The Cherokee Nation is contemplating commercially raising bison like these standing in the ranch of Gerald Parsons in Stratford, Okla. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

CN reps visit commercial bison ranch

The Cherokee Nation is contemplating commercially raising bison like these standing in the ranch of Gerald Parsons in Stratford, Okla. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The Cherokee Nation is contemplating commercially raising bison like these standing in the ranch of Gerald Parsons in Stratford, Okla. ROGER GRAHAM/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Senior Reporter
08/08/2012 08:22 AM
STRATFORD, Okla. – Cherokee Nation representatives recently visited a bison ranch operated by veterinarian and chairman of the North American Bison Registry to determine what is needed to commercially raise bison.

Personnel from CN Natural Resources, Tribal Council, Real Estate Services and the administration’s executive team toured the ranch of Gerald Parsons on July 20. Parsons showed CN officials the Yellowstone-type bison that is available and could benefit the tribe’s economy. Officials also looked at the fencing and facilities needed to raise a bison herd.

“I tried to educate them to give them an idea of what they would be getting into and what they’re dealing with when they are dealing with bison,” said Parsons, who is also the international director of the Canadian Bison Association and serves as a committee chair for the National Bison Association.

Parsons said if he were to personally address the Tribal Council about operating a commercial bison farm, he would tell them about the good feeling he has raising an animal that has been in North America since before the last ice age and survived the “kill offs” of the 1800s and other man-made difficulties that nearly made the bison extinct.

“The other big benefit is the industry itself. The meat industry has just gone wild. You can’t raise enough of them. Right now we are so deficient in bison that the (bison meat) prices just keep going up,” he said.

Parson added that a bison rancher is able to graze 1-1/2 bison per beef cow.

“So it doesn’t take the space and grass like beef, yet they are going to produce you more income,” he said.

The Tribal Council will soon consider whether to invest in a bison ranch that would need to be constructed from the ground up somewhere in the tribe’s jurisdiction.

To start, the CN is eligible to receive a donation of 80 head of bison from Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. The bison are available only to Native American tribes, said Natural Resources Director Pat Gwin.

He added that the bison, which retail for $3,500 apiece, must be raised for commercial use only.
Gwin said raising and selling bison for meat is “lucrative” in today’s market, and bison byproducts like the hide can also be sold, but the CN must be sure they can handle a bison enterprise before it commits to accepting a herd.

“The main reason we were here today was to acquaint ourselves with the animals. We need to make sure that we’re 100 percent ready to receive, maintain and market those animals the day that we receive them,” he said.

Gwin said he also wanted to see the perimeter fencing system used for the bison and the bison holding facilities used on Parsons’ ranch.

“A bison project is going to be an agricultural production project, and it’s going to require at least bi-annual handling of the animals, which means we are really going to have to be able to confine those animals and work around them safely. We’re dealing with 2,000-pound animals that aren’t necessarily domesticated,” he said.

Gwen added that the visit was also to study costs associated with investing in a bison ranch to make sure it would be financially feasible for the Nation. He said it would take two to three years before the CN would begin seeing returns on its investment in a bison ranch.

For a successful economic venture, the CN would have to grow the herd three to four times the size of the 80 head received.

“We got a really good visual image that it is being done in Oklahoma. We do know as an economic venture it is feasible and it is profitable,” Gwin said. “I think it’s a good idea to look into. Obviously we are going to have to make sure the dollars and cents part of the equation really balances out.”

He said many people believe bison only lived west of the Mississippi River. However, a free-ranging herd once roamed from New York to the Carolinas and was important to the Cherokee people and culture.

will-chavez@cherokee.org


918-207-3961

About the Author
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M.

He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life.
He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association.

Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years.
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M. He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life. He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association. Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years.

News

BY STAFF REPORTS
07/29/2015 02:00 PM
KETCHUM, Okla. –The Cherokee Nation recently presented the Native American Association of Ketchum a $57,273 grant to build a park in Ketchum. The park will include two pieces of commercial playground equipment, spring rockers, spinners, swings, teeter-totters and more. The group also plans to add volleyball and basketball courts, as well as a walking trail in the park’s next phase of development. The playground is set to be complete by the end of summer and is located at the corner of Grand Lake Avenue and Amarillo Street. “It means a great deal to partner with the Cherokee Nation because without the tribe there would not be a park in Ketchum,” NAAK President Jerry Taylor said. According to a CN press release, the NAAK is one of several community organizations to receive a grant from the tribe’s Community and Cultural Outreach in 2015. The department awards about 45 grants per year to local organizations that want to make improvements in their communities, helping both Cherokees and non-Cherokees alike. “Helping the town of Ketchum build a family-friendly park is part of the Cherokee Nation’s mission to invest in our citizens and communities,” Principal Chief Bill John Baker said. “This will soon be a beautiful space for children and families to gather and enjoy. I’m proud we are able to improve the quality of life for all citizens in the Ketchum community.” The release states the NAAK was established in 2013 and has been active in the community. In addition to obtaining a grant for the town’s first-ever park, the organization has distributed weatherization kits to citizens in the area and will partner with the CN to do home repairs in the community next month. The organization also hopes to build a community building in the future. For more information about Community and Cultural Outreach, call 918-207-4953.
BY STAFF REPORTS
07/29/2015 10:35 AM
WEST SILOAM SPRINGS, Okla. – The 10th annual Blast to the Past Car & Truck Show makes its return to the Cherokee Casino & Hotel West Siloam Springs on Aug. 15. The show is one of the largest car shows in the region. According to a press release, categories consist of classics built between the years 1900-60, 1961-80 and 1981 to present and customs built between 1900-60, 1961-80 and 1981 to present. There are also the Redneck Award, Car Club Attendance Award and Grand Champion. Steve Perry, of Bentonville, Arkansas, took home the first place prize in the 1900-60 classics category for his 1955 Chevrolet Bel Air at the 2014 show. “It’s a great show and one of our favorites every year,” Perry said. “Blast to the Past is one of the larger draw car shows around. There are a lot of great cars for the enthusiasts in the area. The fact that you can go inside to grab a nice lunch and cool off in a beautiful facility also makes it a great time for the family.” There will be cash prizes and trophies awarded for those who place first through third in each category. All participants will also receive a free shirt. “We are excited to bring back Blast to the Past for the 10th consecutive year,” Cherokee Casino & Hotel West Siloam Springs General Manager Tony Nagy said. “This has been a huge event for us. We’ve had so much interest, we just had to bring it back for 2015. We have some exciting things in the works for this year. It’s going to be a great time.” Jeff Johnson, also of Bentonville, won first in the 1961-80 classics category with his 1971 Chevrolet Camaro 228. “Last year was my third time to attend this show. It is one of the best we have in the region. Everyone in the area looks forward to it,” Johnson said. “The setup is fantastic. We like the environment, and it’s a great place to come show off your hobby. The entire show is nicely put together, with a great location and wonderful employees. It’s a whole lot of fun.” Registration and entry into the car show are free. Those who want to register can do so through noon at the casino on Aug. 15. Participants can also fax their registration forms to 918-422-6229. For more information, visit the promotions page on the Cherokee Casino & Hotel West Siloam Springs section of <a href="http://www.cherokeecasino.com" target="_blank">www.cherokeecasino.com</a> or call 1-800-754-4111.
BY STAFF REPORTS
07/28/2015 11:36 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – In Oklahoma, there is a tax-free weekend in which the state does not require individuals to pay taxes on clothing and shoes. Oklahoma’s sales tax holiday is set for Aug. 7-9. According to the Oklahoma Tax Commission’s website, the annual sales tax holiday will begin at 12:01 a.m. on Aug. 7 and end at midnight on Aug. 9. “Retailers are required to participate and may not collect state and local sales or use tax on most footwear and clothing that are sold for less than $100 during the holiday. Clothing is indicated by all “human wearing apparel,” which includes, but not limited to, aprons, belts, coats, underwear and socks. Having to set aside money for clothing, shoes and school supplies can be a burden on some families that might be struggling financially. USA.gov suggests families to look into qualifying for federal programs that may help ease financial burdens, including low-cost meals and affordable health insurance. For more information and answers to common questions on the sales tax holiday, as well as a listing of sales tax exempt items, please visit the OTC website at <a href="http://www.tax.ok.gov" target="_blank">www.tax.ok.gov</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
07/27/2015 01:09 PM
OOLOGAH, Okla. – Will Rogers and Wiley Post died in an Alaska plane crash on Aug. 15, 1935. It is often called the “crash heard around the world.” This year the Will Rogers & Wiley Post Fly-In at the Will Rogers Birthplace Ranch is set for Aug. 15, the 80th anniversary of the history-making event when bold headlines in newspapers all over the world carried the story. That day and the lives of the two, undoubtedly the world’s strongest aviation boosters of their time, is remembered each year on the Oologah, Indian Territory, ranch were Will Rogers was born. Usually a Sunday event, it was changed to Saturday to reflect the anniversary of the deaths, said Tad Jones, Will Rogers Memorial Museum executive director. Airports across the country have been invited to join in a special Moment of Remembrance at 10 a.m. (CST) at their respective airports to honor those who have lost their lives in a small aircraft accident. At that same time a short program at the Will Rogers Birthplace Ranch airstrip will pay tribute to the lives of Will and Wiley. Mary West of Oologah will sing the “National Anthem” and Ross Adkins, Fly-In announcer for the past several years, will present the commemoration program and call for a moment of silence. RSU Radio will live stream the tribute at 91.3 FM and on their website <a href="http://www.rsuradio.com" target="_blank">www.rsuradio.com</a>. The popular duo of Lester Lurk and Joe Bacon, aka “Will and Wiley,” will land about 9 a.m. The Fly-In provides an opportunity for the public to get a close-up look at airplanes and meet the pilots. Pilots enjoy the fellowship with fellow aviators and people who just enjoy planes. Cherokee Storyteller Robert Lewis will be under a shade tree with his tales of animals, so much a part of early Cherokee tradition. There will be antique cars, inflatables and games for children and food concessions. Ample parking is provided with rides to the viewing area. Roper Martin Howard and members of the Verdigris School football team have assisted with parking several years. Members of Rogers County Sheriff Mounted Troops will be on hand. Air Evac Lifetime, an air medical service, will fly in and be on hand to show their plane and provide information about the access at the Claremore Regional Airport. Ambulances from Oologah-Talala EMS and Northwest First District will have units for the public to see as well as be on hand for emergencies. Bring your own lawn chair or blanket and enjoy watching planes land and take off, walk among the aircraft, visit the house and see the room where Will was born and remember the day 80 years ago when the world learned Will and Wiley had died in Alaska. Admission is free, but donations will be accepted. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.willrogers.com" target="_blank">www.willrogers.com</a>.
BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter
07/27/2015 09:19 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – According to unofficial results, Bryan Warner won the July 25 runoff for the Cherokee Nation’s Dist. 6 Tribal Council seat. Unofficial results show that Warner received 54.06 percent of votes with 619 votes, while Natalie Fullbright received 45.94 percent of votes or 526 ballots. The numbers include 23 accepted challenged ballots. Warner said he feels truly blessed by the results. “This has been a very humbling experience,” he said. He said when he takes office he wants to take a look at everything and already has an idea of what types of resources the CN needs. He added that he wants to get out and meet more people. “I still think there’s people out there that I didn’t get to visit with in this district, and I want them to feel apart of this process,” he said. Warner said he is grateful to all who cast their vote for him to be the next Dist. 6 Tribal Councilor. “Thank you, thank you, thank you. My family thanks you, all my supporters thank you,” he said. “It’s just been a wonderful experience and there’s no way I could have written it out like this at all. I can’t wait to get to work and see what we can do for Dist. 6. When I say we, I mean all of us.” Warner extended congratulations to Fullbright for a well-ran race. “Her family and all her supporters have been wonderful through this campaign, and I feel like they’re all top-notch individuals. They’ve been cordial, they been kind,” he said. “I hope that we can all get together and work together.” In a Facebook post Fullbright conceded defeat to Warner. “Well guys we lost. Not by a lot but by enough. I think a lot of Bryan, get behind him, support him, pray for him work with him,” it stated. The Cherokee Phoenix contacted Fullbright for comment. “Why in the world are you people calling me? You need to call Bryan Warner,” she said. Dist. 6 covers the eastern part of Sequoyah County. Candidates who won their races will be sworn into office on Aug. 14. According to Election Commission officials, candidates had until July 29 to file for a recount. As of publication there was no request for a recount in the Dist. 6 race.
BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter
07/27/2015 09:18 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – According to unofficial results, Keith Austin won the Dist. 14 Tribal Council race against William “Bill” Pearson on July 25. Unofficial results, which included 26 accepted challenged ballots, show that Austin garnered 498 votes for 53.9 percent of the ballots, while Pearson got 425 votes for 46.1 percent. Austin said he would like to thank the Cherokee Nation citizens of District 14 for allowing him the honor of being elected as their next Tribal Councilor. “I am humbled that you would place your faith and trust in me. This is a responsibility that I do not take lightly, and I will endeavor to represent you with the same energy and integrity that I have practiced throughout life,” he said. “I would like to thank Mr. Pearson for his service to our Nation, the community and his willingness to serve the Cherokee Nation. Also, I would like to thank Councilor Lee Keener for his service to District 14 on the Council and I wish him well with his future endeavors.” The Cherokee Phoenix attempted to Pearson, but he was available for comment. The EC rescheduled the Dist. 14 race after the CN Supreme Court on July 8 ruled that a winner could not be determined with mathematical certainty. Pearson was certified the winner of the Dist. 14 race after the June 27 general election by one vote. Following a recount on July 2, his lead had been extended to six votes. Austin appealed the recount results to the Supreme Court alleging that ballots were cast that should not have been accepted, ballots were cast that should have been accepted and two absentee ballot envelopes could not be found. Candidates elected to office during the general and runoff elections are to be sworn into office on Aug. 14, according to the tribe’s election timeline.