Native American Heritage activities in November

BY STAFF REPORTS
11/02/2011 08:57 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation will host two days of activities Nov. 9 and 10 to honor Native American Heritage Month. All events are free and open to the public.

At 10:30 a.m., Wednesday, Nov. 9, Professor Tim Garrison of Portland State University will present the keynote history address for the two-day event in the Tribal Council Chambers. His lecture, “The Cherokees in the Pac-12? Elisha Chester’s Bizarre Removal Plan,” illuminates an interesting aspect of Cherokee history.

In the early 1830s, the United States government was trying to decide where to relocate the Southeastern Indian nations. In 1832, one of the Cherokee Nation’s attorneys, Elisha Chester, offered a bizarre plan for the Cherokees’ relocation. Garrison’s lecture will discuss Chester’s role in the removal crisis, describe his failed removal proposal and explain why the lawyer became a pariah among the Cherokee. There will be time for questions and answers at the end of the presentation.

Professor Garrison is a well-known scholar of Cherokee history. His most recent book, “The Legal Ideology of Removal: The Southern Judiciary and the Sovereignty of Native American Nations,” has just been released in paperback.

Garrison currently directs Native American Studies at Portland State, has won various teaching awards, and has written numerous articles, book chapters, encyclopedia essays and book reviews.
Garrison received his Ph.D. from the University of Kentucky and his J.D. from the University of Georgia.

From 1:30-3 p.m. on Nov. 9, in the council chambers, producers from Twin Path Productions will present for the first time in the Tahlequah area their film of the June 2011 “Remember the Removal Bike Ride.”

This year’s ride was the first time members of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians joined CN riders for 1,000-mile bicycle ride from Georgia to Tahlequah.

From 3:30-4 p.m. Helena McCoy, fifth-grade teacher at the Cherokee Immersion School, will present “My Awakening,” a PowerPoint presentation of images she took as a member of the “West to East Tour” sponsored by the CN Leadership Group this summer to the Cherokee homeland. McCoy will discuss her personal awakening to the achievements of Cherokee people and places and history encountered on the trip.

From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Nov. 10, in the Tsa-La-Gi Community Room (directly behind the Restaurant of the Cherokees), artists will be on hand to teach people how to make a variety of Cherokee arts and crafts.

Among the crafts to be demonstrated and taught are how to make baskets, cornhusk dolls, pinch pots, bead key rings and lanyards, braiding and finger weaving. All supplies for all arts and crafts will be provided at no charge to attendees.

Freeman Owle of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians will also be on hand to teach stone carving. He will have a limited number of stone-carving kits, so people should arrive early to participate in this activity.

A stickball game will also be played this year for the first time. The game will take place from noon to 3 p.m. at the CN complex under the direction of Shane Dominick, who is the stickball coordinator.

“If you have never played and want to learn how, this would be a perfect opportunity. If you just love to watch stickball being played, come watch this fun event,” said event organizer Cathy Monholland.

For additional information, call Monholland at 918-453-5389 or e-mail her at cathy-monholland@cherokee.org.

News

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Reporter
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