Tribes’ impact on OK economy in billions
10/23/2012 8:46:29 AM
 
Workers clean at the Cherokee Nation’s “Replay” media bar inside the new hotel tower at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. According to a recent study tribal activities support the equivalent of 87,174 jobs in Oklahoma. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Workers clean at the Cherokee Nation’s “Replay” media bar inside the new hotel tower at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. According to a recent study tribal activities support the equivalent of 87,174 jobs in Oklahoma. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
BY STAFF REPORTS OKLAHOMA CITY –The impact and contribution of the 38 federally recognized tribes in Oklahoma on the state economy equals $10.8 billion, according to an economic impact analysis released by Oklahoma City University’s Steven C. Agee Economic Research & Policy Institute. The ERPI study additionally found that tribal activities support the equivalent of 87,174 jobs in Oklahoma, as well as $2.5 billion in state income when multipliers impacts are taken into account. The report titled, “The Statewide Impacts of Oklahoma Tribes,” was funded by several Native American tribal governments to quantify the impact of tribal activities on the state’s economy and was also founded and sponsored by the Oklahoma Department of Commerce. “This study represents the first time that economists have attempted to quantify the total direct and indirect impact of all tribal operations to the state economy,” Kyle Dean, associate director and research economist at OCU’s Meinders School of Business, said. “The results show that the tribes’ economic activities positively impact the entire state of Oklahoma and serve as a vital source of income and opportunity to residents in the rural areas of the state.” In addition to $6.7 billion in direct contributions to the local economy from tribal businesses and government spending, tribes accounted for $4.1 billion in spillover production of non-tribal firms that support their operations. The total direct and indirect economic impact represents 7 percent of the state’s $148 billion total economic output in 2010, based on figures from the Bureau of Economic Analysis. Seven Oklahoma tribes participated in the study: the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Citizen Potawatomi Nation and Muscogee (Creek) nations as well as the Peoria and Shawnee tribes. ERPI collected business and government data from participating tribes, compiled the data and extrapolated or extended it to all Oklahoma tribes on a per citizen basis in order to capture total tribal spending, business revenues and employment figures. Then, study authors used this data to determine the multiplier effect of tribal economic activities–the number of non-tribal jobs and income supported by the tribes. “We have always known that the tribal operations and economic development activities of the Cherokee Nation and the other Oklahoma tribes have had a strong positive social and economic impact on our citizens and the entire state of Oklahoma,” said Principal Chief Bill John Baker. “Now, this groundbreaking study allows our contribution to the state to be quantified. Going forward, our desire is to continue to partner with the state government to achieve long-term growth for all Oklahomans.” The study found that the tribes generated $5.6 billion from business activities, including professional services, hospitality and entertainment, gaming and retail operations. Tribal expenditures include $1.5 billion in direct payroll contributions and $792 million to Oklahoma entities for medical care, education, social services and economic development opportunities for tribal citizens. The study also reported that Oklahoma tribes employed 53,747 people in 2010, with approximately one-third employed by tribal governments and the remainder employed by tribal businesses. Native American tribes have 483,000 citizens living in the state, representing close to 13 percent of Oklahoma’s entire population, according to the 2010 U.S. Census. To view the full report visit http://goodengroup.wistia.com/medias/gh6nl3l74v.
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