Dr. Clara Sue Kidwell stands in the area that houses Bacone College’s Native American library collection, a locked room in the basement of Samuel Richard Hall. The school is renovating the library and will move the collection upstairs for more accessibility for students and outside scholars. TESINA JACKSON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Bacone College expands Native American library

Dr. Clara Sue Kidwell stands in the area that houses Bacone College’s Native American library collection, a locked room in the basement of Samuel Richard Hall. The school is renovating the library and will move the collection upstairs for more accessibility for students and outside scholars. TESINA JACKSON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Dr. Clara Sue Kidwell stands in the area that houses Bacone College’s Native American library collection, a locked room in the basement of Samuel Richard Hall. The school is renovating the library and will move the collection upstairs for more accessibility for students and outside scholars. TESINA JACKSON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
BY TESINA JACKSON
Reporter
01/12/2012 08:33 AM
MUSKOGEE, Okla. –This past fall, Bacone College started an expansion project consisting of adding a new library off campus so the current on-campus library can house its history and Native American collections.

“We plan to create a research library in the existing library facility in Samuel Richard Hall,” Dr. Clara Sue Kidwell, associate dean for Program Development, said. “That’s not going to take place until sometime over the spring semester. The main thing that is staying is the Indian room collection, which contains some rare materials.”

Bacone’s Native American collection is currently locked in the basement of Samuel Richard Hall. Once the renovation is finished, the collection will be moved upstairs and more accessible for students and outside scholars.

“In terms of history, most of this stuff pertains to the field of history, but we also have our American Indian studies program, which relies strongly on historical, and what we called ethnographic or anthropological, sources,” Kidwell said. “But that is going to be the core of a research library, which will be open to outside scholars. And we do have occasional scholars coming in, to people that are interested in the history, specifically the history of Bacone, and then more to specific tribal history.”

The current library’s renovation is expected to be done by the end of the spring semester and will include new shelving units, carpet, Wi-Fi access and an updated online research catalog.

“I do think that it is going to be a great advantage to have those materials more accessible to researchers and to students,” Kidwell said.

In order to make room for the Native American collection, more than 48,000 volumes of books and other items from Samuel Richard Hall were moved to the off-campus facility, which occupies half of the former Boy Howdy store at the Northpointe Shopping Center.

“Basically Bacone has owned the land down the hill where this old shopping center, Walmart, grocery store, etc., was located and those were leased by outside vendors,” Kidwell said. “The college has now gotten title to the facilities down there and so we now own the shopping center as well as the land.”

The off-campus library was funded by a legacy donation of more than $600,000 from the Betts family through the Daughters of the American Revolution. The facility is expected to be twice as large and include at least 60,000 volumes. Plans also include making the book collection and electronic resources more modern.

“Much of what we have on the shelves now, the newer books were from back in the 1980s,” Kidwell said. “We also need to update our library system to include, much more directly, things that support the curriculum here.”

The off-campus library, which is expected to be available for students by the end of January, will have new book shelves, an art display and lounge area, study cubicles with Wi-Fi access and small meeting rooms. It is expected to be open to the public by the end of the semester.

“We really want to create an environment where students feel comfortable working independently and individually on their research papers,” Kidwell said.

The other half of the former Boy Howdy store will be a welcome center with registrar, admission, financial aid and other offices. Those offices in their current spots will become dorm rooms.

The old Walmart building in the shopping center will become athletic offices, while the old Warrior Gym, where the athletic offices are currently will become the Center for American Indians.

tesina-jackson@cherokee.org
918-453-5000, ext. 6139

About the Author
Born in Dayton, Ohio, Tesina first started working as an intern for the Cherokee Phoenix after receiving the John Shurr Journalism Award in 2009. Later that year, Tesina received her bachelor’s degree in journalism from Ball State University in Muncie, Ind., and in 2010 joined the Phoenix staff as a reporter.    

In 2006, Tesina received an internship at The Forum newspaper in Fargo, N.D., after attending the American Indian Journalism Institute at the University of South Dakota. She also attended the AIJI summer program in 2007 and in 2009 she participated in the Native American Journalists Association student projects as a reporter. Tesina is currently a member of NAJA and the Investigative Reporters & Editors organization.
TESINA-JACKSON@cherokee.org • 918-453-5000 ext. 6139
Born in Dayton, Ohio, Tesina first started working as an intern for the Cherokee Phoenix after receiving the John Shurr Journalism Award in 2009. Later that year, Tesina received her bachelor’s degree in journalism from Ball State University in Muncie, Ind., and in 2010 joined the Phoenix staff as a reporter. In 2006, Tesina received an internship at The Forum newspaper in Fargo, N.D., after attending the American Indian Journalism Institute at the University of South Dakota. She also attended the AIJI summer program in 2007 and in 2009 she participated in the Native American Journalists Association student projects as a reporter. Tesina is currently a member of NAJA and the Investigative Reporters & Editors organization.

Education

BY STAFF REPORTS
11/26/2014 12:10 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen Geary Don Crofford received notification that he’d be selected as the Outstanding Middle Level Teacher the Oklahoma Science Teacher Association. In a Tahlequah Daily Press story, Crofford said the news “definitely brightened my day.” “The recognition of my peers is the best reward I have the respect of other science teachers across the state,” Crofford said in the article. “As a Cherokee Nation citizen, I have a particular interest in the education of Cherokee students.” Crofford teaches science to sixth, seventh and eighth grade Woodall students. He also helps with the science, technology, engineering and mathematics, robotics, chess along with several other areas. Crofford is from Tahlequah and he received his bachelor’s degree in science education from Northeastern State University in the late 1980s. He received his master’s degree in biology from the University of Texas and also has a doctorate of philosophy, according to the article. Crofford received the award on Oct. 31 in Oklahoma City during the OSTA conference.
BY STAFF REPORTS
11/21/2014 03:29 PM
STILWELL, Okla. – Forty-six years after leaving Stilwell High School to enlist in the U.S. Army, Cherokee artist Donald Vann received his high school diploma during a Veterans Day assembly at his former school. Vann was surprised with the diploma on Nov. 11 in front of hundreds of Stilwell students and former Stilwell Public Schools Superintendent Neil Morton. “I thought I was just going to be a guest speaker, so this was totally unexpected,” said Vann, who served from 1968-73. “I really feel honored and as though the circle is now complete. Just having this diploma means a lot to me, and I’m highly honored to accept it.” In Vietnam, Vann served as a door gunner for the 1st Calvary Aviation Division, dropping off and extracting soldiers from the battlefield. In November 1969, Vann’s helicopter was shot down, killing all but him and his crew chief. Vann’s childhood friend and former classmate Bud Campbell invited him to the 1968 high school class reunion. When Vann declined because he didn’t graduate, Campbell met with fellow classmates and SHS administration to officially make him a graduating member. “We really felt that Donald deserved a diploma, so we made it a point to make that happen,” Campbell, who still lives in Stilwell, said. “That got the ball rolling, and from there it all came together for us. I don’t think people truly realize what we have in Donald Vann. He was a big deal to all of us as kids, and now he’s really a big deal. It means everything in the world to me to be able to help him with this.” Students applauded Vann as he accepted the diploma. An Oklahoma Department of Education act allows veterans who leave high school to serve in World War II, Korea and Vietnam to later receive a diploma. “We had no idea that Donald didn’t have a high school diploma, so when we were made aware of that, we waived the one or two credits he lacked to make him eligible to receive one,” Geri Gilstrap, SHS’s current superintendent who signed the diploma, said. “His story is one of having a dream and chasing after it, which is something I hope our students will take note of. I hope it was a very special day for Mr. Vann.” Vann also served as a drill instructor for more than 16 cycles after recovering from his injuries and was honorably discharged in March 1973. Vann earned the Purple Heart, National Defense, Good Conduct, Vietnam Campaign and Republic of Vietnam Campaign medals for his service. After the Army, Vann pursued a successful career as an artist and is one of the most notable Native American artists today. In August 2014, he was named a Cherokee National Treasure, which is given to Cherokee artists who have shown exceptional knowledge of Cherokee art and culture. Those selected are also actively involved with the preservation and revival of traditional cultural practices that are in danger of being lost from generation to generation. For more information about Vann and his artwork, visit <a href="http://www.donaldvann.com" target="_blank">www.donaldvann.com</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
11/17/2014 12:52 PM
HULBERT, Okla. – The Hulbert Schools FFA Association will host a pie and cake auction at 6:30 on Nov. 25 in the school’s auditorium. According to the school’s FFA, there will be several pied for auction as well as members of the FFA up for auction on a labor exchange. There will also be gift baskets and items that the Ag power and technology shop class made up for bid during a silent auction. All proceeds go toward the Hulbert FFA Alumni. For more information, call Christina Bowlin at 918-708-2072.
BY TESINA JACKSON
Reporter
10/28/2014 01:30 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation’s College Resource Center is looking to expand the Cherokee Promise Scholarship Program to Connors State College in Warner. Dr. Neil Morton, CN Education Services senior advisor, confirmed the possible partnership between the tribe and the college during the Tribal Council’s Education and Culture Committee meeting on Sept. 15. CN Communications officials said Jennifer Pigeon, CRC interim director, declined to comment because details are still being worked on between Connors and the tribe. Connors State College also declined to comment. Under the current criteria for the scholarships, which are available at Northeastern State and Rogers State universities, students selected for the program take Cherokee classes and experience on-campus living together. Selected students each receive a $2,000 CN scholarship and Native American Housing and Self Determination Act-funded housing each semester. During their time at school, the Cherokee Promise scholars are expected to bond during activities as well as study together in cultural education, Cherokee language and college strategies classes. Scholars will also participate in monthly community service activities and, as they advance in the program, act as mentors to incoming freshman. Recipients have also been required to fulfill 20 hours of community service. Five of those hours must be with the other scholar students. When the program started three years ago at NSU, the CRC looked for a university to initiate the program by looking at current CN scholarship students and found that most attended NSU. In 2013, the CRC expanded the program to RSU so more students could apply for the opportunity to receive money for college tuition. For more information, call the CRC at 918-453-5000, ext. 7054.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
10/24/2014 01:24 PM
WINSLOW, Ariz. (AP) – On a desert outpost miles from the closest paved road, Navajo students at the Little Singer Community School gleefully taste traditional fry bread during the school’s heritage week. “It reminds us of the Native American people a long time ago,” says a smiling 9-year-old, Arissa Chee. The cheer comes in the midst of dire surroundings: Little Singer, like so many of the 183 Indian schools overseen by the federal government, is verging on decrepit. The school, which serves 81 students, consists of a cluster of rundown classroom buildings containing asbestos, radon, mice, mold and flimsy outside door locks. The newest building, a large, white monolithic dome that is nearly 20 years old, houses the gym. On a recent day, students carried chairs above their heads while they changed classes, so they would have a place to sit. These are schools, says Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, whose department is responsible for them, “that you or I would not feel good sending our kids to, and I don’t feel good sending Indian kids there, either.” Federally owned schools for Native Americans on reservations are marked by remoteness, extreme poverty and few construction dollars. The schools serve about 48,000 children, or about 7 percent of Indian students, and are among the country’s lowest performing. At Little Singer, less than one-quarter of students were deemed proficient in reading and math on a 2012-2013 assessment. The Obama administration is pushing ahead with a plan to improve the schools that gives tribes more control. But the endeavor is complicated by disrepair of so many buildings, not to mention a federal legacy dating to the 19th century that for many years forced Native American children to attend boarding schools. Little Singer was the vision in the 1970s of a medicine man of the same name who wanted local children educated in the community. Students often come from families struggling with domestic violence, alcoholism and a lack of running water at home, so nurturing is emphasized. The school provides showers, along with shampoo and washing machines. Conflicts and discipline problems are resolved with traditional “peacemaking” discussions, and occasionally the use of a sweat lodge. Principal Etta Shirley’s day starts at 6 a.m., when on her way to work, she picks up kids off the bus routes. Because there’s no teacher housing, a caravan of teachers commutes together about 90 minutes each morning on barely passable dirt roads. All this, to teach in barely passable quarters. “We have little to work with, but we make do with what we have,” says Verna Yazzie, a school board member. The school is on the government’s priority list for replacement. It’s been there since at least 2004. The 183 schools are spread across 23 states and fall under the jurisdiction of the Interior Department’s Bureau of Indian Education. They are in some of the most out-of-the-way places in America; one is at the bottom of the Grand Canyon, reachable by donkey or helicopter. Most are small, with fewer than 150 students. Native Americans perform better in schools that are not overseen by the federal bureau than in schools that are, national and state assessments show. Overall, they trail their peers in an important national assessment and struggle with a graduation rate of 68 percent. President Barack Obama visited Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota in June, where he announced the school improvement plan.
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Senior Reporter
10/24/2014 08:35 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen Sarah Ferrell is enjoying her first year of college at Northeastern State University in Tahlequah. The 18-year-old honor student is attending on a Gates Millennium Scholars Scholarship. She said her father encouraged her to apply for the scholarship, which is given annually to only 1,000 students from throughout the United States. Ferrell said she did not have high expectations of winning the scholarship, which pays for up to 10 years of college. “A bunch of my friends applied for it, and they all kept getting rejection letters and I felt really bad,” she said. The scholarship was established in 1999 by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to provide outstanding American Indian/Alaska Native, African American, Asian Pacific Islander American and Hispanic American students with an opportunity to complete an undergraduate and graduate college education in any discipline area of interest. Ferrell said having the scholarship relieves the pressure of worrying about how to pay for school. “My friends talk about always having to deal with loans and how they’re going to pay it. I don’t have to worry about that,” she said. At Tahlequah High School, she played soccer and was a part of the National Honor Society. One of her long-time interests may surprise some people – she is skilled at shooting a traditional Cherokee bow. “I’ve never shot a compound (bow) or anything. It’s always traditional. My grandpa made them, and I’ve been doing it (shooting) since I was little,” she said. She said if she had to hunt game with a bow and arrow to survive, she could do it. At NSU, she has joined the Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority and is concentrating on her studies. After completing her undergraduate studies, she plans to enroll in graduate school. “I don’t want just four years. I want more than four years,” she said. She admitted she has a tough time with her science classes but does well in her math classes. She is still is considering a career in the medical field, and understands a medical degree will require science classes. Recently, Ferrell was the only Cherokee student selected to the American Indian Center’s “All Native American Academic Team.” Each year only 10 American Indian/Alaska Native students from across the United States are selected based on academic achievement, honors and awards, leadership and community service. Each student is given a monetary award that may be spent at the student’s discretion. “I had to have a lot of volunteer activities and a bunch of leadership roles, and I listed the stuff I had done through the Cherokee Nation,” Ferrell said of the application process. The objectives of the ANAAT is to increase awareness of academic achievement of Indian high school seniors among their peers, Indian Country and the public; to increase recognition of Indian student success and capabilities as a positive motivation for pursuing academic excellence and higher education; and to increase academic achievement and role models as positive influences in Indian Country. The program also means to increase teacher, administrator, parent and community involvement by recommending, nominating and supporting student participation and to increase student participation in high school academic programs and the pursuit of higher education. Ferrell said she felt good about her application to the ANAAT but still wasn’t sure she would be selected to the team because she faced a lot of competition. “I didn’t really think I’d get it because so many people apply for it,” she said.