Synthetic marijuana products have been banned under Oklahoma and federal laws. In 2011, the Cherokee Nation Tax Commission alerted owners of tribally licensed smoke shops that they are not to sell synthetic marijuana products. COURTESY PHOTO

Synthetic marijuana barred in tribally licensed smoke shops

Synthetic marijuana products have been banned under Oklahoma and federal laws. In 2011, the Cherokee Nation Tax Commission alerted owners of tribally licensed smoke shops that they are not to sell synthetic marijuana products. COURTESY PHOTO
Synthetic marijuana products have been banned under Oklahoma and federal laws. In 2011, the Cherokee Nation Tax Commission alerted owners of tribally licensed smoke shops that they are not to sell synthetic marijuana products. COURTESY PHOTO
BY JAMI MURPHY
Senior Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
12/08/2011 08:08 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation Tax Commission recently sent out letters to owners of tribally licensed smoke shops to remind them of the illegality of selling synthetic marijuana.

According to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency, synthetic marijuana is a mixture of herbs and spices that is sprayed with a synthetic compound chemically similar to Tetrahydrocannabinol or more commonly known as THC, the ingredient in marijuana.

Two of the names these types of products are sold under are “K2” and “Spice.”

CN Tax Commission Administrator Sharon Swepston said a law change from the U.S. Department of Justice outlawing the sale of synthetic marijuana prompted the letter.

“You’re hearing on the news where these kids are getting ahold of it. I just wanted to make sure that we were all on the same page and this was just a reminder to them that we cannot sell it,” she said.

The Tax Commission letter states the “drugs are extremely dangerous with unpredictable results for the users, and have become increasingly popular with young adults and children because they have been poorly regulated and often widely available in convenience stores and head shops.”

On March 1, the DOJ through the DEA passed laws that made it illegal to sell, distribute or possess synthetic marijuana.

Swepston said the illegal substances are marketed as bath salts, potpourri and even plant food.

“There was some stuff being sold like a potpourri and they (smoke shop owners) actually called us when they started hearing (it in the news prior to the new law),” she said. “They called and said ‘we want to make sure this is OK.’ What I had them do was fax me all the information about the ingredients and all of that and then I in turn give it to the AG (attorney general) and let them look at it to make sure that it is legal to sell or not.”

The products considered illegal contain mephedrone, methylenedioxypyrovalerone or methylone. As of Oct. 21, merchandise having these ingredients has been deemed illegal to sell or possess in tribally licensed smoke shops.

The long-term effects of the synthetic marijuana are unknown, but the short-term effects are similar to marijuana highs.

“They’re buying it and then they’re smoking it because it gives them the same high that marijuana would, but it’s just a synthetic deal,” Swepston said. “It says on the package it’s ‘not for human consumption’ and all of that, but it doesn’t keep people from evidently doing that.”

She said the Tax Commission does routinely inspect tribally licensed smoke shops to ensure the shops are not selling synthetic marijuana products.

“They never know when we’re going to show up,” she said. “They are aware of the federal laws and now the Oklahoma law that banned the products that have these ingredients in them.”

Punishment for individuals caught with these synthetic marijuana substances consists of possible jail time and fines in the thousands of dollars.

jami-custer@cherokee.org • 918-453-5560



About the Author
Reporter

Jami Murphy graduated from Locust Grove High School in 2000. She received her bachelor’s degree in mass communications in 2006 from Northeastern State University and began working at the Cherokee Phoenix in 2007.

She said the Cherokee Phoenix has allowed her the opportunity to share valuable information with the Cherokee people on a daily basis. 

Jami married Michael Murphy in 2014. They have two sons, Caden and Austin. Together they have four children, including Johnny and Chase. They also have two grandchildren, Bentley and Baylea. 

She is a Cherokee Nation citizen and said working for the Cherokee Phoenix has meant a great deal to her. 

“My great-great-great-great grandfather, John Leaf Springston, worked for the paper long ago. It’s like coming full circle. I’ve learned so much about myself, the Cherokee people and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it.”

Jami is a member of the Native American Journalists Association, and Investigative Reporters and Editors. You can follow her on Twitter @jamilynnmurphy or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/jamimurphy2014.
jami-murphy@cherokee.org • 918-453-5560
Reporter Jami Murphy graduated from Locust Grove High School in 2000. She received her bachelor’s degree in mass communications in 2006 from Northeastern State University and began working at the Cherokee Phoenix in 2007. She said the Cherokee Phoenix has allowed her the opportunity to share valuable information with the Cherokee people on a daily basis. Jami married Michael Murphy in 2014. They have two sons, Caden and Austin. Together they have four children, including Johnny and Chase. They also have two grandchildren, Bentley and Baylea. She is a Cherokee Nation citizen and said working for the Cherokee Phoenix has meant a great deal to her. “My great-great-great-great grandfather, John Leaf Springston, worked for the paper long ago. It’s like coming full circle. I’ve learned so much about myself, the Cherokee people and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it.” Jami is a member of the Native American Journalists Association, and Investigative Reporters and Editors. You can follow her on Twitter @jamilynnmurphy or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/jamimurphy2014.

Health

BY STAFF REPORTS
05/03/2016 04:00 PM
TULSA, Okla. – The Indian Health Care Resource Center is offering various camps this summer, including a Wellness Adventures Camp, Culture Camp and Sports & Fitness Camp. The Wellness Adventures Camp is offered to children who have completed grades 2-9. Youths participate in low and high elements of a challenge course and learn problem-solving skills, communication and teamwork, an IHCRC release states. The Culture Camp helps expose Indian youth to Native culture with field trips to Cherokee and Osage nations as well as the Will Rogers and Woolaroc museums. The Sports & Fitness Camp provides opportunities for physical activities, games, experiential learning and enhancing sports skills. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.ihcrc.org/programs/summer-wellness-camps/" target="_blank">http://www.ihcrc.org/programs/summer-wellness-camps/</a>.
BY JAMI MURPHY
Senior Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
05/03/2016 08:00 AM
LAKE ANDES, S.D. – The Native American Women’s Health Education Resource Center recently released its workbook for Native American females titled “What To Do When You Are Raped, An ABC Handbook For Native Girls.” The book, Cherokee Nation citizen Pam Kingfisher said, is a resource aimed at answering questions women face following a sexual assault. “From thinking through buying emergency contraception, to getting tested for STDS, to who to turn to for support,” she said. Comanche Nation citizen Charon Asetoyer, who is also the Native American Women’s Health Education Resource Center’s CEO, said the book is a woman-to-woman, woman-to-girl, girl-to-girl community response in regards to sexual assault. “Sharing with them, providing support, letting them know they are not alone. That this is not their fault and they shouldn’t blame themselves. The book instructs them on how to report if they choose to,” Asetoyer said. “It talks to them about going in for STD exam and also access to emergency contraceptive Plan B.” Kingfisher and Asetoyer joined Elizabeth Black Bull and Donna Haukaas to co-write the book. [BLOCKQUOTE]Asetoyer said she was asked by a young mother on the Yankton Sioux Reservation in Lake Andes what she should do if her daughter was raped. Asetoyer said that when a mother puts it as when, not if, her daughter is raped, there is a realization that the problem is worse than originally thought. Asetoyer said the book sends a message to women and helps them realize it is not their fault. “There are other women out there. You’re not alone, and turn to them for help,” she said. Kingfisher said the project was personal and that she’s worked with Asetoyer on the book for about four years. “I think it’s so important that we advocate for our health and for our women. As a young girl who was assaulted and didn’t know anything…and later became pregnant and was forced to give up a child for adoption, I didn’t know any of these things. Nobody talked. These conversations didn’t happen at the kitchen table or even around girlfriends,” Kingfisher said. She added that she and Asetoyer, as well as other advocates fighting against sexual assault, want to make this issue real. “For me it’s important that we serve that matriarchal role of being good aunties, being good grandmas, being big sisters and helping,” she said. According to the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network, one of the nation’s largest anti-sexual assault organizations, during an American Indian or Alaskan woman’s lifetime she is at a 34.1 percent chance of suffering from rape or attempted rape, the most of any other race. And about 3 percent of American men have experienced an attempted or completed rape in their lifetimes. The book is available for download at <a href="http://forwomen.org/resources/an-abc-handbook-for-native-girls/" target="_blank">http://forwomen.org/resources/an-abc-handbook-for-native-girls/</a> Kingfisher said hardcopy bulk orders would be available in the future. <strong>Women</strong> • 1 out of every 6 American women has been the victim of an attempted or completed rape in her lifetime (14.8 percent completed rape; 2.8 percent attempted rape). • 17.7 million American women have been victims of attempted or completed rape. • 9 of every 10 rape victims were female in 2003. <strong>Lifetime rate of rape/attempted rape for women by race:</strong> All: 17.6 percent White: 17.7 percent Black: 18.8 percent Asian Pacific Islander: 6.8 percent American Indian/Alaskan: 34.1 percent Mixed race: 24.4 percent <strong>Men</strong> • About 3 percent of American men have experienced an attempted or completed rape in their lifetime. • From 1995-2010, 9 percent of rape and sexual assault victims were male. • 2.78 million men in the U.S. have been victims of sexual assault or rape. <strong>Children</strong> • 15 percent of sexual assault and rape victims are under age 12. • 29 percent are ages 12-17. • 44 percent are under age 18. • 80 percent are under age 30. • Ages 12-34 are the highest-risk years. • Girls ages 16-19 are 4 times more likely than the general population to be victims of rape, attempted rape, or sexual assault. • 7 percent of girls in grades 5-8 and 12 percent of girls in grades 9-12 said they had been sexually abused. • 3 percent of boys grades 5-8 and 5 percent of boys in grades 9-12 said they had been sexually abused. • 82 percent of all juvenile victims are female. • The year in a male’s life when he is most likely to be the victim of a sexual assault is age 4. A female’s year of greatest risk is age 14. • 1 in 9 girls and 1 in 53 boys under the age of 18 experience sexual abuse or assault at the hands of an adult. • In 1995, local child protection service agencies identified 126,000 children who were victims of either substantiated or indicated sexual abuse. • Of these, 75 percent were girls. • Nearly 30 percent of child victims were between ages 4-7. <strong>Every 8 minutes, Child Protective Service responds to a report of sexual abuse.</strong> • 93 percent of juvenile sexual assault victims know their attacker. • 34.2 percent of attackers were family members. • 58.7 percent were acquaintances. • Only 7 percent of the perpetrators were strangers to the victim. • For 80 percent of juvenile victims, the perpetrator was a parent. 6 percent were other relatives. 4 percent were unmarried partners of a parent. 5 percent were “other” (from siblings to strangers). <strong>American Indians</strong> • On average during 1992-2001, American Indians age 12 or older experienced annually an estimated 5,900 rapes or sexual assaults. • American Indians were twice as likely to experience a rape/sexual assault compared to all races. • Sexual violence makes up 5 percent of all violent crime committed against Indians (about the same as for other races). • Offender/victim relationship: 41 percent stranger; 34 percent acquaintance; 25 percent intimate or family member. <strong>Campus Sexual Violence</strong> • Women 18-24 who are enrolled in college are 3 times more likely than women in general to suffer from sexual violence. Females of the same age who are not enrolled in college are 4 times more likely. • Male college-aged students are 78 percent more likely than nonstudents to be a victim of rape or sexual assault. • Female college-aged students are 20 percent less likely than nonstudents to be a victim of rape or sexual assault. • Only 20 percent of female student survivors age 18-24 report to law enforcement. In comparison, 33 percent of female nonstudent survivors aged 18-24 report to law enforcement. • 72 percent of campus law enforcement agencies have a staff member responsible for survivor response and assistance. • 8 percent of all sexual assaults occur while victim is attending school. <strong>Victims of sexual assault are:</strong> 3 times more likely to suffer from depression. 6 times more likely to suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder. 13 times more likely to abuse alcohol. 26 times more likely to abuse drugs. 4 times more likely to contemplate suicide. The preceding statistics were taken from the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network. To see these and other information regarding sexual assault, visit <a href="https://www.rainn.org/get-information/statistics/sexual-assault-victims" target="_blank">https://www.rainn.org/get-information/statistics/sexual-assault-victims</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
04/28/2016 02:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – On May 5, the Oklahoma Breast Care Center’s Mobile Mammogram Unit will be at the Cherokee Nation’s Gadugi Health Center offering mammograms to those who are eligible. Mammogram screenings are available to CN employees who carry insurance. According to a release, the American Cancer Society recommends that women over the age of 40 have a mammogram yearly. When receiving a mammogram it is important to wear a two-piece outfit so it is easy to undress from the waist up. It is also recommended to not wear deodorant or powder because is can show up on the scan. For more information or to schedule a mammogram, call 918-207-4911.
BY STAFF REPORTS
04/28/2016 12:00 PM
CLAREMORE, Okla. – The Claremore Indian Hospital will be closed for the replacement and installation of a new emergency generator from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. on April 30. All patient care will be diverted, and if inclement weather occurs, the maintenance will be rescheduled to following week.
BY STAFF REPORTS
04/25/2016 12:30 PM
CLAREMORE, Okla. – The Claremore Indian Hospital will host an Affordable Care Act Outreach and Enrollment Fair from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on May 19 at 101 S. Moore Ave. According to a hospital press release, Blue Cross & Blue Shield of Oklahoma will be at the hospital to assist patients with signing up for free to low-cost health insurance. Those wishing to sign up must bring their income information such as pay stubs, W-2 forms or “Wage and Tax Statements” to learn about health insurance options. Applicants must also bring their Social Security numbers, policy numbers for any current health insurance and information about any health insurance they or their families could get from an employer. Nov. 1 marked the beginning of the third open enrollment period for the ACA Health Insurance Marketplace. According to the release, even though citizens of federally recognized tribes have a special monthly enrollment status, it is important for American Indian and Alaska Native individuals and families to learn about their insurance options. “Whether it’s purchasing insurance through the Marketplace or qualifying for SoonerCare, knowing that you have quality coverage provides peace of mind,” the release states. For more information, call Sheila Dishno, the hospital’s patient benefit coordinator, at 918-342-6240.
BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
04/22/2016 12:00 PM
PEGGS, Okla. – Spring is in full bloom and many people are taking to their gardens to plant vegetable and flower seeds. Cherokee Nation citizens Deborah Smoke, her husband, William, and their grandson, Caden Murphy, recently spent time turning a patch of dirt into a hopeful crop of okra. Deborah said the okra is the first of several crops they intend to plant. “We’ve cleaned up our beds and we’ve planted okra today, and we have several other bedding plants to put out,” she said. “We have our tomatoes, but with the spring like it’s been we’ve just been real worried about frost, and so we’re trying to work around the weather. My husband and I are trying to get our beds ready. They’re small but they’re productive.” The couple also plans to plant heirloom seeds they received from the CN Seed Bank. “This year we got some heirloom seeds from the Cherokees. We got two varieties. One of them is a bean and one of them is a squash. We’re hoping to see how those go, and if we like them then we’ll save our seeds and we’ll plant them again next year,” she said. Deborah said working in the garden is therapeutic for her and her husband. “In the past several years I’ve had two back surgeries and probably need some more. My husband has had rheumatoid arthritis since he was 35-years-old and he has always been as active as his condition will allow him, and he’s even gone a little above,” she said. “It is very therapeutic for us to get out and work in the gardens and see the results every year.” Deborah said working with Murphy also proves to be therapeutic. “Well, he’s very therapeutic because he keeps you active. He’s just energetic, always wanting to go. Whether you want to get up or not you get up and that’s a good thing because we don’t want to be sedentary,” she said. “He comes out, ‘what can I do? I want to work.’ So we put him to work today on helping grow the garden, wanted to pull weeds. You don’t see young kids wanting to pull weeds, but he’s done that for several years even since he was about 3 years old. He’d go out and pull the weeds.” Deborah said her earliest memory of gardening was with her grandparents in Sapulpa. “I would go out every year and help my grandmother plant, and I’d help her harvest the crops, and of course all the families shared in the goodies,” she said. “These are the times that I can look back and remember and have the good aspects.” She said it’s good to pass her gardening knowledge to Murphy such as her grandparents did with her. “Having your youth to continue this process, I think, is the most important thing that we can do to continue the longevity of our culture, the tribe and the youth of today,” she said. Murphy, 7, said he enjoys helping in the garden because he can “learn stuff and plant seeds.” “I thought people would like eating them (okra) because they are good for you and they taste good,” he said. He said it’s important for kids to help garden “because it’s fun and it’s fun doing it with your family.”