ᏄᏍᏗᏓᏅ, ᎠᏂᏁᏉ ᏄᏍᏗᏓᏅ ᎠᎴ ᎬᏔᏂᏓᏍᏗ ᎤᏛᏒᏅ ᎾᎿ ᏓᏤᏢ ᎠᎴ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎨᏒᎢ.

McClellan, ᏦᏍᎪ ᏅᎩ ᎢᏳᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎾᎿ ᏃᏩᏛ ᏂᏓᏳᎶᏒ, ᎤᏛᏅ ᎤᏥ Carolyn McClellan,ᎤᏬᏎᎴ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎤᏖᎳᏗᏍᏗ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎠᎵᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ NMAI ᎠᎵᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ ᏗᎫᎪᏔᏂᏙᎯ ᎾᎿ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎠᎴ ᎾᎥ ᎠᏁᎲ ᏂᏓᏛᏁᎵᏙᎲᎢ.

“ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏓᏆᏕᎶᏆᎥ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎩᎦᏙᎲᏒ, ᎤᏪᎵᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏱᎦ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏇᏅᏍᏗ ᏩᏒᏓᏃ ᏯᏆᏛᏗ ᏂᎦᎥ ᎠᏆᏕᎶᏆᎥᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ McClellan.

ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎠᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᎨᏒ ᎠᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ Richard Hetzler, ᏄᎬᏫᏳᏒ ᎠᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ ᏧᎾᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎪᏢᏒ NMAI’S Mitsitam ᏧᎾᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ, ᎤᏓᏠᏒ ᏔᎵᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏍᎪᎯ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

McClellan ᏗᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ ᏂᎨᏐ ᎦᎵᏆᏚ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎠᎴ ᏄᎬᏫᏳᏒ ᏗᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ ᎾᎿ Atria Vista del Rio ᎾᎿ Albuquerque, N. M. ᏄᏍᏛ ᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏓᏍᏓᏴᏅ ᎠᏑᏯᎾᎢ ᎢᏤ ᏍᏆᏂ.”

ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎤᏟ ᎬᏩᏰᎸᏗ ᎤᏓᏍᏓᏴᏅ ᎠᏛᏅᏫᏍᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᎯᏓ ᎠᎴ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎠᎩᏍᏗ ᎤᎲ ᎤᎦᎾᏮᎤᏕᎵᎬ ᎤᏃᏢᏗ ᎪᏢᏍᎪ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᏑᏴᏅᎲᏍᎬ ᎯᎠ ᎨᏐ ᏎᎷ, ᏚᏯ, ᎠᎴ ᏍᏆᏏ-- ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏧᏅᏔᏂᏓᏍᏗ ᎨᏎ ᏗᎩᎶᏒ “ᏦᎢ ᎠᎾᏓᎸ” ᏓᏃᏎᎲ ᎠᏁᎯᏯ ᎠᏁᎲᎢ ᏗᏂᎶᎩᏍᎩ.

ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᏗᏍᎬ ᎯᎠ ᏭᏍᎪᎵᏴ ᎠᏑᏴᏓ ᏕᎬᏗᏍᎬ ᏑᏓᎵ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎬ Albuquerque ᎤᏍᏕᎸᎲ ᎠᏛᏅᎢᏍᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ. ᎤᏛᏅᏃ ᎡᎵᏊ ᎬᏗᏍᎬ ᎤᎦᏎᏍᏔᏂ ᎾᎿ ᏂᏓᏳᏓᎴᏅ ᎾᎿ ᏎᎷ, ᏚᏯ, ᎠᎴ ᏍᏆᏏ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎠᏑᏯᎾᎥᎢ ᎡᎵᏊ ᎤᏠᏯ ᏱᎩ ᎬᏗᏍᎪᎢ.

“ᎡᎵᏊ ᎠᏮᏙᏗ ᏍᏆᏏ ᎤᏥᎸᏅ ᎾᏃ ᎠᏮᏙᏗ Zucchini ᎠᎴ ᏓᎶᏂᎨ ᏍᏆᏏ…… ᏎᎷ tortillas ᎡᎵᏊ ᎬᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏎᎷ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᏱᎩ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᏄᎴᏅᏓᏊ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬ. “ᎡᎵᏃ ᎠᏓᏅᏖᎸᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏳᏍᏗ ᎪᏢᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏎᎷ, ᏚᏯ, ᎠᎴ ᏍᏆᏏ ᏂᎦᏓ ᏗᎬᏙᏗ ᏖᎵᏙᎩᎢ.”

ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬ, ᎠᏂᏏᏫᎭ ᏗᎾᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᎬᏩᏂᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ ᎤᏃᏢᏗ ᏔᎵ appetizers, ᏦᎢ entrees ᎠᎴ ᏔᎵ ᎤᎦᎾᏍᏗ ᎬᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏍᎪᎵ ᎬᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

ᎯᎢᏃ ᎤᏂᎰ ᎾᎿ ᏧᏂᎩᏣᏍᏗ ᎠᏣᏗ, ᎧᏬᏄ ᎠᎴ ᏯᎾᏏ ᎭᏫᏯ ᎬᏔᏂᏓᏍᏗ.

McClellan ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎪᏢᏍᎪ ᎤᎦᎾᏍᏗ Ꮭ ᏙᎯᏳ ᏩᏍᎪᎵᏴ ᏱᎩ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏓᏅᏖᏗᎭ. ᎯᎠ ᎪᏢᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬ, ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎤᎵᏍᏓᏴᏁ ᎢᏤ ᎠᏂᏍᏆᏂ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ, ᎠᎪᎵᏰᏓ ᎠᏓᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎪᏪᎵ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎦᏎᏍᏔᎾ ᏧᏓᎴᏅᏓ ᎢᏗᎦᎬᏁᏗ “ᏦᎢ ᏗᎾᏓᎸᎢ” ᎦᎪᏢᏙᏗ ᎨᏒᎢ.

ᎤᏛᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏌᏊ ᎤᏟᏂᎪᎯᏍᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᏲᎯᎲ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎤᏕᎶᏆᎥ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎠᏑᏴᏅᎲᏍᏗ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎠᏑᏴᏅᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ. ᎠᏢᏈᏍᏗᏍᎪᎢ, ᎠᏗᏍᎬ, ᎠᏑᏴᏅᎲᏍᏗ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᎾᎵᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ Ꮭ ᎠᏎ ᎢᎤᎾᏑᏴᏗ ᏱᎦᎩ.

ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬ ᏓᏄᎪᏗᏍᎪ ᎾᎿ ᏄᏍᏛ ᎠᎩᏍᏗᎢ, ᎤᎵᏑᏫᏓ ᎠᎴ ᏄᏍᏛ ᏅᎬᏁᎲ ᎠᎴ ᎢᎪᎯᏓ ᏚᏟᎢᎵᏙᎸ. ᎠᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ ᏑᏟᎶᏓ ᎠᏛᏅᎢᏍᏙᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏑᏟᎶᏓ ᎬᏂᏍᏔᏅᏗ ᏃᏊᏃ ᎦᏍᎩᎸ ᏩᏠᏗ ᎤᏂᎩᏍᏗᎢ.

ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏪᏘ ᎤᏂᏍᏆᏂᎪᏔᏅ’ ᎤᎦᎾᏮᎦᎶᎯᏍᏗ ᎤᏂᏍᏆᎸᎡᏗ, ᎠᎴ McClellan ᎤᏛᏅ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᏄᏗᏝᎬ ᎾᎿ ᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏔᎵ ᎨᏒᎢ, ᎾᏃ ᏄᏗᏞᎬ ᎾᎿ ᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏍᎩᎦᏚ ᎨᏒᎢ.

ᎤᏛᏅ ᎤᏅᏛ ᎾᎿ ᎤᎦᏎᏍᏙᏗᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏄᏗᏢᎬ ᎠᎴ “ᎤᏓᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏓᏅᏛ ᎬᏗ” ᎠᎴ ᎬᏩᏓᎪᏅᏙᏗ ᎨᏒ ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᏃ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎤᎾᎥ ᎪᏪᎵ ᎤᏓᏍᏓᏴᏙᏗ.
“ᎯᎢᎾ ᎠᏆᏜᏅᏓᏕᎸ Ꮭ ᏯᏆᏚᎵᏍᎨ ᎠᎩᏅᏗᏍᏗ ᎯᎠ ᎠᎴ ‘ᎯᎢᏛ ᎡᎵᏊ ᏱᏂᎦᏛᎦ ᎠᎴ ᎡᎵᏊ ᏱᏂᎦᏛᎦ.’ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎦᏓ ᏓᏥᏃᎯᏯ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ,” ᎤᏛᏅ.

ᏗᎫᎪᏗᏍᎩ ᏚᎾᏑᏰᏒ ᎾᎿ ᎢᎸᏍᎦ ᏯᏂ ᏗᎾᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ, ᎾᎿ ᎯᎠ ᏧᎾᏑᏰᏓ ᎯᎠ ᎨᏒ Scott Drewno, ᏩᎦᎸᎳᏗᏴ ᏗᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ ᎾᎿ “”The Source by Wolfgang Puck” ᎠᎴ ᎡᏘ ᏧᎨᏒ ᏩᏒᏓᏃ D.C., ᏗᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ ᏑᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎨᏒᎢ; Brian Patterson, Hetzlers ᎤᎾᏓᎪᎾᏔᏅᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏔᎵᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏍᎪᎯ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ; ᎠᎴ Pati Jinich, ᏩᎦᎸᎳᏗᏴ ᎠᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ ᎾᎿ D.C ᎠᏂᏍᏆᏂ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᎪᏢᏒ ᎠᎴ ᎦᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎾᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ ᏓᏓᏴᎵᏛᏍᎬ “Pati’s ᏍᏆᏂ ᎦᏍᎩᎸ.” ᎾᎿ ᏗᎦᏃᏣᏢᏍᎩ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬ ᎤᏛᏅ McClellan ᎾᎿ ᎤᏂᎪᏓ ᎤᏂᎸᏉᏓ. ᎠᏎᏃ ᏌᏊ ᎢᎦᏅᏅ ᎤᏲᎱᏎᎸᎢ, 629-628.

McClellan ᎤᏛᏅ ᎾᎿ “ᎤᎸᏉᏔᏅ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ,” ᏓᏏᎳᏕᏫᏒ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏓᏅᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ “ᏄᏦᏎᏛᎾ ᎡᎲ” ᎠᎴ ᎤᏬᎯᏳ ᏓᏳᏍᏕᎸᎯᏒ ᏄᏍᏛ ᎾᏛᏁᎲᎢ. ᎤᏛᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏕᎶᏆᎥ ᎠᎴ ᎡᎵᏊ ᎤᏠᏯ ᏱᏂᎦᏛᎦ ᎾᏍᎩ “ᏧᎾᏔᎾ ᎠᏂᏧᏣ.’

“ᎠᏆᏅᏔ ᎬᏩᏓᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎨᏒ, ᎠᎴ ᎪᎯᎦ ᏂᎦᏛᏁᎰᎢ. ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎤᏂᎸᏉᏗ ᎤᏂᎩᏍᏗ ᎠᏆᏓᏍᏓᏴᏅ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.
About the Author
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M.

He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life.
He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association.

Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years.
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-453-3961
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M. He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life. He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association. Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years.

News

BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter
11/28/2014 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Two federal complaints have been filed concerning Oklahoma Sen. James Inhofe’s Sept. 5 “dove hunt” fundraiser in Lone Wolf that included Rep. Markwayne Mullin and Principal Chief Bill John Baker. The event gathered attention when Illinois-based group Showing Animals Respect & Kindness, or SHARK, released a video showing event workers throwing pigeons into the air toward hay bales. People with shotguns, located behind the hay bales, then fired upon the pigeons as they attempted to fly away. It also shows pigeons falling to the ground dead, while others fell injured. Some made their way off the shooting field only to be recaptured by workers and thrown back into the air to be fired upon again. What concerned some people was not only the killing of the pigeons but the use of Kiowa County law officers, who were in full uniform and using their official vehicles, as event security. Rebecca West, of Pryor, submitted a complaint to the Federal Election Commission. Within it she states Inhofe had at least two Kiowa County law officers work as security. She alleges that one officer was paid for his services while the other was on duty while working the event. According to a Tulsa World article, records state that Kiowa County officer Clay Farrington was paid $300 for “event expense/security” around the same time the fundraiser took place. The article also states that Rusty Appleton, Inhofe’s campaign manager, said he “paid one guy an amount and he paid the others.” SHARK officials filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Justice claiming the misuse of the law officers, violation of multiple state and federal laws and committing of animal cruelty. In the complaint, SHARK President Steve Hindi states he’s concerned the fundraiser did not completely follow the law when hiring and reimbursing the county officers who worked the event. He also alleges the fundraiser took place on land owned by the federal government. “Our best research shows that the land that was used for the live pigeon shoot is owned by the United States Department of the Interior Bureau of Reclamation and is managed by the Lugert-Altus Irrigation District,” Hindi said. Hindi states the “serious questions about why this federally owned land was being used, not just for a pigeon shoot, but for a political fundraiser for Senator Inhofe, who, it must be noted, got, ‘$5,000,000 for water related infrastructure improvement projects at the Lugert-Altus Irrigation District, Altus, Oklahoma.’” Hindi also stated he read a Facebook post that claimed the pigeons were captured in Houston and transported to Oklahoma. “…transporting them to Oklahoma makes this an interstate commerce issue,” he stated. He also wrote that an article in The Oklahoman states Appleton said the Inhofe campaign paid a contractor to “trap the bird humanely” and fed, watered and housed the pigeon until the shoot. Hindi stated that this raised concerns regarding the obtaining of the pigeons and if “proper taxes have been paid by the Inhofe campaign and the person who trapped them.” Hindi ended his complaint stating that politicians need to be held accountable for their actions. “When local and state authorities fail, we turn to the federal government to keep the law from being rendered meaningless,” he stated.
BY TESINA JACKSON
Reporter
11/28/2014 02:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Following the Tribal Council’s June amendment of the tribe’s Freedom of Information Act, the Attorney General’s Office has hired Cherokee Nation citizen Gwen Terrapin as the first information officer. The amendment created the position within the Attorney General’s Office. Attorney General Todd Hembree selected his former paralegal to serve as the liaison for Cherokee Nation citizens seeking public records from the tribe. “I am pleased that the Tribal Council chose to create this position,” Hembree said. “Hiring an information officer whose primary job is to increase the free flow of information about the Cherokee Nation government to its people is a huge improvement. The hallmark of every free society is transparency. With this position, transparency is increased, information will be shard on a grander scale and the Cherokee Nation will be better off for it.” Hembree said the officer’s duties will be to process and be a clearinghouse for the Freedom of Information and Government Records acts requests. When requests are received, the officer will make sure it is a proper request, then forward the requests to the proper department/entities for their responses and documents. Once the information is received the officer will then send it to the requestor. A log will also be kept of each request received. According to the act, the officer is to be independent of political influence; can only be terminated for cause; and will be responsible for facilitating, gathering, tracking and responding to FOI and GRA requests, as well as providing monthly reports to the Tribal Council. “The act calls or the information officer to be independent, and in order to have that independence, and to be free of influence, it is best that the information officer has an office to itself,” Hembree said. Currently, all FOI or GRA requests go through the Attorney General’s Office. Hembree said that with the information officer, responses would not have to be approved by the attorney general before being released. Each request will continue to be updated on the attorney general’s website. “The information officer will serve as a direct point of contact for the Cherokee people to help them gather information about tribal government. It is a first position of its kind and will enhance transparency for all Cherokees,” he said. Hembree said the office went through the Human Resources process of posting the job and had more than 15 applicants. The officer’s start date was Nov. 17, is a full-time position and a pay range of $17.24 to $19 per hour. “She was the most qualified applicant with two and a half years experience of doing exactly this type of work,” Hembree said. “She has been a paralegal and clerk for over 10 years.” As of Nov. 20, Terrapin was located at the Attorney General’s Office, but a location for her office was under review. “I'm excited about working in this position, and I look forward to continuing to provide assistance to our council members and tribal citizens,” Terrapin said. CN citizens can call Terrapin at 918-772-4165 or email <a href="mailto: gwen-terrapin@cherokee.org">gwen-terrapin@cherokee.org</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
11/26/2014 11:09 AM
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – A new report shows the state of Oklahoma collected $122 million in gaming fees from Native American tribes during the last fiscal year. The report issued Nov. 19 by the Office of Management and Enterprise Services shows that for the first time ever, the fees paid to the state declined from the previous year. The report noted a drop of nearly $5.5 million – or about 4 percent – from previous year’s collections. The funds are used primarily for public education. Possible reasons cited for the decline include an increase in the number of Class II games such as electronic bingo for which tribes do not pay exclusivity fees and “possible market saturation.” The annual report was prepared by the state agency’s Gaming Compliance Unit.
BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter
11/26/2014 08:27 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen Cierra Fields wants the Tribal Council to raise the age from 14 years old to 16 years old in which someone can lawfully consent to sex under CN law. “The legislation is trying to change the age of consent within Cherokee Nation with its Cherokee citizens from 14 to 16 with plus two, minus two. So if it’s a 16-year-old that sleeps with a 14-year-old it doesn’t go as a sexual offense, but if it’s an 18-year-old who’s sleeping with a 14-year-old then because they’re under 16 and its over two years then it counts as a sexual crime,” Cierra said. The bulk of the amendment is changing the consent age from 14 to 16. “I still can’t decide what I want to eat for breakfast and I’m 15. Fourteen-year-olds mentally and physically are not ready for sex,” she said. Cierra said she’s always been passionate about advocating for those who have been sexually assaulted, having had family members assaulted. She said women she’s known in her life have said they’ve either been sexually assaulted or raped, and it’s always bothered her. “But whenever I was in Oregon (in June for a conference) I was sexually assaulted, and I wasn’t home. I was in a totally unfamiliar place and with only two or three people that I actually knew out of hundreds,” she said. Cierra was a guest speaker at a youth conference when she was assaulted in a hotel room. She had developed a migraine so she took medicine and chose to return to her room rather than go to dinner with friends. “It was probably one of the worse migraines I’ve ever had and they told me to go on up the elevator,” she said. Cierra’s mother, Terri, said her friends watched Cierra get on the elevator that contained the alleged perpetrator, who was attending the conference. “We thought you know, she’s in a 5-star hotel in Portland with people she knows,” Terri said. “This incident could have happened here. It could have happened with me in the hotel. I don’t know if I would have done anything differently. The people that she was with, they done everything that I would have done. It was a crime of opportunity, and he took full advantage of the fact that she was sick. He took advantage that she was dizzy from her medication she had just taken.” Cierra said some sexual offenders probably think ‘well I’m not 18 yet so I can’t go for a sex crime.’ She said the consent law change would give CN officials more leverage in filing first-degree rape charges and make it more difficult to plea down to statutory rape. Attorney General Todd Hembree said there are circumstances between 14 years of age where consent could be allowed under CN law, depending on the age of the other person involved. “Our law right now is very common to a lot of other states. They have what is commonly known as a ‘Romeo and Juliet’ provision where as two individuals that are very close in age both being minors – there are instances where the court can find where consent is allowed during sexual intercourse,” he said. “That’s just something that the Tribal Council will have to weigh of whether we take that…distinction away. Because there can be instances where that should be considered. Here, this amendment is going to be a straight bright line decision, age 16 is consent, no exceptions.” Currently, the age of blanket consent in Oklahoma is 16. However, a 15-year-old can consent to sex with any person who is 15 to 18 years old. No person 14 or younger can consent to sex, CN Assistant Attorney General Chrissi Ross Nimmo said. “Currently, in Cherokee Nation, the age of blanket consent is 16, but a 14- or 15-year-old can consent to sex with any person 14 to 18,” she said. “No person 13 or younger can ever consent to sex. The only difference under current Oklahoma law and current Cherokee Nation law is whether a 14-year-old can consent to sex with someone between the ages of 14 and 18.” Oklahoma’s law states no one under 16 can consent to sex. So the tribe’s possible amendment would mirror what the state deems an age in which one can consent to having sex. It’s not like other states where parents can consent to their 14-year-old child having sex, Cierra said. Terri said the law also doesn’t distinguish if one’s significant other is in high school. “That means that a 30- or 40-year-old can have sex in Cherokee Nation with a 14-year-old with the current law. I consider that a pedophile. So this will at least make the person 16 before they can consent.” she said. Cierra said one reason she thinks raising the consent age has been “shot down” previously is that families can state that he or she didn’t consent now that the boyfriend or girlfriend just turned 18. “Oh, her daddy didn’t like me, and because she is over the age or he just turned 18 even though they’ve been dating for say four years, he still gets charged as a sexual offender. So we’re hoping with the plus two (years) and everything that can help regulate that,” she said. The plus two years and minus two years will attempt to keep people from abusing the age gap, Terri said. (If an 18-year-old) Is dating a 16 year old, it’s not a sexual offense unless it truly is a case of rape. It’s where a parent just can’t come and press charges for like statutory rape,” she said. “‘They don’t like Johnny and he’s 18.’ We definitely don’t want, you know, young men caught in that situation. Because we’ve all been there. We’ve all dated people where your parents are like ‘oh my god, you are to never see that person again.’ And then they are able to use that law to me has been used to their advantage. “Yeah, we understand that, that can happen, but we have to start teaching our students that under 16 you are not legally able to make that choice. Your parents cannot make that choice for you,” Terri added. Both Cierra and Terri hoped the law would state no child under 16 can consent to sex, with or without parental consent, and were waiting on Legislative Act 09-12 to go before the Rules Committee. <strong>Current laws for the Cherokee Nation and Oklahoma Cherokee Nation:</strong> A 16-year-old can consent to sex with any aged adult. A 15-year-old can consent to sex with someone who is 15, 16, 17 or 18. A 14-year-old can consent to sex with someone who is 14, 15, 16, 17 or 18. A 13-year-old (or younger) can never consent to sex. <strong>Oklahoma:</strong> A 16-year-old can consent to sex with any aged adult. A 15-year-old can consent to sex with someone who is 15, 16, 17 or 18. A 14-year-old (or younger) can never consent to sex.
BY STAFF REPORTS
11/25/2014 04:04 PM
CATOOSA, Okla. – On Jan. 29, Loretta Lynn will perform at the The Joint inside Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. After being encouraged to learn to play the guitar and write songs by her husband, Doo, who she married at 13, Lynn quickly became a natural and began playing at area nightclubs. She caught the attention of Zero Records and recorded her debut single “I’m a Honky Tonk Girl.” Lynn made herself a fringed cowgirl outfit, and she and Doo drove across the country promoting her single. By fall 1961, Lynn was a regular on the Grand Ole Opry stage and in 1962 her Decca Record debut came out with the smash hit “Success.” It was the first of her 51 Top 10 hits. Among Lynn’s other songs are “You Wanna Give Me a Lift,” “I Wanna Be Free,” “We’ve Come a Long Way Baby,” “Love Is the Foundation” and “One’s on the Way.” In 1967, she began picking up various Female Vocalist of the Year trophies. Throughout the 1960s and 1970s, Lynn dominated the charts with hits such as “Coal Miner’s Daughter,” “Don’t Come Home A’ Drinkin’ (With Lovin’ on Your Mind),” “Somebody Somewhere,” “Out of My Head and Back in My Bed,” “I’ve Got a Picture of Us on My Mind” and her 1982 smash hits “I Lie” and “Making Love from Memory,” which brought her into the new decade. In 1971, Lynn and fellow country musician Conway Twitty won several Duet of the Year awards. In 1972, Lynn made history as the first woman to win the Country Music Association’s Entertainer of the Year trophy. The country star continued renewing her creativity after being inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1983 with the hit “Heart Don’t Do This to Me.” In 1988, Lynn entered the Country Music Hall of Fame. She earned a gold record in 1994 with “Honky Tonk Angels,” a trio CD with Dolly Parton and Tammy Wynette. In 2000, she was back again with the CD titled “Still Country.” She also returned to the concert trail. In 2002, Lynn published a second memoir, “Still Woman Enough,” and was honored at the Kennedy Center in 2003. The following year she won two Grammy Awards for “Van Lear Rose,” a collaboration with rocker Jack White. Lynn added to her collection of awards in 2008, when she was inducted into the National Songwriters Hall of Fame, and in 2010, when she won the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award. Tickets start at $40 and go on sale Nov. 28. Tickets are available online in The Joint section of <a href="http://www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com" target="_blank">www.hardrockcasinotulsa.com</a> or by calling 918-384-ROCK.
BY STAFF REPORTS
11/25/2014 03:27 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation will hold its annual “Light Up” event at 5 p.m. on Dec. 6 at the Cherokee National Capitol Square. The event will feature the Cherokee National Youth Choir, holiday lights as well as cookies and hot cocoa for guests. Following the event will be the Tahlequah Christmas Parade of Lights at 6 p.m. in downtown Tahlequah.