Cherokee chef Don McClellan speaks to judges during an Iron Chef-style competition July 24 at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. McClellan created two appetizers, three entrees and two desserts for the competition. COURTESY PHOTO

Cherokee chef competes in Iron Chef-style competition

Cherokee chef Don McClellan prepares a dish during an Iron Chef-style competition July 24 at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. McClellan lost the competition by one point. COURTESY PHOTO
Cherokee chef Don McClellan prepares a dish during an Iron Chef-style competition July 24 at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. McClellan lost the competition by one point. COURTESY PHOTO
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Senior Reporter
07/29/2011 07:07 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen and chef Don McClellan stepped out of his comfort zone July 24 to compete in an Iron Chef-style competition as part of the 2011 “Living Earth Festival” at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian.

The annual Washington, D.C, festival celebrates Native contributions to protecting the environment, promoting sustainability and using indigenous plants for health and nutrition.

McClellan, 34, originally of Nowata, said he was invited to compete by his mother Carolyn McClellan, who is the NMAI assistant director of community and constituent services.

“With my education and experience, she thought it would be a great opportunity for me to come to D.C. and showcase all my talent,” McClellan said.

His competition was Chef Richard Hetzler, the executive chef for the NMAI’s Mitsitam Café, who won the 2010 inaugural competition.

McClellen has been a chef for 17 years and is the executive chef at Atria Vista del Rio in Albuquerque, N.M. He describes his dishes as “flavorful New Mexican.”

He said he prefers to keep his preparations simple and flavorful and that his Southwestern style meshed well with the competition’s ingredients of corn, beans and squash – the traditional “Three Sisters” among Native farmers.

He said having worked with the main ingredients for the past six years as a chef in Albuquerque prepared him the competition. He also said he was able to use the derivatives of corn, beans and squashes in addition to the actual ingredients.

“I can use squash blossoms as opposed to using zucchini or yellow squash…Corn tortillas would constitute use of the corn,” he said before the competition. “It’s going to be challenging for the simple fact that corns, beans and squash have to be in each dish.”

For the competition, each chef and his assistants had to prepare two appetizers, three entrees and two desserts using the main ingredients. They also had fresh salmon, duck and buffalo meat available.

McClellan said creating dessert pastries is not one of his strengths and that he was concerned about his desserts. To prepare for the competition, he said he ate New Mexican-style food, read cookbooks and studied various ways “the Three Sisters” can be prepared.

He said one of the strengths he brought to the competition was his ability to flavor foods to make them multi-dimensional in taste. He takes pride, he said, in flavoring and seasoning food so that his customers don’t feel the need to flavor it after it reaches their tables.

The competition was judged on taste, color and presentation and included a time limit. The chefs had one hour for prep work and one hour to prepare their dishes before serving.

The competition was held in the museum’s outdoor amphitheater, and McClellan said during the competition the temperature was around 102 degrees, with a heat index of about 115 degrees.

He said he knew he had to focus in the heat and “cook with his heart” and that he was capable of winning because he had a good menu.

“It’s an opportunity I don’t want to walk away from and say, ‘oh well, I could have done this or I should have done this.’ I want to leave it all out there in the competition,” he said.

Judgment was handed down by a group of local chefs. The panel consisted of Scott Drewno, executive chef at “The Source by Wolfgang Puck” and last year’s Washington, D.C., Chef of the Year; Brian Patterson, Hetzler’s opponent from 2010; and Pati Jinich, executive chef at D.C.’s Mexican Cultural Institute and host of the cooking show “Pati’s Mexican Table.”

A report from the competition states McClellan was the crowd favorite. However, he lost by one point, 629-628.

McClellan said he “loved the competition,” networking and getting out of his “comfort zone” and believes it will help his career.

He said it was a learning experience and that it confirmed he could keep up with the “big boys.”

“I know that I can cook, and I’ve been doing it for a long time. People love my food,” he said.

will-chavez@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961

ᏣᎳᎩ

ᏓᎵᏆ, ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎻ.--- ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎩᎳ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎦ Don McClellan ᎤᎳᏍᎬᏒ ᎾᏃ ᏂᎪᎯᎸ ᎤᏪᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᎦᏰᏉᎾ ᏔᎵᏍᎪᏅᎩᏁᎢ ᎤᏖᎳᏛ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬ ᏧᎾᏓᏃᏣᏟ ᎠᎾᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏔᎵᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏌᏚ “ᎠᏕᏗ ᎡᎶᎯ ᎠᎾᎵᎮᎵᎬᎢ” ᎾᎿ Smithsonian’s ᎬᎾᏕᎾ ᎤᏂᏍᏆᏂᎪᏔᏅᎲᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎹᏱᏟ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯᎢ ᎤᏃᏢᏒᎢ.

ᎾᎿ ᏑᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎢᏳᏓᎵ ᎠᏍᏆᎵᎰ ᏩᏒᏓᏃ, D. C, ᎠᎾᎵᎮᎵᎬ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏁᎯᏯ ᎠᎾᎵᏍᎪᎸᏗ ᎠᎾᎵᏏᏅᏗᏍᎩ ᏄᏍᏗᏓᏅ, ᎠᏂᏁᏉ ᏄᏍᏗᏓᏅ ᎠᎴ ᎬᏔᏂᏓᏍᏗ ᎤᏛᏒᏅ ᎾᎿ ᏓᏤᏢ ᎠᎴ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎨᏒᎢ.

McClellan, ᏦᏍᎪ ᏅᎩ ᎢᏳᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎾᎿ ᏃᏩᏛ ᏂᏓᏳᎶᏒ, ᎤᏛᏅ ᎤᏥ Carolyn McClellan,ᎤᏬᏎᎴ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎤᏖᎳᏗᏍᏗ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎠᎵᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ NMAI ᎠᎵᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ ᏗᎫᎪᏔᏂᏙᎯ ᎾᎿ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎠᎴ ᎾᎥ ᎠᏁᎲ ᏂᏓᏛᏁᎵᏙᎲᎢ.

“ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏓᏆᏕᎶᏆᎥ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎩᎦᏙᎲᏒ, ᎤᏪᎵᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏱᎦ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏇᏅᏍᏗ ᏩᏒᏓᏃ ᏯᏆᏛᏗ ᏂᎦᎥ ᎠᏆᏕᎶᏆᎥᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ McClellan.

ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎠᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᎨᏒ ᎠᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ Richard Hetzler, ᏄᎬᏫᏳᏒ ᎠᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ ᏧᎾᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎪᏢᏒ NMAI’S Mitsitam ᏧᎾᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ, ᎤᏓᏠᏒ ᏔᎵᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏍᎪᎯ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

McClellan ᏗᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ ᏂᎨᏐ ᎦᎵᏆᏚ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎠᎴ ᏄᎬᏫᏳᏒ ᏗᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ ᎾᎿ Atria Vista del Rio ᎾᎿ Albuquerque, N. M. ᏄᏍᏛ ᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏓᏍᏓᏴᏅ ᎠᏑᏯᎾᎢ ᎢᏤ ᏍᏆᏂ.”

ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎤᏟ ᎬᏩᏰᎸᏗ ᎤᏓᏍᏓᏴᏅ ᎠᏛᏅᏫᏍᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᎯᏓ ᎠᎴ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎠᎩᏍᏗ ᎤᎲ ᎤᎦᎾᏮᎤᏕᎵᎬ ᎤᏃᏢᏗ ᎪᏢᏍᎪ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᏑᏴᏅᎲᏍᎬ ᎯᎠ ᎨᏐ ᏎᎷ, ᏚᏯ, ᎠᎴ ᏍᏆᏏ-- ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏧᏅᏔᏂᏓᏍᏗ ᎨᏎ ᏗᎩᎶᏒ “ᏦᎢ ᎠᎾᏓᎸ” ᏓᏃᏎᎲ ᎠᏁᎯᏯ ᎠᏁᎲᎢ ᏗᏂᎶᎩᏍᎩ.

ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᏗᏍᎬ ᎯᎠ ᏭᏍᎪᎵᏴ ᎠᏑᏴᏓ ᏕᎬᏗᏍᎬ ᏑᏓᎵ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎬ Albuquerque ᎤᏍᏕᎸᎲ ᎠᏛᏅᎢᏍᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ. ᎤᏛᏅᏃ ᎡᎵᏊ ᎬᏗᏍᎬ ᎤᎦᏎᏍᏔᏂ ᎾᎿ ᏂᏓᏳᏓᎴᏅ ᎾᎿ ᏎᎷ, ᏚᏯ, ᎠᎴ ᏍᏆᏏ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎠᏑᏯᎾᎥᎢ ᎡᎵᏊ ᎤᏠᏯ ᏱᎩ ᎬᏗᏍᎪᎢ.

“ᎡᎵᏊ ᎠᏮᏙᏗ ᏍᏆᏏ ᎤᏥᎸᏅ ᎾᏃ ᎠᏮᏙᏗ Zucchini ᎠᎴ ᏓᎶᏂᎨ ᏍᏆᏏ…… ᏎᎷ tortillas ᎡᎵᏊ ᎬᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏎᎷ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᏱᎩ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᏄᎴᏅᏓᏊ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬ. “ᎡᎵᏃ ᎠᏓᏅᏖᎸᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏳᏍᏗ ᎪᏢᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏎᎷ, ᏚᏯ, ᎠᎴ ᏍᏆᏏ ᏂᎦᏓ ᏗᎬᏙᏗ ᏖᎵᏙᎩᎢ.”

ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬ, ᎠᏂᏏᏫᎭ ᏗᎾᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᎬᏩᏂᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ ᎤᏃᏢᏗ ᏔᎵ appetizers, ᏦᎢ entrees ᎠᎴ ᏔᎵ ᎤᎦᎾᏍᏗ ᎬᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏍᎪᎵ ᎬᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

ᎯᎢᏃ ᎤᏂᎰ ᎾᎿ ᏧᏂᎩᏣᏍᏗ ᎠᏣᏗ, ᎧᏬᏄ ᎠᎴ ᏯᎾᏏ ᎭᏫᏯ ᎬᏔᏂᏓᏍᏗ.

McClellan ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎪᏢᏍᎪ ᎤᎦᎾᏍᏗ Ꮭ ᏙᎯᏳ ᏩᏍᎪᎵᏴ ᏱᎩ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏓᏅᏖᏗᎭ. ᎯᎠ ᎪᏢᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬ, ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎤᎵᏍᏓᏴᏁ ᎢᏤ ᎠᏂᏍᏆᏂ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ, ᎠᎪᎵᏰᏓ ᎠᏓᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎪᏪᎵ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎦᏎᏍᏔᎾ ᏧᏓᎴᏅᏓ ᎢᏗᎦᎬᏁᏗ “ᏦᎢ ᏗᎾᏓᎸᎢ” ᎦᎪᏢᏙᏗ ᎨᏒᎢ.

ᎤᏛᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏌᏊ ᎤᏟᏂᎪᎯᏍᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᏲᎯᎲ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎤᏕᎶᏆᎥ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎠᏑᏴᏅᎲᏍᏗ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎠᏑᏴᏅᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ. ᎠᏢᏈᏍᏗᏍᎪᎢ, ᎠᏗᏍᎬ, ᎠᏑᏴᏅᎲᏍᏗ ᎠᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᎾᎵᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ Ꮭ ᎠᏎ ᎢᎤᎾᏑᏴᏗ ᏱᎦᎩ.

ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬ ᏓᏄᎪᏗᏍᎪ ᎾᎿ ᏄᏍᏛ ᎠᎩᏍᏗᎢ, ᎤᎵᏑᏫᏓ ᎠᎴ ᏄᏍᏛ ᏅᎬᏁᎲ ᎠᎴ ᎢᎪᎯᏓ ᏚᏟᎢᎵᏙᎸ. ᎠᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ ᏑᏟᎶᏓ ᎠᏛᏅᎢᏍᏙᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏑᏟᎶᏓ ᎬᏂᏍᏔᏅᏗ ᏃᏊᏃ ᎦᏍᎩᎸ ᏩᏠᏗ ᎤᏂᎩᏍᏗᎢ.

ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏪᏘ ᎤᏂᏍᏆᏂᎪᏔᏅ’ ᎤᎦᎾᏮᎦᎶᎯᏍᏗ ᎤᏂᏍᏆᎸᎡᏗ, ᎠᎴ McClellan ᎤᏛᏅ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᏄᏗᏝᎬ ᎾᎿ ᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏔᎵ ᎨᏒᎢ, ᎾᏃ ᏄᏗᏞᎬ ᎾᎿ ᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏍᎩᎦᏚ ᎨᏒᎢ.

ᎤᏛᏅ ᎤᏅᏛ ᎾᎿ ᎤᎦᏎᏍᏙᏗᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏄᏗᏢᎬ ᎠᎴ “ᎤᏓᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏓᏅᏛ ᎬᏗ” ᎠᎴ ᎬᏩᏓᎪᏅᏙᏗ ᎨᏒ ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᏃ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎤᎾᎥ ᎪᏪᎵ ᎤᏓᏍᏓᏴᏙᏗ.
“ᎯᎢᎾ ᎠᏆᏜᏅᏓᏕᎸ Ꮭ ᏯᏆᏚᎵᏍᎨ ᎠᎩᏅᏗᏍᏗ ᎯᎠ ᎠᎴ ‘ᎯᎢᏛ ᎡᎵᏊ ᏱᏂᎦᏛᎦ ᎠᎴ ᎡᎵᏊ ᏱᏂᎦᏛᎦ.’ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎦᏓ ᏓᏥᏃᎯᏯ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ,” ᎤᏛᏅ.

ᏗᎫᎪᏗᏍᎩ ᏚᎾᏑᏰᏒ ᎾᎿ ᎢᎸᏍᎦ ᏯᏂ ᏗᎾᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ, ᎾᎿ ᎯᎠ ᏧᎾᏑᏰᏓ ᎯᎠ ᎨᏒ Scott Drewno, ᏩᎦᎸᎳᏗᏴ ᏗᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ ᎾᎿ “”The Source by Wolfgang Puck” ᎠᎴ ᎡᏘ ᏧᎨᏒ ᏩᏒᏓᏃ D.C., ᏗᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ ᏑᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎨᏒᎢ; Brian Patterson, Hetzlers ᎤᎾᏓᎪᎾᏔᏅᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏔᎵᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏍᎪᎯ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ; ᎠᎴ Pati Jinich, ᏩᎦᎸᎳᏗᏴ ᎠᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ ᎾᎿ D.C ᎠᏂᏍᏆᏂ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᎪᏢᏒ ᎠᎴ ᎦᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎾᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ ᏓᏓᏴᎵᏛᏍᎬ “Pati’s ᏍᏆᏂ ᎦᏍᎩᎸ.” ᎾᎿ ᏗᎦᏃᏣᏢᏍᎩ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬ ᎤᏛᏅ McClellan ᎾᎿ ᎤᏂᎪᏓ ᎤᏂᎸᏉᏓ. ᎠᏎᏃ ᏌᏊ ᎢᎦᏅᏅ ᎤᏲᎱᏎᎸᎢ, 629-628.

McClellan ᎤᏛᏅ ᎾᎿ “ᎤᎸᏉᏔᏅ ᎠᎾᏓᎪᎾᏗᏍᎬᎢ,” ᏓᏏᎳᏕᏫᏒ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏓᏅᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ “ᏄᏦᏎᏛᎾ ᎡᎲ” ᎠᎴ ᎤᏬᎯᏳ ᏓᏳᏍᏕᎸᎯᏒ ᏄᏍᏛ ᎾᏛᏁᎲᎢ. ᎤᏛᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏕᎶᏆᎥ ᎠᎴ ᎡᎵᏊ ᎤᏠᏯ ᏱᏂᎦᏛᎦ ᎾᏍᎩ “ᏧᎾᏔᎾ ᎠᏂᏧᏣ.’

“ᎠᏆᏅᏔ ᎬᏩᏓᏍᏓᏴᏗ ᎨᏒ, ᎠᎴ ᎪᎯᎦ ᏂᎦᏛᏁᎰᎢ. ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎤᏂᎸᏉᏗ ᎤᏂᎩᏍᏗ ᎠᏆᏓᏍᏓᏴᏅ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

About the Author
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M.

He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life.
He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association.

Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years.
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M. He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life. He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association. Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years.

News

BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter
08/31/2015 12:00 PM
DURANT, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen Emalea Hudgens, a junior at Southeastern Oklahoma State University and a double major in psychology and music, recently spent a semester studying at the Swansea University, a public research university based in Wales of the United Kingdom. Hudgens received the title of Brad Henry International Scholar in 2014 and she studied abroad this past spring. The Jay native is a Cherokee Nation citizen and Harvey Scholar recipient. She is also a Savage Storm Leader and was selected to be in the President’s Leadership Class for 2012-13. Hudgens is a member of the Southeastern Chorale, Sparks Dance Team and Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority, according to the SOSU Communications Department. “I am very blessed and excited to get this opportunity to study abroad and become immersed in a different culture,’’ Hudgens said to the Southern, the SOSU newspaper. “It has been a life-long dream of mine to travel the world, and I cannot wait to share the stories and experiences with family and friends.” Hudgens said she felt fortunate to have studied overseas. “It has always been a dream of mine to study abroad and to live in Europe for a period of time. I hope to learn about their culture and get opportunities to work there myself, getting the experience that I need to do so. I just think it would be cool to work in a different culture.” She told the Cherokee Phoenix she was nervous to leave Oklahoma and live in a culture different than hers. “To say the least, it turned out to be the most life-changing experience. During my stay in Wales, I travelled to 11 different countries across Europe,” she said. “It was amazing to see the different cultures and the different people. I came to find people were very interested in hearing about the American culture and they found it fascinating to learn that I was a member of the Cherokee Nation.” Hudgens said studying abroad opened her eyes to many ideas about the world. “It is common to think the world is scary, but it is also very beautiful and filled with beautiful things,” she added. “Since travelling, I have created a passion to want to continue to travel and go see more of the world. I encourage everyone to travel if they get the opportunity.”
BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter
08/31/2015 10:00 AM
NEWKIRK, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation, with the approval of five other tribes, negotiated a lease of more than 8,000 acres to Weatherby Energy for oil and gas exploration at the former Chilocco Indian School in Kay County. CN Real Estate Services Director Ginger Reeves said meetings were held between the CN and Kaw, Pawnee, Ponca, Otoe-Missiouria and Tonkawa tribes in 2009. “Public Law 99-283 in the Federal Register grants Cherokee Nation the authority to lease the trust acres,” she said. “The leases are recorded at the Kay County Clerk’s Office in Newkirk, Oklahoma.” According to CN Resolution 134-09, Reeves said then Principal Chief Chad Smith and the Tribal Council approved a resolution to lease the property. “Regarding the referenced lease, the six Chilocco tribes’ trust lease was approved April 4, 2011, and has until April 4, 2016, to drill and produce or expire. Samson Resources Company, the current lessee, is in the process of assigning the lease to a Texas group (MPG Energy Inc., a subsidiary of Weatherby Energy.) Real Estate Services is processing that assignment approval through the BIA,” she said. Weatherby Energy has received Bureau of Indian Affairs approval for this assignment, officials said. The Cherokee Phoenix attempted to contact Weatherby Energy but did not receive a response as of publication. The Chilocco properties are trust and fee lands and the lease covers both. “The fee land lease will expire Nov. 5, 2015, unless they drill and produce. This fee lease was also recently assigned by Samson to the Texas group. Real Estate Services is processing the assignment for Cherokee Nation approval,” Reeves said. “Both leases were five-year leases and are filed in Cherokee Nation Title Plant. There is also a smaller acreage lease on fee lands at Chilocco with another oil company, which was in place before the lease started.” When the previous leases ended in the early 1990s, Reeves said it covered 320 acres and leased for $11,520 over a three-year term. She said it lasted longer because of oil and gas being produced in “paying quantities” from the property. Officials said the CN receives $8,736.30 on trust property annually plus $6,985.23 on fee property for a total of $15,721.53. A total of 8,152.61 acres are under lease with more than 5,000 acres being trust land and more than 2,300 acres in fee.
BY TESINA JACKSON
Reporter
08/31/2015 08:21 AM
MUSKOGEE, Okla. – Cherokee Nation officials have filed a lawsuit against the pharmaceutical company Johnson & Johnson and its subsidiary Janssen Pharmaceuticals Inc. claiming the companies misbranded the drug Risperdal and failed to disclose risks posed to elderly patients. According to drugs.com, Risperdal is an antipsychotic medicine and is used to treat schizophrenia and symptoms of bipolar disorder and manic depression. Risperdal is also used in autistic children to treat symptoms of irritability. Initially filed by the tribe in April in Sequoyah County, where the drug was distributed at the Redbird Smith Health Center in Sallisaw, the suit was moved in July to the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Oklahoma in Muskogee. According to court documents, the CN claims the companies admitted to selling the “misbranded” drug for unapproved uses more than a decade ago, during the time the tribe purchased it. The tribe also claims that from 1999 through 2005, the companies sold Risperdal for uses that were not approved as safe and effective and between March 3, 2002 and Dec. 31, 2003, the CN purchased the drug after the defendants expressed that the drug was not misbranded. The suit also claims negligence, breach of warranty, unjust enrichment and violation of the Oklahoma Consumer Protection Act on the part of the companies. Court documents state the tribe “is entitled to restitution to the extent of the increased revenue received by defendants from Risperdal prescriptions that were purchased or reimbursed by the Cherokee Nation and which resulted from the sale of misbranded Risperdal.” The tribe is asking for a judgment of $75,000 for “attorney fees, civil penalties and all other relief this court deems just and equitable.” “The crux of our case is that unbeknownst to us, this drug is a bad drug,” CN Attorney General Todd Hembree said. “We prescribed it through our clinics to our citizens. We now know it’s a bad drug and we don’t do it anymore, but as a result of it damaging our citizens, we incur the extra costs of having to take care of those citizens. Money that we otherwise would not have spent if it had not been for this bad drug.” Currently, no hearing has been scheduled. In 2013, Johnson & Johnson and Janssen Pharmaceuticals Inc. reached a $2.5 billion settlement with the U.S. Justice Department over the marketing of the antipsychotic drug for failing to warn that it could cause gynecomastia, which is abnormal development of breasts in males. Former Food and Drug Administration Commissioner David Kessler served as an expert witness for the family that issued the lawsuit and testified that Johnson & Johnson knew about the risks associated with Risperdal but failed to disclose the data showing the extent to which youth may develop gynecomastia. According to the Wall Street Journal, lawsuits continue to be filed against Johnson & Johnson and Janssen Pharmaceuticals Inc. across the country. The Cherokee Phoenix attempted to get a comment from Johnson & Johnson and Janssen Pharmaceuticals but was unsuccessful. <a href="http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/Docs/2015/8/9571_nws04_150814_JJSuit.pdf" target="_blank">Click here to view</a>the lawsuit.
BY STAFF REPORTS
08/27/2015 04:00 PM
LONGMONT, Colo. – The First Nations Development Institute is accepting applications for five $1,000 Native Agriculture and Food Systems Scholarships until Sept. 30. The program is to encourage more Native American college students to enter agricultural-related fields so they can one day assist their communities with food production, improving health and nutrition and eliminating food insecurity, according to the organization’s website. The scholarship can be used in degree fields such as agribusiness management, agriscience technologies, agronomy, animal husbandry, aquaponics, fisheries and wildlife, food production and safety, food-related policy and legislation, horticulture, irrigation science, plant-based nutrition and sustainable agriculture or food systems. Scholarship applicants must be a full-time undergraduate student majoring in agriculture or an agricultural-related field, be Native American with proof of tribal enrollment, have at least a 3.0 GPA and demonstrate a commitment to helping their community reclaim local food-system control. Applicants are also required to submit an enrollment verification form, unofficial transcript, letter of recommendation from a faculty member and a 250-500 word essay addressing how their degree program will help regain control over their local food and explaining how the money would be used. The FNDI’s mission is to strengthen American Indian communities by investing and creating institutions and models that support economic development. To apply, visit <a href="http://www.firstnations.org/grantmaking/scholarship" target="_blank">www.firstnations.org/grantmaking/scholarship</a>. For more information, call 303-774-7836 or email <a href="mailto: ktallmadge@firstnations.org">ktallmadge@firstnations.org</a> or <a href="mailto: mwhiting@firstnations.org">mwhiting@firstnations.org</a>.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
08/27/2015 02:00 PM
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) – A Wyoming company has entered a partnership to develop a Washington state coal port for shipments of the fuel to Asia, in a deal that gives Montana's Crow Tribe the future option of a 5 percent stake in the project. Cloud Peak Energy paid $2 million up front and will pay up to $30 million to cover permitting expenses for the Gateway Pacific Terminal, in exchange for a 49 percent stake in the project, spokesman Rick Curtsinger said Friday. The port in the Puget Sound, just south of the U.S.-Canada border, would accommodate almost 60 million tons a year of coal and other commodities. Cloud Peak, based in Gillette, plans to construct a major mine on the Crow Reservation. Coal companies hope exports to Asia will shore up their industry, which has been battered by competition from cheap natural gas and more stringent restrictions on pollution caused by burning the fuel. Port sponsor SSA Marine retained a 51 percent ownership in the project. The tribe's stake in the port would come out of Cloud Peak's share, and Curtsinger said there is no upfront financial obligation for the Crow. However, if the Crow exercises its ownership option, the tribe would be responsible for 5 percent of construction financing, Curtsinger said. Washington state's Lummi Nation has pressed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to deny the project's permit because it would disrupt the tribe's fishing practices. The proposal also has met strong opposition from environmental groups worried about the greenhouse gases and other pollutants produced by burning coal. Crow Chairman Darren Old Coyote said the deal still needs approval from the tribal Legislature. Construction of the port would make it easier for Cloud Peak to develop and mine coal on the reservation, he said. "It's basically a low-risk, 5 percent stake," he said. Construction costs for Gateway Pacific have been estimated at $700 million, although that could change depending on any conditions attached to pending permits from state and federal agencies, said SSA Marine Senior Vice President Bob Watters. Watters said environmental studies on the proposed port could be done by the end of 2016. The ownership agreement gives Cloud Peak the right to exit the deal during the permitting phase and return its interests to SSA Marine. A previous deal gave Cloud Peak the option to move almost 18 million tons of coal annually through the port.
BY STAFF REPORTS
08/27/2015 12:00 PM
BILLINGS, Mont. – The Professional Indian Horse Racing Association has launched a new website where Indian Relay fans will find everything they need to know about the current relay season, including PIHRA team members and current standings, as well as hotel, ticket and sponsor information for the All Nations Championships. This year, the All Nations Indian Relay Championships will be held Sept. 17-20 at the historic MetraPark Grandstands in Billings. The top teams representing 15 Indian nations will compete for more than $75,000 in money prizes, expenses and the coveted Champions’ Jackets and Belt Buckles. PIHRA was founded to promote Indian Relay, horsemanship and safety and has developed a season-long championship series, culminating with the All Nations Indian Relay Championships. There were 17 founding teams in 2013. Today, PIHRA membership is expected to exceed 60 teams. The teams come from Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, Montana, South Dakota and Canada. The tribes represented in relay include Oglala Lakota Sioux, Northern Cheyenne, Blackfeet, Crow, Shoshone-Bannock, Eastern Shoshone, the Colville Confederated Tribes and the Umatilla Confederated Tribes. For more information, visit the new website at <a href="http://www.letsrelay.com" target="_blank">www.letsrelay.com</a>.