During the Election Commission meeting on Sept. 13, Election Commissioner Martha Calico, right, holds up documentation of the final locations of precincts for the upcoming principal chief election to other EC commissioners. JAMI CUSTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

CNEC to wait 48 hours to certify election results

The Cherokee Nation Election Commission gathered for their regular meeting on Sept. 13. In that meeting the commission selected a new chairperson and approved waiting 48 hours before certifying election results. JAMI CUSTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Cherokee Nation Election Commission gathered for their regular meeting on Sept. 13. In that meeting the commission selected a new chairperson and approved waiting 48 hours before certifying election results. JAMI CUSTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter
09/14/2011 11:18 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation Election Commission approved a motion at its Sept. 13 meeting that calls for the EC to wait 48 hours before certifying unofficial election results after ballot counting has ceased.

EC Commissioner Susan Plumb said she believes not only does the EC need additional ballot counters, but also a break between unofficial results and certified results.

“The goal is to have a result that would withstand any scrutiny,” Plumb said. “We can’t do super human work…we can come back in 24 hours and begin to canvass and certify and that’s not unusual. I don’t find anywhere that there’s an immediate certification requirement in any other election codes.”

The EC also approved entering into a Memorandum of Understanding with the Carter Center, which will observe the Sept. 24 election.

The Carter Center will deploy a small observation mission for the Sept. 24 special election for principal chief, according to a Sept. 14 news release from the center.

Carter Center observers will interview the election commission, political contestants, and others to assess the electoral process. In addition, the Center will observe early voting, as well as election day polling, counting, and tabulation processes.

“The June election for Cherokee Nation Principal Chief and its aftermath created uncertainty about the process,” said Avery Davis-Roberts, assistant director of the Carter Center’s Democracy Program. “The Carter Center hopes that our mission to observe the September special election will reassure Cherokee voters, and will help to strengthen the efforts of the election commission, Tribal Council, political contestants, and civil society to ensure the integrity of future elections.”

Commissioner Patsy Morton said the EC recently met with Carter Center officials, and the EC was very impressed with their background and abilities.

“The people that came were very intelligent and I think they’ll do a great job,” Morton said.

Other action taken at the meeting was the selection of Plumb as the EC chairperson.

Plumb was nominated by Morton and approved by the EC to hold the position that was vacated by former EC Commissioner Roger Johnson, who resigned in July.

“I told the rest of the commission an office was not something that I was seeking, but I would be willing to serve,” Plumb said. “I’m going to need everyone’s expertise and input and I hope to make the election commission more transparent and efficient.”

In old business, EC Attorney Lloyd Cole discussed the status of the Freedman issue and it’s effect on the upcoming election.

“I guess it’s no secret that there’s been a line drawn in the sand between the Cherokee Nation and the Federal government,” Cole said. “We’ve, unfortunately, got a dog in the fight because we’re sitting here waiting for people to tell us what to do. What happens in the court systems is going to impact us in this forthcoming election.”

Cole added that the hearing is Sept. 20, and it appears that the EC isn’t going to have much time to prepare for the decision.

Cole said he doesn’t know that a ruling will be issued that day but he suspects that U.S. District Judge Henry Kennedy, who has been presiding over the federal case, is aware that the CN has an upcoming election. Cole said he hopes that Kennedy would have some kind of decision to be made on that day.

“I don’t know whether it makes any difference because they’ve already arbitrarily said ‘we don’t care what happens, we’re not recognizing your activities to disenfranchise the Freedman,’” Cole said.

The EC also approved the remaining precinct workers needed for the Sept. 24 election, and it also approved a change for the vault entry procedure used during the election process.

Plumb proposed amending the EC’s procedures that would require two signatures to enter the vault.

“I still would like for us to consider an amendment to our procedures that require during an election period that you require two signatures to enter the vault and a vault log that describes what the purpose of entering the vault was,” Plumb said. “I think it would help us to be very clear and that our actions were deliberate.”

Cole suggested that the EC not only incorporate the procedure changes during the counting processes, but also throughout the entire election itself including the time period set aside for recounts.

The EC discussed and approved the final locations of precincts for the Sept. 24 election.

Other items discussed included approving a request from the Chad Smith campaign requesting that its deposit for the “conditional recount” be returned. Cole said he thought the amount for the machine recount was $3,000.

“I researched that, I think it’s refundable,” Cole said. “We did not hold that recount. I looked at the statutes and if you don’t have the recount I don’t think that you are entitled to the deposit.”

The EC tabled the approval of the campaign financial reports and the absentee ballot counting procedure and possible hiring of additional counters. The EC plans to discuss the issues at its next meeting.

The EC also approved the dates of the special election for the District 2 council seat. Those specific dates are available here.

jami-custer@cherokee.org • 918-453-5560
About the Author
Reporter

Jami Murphy graduated from Locust Grove High School in 2000. She received her bachelor’s degree in mass communications in 2006 from Northeastern State University and began working at the Cherokee Phoenix in 2007.

She said the Cherokee Phoenix has allowed her the opportunity to share valuable information with the Cherokee people on a daily basis. 

Jami married Michael Murphy in 2014. They have two sons, Caden and Austin. Together they have four children, including Johnny and Chase. They also have two grandchildren, Bentley and Baylea. 

She is a Cherokee Nation citizen and said working for the Cherokee Phoenix has meant a great deal to her. 

“My great-great-great-great grandfather, John Leaf Springston, worked for the paper long ago. It’s like coming full circle. I’ve learned so much about myself, the Cherokee people and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it.”

Jami is a member of the Native American Journalists Association, and Investigative Reporters and Editors. You can follow her on Twitter @jamilynnmurphy or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/jamimurphy2014.
jami-murphy@cherokee.org • 918-453-5560
Reporter Jami Murphy graduated from Locust Grove High School in 2000. She received her bachelor’s degree in mass communications in 2006 from Northeastern State University and began working at the Cherokee Phoenix in 2007. She said the Cherokee Phoenix has allowed her the opportunity to share valuable information with the Cherokee people on a daily basis. Jami married Michael Murphy in 2014. They have two sons, Caden and Austin. Together they have four children, including Johnny and Chase. They also have two grandchildren, Bentley and Baylea. She is a Cherokee Nation citizen and said working for the Cherokee Phoenix has meant a great deal to her. “My great-great-great-great grandfather, John Leaf Springston, worked for the paper long ago. It’s like coming full circle. I’ve learned so much about myself, the Cherokee people and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it.” Jami is a member of the Native American Journalists Association, and Investigative Reporters and Editors. You can follow her on Twitter @jamilynnmurphy or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/jamimurphy2014.

News

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Senior Reporter
11/21/2014 08:40 AM
LOST CITY, Okla. – American flags lined the dirt road leading up the Swimmer Church in rural Lost City on Nov. 11 as veterans and their families came to partake in the church’s annual Veterans Day program. One of the event’s organizers, Pat Martinez, said her late mother, Lora Crittenden, and her mother’s best friend, Juanita Allen, began honoring veterans at the church 25 years ago on Veterans Day. She said her late uncle, Bob Crittenden, was a prisoner of war during World War II, and her mother and Allen thought it would be nice to honor Bob and other veterans in the community on Veterans Day. “So they called and they went to see people and asked people to come to Veterans Night. They made little trinkets and used crate paper (to make decorations). It’s evolved to 25 years later to what it is now,” Martinez said. “We give them something to remember the church and also to remember them being a veteran. We’re proud of this small community coming together and making a difference.” During the program, veterans enter the church after everyone else is seated and are seated in the front. Veterans are presented with certificates and medals and are asked to stand or sit on the stage and tell everyone the military branch in which they served. After the program, which includes a welcome from the pastor and patriotic songs, the veterans walk next door to the church’s fellowship hall for a potluck meal. Martinez said the church’s congregation understands a program and a meal is “not much” to thank the veterans for their willingness to sacrifice themselves to help protect the country. “If you served during peace time or if you were combat, our freedom still depends on men and women like you,” she said during the program. “God bless you veterans and God bless America.” Cherokee veteran Ross Gourd, who lives in the nearby community of Double Springs, served in the Army from 1969-71. He has been coming to the Swimmer Church Veterans Day program for 13 years and appreciates that veterans have a place to get together on their day and enjoy a home-cooked meal. He is a recipient of the Cherokee Warrior Award from the Cherokee Nation. Jimmy Carey of Hulbert served in the Air Force during the Vietnam era from 1966-70. “I did what I had to do to show that my people were supportive of this government. I think it’s the greatest government there is. It’s not perfect, but it’s great, and I wouldn’t want to live anyplace else,” he said. A CN citizen, Carey taught the Cherokee language at Sequoyah High School for 14 years and worked for the Nation for 22 years. He retired from teaching this past spring. It was his first time attending the church’s Veterans Day program and he said he was “impressed.” “This is what can happen when you get to thinking you need to do something. I like it. I really do. I’ll be back next year,” he said. Martinez said 20 to 25 veterans attend the program each year, but as the years pass there are less and less World War II and Korean War veterans. “We hope the younger ones will pick up the torch and come,” she said.
BY STAFF REPORTS
11/19/2014 10:01 AM
WASHINGTON – Photographer Dana Gluckstein is working alongside Amnesty International to honor Native American Heritage Month. In doing so they announced the tour of DIGNITY: Tribes in Transition, an award-winning photography exhibition that honors indigenous peoples worldwide. Exhibition photographs are being shared on social media sites during November. The exhibition will open on Jan. 29 at the Boston University Art Gallery. According to a Boston University College of Fine Arts press release, DIGNITY’s artistry, power and impassioned call to action create a historic exhibition in support of indigenous peoples, who represent six percent of the global population. DIGNITY previously toured in European museums for the past several years. More exhibition dates and locations will be announced soon. To view Gluckstein’s work, visit her Twitter and Instagram @DanaGluckstein.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
11/18/2014 01:52 PM
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) – Revenue at U.S. casinos jumped more than 6 percent in 2012, the first significant increase in three years as economic growth picked up speed and more casinos opened in several markets. But revenue generated by Indian casinos rose less than 2 percent the same year, Casino City’s North American Gaming Almanac found. Growth is limited due to regulations restricting tribal casino expansion beyond reservations and differences between tribes over how best to expand, said Vin Narayanan, editor-in-chief of Casino City. “There’s a giant political question about that,” he said. Total gambling revenue in 2012 was $94.47 billion, with the largest share, $40.38 billion, from casinos and card rooms. Tribal casinos generated $28.14 billion followed by lotteries ($23.41 billion) and racing and sports gambling ($2.55 billion) in 2012. Casino revenue grew by a fraction of 1 percent in 2011 and 2010 and fell nearly 6 percent in 2009 as the steepest economic downturn since the Depression took hold. Year-to-year revenue changes are vastly different from one state to another. In Ohio, for example, total gambling revenue jumped by one-third from 2011 to 2012 as casino gambling ramped up. But in New Jersey, seventh largest among the states in overall gambling revenue in 2012, casino revenue fell from $3.69 billion in 2009 to $2.71 billion in 2012 as three Atlantic City casinos shut. Nevada, California and New York are the top three states in casino revenue. Narayanan said saturation is the culprit for the decline of Atlantic City’s casinos, but it’s not an issue elsewhere. “Are there too many casinos in the market? As far as Atlantic City is concerned, there are too many casinos on the market,” he said. But casinos opening in Ohio are satisfying “pent-up demand,” he said. Similarly, the legalization of casino gambling in Maryland in 2008 and the opening of the state’s first casino in 2010 generated tremendous revenue. Casino and card room revenue increased from $27.6 million in 2010 to $377.8 million in 2012. Total gambling revenue jumped to $1.15 billion in 2012 from $760.6 million in the same period. “Maryland is a place that’s just taking off,” Narayanan said. The opening of casinos in Massachusetts in the next few years is expected to lead to a significant new source of revenue, possibly at the expense of neighboring Connecticut’s Mohegan Sun and Foxwoods Resort casinos. Narayanan questioned if gamblers who check out a Massachusetts casino will still be comfortable traveling to Connecticut’s tribal casinos. “That’s a real good question,” he said.
BY STAFF REPORTS
11/17/2014 03:09 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Phoenix offers a digital alternative to keep in touch with the news and events posted by the Cherokee Phoenix for those on the go who want to stay in the know. The Cherokee Phoenix Weekly is a digital newsletter that’s emailed every Wednesday. It consists of the latest news and feature stories, links to cherokeephoenix.org and space for advertising. The newsletter is also used to notify its subscribers of important breaking news and can be viewed on any mobile device. To subscribe, go to <a href="http://www.cherokeephoenix.org" target="_blank">www.cherokeephoenix.org</a> and scroll down to the Cherokee Phoenix Weekly Digital Newsletter section on the right side of the page. To inquire about advertising on the newsletter, email <a href="mailto: phoenix-advertising@cherokee.org">phoenix-advertising@cherokee.org</a>.
BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter
11/17/2014 08:09 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – According to a Cherokee Nation Election Commission statement, the last day register to vote in the tribe’s upcoming June 27 general election, as well as a potential July 25 run-off election, is March 31. Open for the 2015 election are the principal chief and deputy chief seats, as well as seats for Tribal Council districts 1, 3, 6, 8, 12, 13, 14 and an At-Large seat. Legislative Act 04-14 states that CN citizens who are 18 years of age or older on the date of the election may apply to be a registered voter. Also, tribal citizens who are 17 years old and can show that their birth dates are prior to the election date shall be allowed to register to vote. “Persons who have never been registered to vote before or who are not currently registered in the district of their residence and persons who are registered but who need to change their registration information may apply by filling out and mailing a Cherokee Nation Election Commission Voter Registration Application form,” the EC statement reads. According to the EC, each person who submits an application will receive a written EC response. “The response is either a Voter Identification Card listing the new voter’s precinct and district location or a letter that explains the reason or reasons the application for voter registration was not approved,” the statement reads. “Any person who has submitted a Voter Registration Application and who has not received a response within 30 days should contact the Election Commission Office.” EC officials said EC staff members are preparing for several voter outreach events and have completed events at Westville High School, Cherokee Eldercare and Sequoyah High School. “The Cherokee Nation Election Commission is reaching out to all ages of Cherokee citizens,” EC Director Connie Parnell said. “The voter registration is well-received and the office is commended on their efforts to increase voter registration for the 2015 general election.” According to EC records, there were 37,415 registered voters as of April 2011. As of Nov. 4, 2014, there were 63,236 registered voters. Officials said new voters and voters who have had name or an address changes should fill out new voter applications. EC officials said it’s important to have the most current information before the next election. They added that if a voter is registered, then the voter should verify that his or her information is correct. Voter applications are available at the EC Office located at 22116 S. Bald Hill Road in Tahlequah and at most community meetings. Applications also are available www.cherokee.org/elections. Citizens may also receive it by email or fax. For more information call 918-458-5899 or toll free at 1-800-353-2895. One can also fax 918-458-6101 or email election-commission@cherokee.org. To mail a form to the EC office use P.O. Box 1188, Tahlequah, OK 74465. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.cherokee.org/OurGovernment/Commissions/ElectionCommission.aspx" target="_blank">www.cherokee.org/OurGovernment/Commissions/ElectionCommission.aspx</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
11/14/2014 02:40 PM
CATOOSA, Okla. – On Nov. 17, the Cherokee Nation is hosting a luncheon at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa celebrating the 10 years since Oklahoma voters passed the State Question 712. The constitutional amendment allowed the state to negotiate with Oklahoma tribes to operate Las Vegas-style gaming, opening the door to a new market for tourism and hospitality in the state. Collectively, Oklahoma tribes have generated nearly $900 million since 2004. At the lunch, which starts at 11:30 a.m., Gov. Brad Henry, who served from 2003-11, will join Principal Chief Bill John Baker and other tribal, state and local officials to reflect on the economic impact of gaming in Oklahoma over the past decade. During the past 10 years, the Nation’s businesses have created more than 4,000 jobs that span gaming, hospitality, information technology, personnel services, distribution, manufacturing, telecommunications, environmental services and security and defense industries.