During the Election Commission meeting on Sept. 13, Election Commissioner Martha Calico, right, holds up documentation of the final locations of precincts for the upcoming principal chief election to other EC commissioners. JAMI CUSTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

CNEC to wait 48 hours to certify election results

The Cherokee Nation Election Commission gathered for their regular meeting on Sept. 13. In that meeting the commission selected a new chairperson and approved waiting 48 hours before certifying election results. JAMI CUSTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Cherokee Nation Election Commission gathered for their regular meeting on Sept. 13. In that meeting the commission selected a new chairperson and approved waiting 48 hours before certifying election results. JAMI CUSTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter
09/14/2011 11:18 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation Election Commission approved a motion at its Sept. 13 meeting that calls for the EC to wait 48 hours before certifying unofficial election results after ballot counting has ceased.

EC Commissioner Susan Plumb said she believes not only does the EC need additional ballot counters, but also a break between unofficial results and certified results.

“The goal is to have a result that would withstand any scrutiny,” Plumb said. “We can’t do super human work…we can come back in 24 hours and begin to canvass and certify and that’s not unusual. I don’t find anywhere that there’s an immediate certification requirement in any other election codes.”

The EC also approved entering into a Memorandum of Understanding with the Carter Center, which will observe the Sept. 24 election.

The Carter Center will deploy a small observation mission for the Sept. 24 special election for principal chief, according to a Sept. 14 news release from the center.

Carter Center observers will interview the election commission, political contestants, and others to assess the electoral process. In addition, the Center will observe early voting, as well as election day polling, counting, and tabulation processes.

“The June election for Cherokee Nation Principal Chief and its aftermath created uncertainty about the process,” said Avery Davis-Roberts, assistant director of the Carter Center’s Democracy Program. “The Carter Center hopes that our mission to observe the September special election will reassure Cherokee voters, and will help to strengthen the efforts of the election commission, Tribal Council, political contestants, and civil society to ensure the integrity of future elections.”

Commissioner Patsy Morton said the EC recently met with Carter Center officials, and the EC was very impressed with their background and abilities.

“The people that came were very intelligent and I think they’ll do a great job,” Morton said.

Other action taken at the meeting was the selection of Plumb as the EC chairperson.

Plumb was nominated by Morton and approved by the EC to hold the position that was vacated by former EC Commissioner Roger Johnson, who resigned in July.

“I told the rest of the commission an office was not something that I was seeking, but I would be willing to serve,” Plumb said. “I’m going to need everyone’s expertise and input and I hope to make the election commission more transparent and efficient.”

In old business, EC Attorney Lloyd Cole discussed the status of the Freedman issue and it’s effect on the upcoming election.

“I guess it’s no secret that there’s been a line drawn in the sand between the Cherokee Nation and the Federal government,” Cole said. “We’ve, unfortunately, got a dog in the fight because we’re sitting here waiting for people to tell us what to do. What happens in the court systems is going to impact us in this forthcoming election.”

Cole added that the hearing is Sept. 20, and it appears that the EC isn’t going to have much time to prepare for the decision.

Cole said he doesn’t know that a ruling will be issued that day but he suspects that U.S. District Judge Henry Kennedy, who has been presiding over the federal case, is aware that the CN has an upcoming election. Cole said he hopes that Kennedy would have some kind of decision to be made on that day.

“I don’t know whether it makes any difference because they’ve already arbitrarily said ‘we don’t care what happens, we’re not recognizing your activities to disenfranchise the Freedman,’” Cole said.

The EC also approved the remaining precinct workers needed for the Sept. 24 election, and it also approved a change for the vault entry procedure used during the election process.

Plumb proposed amending the EC’s procedures that would require two signatures to enter the vault.

“I still would like for us to consider an amendment to our procedures that require during an election period that you require two signatures to enter the vault and a vault log that describes what the purpose of entering the vault was,” Plumb said. “I think it would help us to be very clear and that our actions were deliberate.”

Cole suggested that the EC not only incorporate the procedure changes during the counting processes, but also throughout the entire election itself including the time period set aside for recounts.

The EC discussed and approved the final locations of precincts for the Sept. 24 election.

Other items discussed included approving a request from the Chad Smith campaign requesting that its deposit for the “conditional recount” be returned. Cole said he thought the amount for the machine recount was $3,000.

“I researched that, I think it’s refundable,” Cole said. “We did not hold that recount. I looked at the statutes and if you don’t have the recount I don’t think that you are entitled to the deposit.”

The EC tabled the approval of the campaign financial reports and the absentee ballot counting procedure and possible hiring of additional counters. The EC plans to discuss the issues at its next meeting.

The EC also approved the dates of the special election for the District 2 council seat. Those specific dates are available here.

jami-custer@cherokee.org • 918-453-5560
About the Author
Reporter

Jami Murphy graduated from Locust Grove High School in 2000. She received her bachelor’s degree in mass communications in 2006 from Northeastern State University and began working at the Cherokee Phoenix in 2007.

She said the Cherokee Phoenix has allowed her the opportunity to share valuable information with the Cherokee people on a daily basis. 

Jami married Michael Murphy in 2014. They have two sons, Caden and Austin. Together they have four children, including Johnny and Chase. They also have two grandchildren, Bentley and Baylea. 

She is a Cherokee Nation citizen and said working for the Cherokee Phoenix has meant a great deal to her. 

“My great-great-great-great grandfather, John Leaf Springston, worked for the paper long ago. It’s like coming full circle. I’ve learned so much about myself, the Cherokee people and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it.”

Jami is a member of the Native American Journalists Association, and Investigative Reporters and Editors. You can follow her on Twitter @jamilynnmurphy or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/jamimurphy2014.
jami-murphy@cherokee.org • 918-453-5560
Reporter Jami Murphy graduated from Locust Grove High School in 2000. She received her bachelor’s degree in mass communications in 2006 from Northeastern State University and began working at the Cherokee Phoenix in 2007. She said the Cherokee Phoenix has allowed her the opportunity to share valuable information with the Cherokee people on a daily basis. Jami married Michael Murphy in 2014. They have two sons, Caden and Austin. Together they have four children, including Johnny and Chase. They also have two grandchildren, Bentley and Baylea. She is a Cherokee Nation citizen and said working for the Cherokee Phoenix has meant a great deal to her. “My great-great-great-great grandfather, John Leaf Springston, worked for the paper long ago. It’s like coming full circle. I’ve learned so much about myself, the Cherokee people and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it.” Jami is a member of the Native American Journalists Association, and Investigative Reporters and Editors. You can follow her on Twitter @jamilynnmurphy or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/jamimurphy2014.

News

BY STAFF REPORTS
09/03/2015 04:00 PM
The Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board will be meeting at 10 a.m. CDT, Friday, Sept. 4, 2015, in the O-Si-Yo Training Room at the Tsa-La-Gi Annex. The meeting is open to the public and anyone is welcome to attend. The meeting agenda is <a href="http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/Docs/2015/8/9552_Agenda_Sept_4_2015EditorialBoardMeeting.pdf" target="_blank">here</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
09/02/2015 02:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. –The Tribal Film Festival is set to take place on Sept. 4-6 during the Cherokee National Holiday. Those in attendance can expect to watch indigenous films, ranging from children’s films to horror films. There will also be locally filmed features and documentaries. During the festival, 41 films will be screened totaling more than 21 hours of film time. The event kicks off at 11 a.m. Sept. 4 and is expected to go until 11 p.m. There will be a red carpet event, wine and cheese tasting and a silent auction at 5:30 p.m. On Sept. 5, film screenings kick off at 11 a.m. with the last one showing at 7 p.m. After the last film Red Dirt Southern Rock band Badwater will perform at 9:30 p.m. Admission for the live music is $5 and includes two beers for the first 200 people in attendance. On Sept. 6, those in attendance can expect a day featuring “kids flixs” starting at 1 p.m. TFF sponsors include TribalTV, Cherokee Nation, Osage Casino and Acrylic Graphics and Designs. The Dream Theatre is located at 312 N. Muskogee Ave. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.tribalfilmfestival.com" target="_blank">www.tribalfilmfestival.com</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
09/01/2015 02:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. (AP) – Cherokee Nation Foundation is hosting an open house during the 63rd annual CherokeeNational Holiday Sept. 4-6. CNF hopes to raise awareness about the organization and its mission to help Cherokeeyouth succeed academically and achieve their higher education goals. The open house is Friday and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 800 S. Muskogee. Students, parents and teachers are encouraged to stop by for goodie bags and to gather information about CNF programs and scholarship opportunities. “Most people do not know that we have programs for students as young as fifth grade,” said Janice Randall, executive director of Cherokee Nation Foundation. “We have so many ways to help prepare Cherokee students, and we are dedicated to helping as many of them as possible. We just have to let them know who we are and how we can help.” CNF also plans to reveal its new branding initiative at the open house. “The Cherokee National Holiday is the perfect time to reintroduce ourselves and remind the Cherokee people that we are here to help,” said Randall. “We want Cherokee students to understand the value of higher education and know it is within reach for each and every one of them. We work diligently with all of our students to help them prepare for their academic journey and keep them informed about resources to help them succeed.” For more information, contact Cherokee Nation Foundation at (918) 207-0950 or Janice Randall at jr@cherokeenationfoundation.org.
BY STAFF REPORTS
09/01/2015 08:35 AM
In this month's issue: • The principal chief, deputy chief and eight Tribal Councilors take their oaths of office on Aug. 14. • CN files lawsuit against Johnson & Johnson' • CCO brings Cultural Enlightenment Series to Briggs community • OK tribes approach $1B in state fees ...plus much more. <a href="http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/Docs/2015/9/9576_2015-09-01(rev).pdf" target="_blank">Click here to view</a>the Sept. 2015 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix.
BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter
08/31/2015 12:00 PM
DURANT, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen Emalea Hudgens, a junior at Southeastern Oklahoma State University and a double major in psychology and music, recently spent a semester studying at the Swansea University, a public research university based in Wales of the United Kingdom. Hudgens received the title of Brad Henry International Scholar in 2014 and she studied abroad this past spring. The Jay native is a Cherokee Nation citizen and Harvey Scholar recipient. She is also a Savage Storm Leader and was selected to be in the President’s Leadership Class for 2012-13. Hudgens is a member of the Southeastern Chorale, Sparks Dance Team and Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority, according to the SOSU Communications Department. “I am very blessed and excited to get this opportunity to study abroad and become immersed in a different culture,’’ Hudgens said to the Southern, the SOSU newspaper. “It has been a life-long dream of mine to travel the world, and I cannot wait to share the stories and experiences with family and friends.” Hudgens said she felt fortunate to have studied overseas. “It has always been a dream of mine to study abroad and to live in Europe for a period of time. I hope to learn about their culture and get opportunities to work there myself, getting the experience that I need to do so. I just think it would be cool to work in a different culture.” She told the Cherokee Phoenix she was nervous to leave Oklahoma and live in a culture different than hers. “To say the least, it turned out to be the most life-changing experience. During my stay in Wales, I travelled to 11 different countries across Europe,” she said. “It was amazing to see the different cultures and the different people. I came to find people were very interested in hearing about the American culture and they found it fascinating to learn that I was a member of the Cherokee Nation.” Hudgens said studying abroad opened her eyes to many ideas about the world. “It is common to think the world is scary, but it is also very beautiful and filled with beautiful things,” she added. “Since travelling, I have created a passion to want to continue to travel and go see more of the world. I encourage everyone to travel if they get the opportunity.”
BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter
08/31/2015 10:00 AM
NEWKIRK, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation, with the approval of five other tribes, negotiated a lease of more than 8,000 acres to Weatherby Energy for oil and gas exploration at the former Chilocco Indian School in Kay County. CN Real Estate Services Director Ginger Reeves said meetings were held between the CN and Kaw, Pawnee, Ponca, Otoe-Missiouria and Tonkawa tribes in 2009. “Public Law 99-283 in the Federal Register grants Cherokee Nation the authority to lease the trust acres,” she said. “The leases are recorded at the Kay County Clerk’s Office in Newkirk, Oklahoma.” According to CN Resolution 134-09, Reeves said then Principal Chief Chad Smith and the Tribal Council approved a resolution to lease the property. “Regarding the referenced lease, the six Chilocco tribes’ trust lease was approved April 4, 2011, and has until April 4, 2016, to drill and produce or expire. Samson Resources Company, the current lessee, is in the process of assigning the lease to a Texas group (MPG Energy Inc., a subsidiary of Weatherby Energy.) Real Estate Services is processing that assignment approval through the BIA,” she said. Weatherby Energy has received Bureau of Indian Affairs approval for this assignment, officials said. The Cherokee Phoenix attempted to contact Weatherby Energy but did not receive a response as of publication. The Chilocco properties are trust and fee lands and the lease covers both. “The fee land lease will expire Nov. 5, 2015, unless they drill and produce. This fee lease was also recently assigned by Samson to the Texas group. Real Estate Services is processing the assignment for Cherokee Nation approval,” Reeves said. “Both leases were five-year leases and are filed in Cherokee Nation Title Plant. There is also a smaller acreage lease on fee lands at Chilocco with another oil company, which was in place before the lease started.” When the previous leases ended in the early 1990s, Reeves said it covered 320 acres and leased for $11,520 over a three-year term. She said it lasted longer because of oil and gas being produced in “paying quantities” from the property. Officials said the CN receives $8,736.30 on trust property annually plus $6,985.23 on fee property for a total of $15,721.53. A total of 8,152.61 acres are under lease with more than 5,000 acres being trust land and more than 2,300 acres in fee.