Cars sit in the parking lot of the Cherokee Casino & Hotel West Siloam Springs for a previous “Blast to the Past Car and Truck Show.” The show returns on Aug. 11 to the casino located in West Siloam Springs, Okla. COURTESY PHOTO

West Siloam Springs’ largest free car show returns Aug. 11

BY STAFF REPORTS
07/17/2012 11:13 AM
WEST SILOAM SPRINGS, Okla. – It’s time to wash, wax and register your car for the seventh annual “Blast to the Past Car and Truck Show” on Aug. 11 at the Cherokee Casino & Hotel West Siloam Springs.

Categories consist of classics built between the years 1924-60, 1961-80 and 1981 to present; customs; the popular “Redneck Award;” club attendance; and People’s Choice Award.

Cash prizes and trophies are awarded for first through fifth places in each category. Participants also receive a free T-shirt, free rewards play and a discounted ticket to the buffet.

“Last year, my 1932 Chevy sedan earned the People’s Choice Award and fourth overall in its category,” said Ron Giles, of Locust Grove. “We really enjoy this show. It is one of the largest in the region, and the casino gives you a place to get out of the heat.”

Registration and entry into the car show are free. Registration is available at the casino through noon on Aug. 11. Participants can also fax registration forms to 918-422-6229.

“This show consistently attracts around 250 of the hottest cars,” Roger Barr, Cherokee Casino & Hotel West Siloam Springs general manger, said. “We always look forward to bringing this show to our guests.”

For more information on the show, including the registration form and definitions of each award category, visit the promotions page on the Cherokee Casino & Hotel West Siloam Springs section of www.cherokeestarrewards.com or call 1-800-754-4111.

Cherokee Casino & Hotel West Siloam Springs is located off of U.S. Highway 412 and State Highway 59.

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