http://www.cherokeephoenix.orgMicrosoft Tribal Government Account Manager Don Lionetti, right, discusses his Microsoft laptop computer with Director of Information Systems Jon James before a Dec. 19 ceremony in Tahlequah, Okla., to celebrate the integration of the Cherokee language into Microsoft Windows 8. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Microsoft Tribal Government Account Manager Don Lionetti, right, discusses his Microsoft laptop computer with Director of Information Systems Jon James before a Dec. 19 ceremony in Tahlequah, Okla., to celebrate the integration of the Cherokee language into Microsoft Windows 8. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Microsoft integrates Cherokee in new operating system

Cherokee Nation translators helped translate more than 180,000 Cherokee words for Microsoft Windows 8. Translators, from left, are Russell Feeling, Shirley Feeling, Lawrence Panther, Phyllis Edwards, John Ross, Anna Sixkiller, Patrick Rochford, David Crawler, Lois Leach, Rufus King, Melvina King, Durbin Feeling and Dennis Sixkiller. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Principal Chief Bill John Baker welcomes Microsoft officials from to Tahlequah, Okla., and thanks them for their efforts in helping keep the Cherokee language alive by integrating it into Microsoft’s Windows 8. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation translators helped translate more than 180,000 Cherokee words for Microsoft Windows 8. Translators, from left, are Russell Feeling, Shirley Feeling, Lawrence Panther, Phyllis Edwards, John Ross, Anna Sixkiller, Patrick Rochford, David Crawler, Lois Leach, Rufus King, Melvina King, Durbin Feeling and Dennis Sixkiller. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
01/02/2013 08:39 AM
Video with default Cherokee Phoenix Frame
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Microsoft and Cherokee Nation officials celebrated the integration of the Cherokee language into the new Windows 8 operating system on Dec. 19 at Sequoyah High School.

Cherokee is the first Native American language to be integrated into a Windows system. Sixteen CN language translators and other staff members worked with Microsoft to prepare for the integration of Cherokee into Windows 8.

“On behalf of Microsoft, it’s our honor and pleasure to be here to announce the language interface pack officially available for the Cherokee language on the Windows 8 platform operating system,” Carla Hurd, Microsoft Local Language Program manager, said. “My hat goes off to all of the translators, all of the staff, all of the support that went into this huge effort. I think of this as just the beginning. We’ve already started on Office 2013, which is the next step. It’s an even bigger project. Microsoft products are everywhere, and your language will in turn be everywhere.”

More than 20 years ago, Microsoft employee Tracy Monteith, an Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians citizen, asked the company to include his native language in the computer’s core operating system. It wasn’t until 2010 that CN language technologists met with Monteith and others at Microsoft to get the project going.

A team of translators was assembled, ranging from tribal employees, community speakers and Cherokee college students.

“It became a rewarding experience for me to know that in the future the language is going to be there. I’m just proud to be a part of this effort and being a translator for Microsoft. And I thank the Microsoft people for allowing us to do this,” CN translator Russell Feeling said.

Lois Leach, a 56-year-old clerk in the Nation’s Roads Department, logged more than 100 volunteer hours during the past year translating computer terms that did not exist when the Cherokee language originated.
“You don’t look at yourself really doing anything that huge until you see it come together,” Leach said. “It’s amazing to think our work will be shared all over the world.”

Principal Chief Bill John Baker said Cherokee translators translated more than 180,000 words for the program and that this was the largest Cherokee translation project since the Bible was translated in the 1800s.

“You have done great work, and you are truly heroes of the Cherokee Nation,” Baker said to the translators.
He added that the integration of Cherokee into Windows 8 “will truly keep the language alive.”

“For a people to lose their language is probably the most terrible thing that can befall a people,” he said. “We thank Microsoft for putting their great resources to use. They’ll never make any money off this project, we know that, but they’re going to help keep the Cherokee spirit, the Cherokee language alive forever.”

In November, the tribe partnered with Google to add Cherokee to it email service Gmail. Cherokee speakers can now exchange emails using Gmail and instant message chats entirely in the Cherokee syllabary.

In March 2011, Google added Cherokee as an interface language, meaning anyone who reads and writes Cherokee can look up virtually anything on the World Wide Web using the Cherokee language.

In another effort to perpetuate the language, this past fall Cherokee translators dusted off the numeric system developed by Sequoyah, the inventor of the Cherokee syllabary. Translation Specialist John Ross from the CN Translation Department studied and figured out the numeric system in an effort to create a font to make it useful for printing and computers.

Sequoyah created unique, single symbols for numbers 1 through 19 and numbers 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100. So to create the number 31, the symbol for 30 and 1 would be used together or to create the number 500 the symbol for 5 and 100 would be used together. Ross created a symbol for 0 and created symbols for 1 billion and 1 trillion.

In 2010, the Unicode system was introduced for the Cherokee language. The numbering system associates numbers to language characters and creates a uniform system for writing and reading Cherokee on computers.

“Unicode is the international standard for all computer technology now – cell phones, computers, video games…anything that’s digital uses Unicode to display languages,” Language Technologist Roy Boney said.

A European group called the Unicode Consortium determines computer standards and a numbering system for languages. Language fonts receive their own numbering systems using the consortium’s standards.

“Cherokee has been assigned a (number) code group by the Unicode Consortium. So it is standard across the world,” Boney said.

In 2010, the Cherokee syllabary became available on iPhones and the iPod Touch after three years of developing software with Apple Inc.

In 2009, Facebook added Cherokee to its popular social web site. Boney is one of 14 translators on Facebook who helps Cherokee people maintain cultural ties by allowing speakers registered on the site to translate a glossary of common Facebook words and phrases.

will-chavez@cherokee.org


918-207-3961

ᏣᎳᎩ

ᏓᎵᏆ, ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ. Microsoft ᎠᎴ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎠᎬᏱ ᎠᏂᏙᎾᎢ ᎤᎾᎵᎮᎵᏨ ᎾᎿ ᏓᎾᎵᏔᏅ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎢᏤ Windows ᏧᏁᎳ ᎠᎢᏒ ᎠᏅᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᎿ ᎥᏍᎩᏱ ᏐᏁᎳᏚᏏᏁ ᎾᎿ ᏏᏉᏲ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ.

ᏣᎳᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎬᏱ ᎠᏁᎯᏯ ᎠᎹᏰᏟ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏙᏪᎸᎦ ᎬᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ Windows ᎠᎢᏒ. ᏓᎳᏚ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᏗᏐᎢ ᏚᎾᏙᏢᏒ ᎠᏁᎳᏗᏙ ᏂᎦᏓ ᏚᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎵ ᎾᎿ Microsoft ᎤᎾᏛᏅᎢᏍᏔᎾ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᎤᏙᏪᎶᏗ ᎤᏅᏙᏗ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎾᎿ Window ᏧᏁᎳ.

“ᎾᏍᎩᎾ Microsoft, ᎢᎦ ᎣᏣᎵᎮᎵᎦ ᎠᎴ ᎬᏂᎨᏒ ᏲᎬᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᏚᎾᎵᏔᏅ ᎦᎬᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ Windows ᏧᏁᎳ ᎬᏂᎨᏒ ᎢᎬᏁᎯ ᎠᎢᏒ ᎬᏙᏗᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Carla Hurd, Microsoft ᎾᎥᏂᎨᏍᏗ ᏧᏂᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᏒ ᏗᎫᎪᏔᏂᏙᎯ. “ᏙᎯᏳ ᎦᎵᏍᏇᏚᎩᎠ ᎦᏥᎵᎡᎵᏤᎲ ᏂᎦᏓ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏅ, ᎠᎾᏓᏅᏖᎵᏙ ᏗᏄᎪᏔᏂᏙᎯ, ᏂᎦᏓ ᎤᏂᎫᏍᏛᏅ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎯᎠ ᎤᎪᏓ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎤᏙᏢᏅᎢ. ᎨᎢᎠ ᎯᎠ ᎠᏓᎴᏂᏍᎬᏊ. ᎦᏳᎳ ᎣᎦᎴᏅᏓ ᎾᎿ Office 2013, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏐᎢ ᎠᎳᏍᎬᏍᏗ. ᎤᏔᎾ ᎤᎪᏓ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎯᎠ. Microsoft ᏓᏅᏗᏍᎬ ᏂᎬᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎢᏥᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᏂᎬᎢ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ.”

ᎤᎪᏓ ᎾᏃ ᏔᎵᏍᎪ ᎾᏕᏘᏯ ᏥᎨᏒ, Microsoft ᏧᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ Tracy Monteith, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎧᎸᎬ ᎢᏗᏢ ᎨᎳᏗᏙ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯ ᎠᏁᎳ, ᏚᏛᏛᏅ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ ᎤᎾᏠᏯᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏤᎵ ᎡᎯᏯ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᏍᏆᏂᎪᏗᏍᎩ ᎠᏰᏟ ᎠᎢᏒ ᎬᏙᏗᎢ. ᏞᏃ ᎾᎯᏳᏊ ᏱᏄᎵᏍᏔᏁ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏍᎪᎯ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᏧᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᏚᎾᏠᏎ Monteith ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏐᎢ ᎾᎿ Microsoft ᎾᎿ ᎯᎠ ᏯᏛᏗ ᎤᏂᎩᏍᏗᎢ.

ᎤᎾᏓᏡᎦ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ ᏚᏂᏟᏌᏅ, ᏂᏛᎴᏂᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ, ᎾᎥ ᏄᏅᏓᎴᏫᏒ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ.

“ᎤᎵᎮᎵᏍᏗ ᎠᏓᏅᏓᏗᏍᏗ ᎠᏆᏅᏛ ᎠᏟᎢᎵᏒ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏙᏪᎴᏍᏗ. ᎦᎵᎡᎵᎦ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᏇᎳᏗᏓᏍᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎯᎠ ᎨᏒ ᎠᎴ ᎬᏩᏁᎶᏙᏗ ᎨᏒ Microsoft. ᎠᎴ ᎦᏥᎵᎡᎵᏤ ᎾᎿ Microsoft ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᎬᏩᎵᏍᎪᎸᏓᏁᎸ ᎯᎠ ᏯᏆᏛᏗᎢ,” ᎤᏛᏅ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎠᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ Russell Feeling.

Lois Leach, ᎯᎦᏍᎪ ᏑᏓᎵ ᏳᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏧᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᏅᏃᎯ ᎠᎾᏓᏅᏖᎵᏙ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᏒᎢ, ᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᎢᏳᏟᎶᏓ ᏩᏣ ᎤᏪᏅᏍᏓ ᎤᎵᏍᎪᎸᏔᏂ ᏚᏁᎸᏔᏂ ᎠᏍᏆᏂᎪᏗᏍᎩ ᏗᎧᏁᎢᏍᏗ Ꮭ ᏱᏙᎩᎮ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᏧᏙᏢᏅᎢ.

“ᏝᏃ ᏙᎯᏳ ᏴᏓᏅᏖᏍᎪ ᎯᎠ ᎢᎬᏛᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎦ ᎩᎳ ᏂᎦᏓ ᏱᏓᏓᏟᏌᏅ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Leach. “ᏙᎯᏳ ᎤᏍᏆᏂᎪᏓ ᎠᏓᏅᏖᏗ ᏗᎩᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎸ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎡᎶᎯ ᏂᎬᎾᏛ ᏛᏯᏙᎵ.”

ᎤᎬᏫᏳᎯ Bill John Baker ᎤᏛᏅ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᎾᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ ᏚᎾᏁᎶᏔᏅ ᏳᎪᏓ ᎾᏃ 180,000 ᏗᎧᏁᎢᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᏒ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏭᏔᏂᏗᏴ ᏗᏁᎶᏔᏅ ᎨᏒ ᎣᏂᏃ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎩᏓ ᏚᎾᏁᎶᏔᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎪᏪᎵ ᏧᎭᎩᏓ ᏥᏚᎾᏁᎶᏔᏁᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏢ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ.

“ᏙᎯᏳ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏕᏥᎸᏫᏍᏓᏏ, ᎠᎴ ᏙᎯᏳ ᎡᏥᎸᏉᏓ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ,” ᏚᏬᏎᎸ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ. ᎤᏁᏉᎥ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏚᎾᎵᎪᏔᏅ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ Windows 8 “ᏙᎯᏳ ᎬᏃᏗ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ.”
“ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎤᏂᏲᏎᏗ ᎤᏂᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏎ ᏙᎯᏳ ᎤᏲᏟ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᏳᎾᎵᏍᏓᏁᏗᎢ,” ᎤᏛᏅᎢ.
“ᏙᏣᎵᎮᎵᏤ Microsoft ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᎦᏟᏌᏅ ᎤᏅᏙᏗᎢ. ᏝᏃ ᎠᏕᎳ ᏱᏛᏃᏢᏔᏂ ᎯᎠ, ᎣᎦᏅᏔ, ᎾᏍᎩᏂ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏓᏂᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ ᏚᎾᏓᏅᏛ, ᎠᎴ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎬᏃᏗ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ ᎾᎵᏍᏆᏗᏍᎬᎾ.”

ᎾᎿ ᏅᏓᏕᏆ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏚᎾᎵᎪᏁᎸ Google ᏧᎾᎪᏙᏗ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎢᎺᎵ ᎬᏙᏗ ᏥᎺᎵ. ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᏃᏇ ᎡᎵᏊ ᏧᎾᏓᏙᏪᎳᏅᏗ ᎠᏅᏗᏍᎬ ᏥᎺᎵ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏟᏍᏗ ᏗᎬᏝᏃᎮᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩᎭ ᎪᏪᎵ.

ᎾᏍᎩ ᏚᏂᏅᏗ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏌᏚ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ, Google ᎤᏁᏉᎥ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ, ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎦᏛᎬ ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗᏊ ᎨᎶ ᎬᏩᎪᎵᏱᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎬᏬᏪᎶᏗ ᏱᎩ ᏣᎳᎩᎭᎢ ᎡᎵᏊ ᎢᏳᏍᏗᏊ ᎨᏒ ᎠᎪᎵᏰᎢᏓᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎡᎶᎯ ᎾᏯᏛᎥ ᎠᏏᎳᏕᏫᏒ ᎬᏙᏗ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ.

ᏐᎢᏃ ᎨᏒ ᎤᏠᏯ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ, ᎯᎠ ᎤᎶᎪᎲᏍᏗ ᏥᎨᏒ ᎯᎠ ᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ ᎪᏍᏚ ᎤᏅᎪᏅᏔᏅ ᏗᏎᏍᏗ ᏗᎪᏪᎳ ᏓᏝᎥ ᏏᏉᏯ ᏧᏬᏪᎳᏅᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎾᏍᏊ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᏧᏬᎷᏩᏛᏓ. ᎠᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ ᎠᎦᏔᎯ John Ross ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏧᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏓᏡᎬ ᏚᎦᏎᏍᏔᏅ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏬᎷᏩᏛᎲ ᎢᏗᎬᏗ ᏗᏎᏍᏗ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏱᎵᏙ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᎤᏃᏢᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᎦᎴᏴᏙᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏧᏙᏪᎶᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎦᏙᎥᎲᏍᏗ ᎠᏍᏆᏂᎪᏗᏍᎩᎢ.

ᏏᏉᏯ ᏚᏬᏢᏅ ᏧᏍᏆᏂᎪᏓ, ᏌᏊᎭ ᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᏗᏎᏍᏗ ᏌᏊ ᎠᎴᏂᏍᎩ ᏐᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏗᏎᏍᏗ ᏔᎵᏍᎪ ᎠᎴᏂᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᏍᎪᎯᏧᏊ ᎢᏍᏗ. ᎪᏢᏗᏃ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎪᏪᎳ ᏦᏍᎪ ᏌᏊ, ᎪᏪᎶᏗ ᏦᏍᎪ ᎠᎴ ᏌᏊᎢ ᎢᏧᎳ ᏗᎪᏪᎳᏅ ᏯᏙᏢᎾ ᎠᎴᏗᏍᏊ ᏎᏍᏗ ᎯᏍᎩᏧᏈ ᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᎯᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏗᎵᎪᏙᏗ. Ross ᎤᏬᏢᏅ 0 ᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏬᏢᏅ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏌᏊ ᎢᏯᏔᎳᏗᏅᏛ ᎠᎴ ᎢᏯᏦᎠᏗᏅᏛ.

ᎾᏍᎩ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏍᎪᎯ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ, ᎾᎿ Unicode ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏗ ᎠᎢᏒ ᎬᏂᎨᏒ ᏄᏅᏁᎸ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ. ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᏎᏍᏗ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᏓᏗᎵᎦᏊ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏙᏢᏍᎦ ᏂᎦᏛ ᎤᏠᏱᎭ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎪᎵᏱᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎦᏙᎢᎥᏍᏗ ᎠᏍᏆᏂᎪᏗᏍᎩᎢ.

“Unicode ᏂᎬᎾᏛ ᎠᏅᏗᏍᎪ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎠᎦᏙᎢᎥᏒ ᎠᏍᏆᏂᎪᏗᏍᎩ ᎧᏁᎢᏍᏗ ᏃᏊ ---- ᏎᎵ ᏗᏟᏃᎮᏗ, ᎠᎦᏙᎢᎥᏍᏗ ᎠᏍᏆᏂᎪᏗᏍᎩ, ᎠᎪᏩᏛᏗ ᏗᏁᎸᏙᏗ…… ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗᏍᎬᏊ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎧᏃᎮᏍᎩ ᏗᏎᏍᏗ ᎬᏗ ᎠᏅᏗᏍᎪ Unicode ᎬᏂᎨᏒ ᏂᎬᏁᎲ ᏗᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ,” ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᏖᎪᎾᎵᏥ ᎠᏏᎾᏍᏗ Roy Boney ᎠᏗᏍᎬ.

ᏍᏆᏂᏯ ᎠᏁᎯ ᎤᎾᏓᏡᎦ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᏓᏂᏪᏎᎰ Unicode Consortium ᏓᏄᎪᏗᏍᎪ ᎠᎦᏙᎢᎥᏍᏗ ᎠᏍᏆᏂᎪᏗᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏗᏎᏍᏗ ᏧᏂᎩᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ. ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᎤᏂᎩᏌ ᎤᏅᏌ ᏧᎾᏎᏍᏙᏗ ᏗᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏙᏗ ᎤᎬᏩᏟ. ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᎤᏂᎩᏒ ᎤᏅᏌ ᏗᏎᏍᏗ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᎤᏂᎩᏍᏗ ᎠᏅᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ consortium’s ᏰᎵ ᏚᏙᎵᏨᎢ.

“ᏣᎳᎩ ᏃᏊ ᎠᏎᏍᏙᏗ (ᏎᏍᏗ) ᎨᏥᏁᎳ ᎠᏍᏓᏩᏛᏍᏙᏗ ᎤᎾᏓᏈᎦ ᏂᏓᏳᏓᎴᏅ Unicode Consortium. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏰᎵ ᏗᏙᎵᎦ ᎡᎶᎯ ᏗᎬᏩᎾᏗᏫᎳᏍᏗ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Boney.

ᎾᏍᎩ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏍᎪᎯ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ, ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏰᎵᏊ ᏗᎦᎬᏙᏗ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅ ᎾᎿ iPhones ᎠᎴ iPod Touch ᏦᎢ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᏚᏟᎢᎵᏙᎸ ᎠᏃᏢᏍᎬ ᏩᏂᎨ ᎦᎾᏗᏅᏓ ᎤᎾᎵᎪᎯ Apple Inc.

ᎾᏍᎩ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏐᏁᎳ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ, Facebook ᎤᏁᏉᎥ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏍᏆᏂᎪᏛ ᎤᏂᏰᎸ ᎨᏒ ᎦᏳᎳ web site. Boney ᎾᏍᎩ ᏌᏊ ᎾᎿ ᏂᎦᏚ ᎾᏂᎥ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ FacebookᎢ ᏚᏍᏕᎸᎲ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᏂᎦᏯᎢᏐ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᏂᏧᎾᏛᏁᎸᏍᏔᏅ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᎪᎸᏙᏗ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᏧᏃᏪᎶᏗ ᎾᎿ site ᏧᎾᏁᎶᏙᏗ ᎣᎾᏗᏢ ᏧᏗᎪᏪᎶ ᎧᏃᎮᏍᎩ ᎾᎿ ᏧᏣᏔᏊ Facebook ᏗᎧᏁᎢᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎪᏪᎳᏅᎢ.

About the Author
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M.

He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life.
He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association.

Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years. He was named interim executive editor on Dec. 8, 2015, by the Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board.
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M. He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life. He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association. Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years. He was named interim executive editor on Dec. 8, 2015, by the Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board.

Culture

BY STAFF REPORTS
07/10/2018 08:30 AM
INDIANAPOLIS – At the 26th annual Eiteljorg Indian Market and Festival held June 23-24, Native American artists, including Cherokees, were awarded nearly $16,000 in cash prizes, as well as ribbons for art works they entered into competition. Cherokee artist Bryan Waytula, of Sand Springs, Oklahoma, received first place in the Painting Category and the “Best of Class” award for his painting titled “We Stand As One.” He also received first place for his drawing titled “A Cherokee Treasure,” which is a colored pencil piece with a piece of mat weaving placed at the bottom of the artwork. Waytula said he used remnants from one of his mom’s traditional river cane baskets. His mother, Vivian Garner Cottrell, and his grandmother, Betty Scraper Garner, are both Cherokee National Treasures, which means they have been honored by the Cherokee Nation for their basketwork and for sharing their knowledge of basket making with others. “I’m trying to follow big footprints left my grandmother and mother, both treasures. Those two are rock stars to me,” Waytula said. He said it was his first time visiting the Eiteljorg Indian Market and Festival and was “impressed” with the facility, the artwork and the staff. “I was very impressed with how amazing the staff was towards all the extremely-talented artists I had the pleasure of meeting and seeing their amazing work,” he said. “My dad, who is now retired, came along and helped me drive so it was a fun bonding trip too.” Cherokee basket artist and Cherokee National Treasure Mike Dart, of Stilwell, Oklahoma, also won first place and "Best of Class" for his basket titled “Four Winds.” And he won a first place ribbon in the Non-Native Materials Category, a third-place ribbon in the Traditional Basketry Category and second place in the Contemporary Basketry Category. “Eiteljorg Indian Market is a top of the line show with some of the ‘Best of the Best’ artists from across the nation and Canada. Seeing my name among the list of division winners was an honor. I’m proud and honored to be able to represent the Cherokee Nation in these art markets,” Dart said. Also, Cherokee artist Lisa Rutherford won third place in the Contemporary Pottery Category and third place in the Cultural Items Category. The Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art in Indianapolis hosted more than 100 artists from 60 Native American tribes who showed their jewelry, pottery, baskets, beadwork, carvings, paintings and cultural items. The two-day market and festival drew thousands of visitors who met the artists, purchased their art and enjoyed music, food and performances on the museum’s grounds. “The Eiteljorg Indian Market and Festival creates opportunities for collectors and artists to connect and it builds support for today’s Native American artists,” Eiteljorg President and CEO John Vanausdall said. “The beautiful art works the artists have created make a powerful impact on our market goers and have contributed to the success of the Indian Market and Festival during its 26 years.” Images of the winning artworks in 11 categories are on the Eiteljorg Museum’s Facebook page, and a complete list of award recipients in all categories and prize sponsors is at <a href="http://www.eiteljorg.org/explore/festivals-and-events/indian-market-festival" target="_blank">www.eiteljorg.org/explore/festivals-and-events/indian-market-festival</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
07/09/2018 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee National Prison was built to hold the most hardened criminals in Indian Territory from before statehood and into the 20th century. A new exhibit at the Cherokee National Prison Museum explores the period of time when the building served as the Cherokee County Jail by sharing stories of both lawmen and lawbreakers. The “Cherokee Prison: Post Statehood” exhibit runs July 13 to Jan. 31. The Cherokee National Prison was the only penitentiary building in Indian Territory from 1875 to 1901. It housed sentenced and accused prisoners from throughout the territory. The interpretive site and museum give visitors an idea about how law and order operated in Indian Territory. The site features a working blacksmith area and reconstructed gallows; exhibits about famous prisoners and daring escapes, local outlaws and Cherokee patriots; and jail cells. The Cherokee Nation’s museums are open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. For information, call 1-877-779-6977 or visit <a href="http://www.VisitCherokeeNation.com" target="_blank">www.VisitCherokeeNation.com</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
07/09/2018 08:15 AM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Language Master Apprentice Program is accepting applications until Oct. 1. The two-year program is centered on a group language immersion experience and accepts a limited number of applications each year. In a previous Cherokee Phoenix story, Howard Paden, CLMAP manager, said the program stemmed from a “need” for the language. “This program gets people speaking our language again. You know, we’ve seen a need for it because a lot of the (Cherokee) Immersion (Charter) School parents seen a need to not only push their kids to learn the language but to learn themselves and start having Cherokee speaking households,” Paden said. After completing the program, students will have 4,000 contact hours with the Cherokee language and spend more than 40 hours each week studying and speaking the language. “Our program is about more than teaching someone the Cherokee language, it is about naturally absorbing our language and our way of life to the point that it changes the way we see the world and think. The real goal is to activate people that will spread the language wherever they go,” Paden said. “Our learners say it is a challenging program, but every day they push to give them more language. When they graduate, their passion for speaking the Cherokee language is only rivaled by their commitment to share our language.” To ensure individuals are able to dedicate the needed time to the program, they each receive a $10-an-hour tax-free cash benefit, program officials said. They also said an 80 percent time requirement is mandatory. “They learn a lot of Cherokee. From when they first walk into the classroom to probably two months they already learn about 5,000 words,” Paden said. “The first year is primarily learning as much as they can, and by the second year we expect them to start teaching. Of course they have a master speaker there that can assist them, but they begin to teach phrases to the next group that comes in. So every January we get a new group, so the people that are in their last year will begin teaching in January to the new group that we have coming in.” On Dec. 2, the Cherokee Language Master Apprentice Program graduated four students: Larry Carney, of Tulsa; Ronnie Duncan, of Bell; Lisa O’Field, of Hulbert; and Toney Owens, of Rocky Mountain. In 2014, the tribe began the program as a part of its Community and Cultural Outreach department as a way to promote the Cherokee language. Since its inception, the Cherokee Language Master Apprentice Program has grown into its own department and graduated six Cherokee speakers. To apply for the program, one must be 18 years or older, be available Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., live near Tahlequah or be willing to relocate and possess a strong desire to learn and cultivate the Cherokee language and culture through teaching. For more information or to apply, call 918-207-4964.
BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
07/06/2018 12:00 PM
PARK HILL – After running 777 miles of the Trail of Tears’ Benge Route, Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians citizen Kallup McCoy II completed his run on June 28 at the Cherokee Heritage Center. On his last day, McCoy made the final stretch from Stilwell to Park Hill with his girlfriend and EBCI citizen, Katelynn Ledford, and a group of Oklahoma Cherokees. The runners were greeted at the CHC by Cherokee Nation and United Keetoowah Band citizens, as well as CN Principal Chief Bill John Baker, CN Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden and UKB Chief Joe Bunch. McCoy ran into the CHC wearing a cape made of CN and UKB tribal flags tied together. He said the run was not for him but for all Cherokees and to honor his ancestors who made the original journey due to the forced removals in the 1830s. “I didn’t know what it meant to be Cherokee. I didn’t know what it meant to be proud of my culture, my people. Being out on this run, coming from where I came from and just getting up every day like our people had to do on their way out here and having to push through, I know what it means to be Cherokee, strong, resilient, tenacious, and to love and to forgive,” McCoy said. He began the run to Oklahoma on May 14 in Cherokee, North Carolina. He averaged about 20 miles per day and stopped at several Trail of Tears markers. McCoy documented his journey via Facebook and met people along the way in support of his efforts. He said he ran to raise awareness for people struggling and recovering from drug addiction and to raise funds for his nonprofit organization Rez HOPE Recovery. He said he was able to raise nearly $5,000. “Whenever we see people for their experiences, we see people any differently than us, we’re falling short of the mark,” he said. “It’s not a drug problem we’re in, it’s an opportunity to win souls. It’s an opportunity to heal our people. And the only way we’re going to do that is by banding together and putting aside our differences. God saved me from six overdoses and so many near death experiences, and three of those times I was flat lined.” McCoy talked about his experiences at the CHC such as doing drugs at age 11 and drinking at age 13. He said he lost college scholarships to run track and play football and began stealing pain medication and money when his father was ill. “I got to a point to where I couldn’t stand myself. It ultimately led me to getting sick. It turns us into people we don’t realize who we are,” he said. McCoy said is now looking for the next opportunity, which is opening a recovery house in Cherokee and to start placing recovery houses around the country, including Oklahoma. “Building leadership, people that’s struggling with drug addiction and alcohol or whatever it may be. I think that we need to realize that they’re more than just addicts and junkies and felons and the list goes on and on. I was once there, and I was more than that. I think it’s important for me to tell people to reach back and say you are more than that. That’s somebody’s son, daughter, sister, brother. It’s getting Rez HOPE out here, spreading it across the country. That’s my vision,” he said.
BY STAFF REPORTS
07/05/2018 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism is offering free, family-friendly storytelling events on Wednesdays in July. The one-hour program is hosted in the Cherokee National Peace Pavilion starting at 10 a.m. Each week, “Stories on the Square” concludes with a different hands-on activity or craft. The make-and-take activity schedule is below: July 11 – Soap stone necklaces July 18 – Painting garden rocks July 25 – Clay pinch pots The Cherokee National Peace Pavilion is located at 177 S. Water Ave. In the event of inclement weather, the event will be moved to the Cherokee National Prison Museum at 124 E. Choctaw St. Attendees will receive free admission to the Cherokee National Supreme Court Museum, Cherokee National Prison Museum, John Ross Museum and Sequoyah’s Cabin Museum following the program. For information, call 1-877-779-6977 or visit <a href="http://www.VisitCherokeeNation.com" target="_blank">www.VisitCherokeeNation.com</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
07/02/2018 03:30 PM
TAHLEQUAH – Applications for the 2018-19 Miss Cherokee, Junior Miss Cherokee and Little Cherokee Ambassador competitions are available. To download the application, visit https://www.cherokee.org/Services/Education/Cherokee-Ambassadors, and then scroll to the bottom of the webpage. Applications are also available at the Cherokee First desk at the W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex. The deadline for all applications is July 16. The Miss Cherokee Leadership Competition is held on Aug. 25, with the Junior Miss Cherokee Leadership Competition on Aug. 18 and Little Cherokee Ambassador Competition on Aug. 4. “These three competitions provide an opportunity for contestants to share their knowledge of Cherokee history, culture and language,” Lisa Trice-Turtle, Miss Cherokee sponsor and 1986-87 Miss Cherokee, said. “As ambassadors and messengers of the Cherokee Nation, Miss Cherokee, Junior Miss Cherokee and our Little Cherokee Ambassadors are role models, and they are expected to exemplify the best qualities of Cherokee youth.” Miss Cherokee contestants must be between the ages of 18-22 as of Aug. 25. Candidates cannot have previously served as Miss Cherokee and must be a CN citizen living in the 14-county tribal jurisdiction. In the past year, Miss Cherokee has visited the White House and historic sites in Washington, D.C., including the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian. She has also visited the Oklahoma Capitol and CN community meetings across the country. To run for Junior Miss Cherokee, contestants must be between the ages of 13-17, a CN citizen and reside within the jurisdiction. For the Little Cherokee Ambassador Competition, one girl and one boy are selected from each of three age groups: 4-6 years, 7-9 years and 10-12 years. Candidates must be a CN citizen and live within the jurisdiction. Committee representatives will accept hand-delivered applications on July 16, between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. in the lobby of the W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex. Applications presented after the deadline will not be accepted. For more information on the Miss Cherokee Leadership Competition, call Trice-Turtle at 918-453-5000, ext. 4991. For more information on the Junior Miss Cherokee Leadership Competition, call Reba Bruner at 918-453-5000, ext. 5397. For more information on the Little Cherokee Ambassador Competition, call Kristen Thomas at 918-453-5000, ext. 4974.