Heidi Lyman, left, of Kansas, Okla., receives instruction from Brenda Fowler, a registered nurse for W.W. Hastings Hospital’s Diabetes Management, on how to use a glucometer to test her blood sugar level. JAMI CUSTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Tribes Diabetes Program receives national award

BY JAMI MURPHY
09/18/2012 07:53 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation Diabetes Program was recently awarded the John Pipe Voices for Change Outcomes Award, which recognizes federally funded Special Diabetes Programs for Indians or SDPIs that have excelled advocacy, outcomes and innovation.

CNDP Director Teresa Chaudoin said the award is named in memory of diabetes advocate John Pipe, of Wolf Point, Mont., who served as a member of the American Diabetes Associations’ Native American Initiatives Subcommittee.

“The awards are named in memory of his longstanding advocacy efforts reached from his local community to Washington, D.C., and affected countless tribal communities,” she said. “The Special Diabetes Program for Indians is a $150 million per year grant program that is funded through congressional legislation and administered by the Indian Health Service.”

The CNDP received the award for demonstrating outcomes such as significant improvement on clinical measures of patient care for diabetes patients throughout the CN health system, as well as demonstrating measurable success in health lifestyle change and weight loss in people with pre-diabetes who participate in the CN Diabetes Prevention Program.

This is the first time the CNDP has received the award and Chaudoin said being recognized for doing good work in one’s chosen field is always nice.

“And this award belongs to all the different disciplines of providers in the Cherokee Nation health system – physicians, nurses, dietitians, lab techs, pharmacists, certified diabetes educators, health educators, behavioral health providers, dentists, optometrists, podiatrists – who work together as teams every day to provide excellent care to help their patients with diabetes live healthier lives, and to help people at risk for diabetes to reduce their risk,” she said.

Chaudoin added that the award is a “wonderful reflection on all those people with diabetes or at risk who take an active role” in improving their health.

“Our receipt of this award also demonstrates to Congress and to other agencies that the funding we have received to treat and prevent diabetes in Cherokee Nation has been well-spent,” she said.

The award focuses more on clinical outcomes, Chaudoin added.

CN provides services and supplies to more than 10,000 diabetic patients each year in the 14-county jurisdiction.

“Our program uses a diabetes systems of care approach to prevent and treat diabetic complications, and employs clinical staff from multiple disciplines that are located at nine facilities throughout the Cherokee Nation health system,” she said.

The funding from SDPI for the diabetes program is also shared with CN Healthy Nation and its activities to allow partnering with schools and communities to increase physical activity.

“They have so many things going on…and all those things keep people with diabetes healthier and help prevent diabetes in people who are at risk for developing it,” Chaudoin said.

jami-custer@cherokee.org


918-453-5560

About the Author
Reporter

Jami Murphy graduated from Locust Grove High School in 2000. She received her bachelor’s degree in mass communications in 2006 from Northeastern State University and began working at the Cherokee Phoenix in 2007.

She said the Cherokee Phoenix has allowed her the opportunity to share valuable information with the Cherokee people on a daily basis. 

Jami married Michael Murphy in 2014. They have two sons, Caden and Austin. Together they have four children, including Johnny and Chase. They also have two grandchildren, Bentley and Baylea. 

She is a Cherokee Nation citizen and said working for the Cherokee Phoenix has meant a great deal to her. 

“My great-great-great-great grandfather, John Leaf Springston, worked for the paper long ago. It’s like coming full circle. I’ve learned so much about myself, the Cherokee people and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it.”

Jami is a member of the Native American Journalists Association, and Investigative Reporters and Editors. You can follow her on Twitter @jamilynnmurphy or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/jamimurphy2014.
Reporter Jami Murphy graduated from Locust Grove High School in 2000. She received her bachelor’s degree in mass communications in 2006 from Northeastern State University and began working at the Cherokee Phoenix in 2007. She said the Cherokee Phoenix has allowed her the opportunity to share valuable information with the Cherokee people on a daily basis. Jami married Michael Murphy in 2014. They have two sons, Caden and Austin. Together they have four children, including Johnny and Chase. They also have two grandchildren, Bentley and Baylea. She is a Cherokee Nation citizen and said working for the Cherokee Phoenix has meant a great deal to her. “My great-great-great-great grandfather, John Leaf Springston, worked for the paper long ago. It’s like coming full circle. I’ve learned so much about myself, the Cherokee people and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it.” Jami is a member of the Native American Journalists Association, and Investigative Reporters and Editors. You can follow her on Twitter @jamilynnmurphy or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/jamimurphy2014.

Health

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
09/16/2014 09:31 AM
CHICAGO (AP) – Hundreds of children in more than 10 states have been sickened by a severe respiratory illness that public health officials say may be caused by an uncommon virus similar to the germ that causes the common cold. Nearly 500 children have been treated at one hospital alone – Children’s Mercy in Kansas City, Mo., – and some required intensive care, according to authorities. The suspected germ, enterovirus 68, is an uncommon strain of a very common family of viruses that typically hit from summertime through autumn. The virus can cause mild coldlike symptoms including runny noses, coughing and wheezing but Mark Pallansch, director of the viral diseases division at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said this summer’s cases are unusually severe and include serious breathing problems. “It’s not highly unusual but we’re trying to understand what happened this year in terms of these noticeable and much larger clusters of severe respiratory disease,” Pallansch said. The virus typically causes illness lasting about a week and most children recover with no lasting problems. Cases have been confirmed in Missouri and Illinois. CDC said it is testing to see if the virus caused respiratory illnesses reported in children in Alabama, Colorado, Georgia, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, Oklahoma and Utah. The states’ tally changes as specimens are confirmed or test negative. A spokeswoman for Iowa’s public health department said CDC tests confirmed the virus in samples from patients in central Iowa and a Colorado hospital said it has confirmed cases. The CDC’s Dr. Anne Schuchat said at a Monday news briefing that there are other viruses making kids sick. “Most of the runny noses out there are not going to be turning into this,” she said. Children with asthma and other health problems are especially at risk for the enterovirus, but reported cases include children without asthma who have developed asthmalike breathing problems, Pallansch said. He said no deaths have been reported in the outbreak. Dr. Mary Anne Jackson, director of infectious diseases at Children’s Mercy, said local cases began appearing in mid-August and they appear to have peaked in her area. Schuchat said the strain involved also appeared in the United States last year and in specimens from other countries. She said the CDC learned it had reappeared in this country last month when authorities in Chicago and Kansas City notified the agency about severe illnesses in children who had to be hospitalized. She said the virus was found in 11 of 14 specimens from Chicago and in 19 of 22 specimens from Missouri. In the Denver area, more than 900 children were treated for severe respiratory illnesses at Children’s Hospital Colorado and its urgent care locations and 86 were hospitalized in recent weeks. Spokeswoman Melissa Vizcarra said Monday that CDC had confirmed the virus in 19 of 25 samples from her hospital. The University of Chicago’s Comer Children’s Hospital has treated several cases, including extremely sick children requiring life-support machines, said Dr. Rachel Wolfson, an intensive care unit physician. Affected children are “as small as infants all the way up to teenagers,” Wolfson said. The virus can spread through sneezing and experts say good hand-washing practices are important to curb transmission. “The take-home point is wash your hands and keep your hands away from your face,” Wolfson said.
BY JAMI MURPHY
09/16/2014 08:08 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – In August, the Cherokee Nation began a phone survey focusing on tobacco use within the tribe’s jurisdictional service area. Dr. David Gahn, CN public health surveillance coordinator, said the survey is taken from the Centers for Disease Control and is specific to American Indians. “And we’ve done it in Cherokee Nation before,” he said. “The main purpose is to document and track tobacco use among Cherokee adults in the TJSA.” Participants were randomly selected from a list of Cherokee adults in each county within the TJSA. “So, we used to survey the TJSA as a whole, and this year to get a better understanding of each county individually, we have a list of Cherokee adults from each county and we do our statistics based on each county,” Gahn said. “So instead of 600 to 700 people being surveyed it’s going to be about 4,200 people being surveyed so we can compare counties to see where we need to work.” Phone numbers were shared through the tribe’s health care database. CN Health Services works off one database that encompasses the entire jurisdictional area. “So there’s no Salina clinic database, it’s all just one. So I can ask the database ‘give me a list of every Cherokee adult in Mayes County’ and then ask the same database question about each county,” Gahn said. The database is based all on whether the person is Cherokee and lives in the jurisdiction. “So the way our health care database works is that if you’ve used our health system anytime, then you’re in the database,” he said.” And we’ve found in the past on some other projects that our health care database is more up to date than the Registration database.” Shawn Arthur, Inara Creative Solutions vice president, said participants can be assured that names and contact information are kept in a locked drawer so it is not tampered with. Once the survey is complete that information will be destroyed. Gahn said the goal is to more accurately estimate tobacco use within the jurisdiction. “The information primarily is going to be used to direct our programs and our policies. So we give it to our policy makers like Tribal Council, our public health programs, our clinical programs,” he said. “We can see if we’ve made any progress over the last several years.” The survey is to determine what areas of the CN need more services in regards to tobacco cessation. “Of all of our tobacco control programs, we don’t have enough money or people to do all the programs in all 14 counties, so we have to direct our limited resources to where the need is the most,” Gahn said. “So we also want to track to see if our programs and policies are doing any good. So over time we can track is the rate going up or down.” A survey was conducted in 2011, Gahn said, and from 2009 to 2011 there was no change in the smoking rate overall for Cherokee adults. Results from that survey found a drop in women of reproductive age using tobacco. Their rates dropped, but those surveyed were so few that they could not determine if the rates dropped due to programs offered by the tribe. Gahn said there must be a 15 percent rate of change to be able to determine whether or not a program made a difference. The 2014 survey began in August and will continue until late October or early November. Results will not be available until late spring. Inara Creative Solutions is a Tribal Employment Rights Office-certified vendor in Tahlequah. The business will continue to hire survey administrators until all positions are filled. Those interested can call Drew Trahms at 918-506-8587 from 2 p.m. to 9 p.m. Monday through Friday or from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. on Saturday. Those interested must be 18 or older.
BY WILL CHAVEZ
09/15/2014 08:04 AM
SALINA, Okla. – Public art created for the Cherokee Nation’s A-mo Health Center by Cherokee artists Bill and Demos Glass was carefully delivered by crane to a prominent place in front of the clinic on Sept. 3. Though Bill insists Demos created the stainless steel “Prayer Feather,” Demos said he collaborated with his father to create the 8-foot, 2-inch tall and 24-inch wide piece. “Dad and I wanted to do this symbolic ‘Prayer Feather’ for our clinic in Salina because the staff is very friendly and courteous. We also wanted to do this in loving remembrance of my grandmother Jean Justice Glass, who was a trained Army nurse,” Demos said. “I primarily designed the feather, and he had a ceramics portion in it. The ceramic’s got an inset detail with a nice four (crossed) logs motif. It’s just our symbol for prayer.” The material used was fabricated stainless steel, so it began as a sheet of steel that had to be cut and welded. Demos said he and his dad spent the past five months working on it and that working with stainless steel is challenging. “It’s not going to let you do everything, so you got to use a lot of manipulation,” he said. He said after the piece was welded together, he hand polished it, which can sometimes take months. “I’m still planning and trying to get some of the time cut down in different processes, so I’m always researching. That’s what my whole philosophy is on art. I’m a contemporary artist, and I’m going to continue to research the boundaries of what I can do because it’s exciting to me,” Demos said. “I think the Southeastern designs are the perfect platform to use fabrication techniques.” He said it is a benefit to use the minimalist, and sometimes intricate, designs of Southeastern designs and art used by Cherokee people in ancient times. Gina Olaya, Cherokee Nation Businesses director of cultural art procurement, said the Glasses were commissioned to do the “Prayer Feather” for the clinic. “Bill Glass is a patient at the Salina Clinic. He thought it would be good to have some place where people could actually say a prayer as they’re walking into the building, so that’s how the idea for the ‘Prayer Feather’ sculpture started,” she said. “I’m excited about this. I’m excited for the clinic.” Olaya said there is a CN law that allows for 1 percent of construction or renovation funding to be set aside to procure Cherokee art for the tribal building being constructed or renovated. “We had some money left over from a couple of projects that we pulled together, and those leftover funds are what’s funding these “Prayer Feather” sculpture projects,” Olaya said. Three “Prayer Feathers” are being created at a cost of $76,000. A second “Prayer Feather” will be placed at the renovated Redbird Smith Clinic in Sallisaw, and a third one will be placed at the new W.W. Hastings Hospital in Tahlequah when it is constructed. “The overall design of it will be the same, but the tiling that the Glasses are putting on the bottom of the sculpture will be different at each one of the facilities,” she said. Olaya said she would work with the Glasses to determine the wording for the plaques that will be placed at the bottom of the three sculptures to explain the artwork. CN Health Services Executive Director Connie Davis said the sculpture is “absolutely beautiful.” “I think the important thing is that a patient here was inspired and felt like they wanted to contribute something to the clinic,” she said. “Mr. Glass spoke of how he appreciated the care the staff here delivered to him and his family, and I think that just shows the tightness of this community and how well the staff does take care of its patients.” Demos studied metalsmithing and sculpture at the University of Southern Illinois. He shares an art studio with Bill in Locust Grove, located south of Salina. Demos said he and his father put their thoughts together to come up with an idea that represented prayer. “We know that when you go through the health care system sometimes you’re not really looking forward to going there, so we just thought it would be a nice thing,” Demos said. “Public art can affect people just by walking by it, we believe. So, that’s what we are trying to do. We’re trying to create good feelings here.”
BY STAFF REPORTS
09/09/2014 02:57 PM
CLAREMORE, Okla. – Cherokee Nation Healthy Nation will offer a smoke cessation class on Oct. 1 that is open and free to the public. Those interested must register for the class by Sept. 25. It’s a six-week class meeting at 5:30 p.m. each Wednesday at the CN Field Office located at 23205 Highway 66. Nicotine Replacement Therapy will not be provided in class, according to a release. “To receive Nicotine Replacement Therapy, participants must see their physicians,” the release states. For more information, call Misty Crittenden 918-575-6062 or email <a href="mailto: misty-crittenden@cherokee.org">misty-crittenden@cherokee.org</a>.
BY JAMI MURPHY
08/26/2014 08:54 AM
SALLISAW, Okla. – Cherokee Nation officials celebrated the opening of Redbird Smith Health Center’s main building on Aug. 13 after it underwent a remodel the past two years because of mold found inside. Clinical Director Jerry Caughman said the remodel means a lot to him because he grew up in Sallisaw and is a CN citizen. “I’m not only an employee here, I’m from Sallisaw. Both sides of my family, they’re from Sallisaw and we have been 100-plus years,” he said. “So these people that come to this clinic, they’re not only patients of mine, but they’re my friends and family. And so this means more than anyone can ever know.” The building was closed in 2012, and its patient services were moved to different parts of the health center after the mold was discovered. The building was gutted, said CN Communications officials, with the use of Indian Health Services funds. The building cost $4.4 million to remodel and will house dental, administration, a fitness area and public health nursing. Connie Davis, CN Health Services executive director, said the tribe’s administration, Tribal Council and Health Services have made the expansion of health services a priority. “The Redbird Smith renovation and expansion will not only serve more patients, but also offer programs such as mammography and physical therapy that patients normally would have to be referred to Tahlequah or other health centers to get,” she said. “I’m very proud of this expansion, and it’s just the first of many more to come for our overall health centers.” Tribal Councilor Janelle Fulbright said the new services the facility will offer is something she and patients have waited a long time for. “I’ve been on the council seven years and one of things I really, really wanted when I got on the council was a dialysis center. It took four years, but we accomplished that and helped so many people,” she said. “We’ve got top notch care for our people. When they come here they can rest assured they’re getting some of the finest.” Principal Chief Bill John Baker said “citizens deserve world-class care” and the expansions and remodels represent that. “This will ensure we offer treatment as effectively and efficiently as possible when patients come for health care services. This is the most important long-term investment we can make as a tribal government,” he said. “More importantly, this expansion allows our health center to accommodate more people day in and day out.” A new annex is also being constructed behind the main building. When finished, the center will go from 33,000 square feet to more than 60,000 square feet. Its cost totals about $11 million, making the entire construction at Redbird Smith more than $15 million. The health center opened in 1992, according to CN Communications. In 2013, it served more than 100,000 patients. After renovations, that number is expected to rise.
BY JAMI MURPHY
08/26/2014 08:36 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Former Miss Cherokee Julie Thornton will passed her crown to the new Miss Cherokee on Aug. 23. Thornton has served as Miss Cherokee for nearly a year, visiting different areas of the United States. However, in April, she was diagnosed with soft tissue sarcoma, a type of cancer that attacks muscle and bones. “It’s a type of cancer that causes tumors that are connected to your lymph nodes and your bones,” Thornton said. “It looks like a knot on your skin and usually they turn black and they raise up.” But having cancer hasn’t slowed her. She said despite the diagnosis she’s remained busy with classes at Northeastern State University and is maintaining her grades, earning all A’s. Thornton said both sides of her family has endured cancer, so she has always been careful and watchful about her body. “My grandfather just recently passed away of stomach cancer, and a few years ago my other grandpa died of lung cancer,” she said. “So my family has always taught me to watch my body, and if something is wrong, you know, go to the doctor and make sure it’s all checked out.” She said this spring she noticed a small knot on her thigh and visited the doctor to determine what it was. “They said that ‘it’s just the keloids, just watch it.’ If it got bigger or anything and if it did then to come back,” Thornton said. Keloids are a formation of a type of scar. The scar overgrows tissue at the site of a healed skin injury. It tends to affect more people of a darker pigmentation. She said she’s had keloids since a young age and that she watched the area closely. After the knot changed she returned to the doctor. “Well it got bigger and it got to the size of a half dollar size and it turned black and it raised up,” she added. “So I went to the doctor and they performed a biopsy and they removed the tumor and (I’ve) been going through treatment ever since.” Her treatment has consisted of chemotherapy injections as well as radiation in the form of pills. Depending on the month, she said she takes one chemo injection every two weeks. “So like, sometimes I’ll go like once a month in a big dose or I’ll do once every two weeks in small doses. Now I’m doing just once a week (on the radiation pill),” she added. “Yeah, the medicine is working.” The biggest issue she’s had while going through treatment is exhaustion. “Everyday I would get tired. I can never get enough sleep it feels like. I guess like depending on the day that I get treatment, I get really moody,” she said. She hopes her treatments will stop this fall. As for now, her goals are to continue with her classes, graduate in 2017 with a major in criminal justice and double minor in police force and homeland security. Her goal is to become a Cherokee Nation marshal when she turns 21. Her suggestion for kids and adults is to keep a close watch on one’s body. “But also just knowing your body, and what’s non-normal. Because like, when I got diagnosed with sarcoma, part of the whole treatment process is that you have to get pat downs every month to make sure that you don’t have any new spots as well,” she said. “Know their body. Know what’s not normal. Know if something’s out of place. Notice new spots on you or new bumps. If you don’t think something is supposed to be there, it’s probably not and you need to go to the doctor and get that checked out.”