http://www.cherokeephoenix.orgCherokee translation specialist Phyllis Edwards is part of an effort to bridge the generation gap that exists for Cherokee speakers. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee translation specialist Phyllis Edwards is part of an effort to bridge the generation gap that exists for Cherokee speakers. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

CHEROKEE TRANSLATORS: Cherokee translator making up for lost time

Cherokee Nation translation specialists are, from left, Dennis Sixkiller, Anna Sixkiller, David Pettit, Durbin Feeling, John Ross and Phyllis Edwards. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Cherokee translation specialist Phyllis Edwards is part of an effort to bridge the generation gap that exists for Cherokee speakers. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation translation specialists are, from left, Dennis Sixkiller, Anna Sixkiller, David Pettit, Durbin Feeling, John Ross and Phyllis Edwards. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
02/02/2012 08:03 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Cherokee Nation translation specialists Phyllis Edwards first learned the Cherokee syllabary from her uncle Ben Bush when she was a young girl.

“My first language was the Cherokee language. That was all that was taught in the home. I was about 6 years old when I first starting learning the English language and it was very hard.”

She was 8 years old when her uncle began teaching her, her siblings and cousins how to use the Cherokee syllabary chart.

“After a stickball game at the (stomp) grounds, he would take the young kids and he would sit down and teach the syllabary charts,” she said. “He did that for maybe two years and then he passed away.”

After his death, everyone “drifted away” from the syllabary because nobody took his place, she said.

Edwards, who was raised in Marble City in Sequoyah County, was reintroduced to the syllabary chart about four years ago, when the CN began sponsoring Cherokee language classes in communities. She attended a class for two years and relearned how to read and write the syllabary.

About three years ago, the place where she had worked for 32 years in Fort Smith, Ark., closed, which led her to the tribe and its translation department.

“I had always wanted to work on something like this (language), and then somebody mentioned they (CN) may have an opening for a translator and so I applied and got it,” she said. “To me, I think everything that we do here in this department is important. You can’t say this is more important than this, and that’s also dealing with the public…if you can help them it makes you feel good that you were able to help somebody.”

Edwards said she didn’t teach her children how to speak Cherokee because of the difficulties she had while attending public school.

“The reason I really did not really push our language in my home was I had such a problem when I started when I was 6 years old. It was like going to a different world trying to understand the English language,” she said. “You were not allowed to talk Cherokee, and there was not anyone available at that time like a bilingual speaker to translate what was being said to us.

“I did not want to put my kids in that situation, so therefore I let them learn the English language so it would be easier on them because you don’t how it is to feel like that where you are thrown into a situation where you don’t understand what’s going or what’s expected of you,” she added.
Edwards said the trauma of being forced to learn English has stayed with her, but she regrets not teaching her two children to speak Cherokee.

“They understand (Cherokee) to a certain extent, but they do not speak the language,” she said. “My children are saying ‘why didn’t you just go ahead and teach us.’”

The result of her children’s generation not learning to speak Cherokee is a language gap between her generation and the generation of children attending the Cherokee Language Immersion School.

The future of the language may rest in the hands of the 100 or so students at the immersion school, and Edwards said she is happy to support the school and enjoys visiting the students.
“I just love to hear them talk. They’ll come running to you saying ‘osiyo, osiyo’ (hello). It’s so good to hear that.”

She said it’s not important that the children always speak proper Cherokee as long as the elder speakers can understand them and there is communication occurring.

“In each community the language is spoken differently, and there’s dialects, and I think it can be wrong. I mean, so long as two people can communicate with each other and understand what is being said, I think that’s fine,” she said.

She also understands that even with the efforts being made to save the language, it’s not safe from disappearing. But she’s hopeful the technology such as iPhones and iPads that translators and immersion students use will help save it.

“There are also translated books that young children or anybody can use as a reference and then we have the (language) CDs,” she said.

Edwards added that thanks in part to the translation staff, there is more Cherokee syllabary material available for people who want to study the language and learn to read and write it.

will-chavez@cherokee.org

918-207-3961


ᏣᎳᎩ

ᏓᎵᏆ, ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ.-- ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏗᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ ᎠᎦᏔᎯ Phyllis Edwards ᎢᎬᏱ ᏚᏕᎶᏆᎥ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏚᏥ Ben Bush ᏚᏪᏲᏁ ᎤᏍᏗ ᎠᎨᏳᏣ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ.

“ᎢᎬᏱ ᎠᎩᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎨᏒᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᏩᏌ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᏅᎿ ᏚᏁᏅᏒᎢ. ᏑᏓᎵ ᏯᏆᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎨᏒ ᎠᏆᎴᏅᎲ ᎦᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬ ᏲᏁᎦ ᎠᎴ ᎢᎦ ᏍᏓᏯ ᎨᏒ.”

ᏧᏁᎳ ᎢᏳᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎨᏒ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏚᏣ ᎤᎴᏅᎭ ᏕᎨᏲᎲᏍᎬᎢ, ᏧᏙ, ᎠᎾᏓᎸᎢᏴ ᎠᎴ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᏧᏩᏂ ᎤᏅᏙᏗ ᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᏗᎪᏪᎵ.

“ᎤᎾᎳᏍᎦᎸᎰᏅ ᎠᎾᎵᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎪ ᎾᎿ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᎩᏍᏗᎢ, ᏓᏘᏁᎬ ᏧᎾᏍᏗ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎾᏅᏍᎪ ᎠᎴᏂᏍᎩ ᏕᎨᏲᎲᏍᎪ ᏗᎪᎵᏰᏙᏗ ᏗᎪᏪᎳ ᏣᎳᎩᎭᎢ,” ᎤᏛᏅᎢ. “ᎾᏍᎩ ᎾᏛᏁᎲ ᎠᏎ ᏔᎵᎭ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏲᎱᏒᎢ.”
ᎤᏲᎱᏌᏃ, ᏂᎦᏓ “ᎣᎦᏗᎦᎴᏲᏨ” ᎾᏍᎩ ᎣᎦᏕᎶᏆᎥ Ꮭ ᎩᎶ ᏳᏭᎴᏅᎮ ᏙᎨᏲᎲᏍᎬᎢ, ᎤᏛᏅ.

Edwards, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏛᏒ ᏗᎦᏓᏲᏍᏗ ᏏᏉᏲ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ, ᎤᎴᏅᎯᏌᏅ ᎾᎿ ᏗᎪᎵᏰᏙᏗ ᏗᎪᏪᎳ ᏓᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬᎢ ᏅᎩ ᎾᏕᏘᏯ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏧᎾᎴᏅᎲ ᏗᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᏚᏙᏢᏒ ᏣᎳᎩ ᏓᏁᏲᎲᏍᎬ ᏓᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬᎢ. ᏚᏕᎶᏆᎥ ᏔᎵ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏕᎶᏆᎢᏌᏅ ᎤᎪᎵᏰᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏬᏪᎶᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩᎭᎢ.
ᏦᎢ ᎾᏕᏘᏯ ᏈᎨᏒ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏚᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎳ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏦᏍᎪ ᏔᎵ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎾᎿ Fort Smith, Ark., ᎤᎵᏍᏚᎾ ᎢᎪᎯᏓ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᎷᏨ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎠᎾᏁᎸᏗᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏓᏡᎬᎢ.

“ᏂᎪᎯᎸ ᎠᏆᏚᎵᏍᎩ ᏗᎩᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ (ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ) ᎤᎬᏩᏟ ᎠᎴ ᎩᎶ ᎠᎩᏃᎯᏎᎸ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎡᎵᏊ ᏳᏠᏅᏓ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏗᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏓᏡᎬ ᎠᎴ ᏩᎩᏢᏅ ᎪᏪᎵ ᎠᎴ ᎥᎩᎾᏢᏅᎢ,” ᎤᏛᏅ. “ᎠᏯᏃ ᎨᏒ, ᎨᎵᏍᎪ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎠᎭᏂ ᏥᏃᏣᏛᏁᎭ ᎤᎵᏍᎨᏗ. ᏝᏃ ᎯᎠ ᎤᎪᏓ ᎤᎵᏍᎬᏗᏯ ᎾᏃ ᏐᎢ ᎨᏒᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᏭᏂᎪᏛ ᏙᏯᏗᏜ ᎠᏁᎭ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᏂᏙᏣᏛᏁᎭᎢ……… ᎢᏳᏃ ᏱᏓᏍᏕᎸᎭ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎠᏓᏅᏓᏍᏗ ᎨᏐ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎩᎶ ᎯᏍᏕᎸᎲᎭ.”

Edwards ᎤᏛᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ Ꮭ ᏱᏚᏪᏲᏁ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ ᏚᏪᎧᎲ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎤᏂᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᏂᎦᎥ ᎤᏦᏎᏗ ᎤᎶᏒ ᏲᏁᎦ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎤᎴᏅ ᏓᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬᎢ.

“ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᏍᎬ ᏙᎯᏳ ᏣᎳᎩ ᏂᏗᎨᏲᏅᎾ ᎨᏒ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ ᎠᏇᏅᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎦᎥ ᎤᏦᏎᏗ ᎠᎩᎶᏒ ᏣᏩᎴᏅᎲ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏑᏓᎵ ᏯᏆᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩᏯᏊ ᎨᏒ ᎤᏣᏘᎾ ᎡᎶᎯ ᏱᏩᎩᎷᏣ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎪᎵᎬᎾ ᎨᏒ ᏲᏁᎦ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ,”ᎤᏛᏅᎢ. “ᏝᏃ ᏲᎦᎵᏍᎪᎸᏓᏁᎮ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎣᎩᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗᎢ, ᎠᎴ Ꮭ ᎨᎶ ᏰᏙᎮ ᎪᎵᎦ ᎢᏧᎳ ᏗᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎦᏲᎩᏍᏕᎸᏗ.

“ᏝᏃ ᏯᏆᏚᎵᏍᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᎾᎵᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᏓᎩᎧᎲ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎠᏆᎵᏍᎪᎸᏔᏅ ᏲᏁᎦ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎠᎯᏗᎬ ᎢᏳᎾᎵᏍᏓᏁᏗ Ꮭ ᎠᎩᎶᏒ ᎤᏠᏯ ᏯᏆᏚᎵᏍᎩ ᎤᏂᎶᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏧᎾᏓᏅᏓᏗᏍᏗᏱ ᎾᏃᎵᎬᎾ ᏱᎨᎦᎵᏃᎮᏔᏂ,” ᎤᏛᏅᎢ.

Edwards ᎤᏛᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎾᎬᏁᎸ ᎠᏎ ᎤᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏲᏁᎦ ᏄᏍᏛ ᎤᏓᏅᏓᏛ Ꮟ ᎤᏕᏯᏙᏗᏍᎪ, ᎠᏎᏃ Ꮭ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏳᏰᎸᏐ ᏂᏚᏪᏲᏅᎾ ᎨᏒ ᎠᏂᏔᎵ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎤᏂᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ. “ᏗᏇᏣ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ ᎠᎾᏗᏍᎬ ᏝᏃ ᏱᏙᏍᎨᏁᏲᏁ.”

ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅ ᏧᏪᏥ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ ᎤᎾᏕᏅᎢ Ꮭ ᏳᎾᏕᎶᏆᎡ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎤᏂᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎤᏩᏌ ᎤᏕᏅ ᎠᎴ ᏧᏪᏥ ᎤᎾᏕᏅ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏰᏟ ᎨᏒ Ꮭ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᏳᎾᏕᏁ ᎨᎳ Ꮎ ᏣᎳᎩᎭ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏥᏓᎾᏕᎶᏆᎠ.

ᎤᏩᎪᏗᏗᏒ ᎾᎿ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎤᎾᎵᏐᏈᎳ ᎾᎿ ᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏯᏂ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩᎭ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏥᏓᏁᏕᎶᏆᎠ, ᎠᎴ Edwards ᎤᏛᏅ ᎠᎵᎮᎵᎪ ᏗᎬᏩᏍᏕᎸᏗ ᏥᎩ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎨᏐ ᏱᏚᏩᏛᎯᏙᎳ.

“ᎣᏍᏓ ᎨᏐ ᏗᏛᏓᏍᏙᏗ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ. ᏗᎾᏝᎢᏐ ᏳᎦᎷᏥ ᎣᏏᏲ, ᎣᏏᏲ ᎠᎾᏗᏍᎪ. ᎣᏍᏓ ᎨᏐ ᏗᏛᎪᏗᎢ.”

ᎤᏛᏅᏃ Ꮭ Ꮩ ᎤᎵᏍᎨᏓ ᏱᎩ ᏚᏳᎪᏛ ᏣᎳᎩ ᏯᏂᏬᏂ ᎾᏍᎩᏊ ᏧᎾᏔᎾᏯ ᏯᏃᎵᎦ ᏗᎬᏩᎾᏟᏃᎮᏓ ᏱᎦ.

“ᏗᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᏚᏙᏢᏒ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎨᏒ ᏚᏓᎴᎾᎢ, ᎢᎦᏓ ᏄᏓᎴ ᎾᏅᏁᎰ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᎡᎵᏊ ᏄᏓᎴ ᎢᎬᏩᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎥᎧᏁᎬᎢ. ᎠᏂᏔᎵ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎬᏩᎾᏝᏃᎮᏗ ᏱᎦ ᎠᎴ ᏱᏓᎾᏓᏙᎵᏤᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎣᏏ ᎨᎵᏍᎪ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

ᏐᎢᏃ ᎪᎵᎬ ᎾᎾᏛᏁᎲ ᎠᎾᎵᏏᏅᏗᏍᎬ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ, ᏏᏊᏃ Ꮭ ᏙᎯᏳ ᎠᏚᏓᎴᏓ ᏱᎩ ᎢᎩᏲᏎᏗ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ. ᎠᏎᏍᎩᏂ ᎠᏬᎯᏳᏐ ᎾᎿ ᎯᎠ ᏃᏊ ᎢᏤ ᎦᎾᏅᎪᎬ ᏯᏛᎾ iPhones ᎠᎴ iPads ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎾᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᏣᎳᎩᎭ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏛᎾᎵᏍᏕᎸᎯ ᎠᎵᏏᏅᏙᏗᎢ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ.

“ᎾᏍᎩᏍᏊ ᏗᏁᎶᏔᏅ ᏗᎪᏪᎵ ᏚᏂᎾ ᎾᎿ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏂᎥ ᏗᎬᏩᏂᏙᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎦᏬᏂᏓ ᎾᎿ CD ᏓᏂᏂᏱᏍᎪ ᎠᎴ ᏓᏂᎴᏴᏗᏍᎪ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.
Edwards ᎤᏛᏅ ᎾᎿ ᎨᎳ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎾᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏓᏡᎬᎢ, ᎤᎪᏓ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᎪᏪᎳᏅ ᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᎪᎵᏰᏙᏗ ᏕᎦᏃ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᏗᎬᏩᏂᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎤᎾᏚᎵᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎦᏬᏂᏓ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎤᏂᎪᎵᏰᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏂᎪᎵᏰᏗᎢ.


About the Author
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M.

He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life.
He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association.

Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years. He was named interim executive editor on Dec. 8, 2015, by the Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board.
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M. He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life. He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association. Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years. He was named interim executive editor on Dec. 8, 2015, by the Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board.

Culture

BY STAFF REPORTS
07/10/2018 08:30 AM
INDIANAPOLIS – At the 26th annual Eiteljorg Indian Market and Festival held June 23-24, Native American artists, including Cherokees, were awarded nearly $16,000 in cash prizes, as well as ribbons for art works they entered into competition. Cherokee artist Bryan Waytula, of Sand Springs, Oklahoma, received first place in the Painting Category and the “Best of Class” award for his painting titled “We Stand As One.” He also received first place for his drawing titled “A Cherokee Treasure,” which is a colored pencil piece with a piece of mat weaving placed at the bottom of the artwork. Waytula said he used remnants from one of his mom’s traditional river cane baskets. His mother, Vivian Garner Cottrell, and his grandmother, Betty Scraper Garner, are both Cherokee National Treasures, which means they have been honored by the Cherokee Nation for their basketwork and for sharing their knowledge of basket making with others. “I’m trying to follow big footprints left my grandmother and mother, both treasures. Those two are rock stars to me,” Waytula said. He said it was his first time visiting the Eiteljorg Indian Market and Festival and was “impressed” with the facility, the artwork and the staff. “I was very impressed with how amazing the staff was towards all the extremely-talented artists I had the pleasure of meeting and seeing their amazing work,” he said. “My dad, who is now retired, came along and helped me drive so it was a fun bonding trip too.” Cherokee basket artist and Cherokee National Treasure Mike Dart, of Stilwell, Oklahoma, also won first place and "Best of Class" for his basket titled “Four Winds.” And he won a first place ribbon in the Non-Native Materials Category, a third-place ribbon in the Traditional Basketry Category and second place in the Contemporary Basketry Category. “Eiteljorg Indian Market is a top of the line show with some of the ‘Best of the Best’ artists from across the nation and Canada. Seeing my name among the list of division winners was an honor. I’m proud and honored to be able to represent the Cherokee Nation in these art markets,” Dart said. Also, Cherokee artist Lisa Rutherford won third place in the Contemporary Pottery Category and third place in the Cultural Items Category. The Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art in Indianapolis hosted more than 100 artists from 60 Native American tribes who showed their jewelry, pottery, baskets, beadwork, carvings, paintings and cultural items. The two-day market and festival drew thousands of visitors who met the artists, purchased their art and enjoyed music, food and performances on the museum’s grounds. “The Eiteljorg Indian Market and Festival creates opportunities for collectors and artists to connect and it builds support for today’s Native American artists,” Eiteljorg President and CEO John Vanausdall said. “The beautiful art works the artists have created make a powerful impact on our market goers and have contributed to the success of the Indian Market and Festival during its 26 years.” Images of the winning artworks in 11 categories are on the Eiteljorg Museum’s Facebook page, and a complete list of award recipients in all categories and prize sponsors is at <a href="http://www.eiteljorg.org/explore/festivals-and-events/indian-market-festival" target="_blank">www.eiteljorg.org/explore/festivals-and-events/indian-market-festival</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
07/09/2018 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee National Prison was built to hold the most hardened criminals in Indian Territory from before statehood and into the 20th century. A new exhibit at the Cherokee National Prison Museum explores the period of time when the building served as the Cherokee County Jail by sharing stories of both lawmen and lawbreakers. The “Cherokee Prison: Post Statehood” exhibit runs July 13 to Jan. 31. The Cherokee National Prison was the only penitentiary building in Indian Territory from 1875 to 1901. It housed sentenced and accused prisoners from throughout the territory. The interpretive site and museum give visitors an idea about how law and order operated in Indian Territory. The site features a working blacksmith area and reconstructed gallows; exhibits about famous prisoners and daring escapes, local outlaws and Cherokee patriots; and jail cells. The Cherokee Nation’s museums are open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. For information, call 1-877-779-6977 or visit <a href="http://www.VisitCherokeeNation.com" target="_blank">www.VisitCherokeeNation.com</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
07/09/2018 08:15 AM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Language Master Apprentice Program is accepting applications until Oct. 1. The two-year program is centered on a group language immersion experience and accepts a limited number of applications each year. In a previous Cherokee Phoenix story, Howard Paden, CLMAP manager, said the program stemmed from a “need” for the language. “This program gets people speaking our language again. You know, we’ve seen a need for it because a lot of the (Cherokee) Immersion (Charter) School parents seen a need to not only push their kids to learn the language but to learn themselves and start having Cherokee speaking households,” Paden said. After completing the program, students will have 4,000 contact hours with the Cherokee language and spend more than 40 hours each week studying and speaking the language. “Our program is about more than teaching someone the Cherokee language, it is about naturally absorbing our language and our way of life to the point that it changes the way we see the world and think. The real goal is to activate people that will spread the language wherever they go,” Paden said. “Our learners say it is a challenging program, but every day they push to give them more language. When they graduate, their passion for speaking the Cherokee language is only rivaled by their commitment to share our language.” To ensure individuals are able to dedicate the needed time to the program, they each receive a $10-an-hour tax-free cash benefit, program officials said. They also said an 80 percent time requirement is mandatory. “They learn a lot of Cherokee. From when they first walk into the classroom to probably two months they already learn about 5,000 words,” Paden said. “The first year is primarily learning as much as they can, and by the second year we expect them to start teaching. Of course they have a master speaker there that can assist them, but they begin to teach phrases to the next group that comes in. So every January we get a new group, so the people that are in their last year will begin teaching in January to the new group that we have coming in.” On Dec. 2, the Cherokee Language Master Apprentice Program graduated four students: Larry Carney, of Tulsa; Ronnie Duncan, of Bell; Lisa O’Field, of Hulbert; and Toney Owens, of Rocky Mountain. In 2014, the tribe began the program as a part of its Community and Cultural Outreach department as a way to promote the Cherokee language. Since its inception, the Cherokee Language Master Apprentice Program has grown into its own department and graduated six Cherokee speakers. To apply for the program, one must be 18 years or older, be available Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., live near Tahlequah or be willing to relocate and possess a strong desire to learn and cultivate the Cherokee language and culture through teaching. For more information or to apply, call 918-207-4964.
BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
07/06/2018 12:00 PM
PARK HILL – After running 777 miles of the Trail of Tears’ Benge Route, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians citizen Kallup McCoy II completed his run on June 28 at the Cherokee Heritage Center. On his last day, McCoy made the final stretch from Stilwell to Park Hill with his girlfriend and EBCI citizen, Katelynn Ledford, and a group of Oklahoma Cherokees. The runners were greeted at the CHC by Cherokee Nation and United Keetoowah Band citizens, as well as CN Principal Chief Bill John Baker, CN Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden and UKB Chief Joe Bunch. McCoy ran into the CHC wearing a cape made of CN and UKB tribal flags tied together. He said the run was not for him but for all Cherokees and to honor his ancestors who made the original journey due to the forced removals in the 1830s. “I didn’t know what it meant to be Cherokee. I didn’t know what it meant to be proud of my culture, my people. Being out on this run, coming from where I came from and just getting up every day like our people had to do on their way out here and having to push through, I know what it means to be Cherokee, strong, resilient, tenacious, and to love and to forgive,” McCoy said. He began the run to Oklahoma on May 14 in Cherokee, North Carolina. He averaged about 20 miles per day and stopped at several Trail of Tears markers. McCoy documented his journey via Facebook and met people along the way in support of his efforts. He said he ran to raise awareness for people struggling and recovering from drug addiction and to raise funds for his nonprofit organization Rez HOPE Recovery. He said he was able to raise nearly $5,000. “Whenever we see people for their experiences, we see people any differently than us, we’re falling short of the mark,” he said. “It’s not a drug problem we’re in, it’s an opportunity to win souls. It’s an opportunity to heal our people. And the only way we’re going to do that is by banding together and putting aside our differences. God saved me from six overdoses and so many near death experiences, and three of those times I was flat lined.” McCoy talked about his experiences at the CHC such as doing drugs at age 11 and drinking at age 13. He said he lost college scholarships to run track and play football and began stealing pain medication and money when his father was ill. “I got to a point to where I couldn’t stand myself. It ultimately led me to getting sick. It turns us into people we don’t realize who we are,” he said. McCoy said is now looking for the next opportunity, which is opening a recovery house in Cherokee and to start placing recovery houses around the country, including Oklahoma. “Building leadership, people that’s struggling with drug addiction and alcohol or whatever it may be. I think that we need to realize that they’re more than just addicts and junkies and felons and the list goes on and on. I was once there, and I was more than that. I think it’s important for me to tell people to reach back and say you are more than that. That’s somebody’s son, daughter, sister, brother. It’s getting Rez HOPE out here, spreading it across the country. That’s my vision,” he said.
BY STAFF REPORTS
07/05/2018 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism is offering free, family-friendly storytelling events on Wednesdays in July. The one-hour program is hosted in the Cherokee National Peace Pavilion starting at 10 a.m. Each week, “Stories on the Square” concludes with a different hands-on activity or craft. The make-and-take activity schedule is below: July 11 – Soap stone necklaces July 18 – Painting garden rocks July 25 – Clay pinch pots The Cherokee National Peace Pavilion is located at 177 S. Water Ave. In the event of inclement weather, the event will be moved to the Cherokee National Prison Museum at 124 E. Choctaw St. Attendees will receive free admission to the Cherokee National Supreme Court Museum, Cherokee National Prison Museum, John Ross Museum and Sequoyah’s Cabin Museum following the program. For information, call 1-877-779-6977 or visit <a href="http://www.VisitCherokeeNation.com" target="_blank">www.VisitCherokeeNation.com</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
07/02/2018 03:30 PM
TAHLEQUAH – Applications for the 2018-19 Miss Cherokee, Junior Miss Cherokee and Little Cherokee Ambassador competitions are available. To download the application, visit https://www.cherokee.org/Services/Education/Cherokee-Ambassadors, and then scroll to the bottom of the webpage. Applications are also available at the Cherokee First desk at the W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex. The deadline for all applications is July 16. The Miss Cherokee Leadership Competition is held on Aug. 25, with the Junior Miss Cherokee Leadership Competition on Aug. 18 and Little Cherokee Ambassador Competition on Aug. 4. “These three competitions provide an opportunity for contestants to share their knowledge of Cherokee history, culture and language,” Lisa Trice-Turtle, Miss Cherokee sponsor and 1986-87 Miss Cherokee, said. “As ambassadors and messengers of the Cherokee Nation, Miss Cherokee, Junior Miss Cherokee and our Little Cherokee Ambassadors are role models, and they are expected to exemplify the best qualities of Cherokee youth.” Miss Cherokee contestants must be between the ages of 18-22 as of Aug. 25. Candidates cannot have previously served as Miss Cherokee and must be a CN citizen living in the 14-county tribal jurisdiction. In the past year, Miss Cherokee has visited the White House and historic sites in Washington, D.C., including the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian. She has also visited the Oklahoma Capitol and CN community meetings across the country. To run for Junior Miss Cherokee, contestants must be between the ages of 13-17, a CN citizen and reside within the jurisdiction. For the Little Cherokee Ambassador Competition, one girl and one boy are selected from each of three age groups: 4-6 years, 7-9 years and 10-12 years. Candidates must be a CN citizen and live within the jurisdiction. Committee representatives will accept hand-delivered applications on July 16, between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. in the lobby of the W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex. Applications presented after the deadline will not be accepted. For more information on the Miss Cherokee Leadership Competition, call Trice-Turtle at 918-453-5000, ext. 4991. For more information on the Junior Miss Cherokee Leadership Competition, call Reba Bruner at 918-453-5000, ext. 5397. For more information on the Little Cherokee Ambassador Competition, call Kristen Thomas at 918-453-5000, ext. 4974.