Tribal Councilors Jodie Fishinghawk, left, Tina Glory Jordan and Chuck Hoskin Jr. confer during the council’s Sept. 17 meeting in Tahlequah, Okla. The main topic on the agenda was the tribe’s fiscal year 2013 budget. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Head Start gets additional $400K in 2013 budget

Cherokee veteran Joeseph Fourkiller, 87, of Stilwell, Okla., was honored during the Sept. 17 Tribal Council for his military service by the council, Deputy Chief Joe Crittenden, shown pinning the medal onto Fourkiller, and Principal Chief Bill John Baker, right. Fourkiller was presented with a Cherokee Warrior medal and plaque. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee veteran Joeseph Fourkiller, 87, of Stilwell, Okla., was honored during the Sept. 17 Tribal Council for his military service by the council, Deputy Chief Joe Crittenden, shown pinning the medal onto Fourkiller, and Principal Chief Bill John Baker, right. Fourkiller was presented with a Cherokee Warrior medal and plaque. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Senior Reporter
09/18/2012 04:56 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Tribal Council approved the Cherokee Nation’s fiscal year 2013 budget by a 9-8 vote at its Sept. 17 meeting, giving Head Start $400,000 more than it had in FY 2012 but at the expense of the Cherokee Heritage Center and Cherokee Phoenix.

If Principal Chief Bill John Baker signs the budget act, the Head Start increase will be effective on Oct. 1 and provide pre-K education at tribal Head Start sites throughout northeast Oklahoma.

“Head Start makes a difference for kids and families throughout Cherokee Nation,” Tribal Council Speaker Tina Glory Jordan said. “With this new funding, Head Start can increase teacher salaries and stay competitive.”

During the meeting, Head Start Director Verna Thompson said it has been difficult to retain experienced staff because she was not able to offer competitive salaries.

However, increased funding for Head Start came via 25 percent reductions for the Cherokee Heritage Center and the tribe’s newspaper, the Cherokee Phoenix.

Glory Jordan said both of those entities were capable of finding new funding sources and would continue receiving large subsidies in the new budget.

The Phoenix has a plan to generate new revenues from advertisings sales, subscription fees and sponsored distribution sites, which Deputy Speaker Chuck Hoskin Jr. said would put the paper on the path to “fiscal independence.”

However, Tribal Councilor Cara Cowan Watts disagreed with the CHC and Phoenix cuts.

“I do think that Head Start needs additional money, but it’s going to be at the cost of our Cherokee Heritage Center and our Cherokee Phoenix. They (both) have 25 percent budget cuts,” she said.

Cowan Watts said she thought the cuts had been discussed beforehand with the Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board and staff, but later found that was not the case.

“Another group got caught in the middle of politics, and now I think the very essence of our free press act is at risk…they are going to have to eliminate the paper edition and free subscriptions to Cherokee citizens,” she said. “I think we could have done that way differently. We could plan ahead for that and have our free press be given the opportunity to plan one and three years out.”

She said she believes there’s enough money coming from the tribe’s gaming operations to fund all areas being cut.

Cherokee Phoenix Executive Editor Bryan Pollard shared the newspaper’s business plan with the council and said the budget cut would benefit the Phoenix in the long run.

“The Phoenix was basically at a fork in the road. Down one path was ever-increasing costs due to increasing circulation numbers, increasing printing costs and increasing mailing costs where we would be in the position of asking the council for more and more money,” Pollard said. “Or we could go down another path toward self-sufficiency, which is us finding ways to pay for our own operation, and so we’ve taken that path with this plan.”

Glory Jordan said councilors worked with the Phoenix to put the news organization on a path to self-sufficiency.

“I believe that we’re putting them on the road to, what I see, becoming completely on their own,” she said. “While they are being cut…their money is going to a very needed service, which is Head Start.”

The FY 2013 budget is based on a $618-million blueprint proposed by Chief Baker, his first comprehensive budget since taking office on Oct. 19, 2011. Other budget highlights included $1 million for community waterlines, $195,000 for area Boys & Girls Clubs, $50,000 for backpack nutrition programs for needy school children, $206,000 for a new vocational assistance program, $2 million to complete the Cherokee Veterans Center in Tahlequah and more than $90 million in a separate capital projects budget.

Councilors voting for the budget were Glory Jordan, Hoskin, Jodie Fishinghawk, Janelle Fullbright, Frankie Hargis, Dick Lay, Curtis Snell, Joe Byrd and David Walkingstick. Councilors Cara Cowan Watts, Jack Baker, Julia Coates, Meredith Frailey, Don Garvin, Lee Keener, Burl Anglen and David Thornton opposed it.

In other action, a resolution for a “friendly” lawsuit against the Election Commission seeking a declaratory judgment regarding the Voter Amendment Act of 2012 was approved by a 12-5 vote.

The resolution’s language was amended because the council’s attorney, Dianne Barker Harrold, filed the lawsuit on Aug. 31. The lawsuit is one of two filed in the tribe’s District Court regarding the issue of reapportioning the council’s legislative districts from five to 15.

The second suit filed on Sept. 5 by Cowan Watts, Keener, Anglen, Coates and Baker seeks judgment and relief from the redistricting law they deem unconstitutional.

Hoskin said the two lawsuits seek the same outcome, to determine if the Voter Amendment Act is constitutional or not. “It’s incredible. Often we are butting heads about where we want to go. We actually want to go to the same place.”

Cowan Watts, Keener, Anglen, Baker and Coates voted against the resolution.

will-chavez@cherokee.org


918-207-3961

About the Author
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M.

He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life.
He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association.

Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years.
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M. He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life. He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association. Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years.

Council

BY TESINA JACKSON
Reporter
03/17/2015 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – During the March 16 Tribal Council meeting, Principal Chief Bill John Baker announced that the Sonosky, Chambers, Sachse, Endreson & Perry law firm and attorney Lloyd Miller have jointly donated $200,000 for the construction of Cherokee Nation health care facilities. “We’ve fought the fight on self-governance issues, your battles with the Indian Health Service and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, your battles to ensure the integrity of the Cherokee Nation sometimes against other tribes, and it’s all been successful,” said Miller, who is employed with the law firm that has worked with the tribe for more than 20 years. “You’ve been wonderful to us in terms of your confidence in us, your trust in us, and it’s our pleasure to be able to give back to you.” Baker said the tribe has been successful with Miller as its attorney on contract support costs. “He originally won a lawsuit of about $12 million. Then we just won another one for $20 million with part of the settlement being they (federal government) will fully find contract support costs from now on.” The donation will go to CN construction projects such as health care clinics in Ochelata and Jay as well as a new W.W. Hastings Hospital in Tahlequah. In other business, Tribal Councilors unanimously authorized CN Human Services – specifically children, youth and family services – to submit a grant application for fiscal year 2016 to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Tribal Councilor Cara Cowan Watts absent. Tribal Councilor Frankie Hargis said earlier in the day at the Community Services Committee meeting that the grant is a formula-based grant with a minimum funding of $350,000 for victims of family violence. Tribal Councilors also authorized CN Career Services to submit a grant application to the U.S. Department of Education for vocational rehabilitation program funding. Since 1992, the tribe has operated the vocational rehabilitation program, which assists in ensuring self-sufficiency for tribal citizens. It is Oklahoma’s longest running tribal vocational rehabilitation program. According to the resolution, individuals with disabilities are in need of employment and training activities so they can enter jobs and become self-sufficient, and the Department of Education has funding available for vocational training programs for such individuals. The grant requires that a 10 percent cash match be made available to the program each year of funding. Hargis said the grant is new and would be approximately $600,000 per year for a five-year period. Legislators also approved Bobby L. Vaughn as a governing board member of the CN Comprehensive Care Agency for a term of three years from March 2015 to March 2018. “I’m the patient safety officer at Hastings Hospital right now, and I’d just like to say what an honor it is for me to be nominated for this position by the chief so it’s really near my heart,” Vaughn said during the Feb. 26 Rules Committee meeting. “I hope to do an excellent job for you.” J. Blake Fletcher was reappointed as a commissioner of the CN Environmental Protection Commission for a three-year term. “I just want to thank the council for allowing me to serve in this capacity and I really look forward to continuing that service,” Fletcher said on Feb. 26. Marty D. Matlock was also reappointed as a commissioner of the CN Environmental Protection Commission for a four-year term. The next Tribal Council meeting is scheduled for April 13.
BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter
02/27/2015 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – At its Feb. 26 meeting, the Tribal Council approved an act that gives Cherokee Nation motor vehicle tax revenues to schools outside the tribe’s jurisdictional boundaries but within Tulsa, Rogers, Mayes, Wagoner and Muskogee counties. The monies those schools receive would be based off the number of CN citizens attending each school. Tribal officials said schools would receive about $143 per CN citizen enrolled. Officials said the tribe has garnered about $1.5 million in motor vehicle sales in the non-jurisdictional areas of the five counties since Nov. 1, 2013, when the compact went into effect. Tribal Councilor Victoria Vazquez, who sponsored the bill, made the motion to approve the act and was seconded by Tribal Councilor Don Garvin. However, Tribal Councilor Dick Lay said he didn’t think the bigger schools in the non-jurisdictional areas of Tulsa, Rogers, Mayes, Wagoner and Muskogee counties should benefit from the funding and that the tribe should focus more on the rural schools. Lay also motioned to amend the legislation by asking that half the money go to the schools in the non-jurisdictional area of the five counties and half stay within the tribe’s jurisdiction. “I motion to amend the legislation to leave everything the same except the new jurisdiction, compact jurisdiction, to share the revenue and proceeds 50/50 with the old in-jurisdiction legislation,” he said. He then asked Vazquez if his amendment would work. “I’m not sure its up to me. I would like to have input from our secretary of state (Chuck Hoskin Jr.),” she said. Hoskin said the tribe’s administration was confident in the legislation as written. “The legislation we put before you is consistent with the compact that this body approved, that the Cherokee Nation signed. And I, with respect to Councilman Lay, think that would not be consistent with it,” Hoskin said. “I’ve heard his arguments and respect him greatly but respectfully disagree.” Vazquez refused the amendment and Lay requested that it be put in the form of a motion, but his motion failed for lack of a second. The act passed 10-3 with Tribal Councilors Tina Glory Jordan, David Walkingstick and Lay voting against it. Tribal Councilors Curtis Snell, Julia Coates, Cara Cowan Watts and David Thornton were absent. The council also confirmed CN citizens to various boards and commissions. Carrie Philpott was approved to the Registration Committee, and Rick Smith, Frances Head, Lyndon Emberton and Joe Hutchison were approved to the Elected Officials Citizen Committee. Also, surplus office equipment was approved for donation to the Indian Capital Technology Center’s criminal justice program, Hulbert School, Greasy Community Building, the Tri-Community W.E.B., Chewey Neighborhood Association, the Chelsea Boys and Girls Club, Safenet Services Organization, Friends of the Library in Delaware County, Delaware County Fair Board and Delaware County Boys and Girls Club. Councilors also approved two five-year, trust-land leases for TNT Fireworks. Each lease will last for four weeks in June and July. One lease was approved in Kay County for $7,328 annually and one in Rogers County for $5,000 annually. Also passed was an act to set stipends for the Elected Officials Citizen Committee. The act will pay each member $500 “to cover all expenses they incur to attend up to three of their meetings.” Members are charged with the responsibility of setting salaries for all CN elected officials. Councilors also approved Human Services to submit an application for funding to the Oklahoma Office of Juvenile Affairs for Youth Shelter Services and Prevention. Legislators also authorized the Bureau of Indian Affairs to revise and update the tribe’s inventory of tribal transportation facilities. Other resolutions passed consisted of support for the Autry National Center’s Civil War and the West exhibit and the placement of land into trust for the Clinic in the Woods and Cascade properties in Tahlequah. Officials said the properties would be used for the tribe’s Behavioral Health. Councilors also unanimously passed an act relating to intoxicating liquors. The act allows the tribe to take Cherokees into tribal court and offer them services that may not be available outside of the tribe’s courts. Also, Tribal Councilor Jodie Fishinghawk was elected the council’s new secretary until her council term ends in August.
BY STAFF REPORTS
02/01/2015 12:00 PM
CLAREMORE, Okla. – Principal Chief Bill John Baker recently named Tribal Councilor Janees Taylor as the tribe’s representative to the Claremore Indian Hospital advisory board. Taylor, of Pryor, replaced Tribal Councilor Dick Lay who resigned in December. As a board member, Taylor will work to promote the CN’s interest in decisions that are made at the Indian Health Service-operated hospital. “A lot of positive changes have been made at Claremore Indian Hospital in the last couple of years, and I hope to be a part of it,” Taylor said. “Claremore Indian Hospital is unique in that it is not controlled by the Cherokee Nation, like our other health centers and W.W. Hastings Hospital are. For that reason, continuing to have a Cherokee Nation representative on this board will help our own health care system work toward a seamless transition for our citizens using Claremore Indian Hospital.” The advisory board meets quarterly to discuss current hospital policy and operations. “Councilor Taylor brings a wealth of experience and knowledge to the board of directors. She will be a strong advocate for the hospital’s commitment to quality health care for Native people in northeast Oklahoma,” Baker said. Taylor had her first meeting as a board member on Jan. 20.
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Senior Reporter
01/13/2015 02:29 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – During its Jan. 12 meeting, the Tribal Council unanimously approved a resolution opposing the construction of a transmission power line that would carry power generated by windmills in western Oklahoma through the state and Arkansas into Tennessee. With Julia Coates absent, the 16 Tribal Councilors present voted against the 750-mile project being proposed by the Plains & Eastern Company based in Houston. Legislators are particularly opposed to the line running through Sequoyah County, which is within the tribe’s jurisdiction. Tribal Councilor Cara Cowan Watts initially abstained from voting for the resolution in committee because she said she did not have enough information. “We don’t have information, all the information, I think. Even if it is accurate and it’s going to impact our facilities or places and locations and historic places and routes, not just in Sequoyah County but also in Arkansas, we have a lot of work to do,” Cowan Watts said. “What came out in committee was potentially they had been contacting the tribe for three years, and we (council) hadn’t been informed. So, I think there’s additional investigations that need to occur about what did or didn’t happen with involvement with the tribe.” Tribal Councilor Janelle Fullbright, who helps represent Sequoyah County, said she has attended public meetings regarding the transmission line and heard from landowners who may be affected and who do not want to give up lands. She said landowners, some of them CN citizens, also do not want to see 200-foot towers on their lands or hear humming noises emitted by transmission lines. There is also the possibility that the lines would emit a low-grade level of radiation, Fullbright said. She said 800 Sequoyah County residents have signed a petition against the transmission line and that Sequoyah County commissioners are also against it. Also, the line would run near and parallel to the marked Trail of Tears trail in the county, she said. Tribal Councilor Jack Baker, who serves as the president of the national Trail of Tears Association, said the superintendent who oversees the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail is also opposed to the project because it would affect Trail of Tears sites in Oklahoma and Arkansas. “I’m also opposed to it simply because of the affect it will have on Cherokee citizens as it crosses their property,” he said. In other business, the Tribal Council unanimously approved Nathan Barnard nomination to the CN Administrative Appeals Board, which hears appeals from people who have lost employment with the tribe. Barnard is filling a vacancy left by Lynn Burris, who resigned after being confirmed to the tribe’s Supreme Court. Bernard will serve from Jan. 13 to Oct. 31. Supreme Court Judge John Garrett swore in Barnard during the meeting. “I want to thank Chief (Bill John) Baker for nominating me, and I want to thank the council for the opportunity to serve the Nation, and I will certainly do my very best,” Barnard said after taking his oath. During his State of the Nation report, Principal Chief Bill John Baker announced that the tribe has expanded maternity leave for tribal employees. “This means it’s on our insurance, and it doesn’t mean it is sick leave or vacation. It’s above and beyond (employee insurance), so that our young mothers, and fathers, can nurture our young Cherokee children,” he said. Also, for tribal employees, the CN has adopted a new emergency communications system to better inform workers of “bad weather days.” “The system will allow us to send voice mails and/or text messages directly to the staff in the event of a closing or a delay or any emergency,” Principal Chief Baker said. The Tribal Council also honored CN citizen and artist Donald Vann for his support of fellow Cherokee veterans by donating his art to them and for his achievements as an artist. Vann is a veteran who served in the Vietnam War and was assigned to the 1st Calvary Aviation Division. In November 1969, Vann’s helicopter was shot down. Only he and his crew chief survived the violent crash. After recovering from his injuries, Vann rejoined his unit in Fort Hood, Texas, where he was assigned to desk duty and later went on to be a drill instructor. In March 1973, he received an honorable discharge. He earned several medals, including the Purple Heart, National Defense, Good Conduct, Vietnam Campaign and Republic of Vietnam Campaign. Vann’s Stilwell High School principal, Dr. Neil Morton, spoke about Vann during the meeting saying he recognized that Vann was not like other students and enrolled him in an alternative program and allowed him to paint murals on the school’s walls for two hours every day. He said Vann’s first mural was a depiction of the Trail of Tears. Vann thanked the body for the honor and his business partner, Scott Bernard, for his assistance since moving to Tahlequah from Austin, Texas, about five years ago.
BY STAFF REPORTS
01/01/2015 04:00 PM
During the 6 p.m. Nov. 13, 2014 Tribal Council meeting, Councilors discussed: • A resolution confirming the reappointment of James Amos as a commissioner of the Housing Authority of the Cherokee Nation Board of Commissioners • A act amending the Legislative Act #25-14 authorizing the comprehensive operating budget for FY15 ...and more. <a href="http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/Docs/2014/12/8797_Nov13_2014CouncilMinutes.pdf" target="_blank">Click here to read</a> the Nov. 13, 2014 meeting minutes. <a href="https://cherokee.legistar.com/DepartmentDetail.aspx?ID=3301&GUID=C557BD6A-E296-4A30-BF3E-2035FF8607CC&Mode=MainBody" target="_blank">Click here to view</a> the Nov. 13 Tribal Council meeting video.
BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter
12/22/2014 10:59 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – According to a Dec. 19 statement, Tribal Councilor Dick Lay said he is resigning his position as a Cherokee Nation member of the Claremore Indian Hospital advisory board effective immediately. “I have worked hard and greatly enjoyed my opportunity with the Claremore Indian Hospital Unit in service to Cherokee Nation citizens of the Claremore service area,” he said. He added that during his tenure on the board he helped accomplish: • Taking over the contract referrals for CN citizens in most of the service area, • Supporting the purchase and installation of the MRI equipment at the hospital, • Having the Cherokee Nation Marshal Service assist in law enforcement at the hospital, • Having CN physicians on loan to Claremore hospital when needed, • CN assist with Claremore patients during emergencies, and • Providing all Claremore board reports to the Tribal Council and CN administration. He said overall there the board has achieved “great cooperation” with the Indian Health Service, federal authorities, Claremore management, Claremore hospital personnel and the CN. Lay added that serving on the board has helped him serve not only the hospital but also the tribe, which was one of his goals as a representative. “I would like to thank all the Claremore advisory board members for their friendship and their service to the board,” he said. “Thanks also to the UKB (United Keetoowah Band) representative Dr. Charles Gosnell for his friendship and great insight. Thank you to (Principal) Chief (Bill John) Baker and his Cabinet for their trust in me and allowing me to serve our people.” The Cherokee Phoenix asked for a reason for his resignation, but Lay declined to comment. Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. released a statement on Dec. 22 stating the tribe appreciated Lay’s service on the board but that the position is an CN administration appointment and the executive branch was in the process of selecting his successor.