Tribal Councilors Jodie Fishinghawk, left, Tina Glory Jordan and Chuck Hoskin Jr. confer during the council’s Sept. 17 meeting in Tahlequah, Okla. The main topic on the agenda was the tribe’s fiscal year 2013 budget. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Head Start gets additional $400K in 2013 budget

Cherokee veteran Joeseph Fourkiller, 87, of Stilwell, Okla., was honored during the Sept. 17 Tribal Council for his military service by the council, Deputy Chief Joe Crittenden, shown pinning the medal onto Fourkiller, and Principal Chief Bill John Baker, right. Fourkiller was presented with a Cherokee Warrior medal and plaque. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee veteran Joeseph Fourkiller, 87, of Stilwell, Okla., was honored during the Sept. 17 Tribal Council for his military service by the council, Deputy Chief Joe Crittenden, shown pinning the medal onto Fourkiller, and Principal Chief Bill John Baker, right. Fourkiller was presented with a Cherokee Warrior medal and plaque. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Senior Reporter
09/18/2012 04:56 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Tribal Council approved the Cherokee Nation’s fiscal year 2013 budget by a 9-8 vote at its Sept. 17 meeting, giving Head Start $400,000 more than it had in FY 2012 but at the expense of the Cherokee Heritage Center and Cherokee Phoenix.

If Principal Chief Bill John Baker signs the budget act, the Head Start increase will be effective on Oct. 1 and provide pre-K education at tribal Head Start sites throughout northeast Oklahoma.

“Head Start makes a difference for kids and families throughout Cherokee Nation,” Tribal Council Speaker Tina Glory Jordan said. “With this new funding, Head Start can increase teacher salaries and stay competitive.”

During the meeting, Head Start Director Verna Thompson said it has been difficult to retain experienced staff because she was not able to offer competitive salaries.

However, increased funding for Head Start came via 25 percent reductions for the Cherokee Heritage Center and the tribe’s newspaper, the Cherokee Phoenix.

Glory Jordan said both of those entities were capable of finding new funding sources and would continue receiving large subsidies in the new budget.

The Phoenix has a plan to generate new revenues from advertisings sales, subscription fees and sponsored distribution sites, which Deputy Speaker Chuck Hoskin Jr. said would put the paper on the path to “fiscal independence.”

However, Tribal Councilor Cara Cowan Watts disagreed with the CHC and Phoenix cuts.

“I do think that Head Start needs additional money, but it’s going to be at the cost of our Cherokee Heritage Center and our Cherokee Phoenix. They (both) have 25 percent budget cuts,” she said.

Cowan Watts said she thought the cuts had been discussed beforehand with the Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board and staff, but later found that was not the case.

“Another group got caught in the middle of politics, and now I think the very essence of our free press act is at risk…they are going to have to eliminate the paper edition and free subscriptions to Cherokee citizens,” she said. “I think we could have done that way differently. We could plan ahead for that and have our free press be given the opportunity to plan one and three years out.”

She said she believes there’s enough money coming from the tribe’s gaming operations to fund all areas being cut.

Cherokee Phoenix Executive Editor Bryan Pollard shared the newspaper’s business plan with the council and said the budget cut would benefit the Phoenix in the long run.

“The Phoenix was basically at a fork in the road. Down one path was ever-increasing costs due to increasing circulation numbers, increasing printing costs and increasing mailing costs where we would be in the position of asking the council for more and more money,” Pollard said. “Or we could go down another path toward self-sufficiency, which is us finding ways to pay for our own operation, and so we’ve taken that path with this plan.”

Glory Jordan said councilors worked with the Phoenix to put the news organization on a path to self-sufficiency.

“I believe that we’re putting them on the road to, what I see, becoming completely on their own,” she said. “While they are being cut…their money is going to a very needed service, which is Head Start.”

The FY 2013 budget is based on a $618-million blueprint proposed by Chief Baker, his first comprehensive budget since taking office on Oct. 19, 2011. Other budget highlights included $1 million for community waterlines, $195,000 for area Boys & Girls Clubs, $50,000 for backpack nutrition programs for needy school children, $206,000 for a new vocational assistance program, $2 million to complete the Cherokee Veterans Center in Tahlequah and more than $90 million in a separate capital projects budget.

Councilors voting for the budget were Glory Jordan, Hoskin, Jodie Fishinghawk, Janelle Fullbright, Frankie Hargis, Dick Lay, Curtis Snell, Joe Byrd and David Walkingstick. Councilors Cara Cowan Watts, Jack Baker, Julia Coates, Meredith Frailey, Don Garvin, Lee Keener, Burl Anglen and David Thornton opposed it.

In other action, a resolution for a “friendly” lawsuit against the Election Commission seeking a declaratory judgment regarding the Voter Amendment Act of 2012 was approved by a 12-5 vote.

The resolution’s language was amended because the council’s attorney, Dianne Barker Harrold, filed the lawsuit on Aug. 31. The lawsuit is one of two filed in the tribe’s District Court regarding the issue of reapportioning the council’s legislative districts from five to 15.

The second suit filed on Sept. 5 by Cowan Watts, Keener, Anglen, Coates and Baker seeks judgment and relief from the redistricting law they deem unconstitutional.

Hoskin said the two lawsuits seek the same outcome, to determine if the Voter Amendment Act is constitutional or not. “It’s incredible. Often we are butting heads about where we want to go. We actually want to go to the same place.”

Cowan Watts, Keener, Anglen, Baker and Coates voted against the resolution.

will-chavez@cherokee.org


918-207-3961

About the Author
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M.

He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life.
He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association.

Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years.
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M. He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life. He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association. Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years.

Election

BY BRITTNEY BENNETT
Phoenix Intern
06/29/2015 09:07 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Oka. – Shawn Crittenden defeated Corey Bunch for the Cherokee Nation’s District 8 Tribal Council seat in the June 27 general election. Crittenden won by a vote count of 486-307, according to certified results of the district’s three precincts. Those results showed Crittenden receiving 61.29 percent of the 793 ballots cast to Bunch’s 38.71 percent. “I’m mainly humbled and thankful for the folks in my district,” Crittenden said. “I had a lot of support and I thank the good Lord for the good feeling I have right now. I’m ready to get down to business with the people in my district. My plans are to be accessible and to stay on top of issues when folks need something, when they want to be heard. I want to do everything I can to show them I care and I’m going to work hard for them.” Bunch conceded the race in a Facebook post around midnight on June 28. “I want to congratulate Shawn Crittenden on winning the district 8 council seat. He ran a good and clean campaign and deserves the victory,” Bunch wrote. “I called and told him that I’m behind him 100% and that I would ask everyone else to do the same. I also want to say ‘Thank you’ to everyone who showed such kindness to me and my family for the past several months.” Dist. 8 covers the eastern part of Adair County, as well as much of its northern border. Crittenden is expected to be sworn into office on Aug. 14, the tribe’s inauguration day. The EC certified the results at 10:30 a.m. on June 29.
BY TESINA JACKSON
Reporter
06/29/2015 01:33 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – According to certified results, At-Large Tribal Council candidates Wanda Hatfield and Betsy Swimmer will face each other in the July 25 runoff. Election Commission officials posted results showing Wanda Hatfield leading with 25.94 percent or 1,057 votes, while Betsy Swimmer was second with 18.9 or 770 votes. “We’re very excited about it,” Hatfield said. “We’re already planning what we’re going to do next.” Hatfield, from Oklahoma City, said the At-Large race was clean, respectful and all online comments were kind and professional. “It was a race that I feel like there were 10 very qualified candidates, and I think we all worked very hard,” she said. Swimmer, of Broken Arrow, said she felt privileged the Cherokee people have confidence in her. “I will work very, very hard to make sure that they have proper representation,” she said. “We had some really wonderful candidates running, so with that in mind I certainly feel like it’s a great honor to have been selected.” According to the certified results, the vote breakdown for the remaining At-Large candidates were: • Shane Jett with 17.6 percent or 717 votes, • Deborah Reed with 7.98 percent or 325 votes, • Tommy Jones with 6.82 percent or 278 votes, • Pamela Fox with 6.06 percent or 247 votes, • Benjamin McKee with 6.06 percent or 247 votes, • Linda Leaf-Bolin with 4.71 percent or 192 votes, • Darell R. Matlock Jr. with 4 percent or 163 votes, and • Trey Brown with 1.94 percent or 79 votes. The EC met on June 29 to certify the general election results. Runoff absentee ballots will be mailed on July 13-14 and the runoff election will take place on July 25. All successful candidates are set to be sworn into office on Aug. 14, according to the Cherokee Nation’s election timeline.
BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter
06/29/2015 01:26 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – According to the certified election results of the June 27 general election, William “Bill” Pearson beat Keith Austin by one vote to win the Tribal Council’s Dist. 14 seat. Results show that Pearson received 534 votes for 50.05 percent of the ballots, while Austin received 533 votes for 49.95 percent. The Cherokee Phoenix contacted both candidates, but neither was available for comment at the time of publication. The EC certified the results at on June 29. Candidates have until 5 p.m. on July 1 to request a recount. Recounts are scheduled for July 2-3 with Supreme Court justices in attendance. The election appeals deadline is July 6. Provided there are any appeals, the Supreme Court will hear those cases July 7-9. Candidates who are elected to office during the general and runoff elections are expected to be sworn in Aug. 14, according to the tribe’s election timeline. The runoff election is set for July 25.
BY TESINA JACKSON
Reporter
06/29/2015 01:18 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – According to certified election results, former Tribal Councilor Buel Anglen will return to the Tribal Council to fill the Dist. 13 seat. Anglen, who previously served as Tribal Councilor from 2002-13, won the race with 63.67 percent of the votes at 517 votes. His opponent, Kenneth Holloway, had 36.33 percent or 295 votes. Election Commission officials returned to the Election Services Office on June 28 to count challenged ballots and included them in the final unofficial results. The EC certified the results on June 29. Anglen said, to be safe, he would wait until the challenged ballots were counted before commenting. He could not be reached at the time of publication. Holloway, who conceded the race around 9 a.m. on June 28, congratulated Anglen and offered his support and prayers as Anglen moves into office. He also thanked his supporters. “I want to thank God first and foremost, then my wife who is my biggest supporter and kept me going, my family and everyone who believed in me on this journey to become Dist. 13’s Tribal Councilor,” he said. Dist. 13 covers most of the northeast Tulsa County and part of western Rogers County. Inauguration day for elected officials is set for Aug. 14, according to the Cherokee Nation’s election timeline.
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Senior Reporter
06/29/2015 01:13 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Dist. 12 Tribal Councilor Dick Lay has retained his seat during the 2015 general election, according to certified election results from the Cherokee Nation’s Election Commission. Results show Lay, of Ochelata, received 61.18 percent of the votes with 446 ballots, while his opponent, Dora Smith Patzkowski, received 38.82 percent of the votes with 283 ballots. Lay is expected to begin serving his second term on Aug. 14, the day when tribal elected officials are inaugurated. “Feeling very humble, grateful and thankful today,” Lay said. “Thanks to my wife and family they have allowed me the time to have the privilege to serve the Cherokee people. Thanks to all of our family, friends, and supporters who made it happen. Old friends and new worked hard to get it done. God bless you all and God bless the Cherokee Nation.” Patzkowski, of Bartlesville, could not be reached for comment before publication but said in an earlier statement her top legislative priority for the Dist. 12 was to improve health care and housing for CN citizens. Dist. 12 includes Washington County and part of Tulsa, Rogers and Nowata counties. The EC certified the general election results on June 29.
BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter
06/29/2015 01:03 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – According to certified results, Natalie Fullbright and Bryan Warner will face each other in the July 25 runoff election for the Cherokee Nation’s Dist. 6 Tribal Council seat. According to certified results of the June 27 general election, Fullbright received 44.11 percent of the votes with 618, while Warner garnered 35.76 percent with 501 votes. The Cherokee Phoenix attempted to contact Fullbright but was unsuccessful. Warner said he is “proud and humbled” to be in a runoff race for Dist. 6. He added that it has been hard work to get to where he’s at and he will continue to work hard for the seat. “We plan on continuing to work hard, I think it’s important as a potential council member to work hard,” he said. “Then if you’re left to be elected, that’s when the real work starts.” He also extended his appreciation to all of the CN citizens who cast their votes for him. “One thing like I’ve always told all of them is it’s a group effort, and I feel like I want them to be part of this process because if I’m elected I’ll continue to inform and have the citizens be aware of everything, use their ideas with mine to do the best job possible,” he said. Dist. 6 covers the eastern part of Sequoyah County. Brian Keith McCoy came in third with 11.85 percent or 166 votes, and Ron Goff came in fourth with 8.28 percent or 116 votes. Runoff absentee ballots will be mailed out on July 13-14. The EC met on June 29 to certify the results from the general election. Candidates who are successful in their races are set to be sworn into office on Aug. 14.