Principal Chief Bill John Baker presents a Pendleton blanket to California Rep. Mike Honda as Cherokee Nation Treasurer Lacey Horn looks on during the Democratic National Convention, which was held Sept. 4-6 in Charlotte, N.C. COURTESY PHOTO

Baker serves as Democratic National Convention delegate

Principal Chief Bill John Baker presents a Pendleton blanket to former Oklahoma Sen. Fred Harris during the Democratic National Convention, which was held Sept. 4-6 in Charlotte, N.C. COURTESY PHOTO Principal Chief Bill John Baker presents a Pendleton blanket to former Oklahoma Sen. Fred Harris during the Democratic National Convention, which was held Sept. 4-6 in Charlotte, N.C. COURTESY PHOTO
Principal Chief Bill John Baker presents a Pendleton blanket to former Oklahoma Sen. Fred Harris during the Democratic National Convention, which was held Sept. 4-6 in Charlotte, N.C. COURTESY PHOTO
BY KEVIN SCRAPPER
09/26/2012 08:31 AM
BY KEVIN SCRAPPER
Reporter

TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Not all Democrats get to attend the Democratic Nation Convention to nominate the party’s presidential candidate. Even fewer get to announce his or her state’s delegates vote during the convention’s roll call. However, Principal Chief Bill John Baker got to do both during this year’s DNC held Sept. 4-6 in Charlotte, N.C.

Baker said he represented the Cherokee Nation in his official capacity and that during the vote to re-nominate President Barack Obama for president, he announced Oklahoma’s vote.

“I was honored to attend the convention as principal chief of the Cherokee Nation and on behalf of the Cherokee Nation’s federal interests,” Baker said. “To stand on a national stage as principal chief of the Cherokee Nation and cast my delegate vote for President Obama on behalf of the state of Oklahoma helped shine the national spotlight on the Cherokee Nation.”

However, Baker did not represent the tribe alone. CN Treasurer Lacy Horn, Secretary of State Charles Head, Attorney General Todd Hembree and Communications Director Amanda Clinton joined Baker on the trip, all in their official capacities.

“In Charlotte, my top leadership and I attended meetings with several business leaders, U.S. senators, members of the Oklahoma House of Representatives, as well as promising candidates for national office who support tribal nations,” Baker said. “We were fortunate to meet with Google, Vice President Joe Biden, Congressman Mike Honda and many others.”

As reported by the Cherokee Phoenix, Google awarded the Cherokee Nation Foundation a $50,000 grant that will allow the foundation to launch campaigns on Google.

Baker said the grant and other opportunities obtained were made possible by the meetings he and his team attended.

“Our meetings with Congressman Honda and other members of Congress were equally productive,” he said. “Tribal nations face potential budget cuts from the federal government every year, and as a member of the powerful House Appropriations and Budget Committee, Congressman Honda is a key ally for the Cherokee Nation.”

Baker said Obama is the first president to have a true open door policy with tribes and that openness to listen is proof of his respect for the government-to-government relationship between tribes and the United States.

“As I said during the convention, President Obama has been the best president Indian Country has ever had,” Baker said. “There have been several presidents try to develop a relationship with sovereign nations, but not to the extent of the current administration.”

Baker said he proudly supports Obama as he has populated his staff with talented Natives in key administrative positions that affect tribal communities.

“He supports expanded education opportunities, improved health care access and supported infrastructure improvements to create economic opportunities in Indian County,” he said. “With the Obama administration, several key accomplishments have been met, including the Cobell settlement, the Indian Health care Improvement Act, the Violence Against Woman Act and the Keepseagle settlement. His collaboration with tribes is unprecedented and shows that he truly values the Indian perspective and respects our sovereignty.”

Baker added that attending the DNC meant a lot to him and the CN.

“Overall, my service as a delegate was extremely productive for the Cherokee Nation, and it was an experience I will cherish forever,” he said.

CN funds covered Baker, Horn, Head and Hembree’s travel costs, while Cherokee Nation Businesses covered Clinton’s expenses. According to CN Communications, the Nation paid $8,310.46, while CNB paid $1214.64. Expenses consisted of flight, hotel, meals and ground transportation.

kevin-scrapper@cherokee.org


918-453-5000 ext. 5903

News

BY STAFF REPORTS
03/31/2015 02:00 PM
MUSKOGEE, Okla. – Bacone College senior forward Matt Qualls has been named to the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics 2014-15 Division I Men’s Basketball All-America teams. Qualls, of Tahlequah, was named to the NAIA Third Team All-America list. Qualls led the country and Red River Athletic Conference in scoring at 26.0 points per game and pulled down a conference leading 11 boards per game. He scored 351 points in the 2013-14 season and 676 points in 2014-15 for a total of 1,027 points. Additionally, Qualls was named RRAC All-Conference first team and a NABC-NAIA Men’s Basketball All-Star for his efforts during the 2014-2015 season. On Feb. 20, Qualls scored a career-high 47 points against LSU Shreveport in an 88-82-overtime loss. Qualls also pulled in 19 rebounds on his way to winning player of the week. He also became just the third player in school history to record 1,000 career points since the Bacone Warriors of Muskogee joined the NAIA. Though frequently injured this season, the Cherokee Nation citizen picked up other honors during the season including being named the Red River Athletic Conference “Men’s Basketball Player of the Week” three times and being named the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics “National Division I Men’s Basketball Player” of the Week for Feb. 16-22. He is studying health and physical education at Bacone and hopes to get a chance in the D-League, the National Basketball Association’s development league, or join a professional team in Europe. Eventually, he said wants to be a coach like his father Leroy Qualls.
BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter
03/31/2015 12:00 PM
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BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
03/31/2015 10:00 AM
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BY STAFF REPORTS
03/29/2015 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. –Red Dirt musician Stoney LaRue will be headlining this years Cherokee Nation Employee Appreciation Day, which honors employees for their hard work throughout the past year. The outdoor free concert is open to the public and is on April 2. It will take place just west of the W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex in Tahlequah. The opening act will be the all-Cherokee group, Pumpkin Hollow Band. They will kick off the show at 5:30 p.m. “These Oklahoma musicians have a strong local following and will put on a great show for our community and the entire Cherokee Nation,” said Principal Chief Bill John Baker. “We wanted to show our appreciation to our employees and the community with a night of good music and family fun.” LaRue, who is Texas-born but a longtime Oklahoman, is known for his hits “Down in Flames,” “Feet Don’t Touch the Ground,” “Oklahoma Breakdown” and “One Cord Song.” The crowd can expect to hear his hits and also songs from his new album, “AVIATOR.” “The theme is, essentially, following direction, trusting in yourself and new beginnings,” said LaRue. “I’d say it’s a little combination of rootsy rock, country, folk and whatever else is in the hodge podge, and separate as much of the pride and ego from it, and put it in a format that’s easy to listen to.” CN citizens Rod Buckhorn, Doo Reese, Kirk Reese and Spider Stopp named the band in honor of their birthplace, Pumpkin Hollow. The country and red dirt genre band has opened for Luke Bryan, Mark Chesnutt, Brantley Gilbert and Tracy Lawrence. According to a CN press release, no alcohol, tobacco or ice chests are permitted on the premises. Food vendors will be on site and shuttles available for parking. Bringing lawn chairs and blankets to sit on is encouraged. The Cherokee Nation W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex is located at 17675 S. Muskogee Ave.
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/29/2015 12:00 PM
OOLOGAH, Okla. –The Indian Women’s Pocahontas Club is having its ninth annual Old Fashioned Picnic at 10:30 a.m. on May 16 at the Will Rogers Birthplace Ranch. The event is free to the public but a $10 food donation is suggested to help raise funds for the Indian Women’s Pocahontas Cub Higher Education Scholarship fund. It is suggested to bring a lawn chair to the event. The event will include a hog fry, live music, an auction, Cherokee marbles, corn stalk shoots and hatchet throwing. Cherokee Nation Registration will also be set up at the event getting information for CN photo ID cards. Principal Chief Bill John Baker will be an honored guest at the event. Cherokee Nation Businesses and the Oklahoma Pork Council are sponsoring the event. For more information, call Debra West at 918-760-0813 or Ollie Starr at 918-760-7499 or visit <a href="http://www.iwpclub.org" target="_blank">www.iwpclub.org</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/28/2015 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. –There will be an Oklahoma Blood Institute blood drive from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on April 16 at the Cherokee Nation O-si-yo Ballroom behind the Restaurant of the Cherokees. Blood donors will receive donor T-shirts for their contributions. If they chose to reject the T-shirts the funds designed for the T-shirt will go to the Global Blood Fund, which is a nonprofit organization that provides safe blood services in developing countries. Donating blood takes approximately an hour and can be made every 56 days. According to an OBI press release, those with negative blood types are urged to donate. Only 18 percent of the population has negative blood types and patients with negative blood types can only receive blood from those 18 percent of people. A photo ID is required to donate at OBI blood drives. Participants must be 16 years old or older to donate. Participants who are 16 years old must provide a signed parental permission form and weigh in at 125 pounds or more to donate, those who are 17 years old must weigh in at 125 pounds or more and those 18 and older must weigh in at 110 pounds or more to donate. For more information, email <a href="mailto: patricia-hawk@cherokee.org">patricia-hawk@cherokee.org</a>.