Native American Heritage activities in November

BY STAFF REPORTS
11/02/2011 08:57 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation will host two days of activities Nov. 9 and 10 to honor Native American Heritage Month. All events are free and open to the public.

At 10:30 a.m., Wednesday, Nov. 9, Professor Tim Garrison of Portland State University will present the keynote history address for the two-day event in the Tribal Council Chambers. His lecture, “The Cherokees in the Pac-12? Elisha Chester’s Bizarre Removal Plan,” illuminates an interesting aspect of Cherokee history.

In the early 1830s, the United States government was trying to decide where to relocate the Southeastern Indian nations. In 1832, one of the Cherokee Nation’s attorneys, Elisha Chester, offered a bizarre plan for the Cherokees’ relocation. Garrison’s lecture will discuss Chester’s role in the removal crisis, describe his failed removal proposal and explain why the lawyer became a pariah among the Cherokee. There will be time for questions and answers at the end of the presentation.

Professor Garrison is a well-known scholar of Cherokee history. His most recent book, “The Legal Ideology of Removal: The Southern Judiciary and the Sovereignty of Native American Nations,” has just been released in paperback.

Garrison currently directs Native American Studies at Portland State, has won various teaching awards, and has written numerous articles, book chapters, encyclopedia essays and book reviews.
Garrison received his Ph.D. from the University of Kentucky and his J.D. from the University of Georgia.

From 1:30-3 p.m. on Nov. 9, in the council chambers, producers from Twin Path Productions will present for the first time in the Tahlequah area their film of the June 2011 “Remember the Removal Bike Ride.”

This year’s ride was the first time members of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians joined CN riders for 1,000-mile bicycle ride from Georgia to Tahlequah.

From 3:30-4 p.m. Helena McCoy, fifth-grade teacher at the Cherokee Immersion School, will present “My Awakening,” a PowerPoint presentation of images she took as a member of the “West to East Tour” sponsored by the CN Leadership Group this summer to the Cherokee homeland. McCoy will discuss her personal awakening to the achievements of Cherokee people and places and history encountered on the trip.

From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Nov. 10, in the Tsa-La-Gi Community Room (directly behind the Restaurant of the Cherokees), artists will be on hand to teach people how to make a variety of Cherokee arts and crafts.

Among the crafts to be demonstrated and taught are how to make baskets, cornhusk dolls, pinch pots, bead key rings and lanyards, braiding and finger weaving. All supplies for all arts and crafts will be provided at no charge to attendees.

Freeman Owle of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians will also be on hand to teach stone carving. He will have a limited number of stone-carving kits, so people should arrive early to participate in this activity.

A stickball game will also be played this year for the first time. The game will take place from noon to 3 p.m. at the CN complex under the direction of Shane Dominick, who is the stickball coordinator.

“If you have never played and want to learn how, this would be a perfect opportunity. If you just love to watch stickball being played, come watch this fun event,” said event organizer Cathy Monholland.

For additional information, call Monholland at 918-453-5389 or e-mail her at cathy-monholland@cherokee.org.

News

BY JAMI MURPHY
Senior Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
05/31/2016 04:30 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Family, friends and supporters joined Cherokee Nation officials to wish 10 tribal citizens good luck as they left for North Carolina to meet Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians cyclists for the 2016 “Remember the Removal” bike ride. The ride is held annually to commemorate the forced removal of the Cherokee people from their Southeastern homelands during the winter of 1838-39. According to the send-off program, the ride allows Cherokee people the opportunity to travel along the Trail of Tears where their ancestors traveled. The CN-sponsored team was expected to meet with EBCI riders in Cherokee, North Carolina, and on June 5 begin the journey from New Echota, Georgia. The CN cyclists are trainer Keven Jackson, Blayn Workman, Amber Anderson, historian Stacy Leeds, Amicia Craig, Kylar Trumbla, Nikki Lewis, Glendon VanSandt, Steffy Hammer, Kelsey Girty and CN ambassador Sammy Houseberg. The EBCI riders are Marissa Cabe, Cole Saunooke, Tom Hill, Tosh Welch, J.C. Arch, Jake Cooper and Aaron Hogner. All the riders were expected to arrive on June 23 in Tahlequah to an 11 a.m. welcoming ceremony. Girty, a Northeastern State University senior from Warner, said all the talk during the years regarding the experience one can have on this ride is what prompted her to apply to ride. “I’ve heard people talk about it, and they say how life changing it is and how amazing it is, and I just wanted a chance to see things I’ve never seen before and get more in touch with my heritage and learn more about being Cherokee and what it means to be Cherokee,” she said. One thing she said she was most looking forward to was seeing the land, the Great Smokey Mountains and the places from which her family came. “I didn’t know a lot about my family, and I found out some stuff through the genealogy. I’m just real excited to actually see like my families in particular, where they come from,” Girty said. The two groups of riders are expected to bike approximately 950 miles in three weeks along the trail’s Northern Route, which consists of Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma. CN citizen Glendon VanSandt, of Siloam Springs, Arkansas, said this ride is for Cherokee ambassadors who, while on the ride, will learn history pertaining to the Cherokee people and culture. VanSandt said the team has trained for this ride since February. “It’s been a lot just on the bikes and then a lot in the gym, just building up our legs and also our arms so that we can support our weight,” he said. “I think everyone’s very capable of doing this ride. I’m looking forward to the history. I’m a biker and so I like the biking, but I also love my heritage so I want to learn more about that,” he said. The bicycle ride originated more than 30 years ago as a leadership program that offered Cherokee students a glimpse of the hardships their ancestors faced while making the same trek on foot. For the first time since the program began, participants will receive three hours of college credit from NSU after completing the ride. Follow the cyclists’ journey at <a href="http://www.facebook.com/removal.ride" target="_blank">www.facebook.com/removal.ride</a> or with the Twitter hashtag #RememberTheRemoval. <strong>“Remember the Removal” Ride Timeline</strong Georgia:?June 5 – New Echota to Cleveland, Tennessee Tennessee:?June 6 – Cleveland to Dayton?June 7 – Dayton to Pikeville?June 8 – Pikeville to Woodbury?June 9 – Woodbury to Nashville?June 10 –Nashville to Hopkinsville, Kentucky Kentucky:?June 11 – Hopkinsville to Golconda, Illinois Illinois:?June 12 – Golconda to Cape Girardeau, Missouri Missouri:?June 14 – Cape Girardeau to Farmington?June 15 – Farmington to Steelville?June 16 – Steelville to St. Robert?June 17 – St. Robert to Lebanon?June 18 – Lebanon to Springfield?June 20 – Springfield to Cassville?June 21 – Cassville to Springdale, Arkansas Arkansas:?June 22 – Springdale to Stilwell, Oklahoma Oklahoma:?June 23 – Stilwell to Tahlequah
BY LENZY KREHBIEL-BURTON
Special Correspondent
05/31/2016 08:30 AM
WASHINGTON – Despite headlines generated by a recent poll, opponents of the Washington, D.C., NFL team’s mascot are not giving up just yet. On May 27, representatives with the National Congress of American Indians and a trademark lawsuit against Pro Football Inc. reiterated their stance against indigenous-themed mascots in response to a poll conducted and funded by the Washington Post. According to the poll’s results, published in mid-May, nine out of 10 American Indians nationwide do not find the Washington, D.C., NFL team’s mascot offensive. About 500 self-identified Native American adults nationwide were surveyed via telephone, with less than half claiming tribal enrollment. “Our fight is not over,” lawsuit lead plaintiff Amanda Blackhorse said. “The fight to end racism or cultural appropriation is not over. This poll was an attack…an attempt to silence those who oppose the name and diminish those who have been hurt by it.” American Indian groups nationwide have criticized both the poll and the methodology used to conduct it, which was similar to one conducted in 2004 by the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania. The Native American Journalists Association has called the poll an “egregious example of creating the news rather than simply reporting it” and publicly took the Post to task for not having any Native American staffers in its newsroom. Noting the multiple resolutions passed by NCAI member organizations against the mascot, NCAI Executive Director Jacqueline Pata dismissed claims that the mascot issue should take a back seat to other issues facing tribes. Instead, she said that the mascot issue is directly related to health care, education and equitable access concerns by a common thread: respect. “One of the worst, demeaning elements of that is the mascot who constantly in sports reminds us over and over again…how many people treat us as if we’re just mascots,” Pata said. “We want to overcome that so we can overcome all of the other challenges in Indian Country.”
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Senior Reporter – @cp_wchavez
05/30/2016 08:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Veterans, their families and Cherokee Nation leaders gathered on May 27 in front of the Cherokee Warrior Memorial on the W.W. Keeler Complex to commemorate Memorial Day ahead of the official holiday on May 30. The Cherokee Nation Color Guard and veterans from various eras presented the CN and American flags and flags from this country’s military branches to kick off the annual ceremony. Cherokee veteran Larry T. Smith, 48, of Muskogee, served 17 years in the Air Force and the Oklahoma Air National Guard from 1989 to 2005. He said he attended to honor service people who paid “the ultimate price” in defending this country and its freedoms. He said he has not lost a family member who served during time of war, but two uncles were wounded – one in the Korean War and one in Vietnam. His said his brother also served with the 82nd Airborne. The fact that he served his country as a CN citizen means a lot to him, Smith said, because he is part of a tradition of Native Americans serving their country in large numbers. “Native Americans have a long history of serving the United States, even in the military. I think per capita of any group in the country Native Americans have the highest percentage of participation in the military, and that means a lot to me,” he said. The Cherokee National Youth Choir performed during the ceremony and Principal Chief Bill John Baker and Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden placed wreaths at the foot of the memorial. James Powell, 88, of Tahlequah, served in the South Pacific with the Navy from 1945-47 aboard the USS Whiteside, an Andromeda-class attack cargo ship. The Cherokee veteran said he wanted to be at the ceremony to honor the country’s war dead. “I wouldn’t miss it for nothing,” he said. “It’s a great thing to honor all veterans that give their all, especially the ones who are still in. It’s a great thing.” Cherokee veteran Thomas Blair, 60 of Woodall, served in the Army for seven years with the 1st Cavalry Division, the 25th Infantry Division and the 2nd Infantry Division in Korea. He said Memorial Day reminds him of his family members who are buried in the Fort Gibson National Cemetery about 20 miles southwest of Tahlequah. “My father served 23 years, and I got uncles and I got a son that served that’s buried over there,” he said. “I remember all the guys that I served with in my time of service. It means a lot to me.” From 2003-11 4,488 service people died in missions in Iraq, and from 2001 to present 2,229 service people have died in Afghanistan. Those numbers are added to the 58,209 who died in Vietnam; 36,516 during the Korean Conflict; 405,399 during World War II; and 116,516 during World War I. And approximately 750,000 Union and Confederate soldiers and other participants died during the Civil War. According to the website usmemorialday.org, Memorial Day, originally called Decoration Day, is a day of remembrance for those who have died in service of the United States and was borne out of the Civil War and a desire to honor this country’s military dead. The first state to recognize the holiday was New York in 1873. By 1890, it was recognized by all of the northern states. The South refused to acknowledge the day, honoring their dead on separate days until after World War I when the holiday changed from honoring just those who died fighting in the Civil War to honoring Americans who died fighting in any war, including Indian wars.
BY JAMI MURPHY
Senior Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
05/27/2016 02:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – From May 24-26, Sequoyah basketball coach Jay Herrin hosted a boys basketball camp to introduce and maintain basketball fundamentals for children in grades first through ninth. “We work on the fundamental skills – dribbling and basket shooting. Got a lot of different-aged groups and got a lot of different-ability groups. But we try to tailor it to the kids’ needs whether a beginning player or a more advanced player,” he said. Herrin, a Cherokee Nation citizen, said the three-day camp saw approximately 90 children attend. “What’s good is to get these guys out doing something. School is out now, and trying to keep them active is one thing,” he said. Herrin said he reaches out to former and current players to help coach and assist campers. “A lot of my former players, some of them are playing basketball in college. A lot of them are current players. Plus we have a young lady (Maci Dale) helping us from Kansas (High School) who just graduated who is doing it as a community service project,” he said. “They help coach and assist in teaching skills and help referee and kind of do everything they have to do to kind of keep it running smoothly.” Creek Nation citizen William Leach, a Sequoyah High School graduate, said volunteering is a way to give back to the community, which makes him feel good about himself. “Helping out the kids and I like giving back. It’s a lot of fun. I think they’re just getting the most out of having fun and enjoying the game. And I think they just like being around each other, you know. They like to have fun,” Leach said. “I like coming to the community. There’s not many camps around here. You can go to Tulsa and the kids have camps every weekend. So anytime I get a chance to help out, I like to help out and give back,” he said. The camp is offered to students in grades first through ninth. They don’t have to be Cherokee or attend Sequoyah Schools. The cost is $40, which provides free breakfast and lunch, if needed, and a T-shirt. Campers in grades first through fifth go from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. and campers in grades sixth through ninth attend in the afternoon. Although the boys camp is done, the girls three-day camp will begin May 31. Those interested in attending can show up at the Place Where They Play gym at 8 a.m. and fill out an application. The gym is located on the SHS campus. Herrin said he tries to hold the camps each summer after school ends. “They can learn a lot of teamwork, a lot of social skills besides just the benefit of getting out and being active. Getting off video games and sitting inside and getting out and doing something is really good for these guys,” he said.
BY JAMI MURPHY
Senior Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
05/27/2016 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – In April, the Tribal Council passed a law creating a judgment fund that would be used to pay for any judgment against the Cherokee Nation. “The judgment fund is modeled after the U.S. government judgment fund. What the premise of the idea is that Congress, which would be the council in our scenario, would appropriate money to a judgment fund. And they would do that based on what the risk may be out there any given year,” Attorney General Todd Hembree said. Hembree said it falls to the legislators because they appropriate monies for the tribe’s annual budget. “When there is a judgment against the Cherokee Nation…well that money would have to come from somewhere. So that means it would have to come from a budget that otherwise wasn’t intended for,” he said. “What a judgment fund does is an exercise in good government. The council knows and departments know that if there is a judgment, it comes out of this fund. It doesn’t affect any other budgets. They can plan…knowing that nothing is going to disrupt that.” Hembree said many governments have judgments funds and that it was time for the tribe to follow suit. As of publication, no monies were in the judgment fund but creating the fund was the first step, he said. “The legislation is passed. It’s been signed. So sometime in the next two to three months the council will need to make a determination of how much money to put in there and to appropriate that money,” he said. Departmental budgets are being submitted to the council, he said, so this is an opportune time to decide what should be placed within that fund. The Attorney General’s Office would certify any judgment, he said, whether it’s from the CN court system or another court against the CN. Once certified, he added, the tribal treasurer would pay the judgment out of the fund. “It’s not a first-come, first-served. No one party claimant can take more than half (of what is in the fund) any given fiscal year. You take up to half of it and then next year you take more or the other half of your judgment,” he said. “Or, at any time, just like any budget modification, the council can add more money into the judgment fund as the year goes on.” Any judgments following the date the fund was signed into law would be tied to receiving their payments through this fund. Having this fund, Hembree said, brings budgetary stability to the tribe. “We have departments that make an estimate of their expenditures for the next year. It just helps solidify that nothing’s going to come an disrupt, no judgment will come in and disrupt that next year’s budget…If there’s a judgment, it doesn’t have to come out of education’s budget or health. It comes out of the judgment fund,” he said. “They won’t have to worry…we’re taking that out of the equation.”
BY STAFF REPORTS
05/26/2016 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation donated $195,000 on May 26 to eight area Boys & Girls Clubs in northeastern Oklahoma. The organizations serve Cherokee and Native American students in their summer and afterschool programs. The CN gave checks to clubs in Adair, Sequoyah, Cherokee, Mayes, Nowata, Rogers, Delaware and Washington counties. Currently, the programs serve more than 10,000 students. “We remain a proud and consistent financial supporter of the mentoring work done by the Boys & Girls Clubs,” Principal Chief Bill John Baker said. “Participating in the activities of a local club means access to community-based mentors and educational opportunities that will help our youth grow into their full potential. Supporting the mission of Boys and Girls Club is another opportunity where Cherokee Nation can have a positive influence in the lives of Cherokee children." The tribe has contributed more than $2 million total since 2008 to help the afterschool programs continue character and leadership development among both Cherokee youth and non-Native students. “The Boys & Girls Clubs provide an invaluable service to thousands of students within the Cherokee Nation,” Tribal Councilor Joe Byrd said. “These clubs provide a safe place for children to learn and grow, while also offering new experiences and a variety of hands-on activities. The Cherokee Nation is proud to partner with these eight clubs in order to enhance their programs for Cherokee and non-Cherokee students alike.” With the second-largest enrollment of any club in the CN, the Boys & Girls Club of Sequoyah County depends heavily on CN funding to maintain operations at the club’s six facilities in Sequoyah County. “Cherokee Nation’s support means a lot to the Boys & Girls Club of Sequoyah County. It enables us to continue to provide funding for our programs and kids that need us the most in the county,” Laura Kuykendall, Boys & Girls Club of Sequoyah County representative, said. The Boys & Girls Clubs of America serves more than 4 million young people throughout the country and on military bases worldwide. <strong>The CN donated to the following clubs.</strong> Organization-Enrollment-Award Amount Adair County- 1,181- $21,797.52 Bartlesville- 1,187- $21,908.66 Chelsea- 327- $6,035.49 Tahlequah- 4,325- $79,827.26 Delaware County- 926- $17,091.34 Green Country-Pryor- 420- $7,7502.01 Nowata- 669- $12,347.85 Sequoyah County- 1,530- $28,239.47