Tribes Diabetes Program receives national award
9/18/2012 7:53:07 AM
 
Heidi Lyman, left, of Kansas, Okla., receives instruction from Brenda Fowler, a registered nurse for W.W. Hastings Hospital’s Diabetes Management, on how to use a glucometer to test her blood sugar level. JAMI CUSTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Heidi Lyman, left, of Kansas, Okla., receives instruction from Brenda Fowler, a registered nurse for W.W. Hastings Hospital’s Diabetes Management, on how to use a glucometer to test her blood sugar level. JAMI CUSTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
BY JAMI CUSTER Reporter TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation Diabetes Program was recently awarded the John Pipe Voices for Change Outcomes Award, which recognizes federally funded Special Diabetes Programs for Indians or SDPIs that have excelled advocacy, outcomes and innovation. CNDP Director Teresa Chaudoin said the award is named in memory of diabetes advocate John Pipe, of Wolf Point, Mont., who served as a member of the American Diabetes Associations’ Native American Initiatives Subcommittee. “The awards are named in memory of his longstanding advocacy efforts reached from his local community to Washington, D.C., and affected countless tribal communities,” she said. “The Special Diabetes Program for Indians is a $150 million per year grant program that is funded through congressional legislation and administered by the Indian Health Service.” The CNDP received the award for demonstrating outcomes such as significant improvement on clinical measures of patient care for diabetes patients throughout the CN health system, as well as demonstrating measurable success in health lifestyle change and weight loss in people with pre-diabetes who participate in the CN Diabetes Prevention Program. This is the first time the CNDP has received the award and Chaudoin said being recognized for doing good work in one’s chosen field is always nice. “And this award belongs to all the different disciplines of providers in the Cherokee Nation health system – physicians, nurses, dietitians, lab techs, pharmacists, certified diabetes educators, health educators, behavioral health providers, dentists, optometrists, podiatrists – who work together as teams every day to provide excellent care to help their patients with diabetes live healthier lives, and to help people at risk for diabetes to reduce their risk,” she said. Chaudoin added that the award is a “wonderful reflection on all those people with diabetes or at risk who take an active role” in improving their health. “Our receipt of this award also demonstrates to Congress and to other agencies that the funding we have received to treat and prevent diabetes in Cherokee Nation has been well-spent,” she said. The award focuses more on clinical outcomes, Chaudoin added. CN provides services and supplies to more than 10,000 diabetic patients each year in the 14-county jurisdiction. “Our program uses a diabetes systems of care approach to prevent and treat diabetic complications, and employs clinical staff from multiple disciplines that are located at nine facilities throughout the Cherokee Nation health system,” she said. The funding from SDPI for the diabetes program is also shared with CN Healthy Nation and its activities to allow partnering with schools and communities to increase physical activity. “They have so many things going on…and all those things keep people with diabetes healthier and help prevent diabetes in people who are at risk for developing it,” Chaudoin said.

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