Caidlen Dunham, of Jay, stands in front of Cherokee Colored Flour Corn that she and her father planted. The seeds came from the tribe’s seed bank project. COURTESY PHOTO

CN offers heirloom seeds to citizens

Former Cherokee Nation Natural Resources intern Jamie Loy holds a Cherokee heirloom Georgia Candy Roaster Squash growing in the tribe’s garden in Tahlequah, Okla. COURTESY PHOTO
Former Cherokee Nation Natural Resources intern Jamie Loy holds a Cherokee heirloom Georgia Candy Roaster Squash growing in the tribe’s garden in Tahlequah, Okla. COURTESY PHOTO
BY STAFF REPORTS
02/22/2012 08:28 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The days are getting longer and all good gardeners know that means it will soon be time to start seeds for spring and summer gardens. And once again the Cherokee Nation is offering gardeners a chance to grow a bit of the tribe’s history and culture in their own backyards.

For the past few years tribal citizens have had the opportunity to request heirloom seeds from the CN Natural Resources as part of a seed bank project. The seeds are for plants that have been researched to relate historically to the CN, such as Georgia Candy Roaster Squash, Job’s Tears or Birdhouse and Dipper Gourds. Other species Cherokee Floured Corn, Cherokee White Eagle Corn, Cherokee White Flour Corn, Cherokee Yellow Flour Corn, Red Pop Corn, Rattlesnake Bean, Native Tobacco, Pumpkin Squash and Trail of Tears’ Beads. Most are rare cultivars not widely available through commercial means.

“The qualities that were desired back then, are most definitely more different than the qualities desired today,” Natural Resources Director Pat Gwin said. “You can leave our corn in a bucket for months on end and it will retain a high nutritional value and never lose its freshness. It can also be ground up into flour over the winter months. Whereas if you leave sweet corn in the same position it will shrivel up into nothing and lose all of its attributes.”

Around 2,000 seed packets were mailed to CN citizens throughout the U.S. and beyond in 2011. The Natural Resources staff is gearing up to send out at least that many seeds this winter. The seeds are free, but participating gardeners are asked to help restock the seed bank by sending seeds from their crops to share with others via the seed bank.

“We already have a significant amount of requests for seeds,” Natural Resources specialist Mark Dunham said “And we will start advertising everything we offer and grow on Feb. 1.”

A good variety will be available for request for the 2012 growing season. Beans and some other items will be limited this year due to last year’s extreme weather in parts of the country.

“The heat and drought really diminished our inventories and prevented us from replenishing our seed bank with certain varieties. Fortunately, we had some folks from back east that sent us seeds, allowing us to still be able to give those items away,” Dunham said.

Dunham said one seed the bank this year that it didn’t in 2011 is the Jewel Gourd.

He said the gourds, which measure around 2 to 3 inches in diameter, might have been worn ornamentally by Cherokees for centuries in a similar manner to how other tribes might wear a deerskin pouch.

“You see designs sometimes that show people wearing Jewel Gourds on old Eastern woodlands pottery,” Dunham said.

For more information about the seed bank project, visit the Natural Resources webpage at www.cherokee.org or email mark-dunham@cherokee.org. A person may specify up to two seed varieties and are encouraged to include an alternate selection if the first choice is not available. Please include a name, copy of CN citizenship card (blue card), mailing address, and if requesting tobacco seeds, proof of being at least 18.

– Reporter Dillon Turman contributed to this report

News

BY STAFF REPORTS
08/29/2014 04:09 PM
The Cherokee Phoenix will be selling subscriptions and merchandise Sat. Aug. 30, 2014 during the 62nd Annual Cherokee National Holiday. Come visit with staff members from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Courthouse Square and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. inside the Cherokee Nation Tribal Complex during it's annual open house. Scroll through the photos to see when and where each staff member will be.
BY STAFF REPORTS
08/29/2014 02:12 PM
In this month's issue: • Hard Rock Cherokee Tower under revamp • Cherokee Phoenix wins awards at NAJA conference • Tribe requests IHS help to build Tahlequah hospital • Watt strives to enlighten others with his artwork ...and much more. <a href="http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/Docs/2014/8/8483_2014-09-01.pdf" target="_blank">Click here</a> to read this month's issue.
BY JAMI MURPHY
08/29/2014 01:20 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – During the Cherokee National Holiday weekend, Cherokee Nation and Cherokee Nation Businesses officials unveiled plans to build the Cherokee Springs Plaza, a travel destination that will include venues for dining, shopping and gaming. An artist’s rendering shows the complex including retail spaces, restaurant sites, auto sales lots, office spaces, a convention center, two hotels and a casino. Principal Chief Bill John Baker said purchasing the former Cherry Springs Golf Course property and the vacant land parallel to Highway 62 was a business decision of CNB “knowing that anytime they do anything it’s first class.” “It was the largest contiguous piece of property left in the capitol of the Cherokee Nation, and they’ve been on the drawing board for almost a year now with some of the best land developers in the country coming up with their plan to make this a showpiece in not only all of Indian Country, but I think it’s going to be a showplace for Oklahoma,” Baker said. [BLOCKQUOTE]The approximate 150 acres will bring more traffic to Tahlequah and more attention to the CN, he said. “Just be an awesome, awesome development for this part of Oklahoma,” Baker added. When officials unveiled the project, they said there would be spots for approximately six national restaurants. “I don’t know anybody in this part of the country that hasn’t said ‘I wish we had this’ or ‘I wished we had that.’ People don’t realize the dollars that go to Muskogee or go to Tulsa to just go out to dinner, and we think we can reverse that to where folks from Muskogee are going to be coming this way,” Baker said. “Folks from Tulsa, they can play golf. They eat at our restaurants and eventually stay at our hotel. It’s just going to be a destination of a mixture of fine dining, shopping, a casino resort, golfing. It’s going to tie everything together here at the Cherokee Nation.” Baker said the space would also include a convention center so people who often use convention centers at hotels in the Tulsa area can stay closer to home. He added that CNB Executive Vice President Chuck Garrett had much to do with what the CN envisioned for the property and was the “perfect fit to carry the ball.” Garrett said he’s looking forward to helping execute Baker’s vision for the property. “As chief said, I think that for the first time the citizens of Tahlequah and Cherokee County are going to have the entertainment and amenities that they deserve. They’re no longer going to have to travel to Tulsa, Muskogee or other larger cities outside of the area to enjoy a restaurant or some shopping opportunities that they’ve previously had to travel for,” he said. “We also hope to be providing a venue for entertainment and other community activities within a conference center that will be attached to a hotel.” The project will be completed in three phases, Garrett said. Phase 1 will include the “civil engineering” portion of the project that will consist of road construction and pad sites where potential businesses will be developed. “So our initial efforts will be focused on the engineering and road construction necessary for the development including water, sewer and those sorts of things,” Garrett said. The first thing citizens will see, he said, will be pad sites along the highway that will be the future homes of restaurants. Phase 1 is underway and is expected to be complete in 12 to 18 months. But citizens will see work on the property within the next month, Garrett said. Once everything is complete, Baker said, the CN would continue with its plan to move the Cherokee Nation Immersion Charter School into what will be the former Cherokee Casino Tahlequah, located west of Sequoyah Schools along Hwy 62. “We designed it that way when we built it…so we won’t have two casinos. But when we build the one there (behind Cherokee Springs Golf Course), the one out here (Hwy 62) will become the immersion school,” Baker said. The Cherokee Phoenix will update this story as more developments unfold.
BY STAFF REPORTS
08/29/2014 11:40 AM
<a href="http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/Docs/2014/8/8481_HolidayGuide2014.pdf" target="_blank">Here</a> you will find the schedule of events for the 62nd Annual Cherokee National Holiday.
BY BRYAN POLLARD
08/29/2014 10:23 AM
The Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board will be meeting via conference call at 9 a.m. CDT, September 10, 2014. To attend, please use the conference call information listed below. The meeting agenda is <a href="http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/Docs/2014/8/8480_140910_EB_Agenda.pdf" target="_blank">here</a>. Dial-in: 866-210-1669 Entry code: 4331082
BY JOSH NEWTON
08/29/2014 08:31 AM
Tahlequah Daily Press TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Authorities with the Cherokee Nation Marshal Service and Ontario Provincial Police in Canada say that until last month, a man living in Tahlequah had been presumed dead as a result of a 1977 barn fire. “The Cherokee Nation Marshal Service, acting on a tip, did locate Ronald Stan alive and living in Tahlequah on Aug. 5,” said Amanda Clinton, the Cherokee Nation communications director. She said the tribe would make no other comment about the discovery. Authorities in Canada say Stan, who has been living in Tahlequah under the alias of Jeff Walton, disappeared from his home in Ontario nearly 37 years ago. According to media reports out of Canada, Stan lived in the former Township of East Williams in Middlesex County, but was reported missing when a barn caught fire on Sept. 29, 1977. Witnesses reportedly saw Stan near the barn before it broke out into a blaze. Remnants of a body were never found, but in 1986, Stan was declared legally dead in Canada. He had reportedly left behind a wife and children there. But authorities in Canada say a recent audit of Stan’s disappearance somehow connected the supposedly missing person to a man living near Tahlequah, 69-year-old Jeff Walton. According to some media reports, police used Facebook connections to pinpoint Walton in Cherokee County. Authorities have not said what Stan’s motives might have been for disappearing 37 years ago, nor whether the barn fire thought to have taken his life was or is now considered to have been suspicious. But Canadian officials have suggested Stan faces no criminal charges there. Stan’s 35-year-old son, Jeff Walton Jr., told the Toronto Star that his family is “still trying to put all the puzzle pieces together.” He said family members from Stan’s U.S. life learned of the former life last month. Stan reportedly has grandchildren in the U.S. as well. On April 23, 2000, Stan, under the name of Walton, married Cherokee County resident Debra E. Proctor in Eureka Springs, Arkansas. Court records show Proctor and Stan divorced earlier this month – according to Walton Jr., because of the revelation of his father’s secret Canadian past. In Proctor’s petition for divorce, she cites “incompatibility” between herself and Stan. Walton Jr. told the Toronto Star that his father now suffers from vascular dementia and heart disease, and was in a nursing home when authorities began to uncover Stan’s past. According to court documents, Stan has also gone by the name of Jeff Winton, and reportedly spent some time in Louisiana after leaving Canada. “It’s been tough on me, but he’s still my father,” Walton Jr. told the Toronto Star. “It doesn’t change the man I knew for 35 years. Hopefully one day, he can sit down and write a book and remember all the stuff he’s been through in his life. It’d be a damn good book, I’ll tell you that, just from what I’ve heard.” Canadian media also reported that the Ontario Provincial Police have closed their case. – REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION