Cherokee artists Lisa Rutherford, left, and Cathy Moomaw discuss art that is part of the 16th Annual Cherokee Homecoming Art Show during an opening reception Aug. 12. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Jackson wins grand prize at Homecoming Art Show

Troy Jackson stands next to his grand-prize-winning sculpture titled “Halfbreed-Am I Red and White or Am I White and Red.” WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX People take in the artwork that is part of the 16h Annual Cherokee Homecoming Art Show at the Cherokee Heritage Center. The show runs through Oct. 2. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX A painting titled “After the Vote” by Cherokee artist Joseph Erb won the Visual Arts category in the 16th Annual Cherokee Homecoming Art Show that opened Aug. 12. COURTESY PHOTO
Troy Jackson stands next to his grand-prize-winning sculpture titled “Halfbreed-Am I Red and White or Am I White and Red.” WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Senior Reporter
08/17/2011 08:42 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Cherokee artist Troy Jackson took home the grand prize in the 16th Annual Cherokee Homecoming Art Show that opened Aug. 13.

Along with a ribbon, Jackson received a $1,100 check, which was part of $15,000 in prize money awarded during the opening. The show, which runs through Oct. 2, was open to enrolled members of the three federally recognized Cherokee tribes: the Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians and Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.

“This year, I’m very proud to say, is the largest Homecoming Art Show ever. We had 81 artists submit 162 pieces … and they are all Cherokee,” said Cherokee Heritage Center Executive Director Carey Tilley. “We accepted the best quality, originality and craftsmanship. We are very excited about the quality of the entries, and we’re very excited about the quality of the show.”

Cherokee Nation Businesses sponsored the show and allocated $25,000 for the show, which included the $15,000 in prize money.

“It (Homecoming Show) helps keep Cherokee art alive, which is what I think is Cherokee Nation Businesses’ goal here,” Tilley said.

Jackson of the Grandview Community won the Grand Prize with his sculpture titled “Halfbreed-Am I Red and White or Am I White and Red.”

“I am both white and Native American, and so I struggle with it in different areas. Sometimes I feel like I’m white and sometimes I feel like I’m Native American,” Jackson said.

He added growing up he dealt with this conflict and believes many other Cherokee people can identify with his struggle.

Jackson said he has been working on his art for about 10 years. In April, he won the Grand Prize in the annual Trail of Tears Art Show for his work “Putting The Pieces Together” in the pottery category.

He said he appreciates the two Cherokee art shows because it allows him to see the work of other Cherokee artists and his competition.

“Every year that I come here it just seems to be a better show, and people are progressing in their work. I think that is important because this is the 21st century, and I see people really shooting for the future in Native American art,” he said.

Joseph Erb of the Blackgum Community, won the Visual Arts category with his painting titled “After the Vote,” which depicts the reactions of Cherokee people after the June 25 Cherokee Nation election.

He said he was surprised by his win because the painting depicts a controversial period. He added he wasn’t even sure the piece would be accepted into the show.

“It was made because a lot of stuff occurred after the election to where the community started fighting each other. I thought I’d make an art piece about it,” Erb said. “It’s a perspective. I’m not picking the side of one group or another. I just wanted to show the reality of what politics can do to a community. It’s about the idea that we were letting an election divide our community.”

In the piece, the leaders of each political group are wearing gourd booger masks while their supporters are wearing wooden booger masks. Each faction carries a banner that reads “no good” in the Cherokee syllabary.

The words around the eyeball in the center of the painting say “after the vote” in the syllabary to show the arguing and campaigning continued after the votes were cast, Erb said. A keyboard and computer represent the way Cherokee people communicated about the election using the Internet and social networks like Facebook.

Erb also included in the painting the Cherokee Phoenix’s role in covering the election and controversy. He said Cherokee people depended on the newspaper’s website and its Facebook page to keep them up to date on what was happening on a daily basis.

“It think this increased our news cycle that it will actually never change again because people are really expecting fast news,” he said. “This is really a neat thing to see happen. A newspaper that gave us such notoriety as Native people throughout the world is still running today and still serving the people. That’s one of the reasons I paid homage to it.”

Lisa Forrest of the Rocky Ford Community entered the Contemporary and Traditional Basket categories and won a judges’ choice award with her traditional basket titled “Fall Harvest.” This is the third award she has won in the Homecoming Show, she said.

Forrest said she learned how to weave baskets from her mother, Lena Blackbird, who is Cherokee National Treasure.

“I’m just carrying on with it and it makes her pretty proud,” Forrest said.

She added she appreciates the homecoming show because it allows her to see the artwork of other Cherokee artisans.

“It’s just pretty amazing what our people can do,” she said.

Cherokee artwork was judged in traditional and contemporary divisions with 162 entries under consideration. The traditional division is defined as arts originating before European contact and consists of four categories including basketry, jewelry and beading, pottery and traditional arts.

The contemporary division is defined as arts arising among the Cherokee after European contact, and consists of five categories including paintings, sculpture, pottery, basketry and textiles.

Other winners in the Homecoming Art Show

Contemporary Basketry – Winner - Shawna Cain, “Squisidi Agasga”

Honorable Mentions - Sandra Pallie and Joann Richmond


Contemporary Pottery – Winner - Troy Jackson, “One Man’s Legacy”

Honorable Mentions - David Pruitt, Joel Queen and Janet Smith


Jewelry and Beadwork – Winner – Antonio Grant , “The Union”

Honorable Mentions – Abraham Locust and Teri Lee Rhoades


Sculpture – Winner – Jane Osti, “Selu”

Honorable Mentions – Karen Berry and Janet Smith


Textiles – Winner – Bessie Russell, “Dogwood Quilt”

Judges’ Choice – Ernest Grant, “Red Clay Reunion”

Tonia Hogner-Weavel, “Stripes”

Rene’e Hoover, “Winter Grays”

Honorable Mention – Dorothy Ice


Traditional Basketry – Winner – Bessie Russell, untitled

Judges’ Choice – Lisa Forrest


Traditional Pottery – Winner – Joann Richmond, “Earth, Wind and Fire”


Traditional Arts – Winner – Rebecca Alice Wiltshire Whitwell, “Wenona’s Rattle”

Honorable Mentions – Noel Grayson and Lisa Rutherford


Visual Arts – Winner – Joseph Erb, “After the Vote”

Judges’ Choice – Dan Horsechief, “Resurgence”

Honorable Mentions – Hilary Glass and Lori Smiley


will-chavez@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
About the Author
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M.

He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life.
He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association.

Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years.
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M. He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life. He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association. Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years.

Culture

BY STAFF REPORTS
08/27/2015 10:00 AM
ATHENS, Ga. – For the last 500 years, and particularly since they began to be displaced and removed from their ancestral homelands, Native American tribes from what is now the Southeastern United States have returned annually for ceremonial rites on the autumnal equinox in late September. “Return from Exile,” an art exhibition of more than 30 contemporary Southeastern Native American artists timed to coincide with annual homecomings, will be on view Aug. 22 to Oct. 10 at the Lyndon House Arts Center in Athens. The exhibition is beginning a two-year tour of museums throughout the U.S. and is sponsored by the University of Georgia Institute of Native American Studies and the Lyndon House. On Saturday Aug. 29 a daylong symposium will feature panels of artists and scholars of Native American art and guided gallery tours. An opening reception for the exhibition will be held at 6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 10 and is sponsored by the institute. All events are free and open to the public. The exhibition features art representing the five tribes removed from the Southeast in the 1830s: Muscogee (Creek), Cherokee, Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Seminole. “Featuring those five tribes and in Athens is particularly apt because the Oconee River was the traditional dividing line between the Creeks and the Cherokee, so Athens straddles that territory literally in Georgia,” said Jace Weaver, the Franklin Professor of Native American Studies, director of the UGA Institute of Native American Studies, and one of the exhibition’s curators. The exhibition and symposium are bookends to related events designed to highlight the equinox and the celebration of Native American cultural heritage and return to the region. On Tuesday, Sept. 22, the Lyndon House will host a screening of “This May Be the Last Time,” a documentary directed by Sterlin Harjo about the tradition of Creek Christian hymn singing. On Wednesday, Sept. 23, the first American Indian Returnings, or AIR, talk will be held at 4:30 p.m. in Room 214 of the Miller Learning Center. The speaker will be Jodi Byrd, a citizen of the Chickasaw Nation and associate professor of English, gender and women’s studies at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. Byrd’s lecture, “Something Native This Way Comes,” will address issues of literary genre, returns, embodiment, civility, and horror. “Return from Exile” is curated by Weaver; Bob Martin, associate professor of visual art at John Brown University; and Tony Tiger, former chair of the art department at Bacone College in Muskogee, Oklahoma. Following its run at the Lyndon House, the exhibition will travel to the Collier County Museum in Naples, Florida. It will then travel the country through 2017 to venues including the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa, and the Cherokee National Museum in Park Hill, Oklahoma. The UGA Institute of Native American Studies, the Southeastern Indian Artist Association, the Lyndon House Arts Center, the UGA President’s Venture Fund, the Native Arts and Cultures Foundation, the Cherokee Nation, and the Muscogee (Creek) Nation is supporting the exhibition.
BY TESINA JACKSON
Reporter
08/27/2015 08:30 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – For nearly 60 years, Miss Cherokee has served the Cherokee Nation as a goodwill ambassador and messenger, promoting the tribe’s government, history, language and culture. And during her one-year reign, Miss Cherokee wears her crown when representing the tribe. According to the Cherokee Heritage Center Miss Cherokee exhibit, which was set to end Aug. 23, the original Miss Cherokee crown was a leather strap that would have a feather in the back. Later, in the 1960s, the crown became fully beaded. The first indication of royalty during the Cherokee National Holiday, where a new Miss Cherokee is crowned each year, was in 1955 when Phyllis Osage, a Sequoyah Vocational School student, was Queen of the Cornstalk Shoot. In 1957, the title was changed to Miss Cherokee Holiday, and Linda Burrows was the first to hold that title. The first to be crowned with the Miss Cherokee title was Ramona Collier in 1962. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, created by Cherokee artist Willard Stone, the crown was handcrafted from copper. Seven turkey feathers were incorporated into its design symbolizing the seven Cherokee clans. The Cherokee seal was also inscribed in the crown’s center with the Cherokee star, also representing the seven clans. Turkey footprints also appear on the sides of the crown leading toward the crown’s center design symbolizing young Cherokee maidens going toward the “golden Cherokee hills” to compete for the Miss Cherokee title, according to the exhibit. In 1992, updated by Cherokee artist Bill Glass Sr., a pearl shell Cherokee star was added to the front of the crown while feathers are still represented. His daughter, Geri Gayle Glass, became Miss Cherokee the same year and wore the crown. Since 2003 there have been two crowns created by Cherokee artist Demos Glass. “As an artist I knew the challenge because these aren’t any kind of small feat, so I was intrigued by the idea and my grandfather (Bill Glass Sr.) had made the last one and I had seen what he had done and I studied my grandfather’s work and checked it out and that was part of my education growing up as a metalsmith,” he said. The first crown Demos created, which was used until 2013, had sterling silver and pink mussel shell incorporated with the copper. He said for his first crown he wanted to stay within the same design as the crown created by Stone. For the second crown, he got inspiration from early 1900s drawings of the Cherokee people at events and celebrations. The second crown, which is used today, is all copper. Demos said he wanted to curve the feathers and make them taller to give them a “southeast feel.” Both crowns display the seven feathers and Cherokee star. “I wanted to have a chance to get involved with today’s youth and make sure that my design was something that empowered the up-and-coming young lady that was going to lead our culture into the future,” he said. “I put a lot of pride into the fact that I did make something for this title, and it was something I felt whole heartedly about, give the upmost respect to this title.” Sunday Plumb is Miss Cherokee 2014-15. Her reign will end when a new Miss Cherokee is crowned at the Cherokee National Holiday during Labor Day weekend.
BY STAFF REPORTS
08/26/2015 04:00 PM
MARIETTA, Ga. – The Cherokee Garden at Green Meadows Preserve in Cobb County will be dedicated 10 a.m. on Aug. 29. The garden was the brainchild of Tony and Carra Harris of Marietta. Tony is a Cherokee Nation citizen, a member of the Cobb County Master Gardeners and vice president of the Georgia Chapter of the Trail of Tears Association. Earlier this year, the Cherokee Garden became a certified interpretive site on the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail. The garden features plants and trees that the Cherokee used for medicine, food, tools, weapons, shelter and ceremonial purposes prior to the Trail of Tears. The plants will eventually be marked with their Cherokee and English names. Volunteers from the Cobb County Master Gardeners and members of the Georgia Native Plant Society maintain the property. Green Meadows Preserve is part of the Cobb County Parks System. It is located at 3780 Dallas Highway, Powder Springs, Georgia. The park is free and open to the public. Cobb County Parks will have a tent or canopy at the dedication site. For additional information, email <a href="mailto: harris7627@bellsouth.net">harris7627@bellsouth.net</a> or call 770-425-2411.
BY STAFF REPORTS
08/19/2015 04:00 PM
MCKEY, Okla. – An archery contest will take place on Sept. 19 in this small Sequoyah County community. Registration begins at 9 a.m. and the contest starts at 10 a.m. for the “Northeast District Archery 3-D Contest - Circuit Series.” Entry fee is $15. There will be compound and recurve bow divisions with Junior, 9-11 years old; Intermediate, 12-13 years old; and Senior, 14-18 years old age groups. To reach the competition site, people may exit I-40 at the 303 exit and turn south or right on Dwight Mission Road for 3.3 miles and then turn right on East 1110 Road. Sponsors are Sequoyah County 4-H and Ely 6J Beefmaster Ranch. For more information, call 918-775-4838.
BY STAFF REPORTS
08/19/2015 10:00 AM
DAHLONEGA, Ga. – The September meeting of the Georgia Chapter of the Trail of Tears Association will be held from 10:30 a.m. to noon on Sept. 12 at Kennesaw Mountain Battlefield Park in the Educational Center. The speaker will be President of the Kennesaw Historical Society and a member of the executive board of the Kennesaw Museum Foundation Robert C. Jones. Jones has written a number of books on Civil War and railroad themes, including “Retracing the Route of Sherman's Atlanta Campaign,” “A Guide to the Civil War in Georgia,” and “Conspirators, Assassins, and the Death of Abraham Lincoln.” The topic of the meeting will be the role of the Cherokee Indians in the Civil War. Cherokee Indians fought on both sides in the Civil War. On the Confederate side, most Cherokees fought under the command of Brigadier General Stand Watie, the only Cherokee (and one of only two Indians) to rise to the rank of general during the Civil War. This presentation will examine Watie and his command, including their exploits at the Battle of Pea Ridge, Arkansas, and the Second Battle of Cabin Creek. It will also examine their reasons for fighting for the Confederacy. Trail of Tears Association meetings are free and open to the public. People need not have Native American ancestry to attend TOTA meetings just an interest and desire to learn more about this fascinating and tragic period in the country’s history. TOTA was created to support the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail established by an act of Congress in 1987. The TOTA is dedicated to identifying and preserving sites associated with the removal of Native Americans from the Southeast. The association consists of nine state chapters representing the nine states that the Cherokee and other tribes traveled through on their way to Indian Territory (now Oklahoma). For more information about the TOTA, visit the National TOTA website at www.nationaltota.org and the Georgia Chapter website at <a href="http://www.gatrailoftears.org" target="_blank">Click here to view</a>. The address for the park is 900 Kennesaw Mountain Dr., Kennesaw, GA 30152 and the telephone number is 770-427-4686. For further information about the September meeting, contact Tony Harris at <a href="mailto: harris7627@bellsouth.net">harris7627@bellsouth.net</a>.
BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter
08/19/2015 08:00 AM
LOST CITY, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen Larry Shade has lived his life in this northern Cherokee County community learning the ways of the Cherokee culture from his grandparents and father, the late Deputy Chief Hastings Shade. Among the cultural aspects he’s learned, one he truly enjoys is crawdad gigging. Larry gigs crawdads in a section of Fourteen Mile Creek that his family owns. “It’s just something that my dad always did when we were growing up. He worked, and when he came home that was the first thing we were going to do. We’d go out in the daytime, but a lot of times we’d go out at night, which is a lot easier,” he said. “It’s just a time-honored tradition that we hold true to our culture.” He said many people who catch crawdads use traps, but he and his family use homemade gigs, something he also learned to do from his father. “The gigs we are using tonight are all hand-forged by my dad. I’m in my 50s and the gigs that we’re going to use, I was 18 when dad made them,” he said. Hastings died in 2010 at age 67. He was known as a Cherokee traditionalist and was widely recognized for his work in cultural preservation and as a skilled traditional artisan. He was designated a Cherokee National Treasure in 1991 for his craftsmanship, which included making gigs. When gigging, Larry said they never catch more crawdads than they can eat. He said he and his family will determine how many crawdads they need to feed everyone and then they’ll go out and catch that amount. “We always leave some either for the next family or next year’s crop, but we never take more than what we need,” he said. “It’s part of the Cherokee way.” He said most of the time when he and his family “get together” they go gigging the night before. “My son, some of his friends and my daughter, we all go out and they know how,” he said. “We go through whether the water is cold or it’s warm, whether it’s leaches or snakes. They understand there’s a few dangers out there, but it’s something that we’ve done all our lives.” The method the Shades use to catch crawdads is not the easiest, Larry said, but it’s their tradition and it’s how he honors the Cherokee traditions and culture. “There a lot of easier way to get crawdads, but this is a time-honored tradition for us,” he said. “I’m skilled in what I’ve done and it’s hard for me to do something else.” Larry said he’s been gigging as long as he can remember. “Ever since dad trusted us and we were old enough to understand what ‘no’ meant and ‘don’t do that,’” he said. “I’m going to say, 5 or 6 years old…at least 46 years.” He said years ago catching crawdads was a way to feed one’s family. It’s not like that so much now, but the experience of providing for his family is something he said he would always honor and cherish. “My grandparents did it and passed it on to my dad. And you know my grandfather, he forged his gigs, which he passed on to my dad,” Larry said. “Dustin’s (one of Larry’s son) with me most the time and I’m glad that he’s with me and I hope that he carries it on. We all won’t be here…too much longer and we hope the traditions that we have…we carry on to our children and even the friends of my sons and daughters. I hope that they carry on.” Larry said if no one has ever tried gigging they are welcome to email him at larry-shade@cherokee.org. “I more than welcome you to look me up. Give me a holler. I will definitely take you. We’ll go out one night and I’ll show you the cultural way,” he said. “I invite all Cherokees or any tribal member. If they want to come experience a little history and a little culture.” <strong>Catching</strong> Larry Shade and his family slowly walk through creek waters at night carrying a lamplight, a bucket and a gig. Crawdads feed at night. The Shades catch both in shallow and deep waters. “So it just depends on where you find the crawdads. You have to go to them. They don’t come to you,” he said. Larry said many people “bait” a hole the night before by throwing out “chum” or something for the crawdads to feed on and draw them with. “If I clean fish, sometimes I’ll throw that in the water and that’s just so the crawdad have food. I don’t go back and bait the hole. What we do is we do it the sportsman way. I don’t cheat nature,” he said. Larry said when gigging, get close enough to the crawdad without scaring it, stab the crawdad with the gig in the upper portion of the body because you eat the tail and you don’t want to damage it. He said it’s also important to make sure when hunting at night that one’s light is bright enough to shine through the water and always be aware of your surroundings. <strong>Cleaning and Cooking</strong> After a good catch, Larry and his family clean the crawdads, usually at the creek because it’s just easier. “The way we clean ours is we take the back part of the crawdad and pull the back part up and we clean the guts and intestines (out). And then we turn the crawdad around and we’ll find the middle fin and we’ll pull the middle fin. That way the intestinal track will come out. Most the time we’ll tear the legs off because the edible part is the front section that we cook and we’ll break up the tail part and just eat the meat in the shell.” After cleaning, he said they soak the crawdads in hot water with about one tablespoon of salt to ensure the crustaceans are clean and preserved until they’re cooked. If the Shades don’t cook them that night, Larry said sometimes he’ll place them in just enough water to cover each crawdad with a half teaspoon of salt in a gallon plastic bag and put them into the freezer. When they’re ready to cook, Larry said he doesn’t add a whole lot to them, just a little season and cornmeal. He said to lightly salt and pepper and add just enough cornmeal to coat each crawdad. “Little salt and little pepper and then a little cornmeal and then we’ll fry it,” he said. “I know it’s kind of the unhealthy way, but it’s something that we’ve done our whole lives.”