The Cherokee Nation Foundation, in partnership with Cherokee Media Ltd., has produced three books written in the Cherokee language accompanied by audio so children can listen to the story while they read. The two books shown are “The Three Bears” and “The Little Red Hen.” TESINA JACKSON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

CNF releases Cherokee language audio books

BY TESINA JACKSON
Reporter
09/21/2012 08:34 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – In 2008, the Cherokee Nation Foundation, in partnership with Cherokee Media Ltd., produced three books written in the Cherokee language and accompanied by audio so children can listen to the story while they read.

“The books are traditional stories including ‘The Three Bears,’ ‘The Little Red Hen’ and ‘Origins of Oak Leafs,’” CNF Executive Director Kimberlie Gilliland said. “Using these well-known story books allowed us to engage the readers with the Cherokee language, while giving them comfort in stories they are already familiar with.”

Cherokee Nation citizens Ray D. Ketter and Wynema Smith wrote the books while Andrew Sikora, director at Cherokee Media, produced audio recordings, which feature Smith’s voice.

Noksi Press originally printed the books in 2008, and in July 2012, the CNF secured funding necessary to include the audio element and reprint in larger quantities for mass distribution.

“The books were created to help with Cherokee language literacy and fluency,” Gilliland said. “The audio element is the best possible way to address common difficulties in the annunciation of the Cherokee language.”

So far, the audio kits have been distributed to 16 students at the Cherokee Language Immersion School and a few at-large California Cherokee community groups.

CNF officials hope to expand the project by donating 500 audio kits to local libraries and schools within the tribe’s 14-county jurisdiction in November in honor of Native American history month. Each kit would include the three print books accompanied by its audio.

“We do plan on having the kits available for purchase through the Cherokee Nation
Gift Shop near the end of the year for the holiday season,” Gilliland said.

All proceeds from the books will go to the advancement of the audio book initiative and fund the creation and distribution of additional books. The project was funded through private donation to the CNF.

tesina-jackson@cherokee.org


918-453-5000, ext. 6139

Education

BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
05/31/2016 12:00 PM
TULSA, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen Nicolas Crear, a 17-year-old junior at Union High School, spent the first few days of May serving as an Oklahoma House of Representative page for Rep. Regina Goodwin as part of the House of Representative Page Program. “A select few high school students get picked from different parts of Oklahoma to aid a senator or a House representative,” he said. “We sit at this desk and when the phone rings they tell us to go run this errand in the House or in the Senate. We’re pretty much running all over the state Capitol just doing errands for senators or representatives.” Crear said he previously was a page for Oklahoma Sen. Anastasia Pittman, so he was excited to serve for Goodwin and see what the House had to offer. “I was on the floor a little bit more this time because in the Senate I think they were like starting to slow down in this session. It was like one of the last weeks when they didn’t have too many bills to pass,” he said. “So, on the House side there were a lot more bills. We spent like, I think, three hours on the floor one day.” Crear said next year he hopes to be a page for the Oklahoma Senate again. “I would like to do a little bit more on the Senate side because it’s not as many people and you get to do more jobs because when there’s like 28 kids or something like that work is distributed. Everyone does a good amount of work, but I just wish I could have did a little bit more,” he said. Crear said the opportunities he has received to serve as a page for both the Oklahoma Senate and House have given him new educational experiences. He added that he suggests others his age try becoming a page. “I think it’s important for teenagers to understand why these things or how these bills get passed because it just doesn’t happen over night,” he said. “I highly suggest that someone should try this out because if we’re going to want to better our community we need to know what goes on to passing a bill and we need to be just a little more educated on how government works.” What is a Student Spotlight? A Student Spotlight is a 200-to-400-word feature on a Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band or Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians citizen who is a student, whether they are in grades kindergarten through 12 or higher education, either excelling in school or doing something out of the ordinary. How do I recommend a student for the Student Spotlight series? To recommend a student, email stacie-guthrie@cherokee.org with the student’s name, contact information and a brief summary of why he or she should be chosen.
BY STAFF REPORTS
05/19/2016 10:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizens Jackson Wells and Ashlyn King are, respectively, the valedictorian and salutatorian for Sequoyah High School’s class of 2016. The school’s graduation is at 6:30 p.m. on May 20 at the Place Where They Play gym. “This year’s graduating class has outstanding leaders who will go on to do many great things,” Sequoyah Superintendent Leroy Qualls said. “We are proud of their accomplishments and wish them a bright future as they move into their next journey.” Wells, 18, of Tahlequah, has a 4.57 GPA and is attending Brown University this fall. “My grandpa has always been my biggest motivation because he always believed in me,” Wells said. “He is the wisest person I have ever met and everything he has said has always driven me.” Wells completed 36 hours of concurrent college courses at Northeastern State University while in high school. He is also in National Honor Society, student council, academic team, chess club, yearbook, drama club and band. King, 18, of Tahlequah, has a 4.26 GPA and is attending the University of Oklahoma this fall. King is a member of NHS and drama club. She is also the percussion section leader in the school’s marching band and president of Students Working Against Tobacco. King has completed 17 hours of concurrent college courses at NSU and is taking six hours of summer classes at OU. “I will really miss marching band,” King said. “One of the most memorable moments I will always have is during my sophomore year we won a trophy for best drum line of the year in a competition and the trophy was about 4 feet tall. It was awesome.” King plans to study biochemistry and Wells is undecided, but hopes to one day be a professor. The class of 2016 has earned $1.36 million in college scholarships, had two Gates Millennium Scholars and 33 seniors complete at least 12 hours of concurrent college courses.
BY STAFF REPORTS
05/17/2016 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Sequoyah Schools Summer Feeding Program will kick off on May 23. The program provides free breakfast and lunch to children 18 years old and younger. The program is set to run until July 8 and will be provide meals Monday through Thursday. Breakfast is served at 7 a.m. to 8 a.m. while lunch is served from 11 a.m. to noon. Adults may also enjoy the food and purchase breakfast for $2 and lunch for $4. Sequoyah’s cafeteria is located at 17091 S. Muskogee Ave. For more information, call 918-453-5190.
BY STAFF REPORTS
05/13/2016 12:30 PM
CLAREMORE, Okla. – The Indian Women’s Pocahontas Club will sponsor 10 Cherokee students’ with a $600 per academic year scholarship or endowment. The scholarship applications will be considered on a first-come, first-served basis for full-time students enrolled in an accredited institution of higher education, according to a release. Applications must be received by July 31. For more information regarding eligibility requirements, call Vicki at 918-798-0771 or visit <a href="http://www.iwpclub.org" target="_blank">www.iwpclub.org</a>.
BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
05/13/2016 08:15 AM
STILLWATER, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen Megan Baker, an 18-year-old sophomore at Oklahoma State University, was recently crowned as the university’s Miss American Indian 2016-17. With the title comes responsibility and Baker said she is ready for it. “I was filled with pride to be chosen as a Native American representative for Oklahoma State University and was anxious to make a difference in my community,” she said. Baker said earning the title has led her to “countless” opportunities. “I recently have been chosen to attend the sixth annual Native Women’s Leadership Academy, along with (CN citizen) Cierra Fields, to represent Cherokee Nation. It means that I am going to be a representative of the Cherokee Nation and my school,” she said. Baker said she is involved with the school’s Native American Student Association, which she helps with different events such as the annual powwow. “We put on the annual powwow there in Stillwater. This year I helped with that for about 12 hours,” she said. “We also have Indian taco sales, which help us put on different programs.” Baker is a psychology major and plans to minor in sociology. She said she eventually hopes to become a criminal profiler or criminal psychologist and work with the FBI. “It has always been my dream to be an investigator of sorts and helping people is just rewarding in itself,” she said. Baker said before entering college she was a 2015 co-valedictorian at Locust Grove High School. “It was just the greatest honor that I could have received from Locust Grove. I tried so hard academically, taking all honors courses and being a concurrent student that it felt like I got the recognition and felt like they noticed my hard work as a student,” she said. Baker said being a CN citizen not only makes her a strong person, but also leader. “Our people are so strong and have been through so much and have come out of the ashes to become one of the best nations, in my book,” she said. “I think that there are so many great young representatives that are doing amazing things for our Nation, and to me I believe that to be a citizen, means to be a strong person and a strong leader.”
BY JAMI MURPHY
Senior Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
05/12/2016 08:15 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Columbia University in New York recently accepted Tahlequah High School senior Miriam Reed for the fall semester. To pay for that Ivy League education, the school is giving the Cherokee Nation citizen an annual scholarship of $73,000 for four years. She is a Gates Millennium scholar to boot. With hopes of majoring in environmental engineering, Reed committed to the school in April. Several universities, including California Berkley, Notre Dame, Pennsylvania and Arkansas, accepted her college applications. She narrowed her options to Berkley and Columbia before choosing Columbia. That decision was affirmed after attending a paid trip to the school’s Engineering Days in April. “Everyone there was so welcoming, and they made it feel like a place that I wanted to spend the next four years,” she said. “Your admission counselors knew everything about you. It just really felt like home.” Reed said the Columbia scholarship would cover all aspects of her life there, including personal expenses and travel. Her Gates Millennium Scholarship, she said, would allow her to focus on school and not work. “That gives me the opportunity to study abroad. I don’t have to do a work study program, so I can focus purely on my school,” she said. “It covers 10 years of a college education, if I wanted to go get my master’s (degree) elsewhere. I don’t have to be pressured into staying at a school for four years…it also gives me the opportunity to lessen my grant that I got from Columbia to help someone else provide for their school as well.” Her long-term goals include earning a degree in environmental engineering and partaking in alternative energy projects for underdeveloped areas of the world. “I’m looking forward to joining their (Columbia’s) engineering club that they have there. They go out and they get to help different countries with water filtration systems and helping build bridges and just like really helping countries that are less privileged than the country we live in,” she said. In high school, Reed was involved in the Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps, dance team, National Honor Society, student council, science club, academic team, Mu Alpha Theta and Cherokee club. She also took Advance Placement classes in literature, U.S. history, calculus, physics and statistics. “I’m in the top 3 percent. I’m ranked No. 4 (in a class of about 300),” she said. “As the first of my mother’s children to go to college it means a lot to me that I was able to excel so greatly.” Reed said she’s dreamed of attending college outside of Oklahoma and that opportunities are more abundant elsewhere. “Once you get out you can see all the different diversity and the other options that are in this country for us, and I believe that once you gain different ideas and different opportunities from other places, when you come home it makes you appreciate home much more, and it gives you something different to bring back to your town.” Reed said. Other than her home, family and friends, she said she would miss the “small town life.” “I’m going to miss getting to walk down the street and see downtown. There’s not going to be the tight-knit sense of community that Tahlequah is. There’s going to be so much more people. It’s going to feel like that small town vibe is what I’m going to miss the most,” she said. She added that students like her should strive for higher educations. She also offered advice for when interviewing at colleges: be yourself. “Don’t feel like you have to act like someone else. Just be genuine and be who you are and let them see your character. They’re not looking to see that you know these large vocabulary words. They want to know that you’re a human being that has a passion for something. They’re looking to see that you’re involved in things and that you care about something.”