Frozen HUD funds released to Cherokee Nation

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Senior Reporter
10/28/2011 03:27 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development informed the Cherokee Nation yesterday in a letter that it is lifting a temporary suspension of the tribe’s housing funds.

HUD froze the funds in August following a ruling by the CN Supreme Court that stripped tribal citizenship from Cherokee Freedmen descendants.

“We are pleased that in the second week of our term we’ve managed to work with the federal government to have this money released. It’s important we have that money so we can better take care of our people,” Principal Chief Bill John Baker said.

The $39 million in housing funds allocated to the CN is $6 million more than the CN expected to receive in August. In a letter to Baker, HUD informed the CN that based on its compliance with the Sept. 21 federal district court ruling that restored citizenship to Freedmen it is releasing the funds.

“In light of these considerations and after considerable analysis of Section 801, HUD has determined that section 801 of the Native American Housing Assistance and Self Determination Act does not prohibit HUD from making IHBG funding available to the tribe,” the letter from Assistant HUD Secretary Sandra B. Henriquez stated. “Consistent with previous statements made by the tribe and tribe’s actions to date, HUD expects that the tribe will continue to comply with the terms of the Nash order.”

The Sept. 21 ruling for Cherokee Nation v. Nash, in the United States District Court in Washington, D.C., ordered the tribe to ensure all Cherokee Freedmen descendants who were stripped of CN citizenship on Aug. 22 by the tribe’s Supreme Court be recognized as citizens again, be provided the rights and benefits of other CN citizens and be allowed to vote in the Sept. 24 special election.

The Supreme Court ruled on Aug. 22 that a March 2007 constitutional amendment approved by Cherokee voters was valid. The amendment prevented Freedmen descendants without Indian blood from being CN citizens.

HUD said in September that because of the court’s ruling it was suspending NAHASDA funding, and while HUD sought guidance on the ruling, housing funds would remain suspended.

Previously, Housing Authority of the Cherokee Nation Executive Director David Southerland said a majority of the expected $33 million in NAHASDA funding, nearly $11 million, was used by Housing Services. The tribe’s commerce department received nearly $5.7 million for mortgage assistance and other housing programs; Human Services received nearly $5.2 million; and Community Services nearly $2.3 million. The remaining funds are allocated to CN Career Services, Environmental Services, the Marshal Service, Delaware Tribal Housing and indirect costs.

In her letter to Baker, Henriquez added that HUD reserves the right to reassess its decision to release the tribe’s funds in the future if the tribe is deemed to be in violation of the terms of the federal court order.

“Failure to adhere to a federal court could lead to sanctions, up to and including termination of the tribe’s IHBG funds,” the letter stated.

will-chavez@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961


About the Author
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M.

He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life.
He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association.

Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years.
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M. He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life. He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association. Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years.

News

BY STAFF REPORTS
09/04/2015 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. –The Cherokee Nation recently announced that Houston-based Stage Stores Inc. presented the tribe with a $10,000 check as part of its sponsorship of the 63rd Cherokee National Holiday. “Stage Stores is honored to support the 63rd Cherokee National Holiday,” Stage Executive Vice President Russ Lundy said. “Our company values our customers and supports the communities where our stores are located.” According to a CN press release, this is the fifth year Stage has sponsored the holiday. “The Cherokee National Holiday attracts thousands of visitors to Tahlequah each year, and we’re thankful to have a community partner like Stage Stores that supports our largest annual cultural celebration,” Principal Chief Bill John Baker said. “It’s a great opportunity to partner with corporations like Stage, which help further the mission of the Cherokee Nation.” The CN also partners with Stage to allow income eligible families to receive back-to-school clothing vouchers, as well as winter coat vouchers. According to the release, nearly 7,000 Stage back-to-school clothing vouchers worth $100 each were distributed to CN children this summer. There is a Stage store located at 907 S. Muskogee Ave., as well as approximately 10 stores located within the tribe’s 14-county jurisdiction.
BY STAFF REPORTS
09/03/2015 04:00 PM
The Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board will be meeting at 10 a.m. CDT, Friday, Sept. 4, 2015, in the O-Si-Yo Training Room at the Tsa-La-Gi Annex. The meeting is open to the public and anyone is welcome to attend. The meeting agenda is <a href="http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/Docs/2015/8/9552_Agenda_Sept_4_2015EditorialBoardMeeting.pdf" target="_blank">here</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
09/02/2015 02:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. –The Tribal Film Festival is set to take place on Sept. 4-6 during the Cherokee National Holiday. Those in attendance can expect to watch indigenous films, ranging from children’s films to horror films. There will also be locally filmed features and documentaries. During the festival, 41 films will be screened totaling more than 21 hours of film time. The event kicks off at 11 a.m. Sept. 4 and is expected to go until 11 p.m. There will be a red carpet event, wine and cheese tasting and a silent auction at 5:30 p.m. On Sept. 5, film screenings kick off at 11 a.m. with the last one showing at 7 p.m. After the last film Red Dirt Southern Rock band Badwater will perform at 9:30 p.m. Admission for the live music is $5 and includes two beers for the first 200 people in attendance. On Sept. 6, those in attendance can expect a day featuring “kids flixs” starting at 1 p.m. TFF sponsors include TribalTV, Cherokee Nation, Osage Casino and Acrylic Graphics and Designs. The Dream Theatre is located at 312 N. Muskogee Ave. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.tribalfilmfestival.com" target="_blank">www.tribalfilmfestival.com</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
09/01/2015 02:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. (AP) – Cherokee Nation Foundation is hosting an open house during the 63rd annual CherokeeNational Holiday Sept. 4-6. CNF hopes to raise awareness about the organization and its mission to help Cherokeeyouth succeed academically and achieve their higher education goals. The open house is Friday and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 800 S. Muskogee. Students, parents and teachers are encouraged to stop by for goodie bags and to gather information about CNF programs and scholarship opportunities. “Most people do not know that we have programs for students as young as fifth grade,” said Janice Randall, executive director of Cherokee Nation Foundation. “We have so many ways to help prepare Cherokee students, and we are dedicated to helping as many of them as possible. We just have to let them know who we are and how we can help.” CNF also plans to reveal its new branding initiative at the open house. “The Cherokee National Holiday is the perfect time to reintroduce ourselves and remind the Cherokee people that we are here to help,” said Randall. “We want Cherokee students to understand the value of higher education and know it is within reach for each and every one of them. We work diligently with all of our students to help them prepare for their academic journey and keep them informed about resources to help them succeed.” For more information, contact Cherokee Nation Foundation at (918) 207-0950 or Janice Randall at jr@cherokeenationfoundation.org.
BY STAFF REPORTS
09/01/2015 08:35 AM
In this month's issue: • The principal chief, deputy chief and eight Tribal Councilors take their oaths of office on Aug. 14. • CN files lawsuit against Johnson & Johnson' • CCO brings Cultural Enlightenment Series to Briggs community • OK tribes approach $1B in state fees ...plus much more. <a href="http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/Docs/2015/9/9576_2015-09-01(rev).pdf" target="_blank">Click here to view</a>the Sept. 2015 issue of the Cherokee Phoenix.
BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter
08/31/2015 12:00 PM
DURANT, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen Emalea Hudgens, a junior at Southeastern Oklahoma State University and a double major in psychology and music, recently spent a semester studying at the Swansea University, a public research university based in Wales of the United Kingdom. Hudgens received the title of Brad Henry International Scholar in 2014 and she studied abroad this past spring. The Jay native is a Cherokee Nation citizen and Harvey Scholar recipient. She is also a Savage Storm Leader and was selected to be in the President’s Leadership Class for 2012-13. Hudgens is a member of the Southeastern Chorale, Sparks Dance Team and Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority, according to the SOSU Communications Department. “I am very blessed and excited to get this opportunity to study abroad and become immersed in a different culture,’’ Hudgens said to the Southern, the SOSU newspaper. “It has been a life-long dream of mine to travel the world, and I cannot wait to share the stories and experiences with family and friends.” Hudgens said she felt fortunate to have studied overseas. “It has always been a dream of mine to study abroad and to live in Europe for a period of time. I hope to learn about their culture and get opportunities to work there myself, getting the experience that I need to do so. I just think it would be cool to work in a different culture.” She told the Cherokee Phoenix she was nervous to leave Oklahoma and live in a culture different than hers. “To say the least, it turned out to be the most life-changing experience. During my stay in Wales, I travelled to 11 different countries across Europe,” she said. “It was amazing to see the different cultures and the different people. I came to find people were very interested in hearing about the American culture and they found it fascinating to learn that I was a member of the Cherokee Nation.” Hudgens said studying abroad opened her eyes to many ideas about the world. “It is common to think the world is scary, but it is also very beautiful and filled with beautiful things,” she added. “Since travelling, I have created a passion to want to continue to travel and go see more of the world. I encourage everyone to travel if they get the opportunity.”