Tribal Councilor Chuck Hoskin Jr., left, stands with Deputy Chief Joe Crittenden, right, as Principal Chief Bill John Baker signs his first piece of legislation, the Cherokee Nation Corporation Health Dividend Act of 2011. This bill increases the percentage of the profits the tribe directly receives from its for-profit corporations, from 30 percent to 35 percent, with the additional 5 percent earmarked for contract health services across the Cherokee Nation’s 14-county jurisdiction. TESINA JACKSON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Council increases CNB dividend for contract health care

This map shows contract health service delivery areas for Native Americans living in Oklahoma. MAP COURTESY OF INDIAN HEALTH SERVICES OFFICE OF PLANNING AND PARTNERSHIP DEVELOPMENT
This map shows contract health service delivery areas for Native Americans living in Oklahoma. MAP COURTESY OF INDIAN HEALTH SERVICES OFFICE OF PLANNING AND PARTNERSHIP DEVELOPMENT
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Interim Executive Editor – @cp_wchavez
11/21/2011 11:09 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Principal Chief Bill John Baker signed into law on Nov. 21 the Corporation Health Dividend Act of 2011, which adds 5 percent to the 30 percent dividend that Cherokee Nation Businesses provides to the Nation for health care needs.

According to the act, the additional 5 percent will be “set aside exclusively for contract health services” for CN citizens. The act also states funds “shall be expended to Cherokee Nation citizens who reside anywhere” within the CN’s 14-county jurisdictional area.

“Our people should be pleased with this,” Baker said. “This will go a long way to making sure the health needs of the Cherokee people across our 14 counties are being met.”

Baker originally sponsored the legislation when he was on the Tribal Council. Councilor Chuck Hoskin Jr., a current sponsor, said it’s estimated that the legislation would yield $5 million for health care services including, but not limited to, eyeglasses, dentures, prosthesis, cancer treatments and hearing aids “provided the amount of increase over the current 30 percent is conditioned upon CNB remaining in compliance with the financial covenants of any credit agreement and guaranty.”

Councilors passed the act Nov. 14 by an 11-4 vote with Councilors Jack Baker, Julia Coates, Lee Keener and Cara Cowan Watts voting against it.
Before the vote, Cowan Watts requested a friendly amendment to the act clarifying that the dividend increase would only come from “for profit” corporations and not nonprofits such as the Cherokee Heritage Center.

Her amendment request, which was accepted, was part of a larger amendment request sponsored by her, Buel Anglen and Keener. Keener requested that the additional dividend funds be set aside exclusively for in-patient and out-patient contract health services as defined by tribal Health Service policy for CN citizens living within the jurisdiction who are not currently served by contract health services.

Keener also asked that Health Services monitor contract health services at Claremore Indian Hospital, Miami Clinic and Muscogee Creek Nation clinics to ensure CN citizens are not being denied solely because of the new dividend funding.

“I want to ensure that those that qualify for any help will get it,” Keener said. “I just want to ensure that whoever gets the (dividend) money will be a Cherokee citizen.”

Hoskin rejected Keener’s request because he said some of its content is already in the dividend legislation, and the request limited health coverage for citizens.

“I don’t accept because it starts to draw lines. Even though the federal government has compelled us to draw some lines, I don’t think we need to be in the business of drawing lines,” Hoskin said. ‘I think we have mechanisms in place that Cherokee citizens get this money whether they live in Craig County or they live in Cherokee County. I think the legislation as written will do that.”

Cowan Watts said the contract health services issue is a difficult one because of a lack of funding. Contract health services are specialty services such as cancer treatments, heart surgeries or advanced diabetic care provided outside an Indian Health Service-funded facility.

She added that it was suggested in committee that CNB provide an additional 10 percent rather than 5 percent to fund contract health care, but that suggestion was rejected.

“I think it falls short as it’s written today. It’s even more grievous when we’re looking at serving 14 counties under the existing structure of contract health services,” Cowan Watts said.

Before the meeting, she provided a letter that Claremore Indian Hospital gives to patients inquiring about contract health care. In it, written by hospital CEO James Cussen, patients are informed that northeastern Oklahoma has varied contract health service areas, and each area has established different contract health priorities. Also, eligible patients must use the clinic or hospital assigned to the county they live in for their contract health requests, the letter states.

The act became affective with Baker’s signature.

will-chavez@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961


About the Author
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M.

He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life.
He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association.

Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years. He was named interim executive editor on Dec. 8, 2015, by the Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board.
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M. He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life. He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association. Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years. He was named interim executive editor on Dec. 8, 2015, by the Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board.

Council

BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
01/13/2016 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – During its Jan. 11 meeting, the Tribal Council, via Legislative Act 17-15, increased the fiscal year 2016 operating budget by $1,773,125 making the total operating budget authority $654.7 million. The modification consisted of adding $1.8 million in grant and carryover funding, as well as a decrease of approximately $75,000 from several tribal funds. Although there was no discussion during the meeting, Tribal Councilor Dick Lay abstained during the act’s voting. All other legislators voted to approve. The act passed 16-0-1. In an email, Lay stated he abstained because of inefficiencies in the Cherokee Nation’s Rehabilitation Housing group and the fact the tribe’s administration is making changes to it. “They may move CN Rehab employees to the CN Housing Authority. The CN administration placed in the budget mod (modification) to move the funding from CN Rehab to the CN Housing Authority,” Lay said. “These items were in CN Rehab budgets, and now have been sent to the CN Housing authority. “The CN Rehab Housing is a CN government entity, under the authority of the CN government. These 79 CN Rehab housing jobs had full vesting and employment rights in the CN government,” he added. “The CN Housing Authority is not a CN government department. It is a State of Oklahoma agency. I’m being told its employees are considered at-will employees. The CN government essentially funds the state agency – the CN Housing Authority. Because it has not been explained, and I’m still not sure how the CN Rehab group will be improved, and more importantly, because I’m concerned for the 79 CN government Rehab Housing employees and their families, I voted abstain instead of yes.” Councilors also approved the donation of surplus office equipment to the Foyil Community Building. Also, Principal Chief Bill John Baker said in his State of the Nation address that CN officials met with Secretary of U.S. Housing and Urban Development Julián Castro to discuss a new program that will benefit Native American veterans who are homeless. “We were one of 26 tribes nationwide to be selected. It gives us an opportunity to get 20 veterans that are homeless into safe, sanitary, decent housing with our partnership with the VA (Veterans Affairs),” Baker said. “If you know them, help us locate them.” He also said the Attorney General’s Office and the tribe’s One Fire program has secured a $400,000 grant to “increase awareness and help prosecute more cases involving sexual assault against women.” Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden also honored three veterans during the meeting, giving them CN Medal of Patriotism awards. The veterans were Chester Benton Havenstrite, who served in the Army during the Cold War; Selbert Lee Taylor, who served in the Marine Corps during the Korean War; and Samuel Jordan, who served in the Army during the Vietnam War.
BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
12/15/2015 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Tribal Council on Dec. 14 approved a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Interior and Bureau of Indian Affairs’ Eastern Oklahoma Region for wildland and fire management. “Basically the (wildland and fire) resolution allows us to continue to receive funding from the BIA and we work with them in protecting our tribal lands,” Willard Mounce, CN Tribal Employment Rights Office administration officer, said. Mounce said as of Dec. 14 the tribe’s Wildland and Fire Management program did not have a firefighter over it, but that the position was expected to open. He said to be eligible for the position one has to pass an endurance test as and meet specific BIA requirements. Until the position is filled, he said the BIA would provide a firefighter during the increased fire season. The agreement is approved annually, Mounce said, and funds $65,000 to the tribe. Tribal Councilors also approved a bill allowing the CN to become a Native American Fish and Wildlife Society member. The NAFWS has been in existence since 1983. It assists tribes with establishing fish and wildlife programs, supporting funding for tribal fish and wildlife programs and educating and training Native fish and wildlife biologists, managers, technicians and conservation officers. However, to benefit from the group’s services, the CN must first be a member. “Be it resolved by the Cherokee Nation, that this Council hereby wishes to become a member of the Native American Fish and Wildlife Society and to participate in the services provided by the organization and its staff; and be it further resolved; that this Resolution of Support be submitted to the NAFWS; and be it further resolved; that the Cherokee Nation supports the efforts of the NAFWS to secure funding to maintain the organization and the services that will be provided directly to tribal fish and wildlife programs,” the legislation states. Both resolutions passed unanimously. The Tribal Council also unanimously passed Janie Dibble’s nomination to the Comprehensive Care Agency or PACE board. Also, legislators approved the re-appointments Carrie Philpott and Farrell Prater to the Registration Committee, Amon Baker to the Sequoyah High School board of education and Nathan Barnard to the Appeals Board. Councilors also unanimously approved CN citizen Chris Carter to the Cherokee Nation Businesses board of directors. He resigned from the Cherokee Nation Tax Commission effective Dec. 14, upon confirmation to the CNB board. “I am very pleased with the opportunity to share insights from my many years as a businessman for the benefit of all the citizens of the Cherokee Nation,” Carter, a business owner from Vinita, said. During the State of the Nation, Principal Chief Bill John Baker recognized the Cherokee Renegades, a basketball team of Cherokee men who won the National Indian Association championship in 1981, and the new CN Tribal Youth Council. In other news, CNB CEO Shawn Slaton said fiscal year 2015 was a success bringing in $123 million in net income. He also reported that the Roland Casino hotel opened on Dec. 10 and that CNB employs more than 4,600 CN citizens and has more than 80 percent Native American in its employment. Also, Housing Authority of the Cherokee Nation Director Gary Cooper reported that 6,600 families have received some kind of assistance this year from the HACN.
BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
11/17/2015 02:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Tribal Council approved the newest member of the Cherokee Nation Administrative Appeals Board on Nov. 16 at the legislative body’s monthly meeting after moving forward the nomination from the Rules Committee meeting earlier in the day. Tribal Councilors, minus an absent Jack Baker, unanimously approved Junior Dewayne Littlejohn during the Rules Committee meeting and full Tribal Council. Littlejohn will begin serving Dec. 15 for a term of four years. “Junior Dewayne Littlejohn is duly qualified and should be appointed as a Member of the Administrative Appeals Board,” the legislation reads. The AAB is a board comprised of three members who hear employee grievances, including wrongful termination cases. The board’s other two members are James Cosby and Nathan Barnard. The Tribal Council also approved two budget modifications. The first modification passed the Executive and Finance Committee on Oct. 29 and increased the tribe’s budget by $4.2 million to more than $651 million. It included $3.97 million related to carryover of a Department of Labor grant. The second passed the committee on Nov. 16 and increased the tribe’s total operating budget by more than $1.1 million to more than $653 million. It contained $760,000 related to an increase in the Tribe’s Employment Rights Office program from TERO fees to be collected. Also during the meeting, Health Services Director Connie Davis recognized Craig Edgmon, a home health nurse for the tribe’s Redbird Smith Health Center, who successfully resuscitated an unresponsive patient during a home visit. “And because of his heroic efforts this patient survived that event,” she said. “He went on the next week to teach a CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) class where the following week one of his students passed on that and paid it forward and successfully resuscitated yet another patient out in the field. That shows what your efforts have done.” In other news, Cherokee Nation Businesses CEO Shawn Slaton said that the Outpost 1 convenient store on the Tribal Complex is expected to be open around Feb. 1. Once opened the fuel system would be shut down for about three months until new fueling stations can be added. Slaton also said the Roland Casino hotel is expected to open near Dec. 1 and that CNB’s television show “OsiyoTV” would expand to the Oklahoma City area playing at 9:30 a.m. on Sunday mornings on channel CW 34. In addition, he said that CNB Native American employment rate is at 81.6 percent with 73.5 percent of that strictly CN citizens. Deputy Principal Chief S. Joe Crittenden also recognized two CN citizens for their military service, Christopher Dale Mayfield for his service in Operation Desert Storm and Jerry Wane Daniels for his time in Vietnam.
BY BRITTNEY BENNETT
Intern – @cp_bbennett
11/16/2015 12:00 PM
HULBERT, Okla. – Rex Jordan had spent the past 20 years serving the Housing Authority of the Cherokee Nation, but this year he is taking on a new assignment as Dist. 1 Tribal Councilor. “I was both excited and humbled when I learned the Cherokee citizens of District 1 placed their faith in me to represent them in their government,” Jordan said. “I have always called District 1 home. It is the place where I grew up, was educated, and raised my family. Over the years, I have seen this area thrive and grow, and I want to do my part in seeing that progress continue.” Dist. 1 covers the western part of Cherokee County and a portion of eastern Wagoner County. Jordan was sworn into office Aug. 14 at Sequoyah High School’s The Place Where They Play after defeating Ryan Sierra in the June 27 general election. Certified results named Jordan the winner by a vote count of 856-494. Since inauguration, Jordan said he has been “impressed” with the Cherokee Nation orientation process for new Tribal Councilors. “We had the opportunity to visit with every single department head, and are undergoing a comprehensive program in which we spend time visiting individual departments,” he said. “The time spent with staff is invaluable, as we have the opportunity to ask very specific questions. It certainly makes both committee and council meetings work better.” During his term, Jordan plans to assist those in his district by focusing on improving housing. “Housing is an area of top priority for me,” he said. “I believe providing new homes and rehabilitating existing housing to meet the needs of the Cherokee people is of utmost importance.” Jordan is already working toward that goal by joining the HACN board as an advisory member along with fellow Tribal Councilors Bryan Warner, Frankie Hargis, Janees Taylor and Curtis Snell. Advisory member positions are non-voting positions. Jordan is also focused on increasing investments in education for citizens, especially since his background includes bachelor’s and master’s degrees in agriculture education from Oklahoma State University. “Education is also a key component of my platform,” he said. “I believe investing in tribal citizens by assisting them with their educational needs is the key to a secure future.” As only one of seven tribes in the United States to be awarded a Joint Venture Program project with the Indian Health Service, Jordan has also made it a priority to improve the health care for people of his district. “Health and the new joint venture is of great importance to the Cherokee citizens of District 1,” he said. “I want to provide all the assistance I can to seeing this completed and online within the next four years. The new health complex at (W.W.) Hastings (Hospital) will be of benefit to the Cherokee people for all our children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. This will be our future in health.” When completed, the project will add almost 470,000 square feet of space to the existing hospital, as well as provide state-of-the-art medical equipment to better meet the needs of patients. Jordan, a lifetime resident of Cherokee County, graduated from Hulbert High School and maintains a cattle operation on his family farm with wife and former Dist. 1 Tribal Councilor Tina Glory Jordan. When not herding cattle, he enjoys spending time with his grandchildren and meeting with the people in his district. “I am a hands-on individual. I enjoy visiting with the people in my district, many of whom will tell you I have spent time with them in their homes or on their front porches, listening to their concerns,” he said. “It's my job to take those concerns and questions back to the council and department heads so that we can work to provide information and solutions to the Cherokee citizens that I work with every day.”
BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
10/13/2015 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation Tribal Council on Oct. 12 confirmed Sara Hill as the first cabinet level Secretary of Natural Resources. After full council confirmed her nomination, she was sworn in by Supreme Court Justice Angela Jones during the meeting. Hill said she was grateful for the faith that both Principal Chief Bill John Baker and the Tribal Council have in her. “This is such an important step for the Cherokee Nation that you’re taking. It’s very easy to continue to do what’s always been done. It’s difficult to do something new and I appreciate you taking this step to do something new,” Hill said. The cabinet position will be responsible for ensuring that the tribe’s natural resources are properly preserved for the future of the Cherokee Nation and its citizens. “I am so proud to say we are finally making our natural and environmental resources a priority. Our natural habitats and environment must be a factor in every decision we make. We have a responsibility to leave this land, this water and this air pure and clean for future generations,” Baker said in his weekly column regarding his nomination. “This position was originally established by the 1999 Constitutional Convention. Unfortunately, it was never filled, but this key advisory role cannot go vacant any longer.” Baker added that with the Secretary of Natural Resources in place and with the leadership of the Tribal Council, laws can be created that will sustain tribal lands, water and air for generations to come. “The Cherokee people deserve that. Clean air, safe water and a fertile land will always be our foundation for long-term health as a tribe and a people,” he said. The resolution confirming her appointment was passed unanimously. Hill previously served as the Deputy Attorney General of the Cherokee Nation, with expertise on environmental issues, water rights and natural resource protection, according to Baker’s column. Also passed by council was a resolution confirming the nomination of Tommye Sue Bradshaw Wright as a board member of Cherokee Nation Businesses. Her nomination was one of Baker’s and was passed during the Sept. 24 Rules Committee meeting with no discussion by a vote of 13-2 with one abstention. She was originally on the CNB beginning in 2011, but resigned for personal reasons in 2014. During the full council meeting where she was confirmed, Wright said she appreciates the opportunity to serve. “I will do a good job for the Cherokee people,” she added. Wright’s nomination passed by a vote of 13-3 with Councilors Harley Buzzard, Buel Anglen and Jack Baker voting against. Councilor Don Garvin abstained. Tribal Council also passed a resolution authorizing the tribe to become a member of the National Congress of American Indians as well as appoint the tribal delegates and alternates. Tribal Council also amended the agenda to bring three items from the Community Services Committee meeting that happened earlier that day. The three resolutions were voted on together: a resolution authorizing the appropriation of $267,000 of housing rehabilitation funding for FY 2015 for grant matching, a resolution certifying compliance with 24 CFR Chapter IX, and a resolution adopting standards for Section 8 housing rehabilitation. All passed unanimously. Brothers Oran L. Roberts and John Thomas Roberts Jr., who served in Vietnam as well as other service areas, were both recognized by Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden and Baker for their service in the army and navy, respectively. Bill Horton, former Chairman of the Cherokee Nation Election Commission, was also recognized for his service in the army where he served in Vietnam.
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Interim Executive Editor – @cp_wchavez
10/06/2015 04:00 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY – With family support, Wanda Hatfield took on the challenge of winning the At-Large Tribal Council seat. Joining a field of 9 candidates, she said she used her background of growing up in the Cherry Tree in Adair County to held her understand the needs of Cherokee Nation citizens. “Basically we all have the same needs wherever we are, but I think just growing up in this part of the country I have a really good understanding of our people and our culture. Just growing in it I think I have, not an advantage, but maybe just more knowledge of the needs of Cherokees,” she said. She also said her strong desire to serve Cherokee people, like her late father did in Adair County, set her apart from the other candidates. “I didn’t have any speeches. I spoke from my heart. I’m a good listener,” she said. “The rest of the candidates were well-qualified. I think any one of us could have served well.” Hatfield traveled the United States during the 2015 campaign visiting with At-Large citizens to learn their thoughts and concerns. She learned that many want “a closer connection to the Cherokee Nation,” and want to experience the culture. She also learned many At-Large citizens are from eastern Oklahoma, having moved away during the federal government’s relocation program in the 1950s, or are descendants of Cherokees who moved away during the state’s Dust Bowl days or during the Great Depression in the 1930s. Also, some moved to the West Coast to find jobs, she said. She said At-Large citizens do get tribal higher education scholarships, but she would like to see more funding put in that area and more scholarships go to them. She said those scholarships are needed because college tuition continues to rise and citizens need scholarships to attend vocational schools or receive career trainings. Another need for At-Large citizens is health care. She said they are not able to get the specialized or contract health care that citizens living in the tribe’s boundary are able to receive. Hatfield resides in Oklahoma City with her husband Roger. They have one daughter and three grandchildren. Her parents are the late Jack Claphan and Carolyn Doublehead Claphan of Stilwell. Her great-great grandfather was Rabbit Bunch, who served as CN assistant principal chief from 1880-87. [BLOCKQUOTE]She earned a bachelor’s degree in education from the University of Oklahoma and taught in the Shawnee and Midwest City-Del City school districts for 28 years. “I have been successful in education, and I spent a lot of time in the classroom in the education field, and I was at the point in my life where I wanted to do something new and challenging,” she said. “This is something that I’ve always wanted to do – some kind of service for the Cherokees.” So far, she said it has been challenging to absorb the information given to Tribal Councilors regarding the tribe’s budget and other information they are expected to know. “I want to know it now, but I’m trying to embrace it slowly. I feel like the more knowledgeable I am, the more helpful I can be,” she said. She said serving on the council and meeting new people have been rewarding and the love and support she has been shown has been “overwhelming.” “I just want to thank everybody for their support. I’m available for my citizens any time, and I think it’s going to be a definite challenge but a wonderful challenge. I’m really looking forward to it. It’s been an incredible journey so far.”