http://www.cherokeephoenix.orgMicrosoft Tribal Government Account Manager Don Lionetti, right, discusses his Microsoft laptop computer with Director of Information Systems Jon James before a Dec. 19 ceremony in Tahlequah, Okla., to celebrate the integration of the Cherokee language into Microsoft Windows 8. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Microsoft Tribal Government Account Manager Don Lionetti, right, discusses his Microsoft laptop computer with Director of Information Systems Jon James before a Dec. 19 ceremony in Tahlequah, Okla., to celebrate the integration of the Cherokee language into Microsoft Windows 8. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Microsoft integrates Cherokee in new operating system

Cherokee Nation translators helped translate more than 180,000 Cherokee words for Microsoft Windows 8. Translators, from left, are Russell Feeling, Shirley Feeling, Lawrence Panther, Phyllis Edwards, John Ross, Anna Sixkiller, Patrick Rochford, David Crawler, Lois Leach, Rufus King, Melvina King, Durbin Feeling and Dennis Sixkiller. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Principal Chief Bill John Baker welcomes Microsoft officials from to Tahlequah, Okla., and thanks them for their efforts in helping keep the Cherokee language alive by integrating it into Microsoft’s Windows 8. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation translators helped translate more than 180,000 Cherokee words for Microsoft Windows 8. Translators, from left, are Russell Feeling, Shirley Feeling, Lawrence Panther, Phyllis Edwards, John Ross, Anna Sixkiller, Patrick Rochford, David Crawler, Lois Leach, Rufus King, Melvina King, Durbin Feeling and Dennis Sixkiller. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
01/02/2013 08:39 AM
Video with default Cherokee Phoenix Frame
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Microsoft and Cherokee Nation officials celebrated the integration of the Cherokee language into the new Windows 8 operating system on Dec. 19 at Sequoyah High School.

Cherokee is the first Native American language to be integrated into a Windows system. Sixteen CN language translators and other staff members worked with Microsoft to prepare for the integration of Cherokee into Windows 8.

“On behalf of Microsoft, it’s our honor and pleasure to be here to announce the language interface pack officially available for the Cherokee language on the Windows 8 platform operating system,” Carla Hurd, Microsoft Local Language Program manager, said. “My hat goes off to all of the translators, all of the staff, all of the support that went into this huge effort. I think of this as just the beginning. We’ve already started on Office 2013, which is the next step. It’s an even bigger project. Microsoft products are everywhere, and your language will in turn be everywhere.”

More than 20 years ago, Microsoft employee Tracy Monteith, an Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians citizen, asked the company to include his native language in the computer’s core operating system. It wasn’t until 2010 that CN language technologists met with Monteith and others at Microsoft to get the project going.

A team of translators was assembled, ranging from tribal employees, community speakers and Cherokee college students.

“It became a rewarding experience for me to know that in the future the language is going to be there. I’m just proud to be a part of this effort and being a translator for Microsoft. And I thank the Microsoft people for allowing us to do this,” CN translator Russell Feeling said.

Lois Leach, a 56-year-old clerk in the Nation’s Roads Department, logged more than 100 volunteer hours during the past year translating computer terms that did not exist when the Cherokee language originated.
“You don’t look at yourself really doing anything that huge until you see it come together,” Leach said. “It’s amazing to think our work will be shared all over the world.”

Principal Chief Bill John Baker said Cherokee translators translated more than 180,000 words for the program and that this was the largest Cherokee translation project since the Bible was translated in the 1800s.

“You have done great work, and you are truly heroes of the Cherokee Nation,” Baker said to the translators.
He added that the integration of Cherokee into Windows 8 “will truly keep the language alive.”

“For a people to lose their language is probably the most terrible thing that can befall a people,” he said. “We thank Microsoft for putting their great resources to use. They’ll never make any money off this project, we know that, but they’re going to help keep the Cherokee spirit, the Cherokee language alive forever.”

In November, the tribe partnered with Google to add Cherokee to it email service Gmail. Cherokee speakers can now exchange emails using Gmail and instant message chats entirely in the Cherokee syllabary.

In March 2011, Google added Cherokee as an interface language, meaning anyone who reads and writes Cherokee can look up virtually anything on the World Wide Web using the Cherokee language.

In another effort to perpetuate the language, this past fall Cherokee translators dusted off the numeric system developed by Sequoyah, the inventor of the Cherokee syllabary. Translation Specialist John Ross from the CN Translation Department studied and figured out the numeric system in an effort to create a font to make it useful for printing and computers.

Sequoyah created unique, single symbols for numbers 1 through 19 and numbers 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 and 100. So to create the number 31, the symbol for 30 and 1 would be used together or to create the number 500 the symbol for 5 and 100 would be used together. Ross created a symbol for 0 and created symbols for 1 billion and 1 trillion.

In 2010, the Unicode system was introduced for the Cherokee language. The numbering system associates numbers to language characters and creates a uniform system for writing and reading Cherokee on computers.

“Unicode is the international standard for all computer technology now – cell phones, computers, video games…anything that’s digital uses Unicode to display languages,” Language Technologist Roy Boney said.

A European group called the Unicode Consortium determines computer standards and a numbering system for languages. Language fonts receive their own numbering systems using the consortium’s standards.

“Cherokee has been assigned a (number) code group by the Unicode Consortium. So it is standard across the world,” Boney said.

In 2010, the Cherokee syllabary became available on iPhones and the iPod Touch after three years of developing software with Apple Inc.

In 2009, Facebook added Cherokee to its popular social web site. Boney is one of 14 translators on Facebook who helps Cherokee people maintain cultural ties by allowing speakers registered on the site to translate a glossary of common Facebook words and phrases.

will-chavez@cherokee.org


918-207-3961

ᏣᎳᎩ

ᏓᎵᏆ, ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ. Microsoft ᎠᎴ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎠᎬᏱ ᎠᏂᏙᎾᎢ ᎤᎾᎵᎮᎵᏨ ᎾᎿ ᏓᎾᎵᏔᏅ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎢᏤ Windows ᏧᏁᎳ ᎠᎢᏒ ᎠᏅᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᎿ ᎥᏍᎩᏱ ᏐᏁᎳᏚᏏᏁ ᎾᎿ ᏏᏉᏲ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ.

ᏣᎳᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎬᏱ ᎠᏁᎯᏯ ᎠᎹᏰᏟ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏙᏪᎸᎦ ᎬᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ Windows ᎠᎢᏒ. ᏓᎳᏚ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᏗᏐᎢ ᏚᎾᏙᏢᏒ ᎠᏁᎳᏗᏙ ᏂᎦᏓ ᏚᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎵ ᎾᎿ Microsoft ᎤᎾᏛᏅᎢᏍᏔᎾ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᎤᏙᏪᎶᏗ ᎤᏅᏙᏗ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎾᎿ Window ᏧᏁᎳ.

“ᎾᏍᎩᎾ Microsoft, ᎢᎦ ᎣᏣᎵᎮᎵᎦ ᎠᎴ ᎬᏂᎨᏒ ᏲᎬᏗ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᏚᎾᎵᏔᏅ ᎦᎬᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ Windows ᏧᏁᎳ ᎬᏂᎨᏒ ᎢᎬᏁᎯ ᎠᎢᏒ ᎬᏙᏗᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Carla Hurd, Microsoft ᎾᎥᏂᎨᏍᏗ ᏧᏂᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᏒ ᏗᎫᎪᏔᏂᏙᎯ. “ᏙᎯᏳ ᎦᎵᏍᏇᏚᎩᎠ ᎦᏥᎵᎡᎵᏤᎲ ᏂᎦᏓ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏅ, ᎠᎾᏓᏅᏖᎵᏙ ᏗᏄᎪᏔᏂᏙᎯ, ᏂᎦᏓ ᎤᏂᎫᏍᏛᏅ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎯᎠ ᎤᎪᏓ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎤᏙᏢᏅᎢ. ᎨᎢᎠ ᎯᎠ ᎠᏓᎴᏂᏍᎬᏊ. ᎦᏳᎳ ᎣᎦᎴᏅᏓ ᎾᎿ Office 2013, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏐᎢ ᎠᎳᏍᎬᏍᏗ. ᎤᏔᎾ ᎤᎪᏓ ᏗᎦᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ ᎯᎠ. Microsoft ᏓᏅᏗᏍᎬ ᏂᎬᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎢᏥᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᏂᎬᎢ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ.”

ᎤᎪᏓ ᎾᏃ ᏔᎵᏍᎪ ᎾᏕᏘᏯ ᏥᎨᏒ, Microsoft ᏧᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ Tracy Monteith, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎧᎸᎬ ᎢᏗᏢ ᎨᎳᏗᏙ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯ ᎠᏁᎳ, ᏚᏛᏛᏅ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ ᎤᎾᏠᏯᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏤᎵ ᎡᎯᏯ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᏍᏆᏂᎪᏗᏍᎩ ᎠᏰᏟ ᎠᎢᏒ ᎬᏙᏗᎢ. ᏞᏃ ᎾᎯᏳᏊ ᏱᏄᎵᏍᏔᏁ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏍᎪᎯ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᏧᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᏚᎾᏠᏎ Monteith ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏐᎢ ᎾᎿ Microsoft ᎾᎿ ᎯᎠ ᏯᏛᏗ ᎤᏂᎩᏍᏗᎢ.

ᎤᎾᏓᏡᎦ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ ᏚᏂᏟᏌᏅ, ᏂᏛᎴᏂᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ, ᎾᎥ ᏄᏅᏓᎴᏫᏒ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ.

“ᎤᎵᎮᎵᏍᏗ ᎠᏓᏅᏓᏗᏍᏗ ᎠᏆᏅᏛ ᎠᏟᎢᎵᏒ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏙᏪᎴᏍᏗ. ᎦᎵᎡᎵᎦ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᏇᎳᏗᏓᏍᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎯᎠ ᎨᏒ ᎠᎴ ᎬᏩᏁᎶᏙᏗ ᎨᏒ Microsoft. ᎠᎴ ᎦᏥᎵᎡᎵᏤ ᎾᎿ Microsoft ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᎬᏩᎵᏍᎪᎸᏓᏁᎸ ᎯᎠ ᏯᏆᏛᏗᎢ,” ᎤᏛᏅ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎠᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ Russell Feeling.

Lois Leach, ᎯᎦᏍᎪ ᏑᏓᎵ ᏳᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏧᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᏅᏃᎯ ᎠᎾᏓᏅᏖᎵᏙ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᏒᎢ, ᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᎢᏳᏟᎶᏓ ᏩᏣ ᎤᏪᏅᏍᏓ ᎤᎵᏍᎪᎸᏔᏂ ᏚᏁᎸᏔᏂ ᎠᏍᏆᏂᎪᏗᏍᎩ ᏗᎧᏁᎢᏍᏗ Ꮭ ᏱᏙᎩᎮ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᏧᏙᏢᏅᎢ.

“ᏝᏃ ᏙᎯᏳ ᏴᏓᏅᏖᏍᎪ ᎯᎠ ᎢᎬᏛᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎦ ᎩᎳ ᏂᎦᏓ ᏱᏓᏓᏟᏌᏅ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Leach. “ᏙᎯᏳ ᎤᏍᏆᏂᎪᏓ ᎠᏓᏅᏖᏗ ᏗᎩᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎸ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎡᎶᎯ ᏂᎬᎾᏛ ᏛᏯᏙᎵ.”

ᎤᎬᏫᏳᎯ Bill John Baker ᎤᏛᏅ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᎾᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ ᏚᎾᏁᎶᏔᏅ ᏳᎪᏓ ᎾᏃ 180,000 ᏗᎧᏁᎢᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᏒ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏭᏔᏂᏗᏴ ᏗᏁᎶᏔᏅ ᎨᏒ ᎣᏂᏃ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᎩᏓ ᏚᎾᏁᎶᏔᏅ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎪᏪᎵ ᏧᎭᎩᏓ ᏥᏚᎾᏁᎶᏔᏁᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏢ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ.

“ᏙᎯᏳ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏕᏥᎸᏫᏍᏓᏏ, ᎠᎴ ᏙᎯᏳ ᎡᏥᎸᏉᏓ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ,” ᏚᏬᏎᎸ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ. ᎤᏁᏉᎥ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏚᎾᎵᎪᏔᏅ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ Windows 8 “ᏙᎯᏳ ᎬᏃᏗ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ.”
“ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎤᏂᏲᏎᏗ ᎤᏂᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏎ ᏙᎯᏳ ᎤᏲᏟ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᏳᎾᎵᏍᏓᏁᏗᎢ,” ᎤᏛᏅᎢ.
“ᏙᏣᎵᎮᎵᏤ Microsoft ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᎦᏟᏌᏅ ᎤᏅᏙᏗᎢ. ᏝᏃ ᎠᏕᎳ ᏱᏛᏃᏢᏔᏂ ᎯᎠ, ᎣᎦᏅᏔ, ᎾᏍᎩᏂ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏓᏂᏍᏕᎵᏍᎩ ᏚᎾᏓᏅᏛ, ᎠᎴ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎬᏃᏗ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ ᎾᎵᏍᏆᏗᏍᎬᎾ.”

ᎾᎿ ᏅᏓᏕᏆ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏚᎾᎵᎪᏁᎸ Google ᏧᎾᎪᏙᏗ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎢᎺᎵ ᎬᏙᏗ ᏥᎺᎵ. ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᏃᏇ ᎡᎵᏊ ᏧᎾᏓᏙᏪᎳᏅᏗ ᎠᏅᏗᏍᎬ ᏥᎺᎵ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏟᏍᏗ ᏗᎬᏝᏃᎮᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩᎭ ᎪᏪᎵ.

ᎾᏍᎩ ᏚᏂᏅᏗ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏌᏚ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ, Google ᎤᏁᏉᎥ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ, ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎦᏛᎬ ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗᏊ ᎨᎶ ᎬᏩᎪᎵᏱᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎬᏬᏪᎶᏗ ᏱᎩ ᏣᎳᎩᎭᎢ ᎡᎵᏊ ᎢᏳᏍᏗᏊ ᎨᏒ ᎠᎪᎵᏰᎢᏓᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎡᎶᎯ ᎾᏯᏛᎥ ᎠᏏᎳᏕᏫᏒ ᎬᏙᏗ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ.

ᏐᎢᏃ ᎨᏒ ᎤᏠᏯ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ, ᎯᎠ ᎤᎶᎪᎲᏍᏗ ᏥᎨᏒ ᎯᎠ ᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ ᎪᏍᏚ ᎤᏅᎪᏅᏔᏅ ᏗᏎᏍᏗ ᏗᎪᏪᎳ ᏓᏝᎥ ᏏᏉᏯ ᏧᏬᏪᎳᏅᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎾᏍᏊ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᏧᏬᎷᏩᏛᏓ. ᎠᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ ᎠᎦᏔᎯ John Ross ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏧᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏓᏡᎬ ᏚᎦᏎᏍᏔᏅ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏬᎷᏩᏛᎲ ᎢᏗᎬᏗ ᏗᏎᏍᏗ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏱᎵᏙ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᎤᏃᏢᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᎦᎴᏴᏙᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏧᏙᏪᎶᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎦᏙᎥᎲᏍᏗ ᎠᏍᏆᏂᎪᏗᏍᎩᎢ.

ᏏᏉᏯ ᏚᏬᏢᏅ ᏧᏍᏆᏂᎪᏓ, ᏌᏊᎭ ᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᏗᏎᏍᏗ ᏌᏊ ᎠᎴᏂᏍᎩ ᏐᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏗᏎᏍᏗ ᏔᎵᏍᎪ ᎠᎴᏂᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᏍᎪᎯᏧᏊ ᎢᏍᏗ. ᎪᏢᏗᏃ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎪᏪᎳ ᏦᏍᎪ ᏌᏊ, ᎪᏪᎶᏗ ᏦᏍᎪ ᎠᎴ ᏌᏊᎢ ᎢᏧᎳ ᏗᎪᏪᎳᏅ ᏯᏙᏢᎾ ᎠᎴᏗᏍᏊ ᏎᏍᏗ ᎯᏍᎩᏧᏈ ᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᎯᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏗᎵᎪᏙᏗ. Ross ᎤᏬᏢᏅ 0 ᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏬᏢᏅ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏌᏊ ᎢᏯᏔᎳᏗᏅᏛ ᎠᎴ ᎢᏯᏦᎠᏗᏅᏛ.

ᎾᏍᎩ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏍᎪᎯ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ, ᎾᎿ Unicode ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏗ ᎠᎢᏒ ᎬᏂᎨᏒ ᏄᏅᏁᎸ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ. ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᏎᏍᏗ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᏓᏗᎵᎦᏊ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏙᏢᏍᎦ ᏂᎦᏛ ᎤᏠᏱᎭ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎪᎵᏱᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎦᏙᎢᎥᏍᏗ ᎠᏍᏆᏂᎪᏗᏍᎩᎢ.

“Unicode ᏂᎬᎾᏛ ᎠᏅᏗᏍᎪ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎠᎦᏙᎢᎥᏒ ᎠᏍᏆᏂᎪᏗᏍᎩ ᎧᏁᎢᏍᏗ ᏃᏊ ---- ᏎᎵ ᏗᏟᏃᎮᏗ, ᎠᎦᏙᎢᎥᏍᏗ ᎠᏍᏆᏂᎪᏗᏍᎩ, ᎠᎪᏩᏛᏗ ᏗᏁᎸᏙᏗ…… ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗᏍᎬᏊ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎧᏃᎮᏍᎩ ᏗᏎᏍᏗ ᎬᏗ ᎠᏅᏗᏍᎪ Unicode ᎬᏂᎨᏒ ᏂᎬᏁᎲ ᏗᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ,” ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᏖᎪᎾᎵᏥ ᎠᏏᎾᏍᏗ Roy Boney ᎠᏗᏍᎬ.

ᏍᏆᏂᏯ ᎠᏁᎯ ᎤᎾᏓᏡᎦ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᏓᏂᏪᏎᎰ Unicode Consortium ᏓᏄᎪᏗᏍᎪ ᎠᎦᏙᎢᎥᏍᏗ ᎠᏍᏆᏂᎪᏗᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏗᏎᏍᏗ ᏧᏂᎩᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ. ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᎤᏂᎩᏌ ᎤᏅᏌ ᏧᎾᏎᏍᏙᏗ ᏗᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏙᏗ ᎤᎬᏩᏟ. ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᎤᏂᎩᏒ ᎤᏅᏌ ᏗᏎᏍᏗ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᎤᏂᎩᏍᏗ ᎠᏅᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ consortium’s ᏰᎵ ᏚᏙᎵᏨᎢ.

“ᏣᎳᎩ ᏃᏊ ᎠᏎᏍᏙᏗ (ᏎᏍᏗ) ᎨᏥᏁᎳ ᎠᏍᏓᏩᏛᏍᏙᏗ ᎤᎾᏓᏈᎦ ᏂᏓᏳᏓᎴᏅ Unicode Consortium. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏰᎵ ᏗᏙᎵᎦ ᎡᎶᎯ ᏗᎬᏩᎾᏗᏫᎳᏍᏗ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Boney.

ᎾᏍᎩ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏍᎪᎯ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ, ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᎪᏪᎶᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏰᎵᏊ ᏗᎦᎬᏙᏗ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅ ᎾᎿ iPhones ᎠᎴ iPod Touch ᏦᎢ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᏚᏟᎢᎵᏙᎸ ᎠᏃᏢᏍᎬ ᏩᏂᎨ ᎦᎾᏗᏅᏓ ᎤᎾᎵᎪᎯ Apple Inc.

ᎾᏍᎩ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏐᏁᎳ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ, Facebook ᎤᏁᏉᎥ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏍᏆᏂᎪᏛ ᎤᏂᏰᎸ ᎨᏒ ᎦᏳᎳ web site. Boney ᎾᏍᎩ ᏌᏊ ᎾᎿ ᏂᎦᏚ ᎾᏂᎥ ᏗᎾᏁᎶᏗᏍᎩ FacebookᎢ ᏚᏍᏕᎸᎲ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᏂᎦᏯᎢᏐ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᏂᏧᎾᏛᏁᎸᏍᏔᏅ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᎪᎸᏙᏗ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᏧᏃᏪᎶᏗ ᎾᎿ site ᏧᎾᏁᎶᏙᏗ ᎣᎾᏗᏢ ᏧᏗᎪᏪᎶ ᎧᏃᎮᏍᎩ ᎾᎿ ᏧᏣᏔᏊ Facebook ᏗᎧᏁᎢᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎪᏪᎳᏅᎢ.

About the Author
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M.

He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life.
He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association.

Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years. He was named interim executive editor on Dec. 8, 2015, by the Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board.
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M. He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life. He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association. Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years. He was named interim executive editor on Dec. 8, 2015, by the Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board.

Culture

BY STAFF REPORTS
10/19/2017 08:15 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Thanks in part from an Oklahoma Arts Council grant, the Northeastern State University Center for Tribal Studies will host the Indigenous Arts Education Series in November for American Indian Heritage Month. The series will include the following: <strong>Nov. 2</strong> Marcus Harjo (Pawnee/Seminole) will present “Creative Writing and Music Production Workshop” from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the University Center Redbud Room. Harjo uses writing, music production and live performances to promote his passions of youth outreach, cultural awareness and promoting healthy, drug-free lifestyles, specifically among American Indian populations. His workshop will focus on teaching participants how to use writing and music composition skills to enhance the delivery of their message. His workshop will conclude with a live performance. <strong>Nov. 8</strong> Sandy Fife Wilson (Muscogee Creek) will present “Shell Carving Demonstration” from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. in the University Center Redbud Room. Wilson is an experienced artist having learned her art techniques through both formal education and traditional means as she comes from a long line of family artists. Wilson specializes in Southeastern design shell carvings, finger-woven items and Creek basketry. She will host a demonstration that will educate the audience on this traditional form of art and lead participants through the process using a direct, hands-on approach to instruction. <strong>Nov. 14</strong> Yatika Starr Fields (Muscogee Creek/Osage/Cherokee) will present “Becoming a Mural Artist” from 6 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in the University Center Redbud Room. Fields’ presentation will highlight his experience and work as a mural artist and provide attendees with some insight into the highly specialized field of mural art. This event will include a live art demonstration. The Oklahoma Arts Council is the official state agency for the support and development of the arts. The agency’s mission is to lead in the advancement of Oklahoma’s thriving arts industry. Additional information is available at <a href="http://www.arts.ok.gov" target="_blank">arts.ok.gov</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
10/18/2017 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee National Youth Choir’s album “Celebration” was named Best Pop Recording during the 17th annual Native American Music Awards on Oct. 14. This year’s award marks the fifth honor – referred to as a NAMMY – the Cherokee National Youth Choir has garnered since the choir’s inception in 2000. The youth choir was also nominated for Group of the Year and Record of the Year for its latest album. “We were so excited to win Best Pop Recording at the Native American Music Awards,” Mary Kay Henderson, Cherokee National Youth Choir director, said. “Our CD, ‘Celebration,’ is a collection of Motown music and has been a fun way to encourage our young people to learn our language. Language teacher and choir coordinator Kathy Sierra and I would like to thank everyone who took the time to vote for the Cherokee National Youth Choir.” The “Celebration” record is a combination of the 2017 Cherokee National Youth Choir and its soloists and members of the 2006 youth choir. Songs on the “Celebration” album include “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough,” “Celebration,” “Lean On Me,” “My Girl,” “Respect,” “My Guy,” “Stand By Me” and “We Are Family.” Sierra translated the lyrics from English to Cherokee for the recording. The Cherokee National Youth Choir has performed dozens of songs in the Cherokee language in the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade and at venues across the country, including the Oklahoma State Capitol. The choir also previously performed with such legendary artists as Foreigner, Dolly Parton, Vince Gill, Roy Clark, Kenny Rogers and the Oak Ridge Boys. The choir is made up of 30 to 40 young Cherokees from northeastern Oklahoma communities. Members are middle and high school youth in grades 6-12. The students compete in auditions every year for inclusion in the group. “The Cherokee Nation Youth Choir has proven time and time again to be excellent cultural ambassadors for our tribal government and our people,” Principal Chief Bill John Baker said. “We are so proud of them for bringing home another NAMMY honor. The accomplishments of these young people should be celebrated, as they are learning and utilizing the Cherokee language. Additionally, they have volunteered their time and talents to be part of the youth choir, which is an opportunity to grow their leadership skills. Congratulations to everyone involved with this wonderful achievement.” The choir’s newest album, “Just Jesus,” as well as past albums will be available for purchase later this year at Cherokee Nation Gift Shop locations and online at <a href="http://www.CherokeeGiftShop.com" target="_blank">www.CherokeeGiftShop.com</a>.
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
10/17/2017 04:00 PM
CATOOSA, Okla. – Navajo artist Ric Charlie won Best of Show for his jewelry piece “Navajo Bling” at the 12th annual Cherokee Art Market held Oct. 14-15 at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. Artists from throughout the nation competed in eight categories: painting, sculpture, beadwork/quillwork, basketry, pottery, textiles, jewelry and diverse art forms. Sixty artists received awards, and 150 artists displayed and sold their art during the event. Charlie, 59, of Tuba City, Arizona, makes jewelry, paints and sculpts. “I can’t make a living with those (painting and sculpting), but I do it for therapy,” he said. “I’ve enjoyed all kinds of art, ever since I was a kid.” He said his winning necklace was inspired by “a nice summer day” when he was out of school and had time on his hands. “Navajo Bling” is a 14-karat gold jewelry set featuring more than 1,700 individually set diamonds and is valued at $75,000. “As a kid I was always involved in creating things because on the reservation you had to. I learned a lot from my grandfather because he was the creator of many things,” he said. “The work that I do now is something I only dreamed about doing. When I started making jewelry, I said, ‘I really want to get into gold. I really want to get into diamonds. I really want to do this type of work.’ It’s just a dream come true.” Charlie said he “dreamed big” as a child. “If you don’t dream big, it won’t happen.” He’s participated in other art shows such as the Santa Fe Indian Market, but this was the first time he entered the Cherokee Art Market. He said he plans to enter his work again. “I find it (Cherokee Art Market) really personal. People here are very, very friendly and welcoming, too. The level of artwork here is incredible,” Charlie said. Cherokee artist Bryan Waytula won Best of Class for Class 1: Painting, Drawing, Graphics & Photography for his painting titled “We Stand as One.” Cherokee sculpture Bill Glass Jr. won Best of Class for Class 2: Sculpture for his piece “The Discussion Revolves.” In the Class 5: Pottery Division, Cherokee artist Troy Jackson won Best of Class for his work “Bird Effigy.” Cherokee Art Market Manager Deborah Fritts said one artist came from Alaska and another came from Maine and other artists from in between. She said the show has come a long way from its first year in 2005 when it was held under tents in the casino parking lot. It has been held inside the casino since 2009. Fritts attends other art shows to “scope” out artists and to network. She also meets with other art market coordinators. “A lot of the people that win at the other shows, like at Santa Fe (Indian Market) or the Heard Museum (Phoenix), they come to our show,” she said. Dallin Maybee is chief operating officer for the Southwest Association for Indian Arts, the nonprofit association that produces the Santa Fe Indian Market. He said the Cherokee Art Market has its own “personality,” and he wouldn’t compare it to Santa Fe but “it’s a great show.” “This brings an incredible competitive field of artists. It’s a nice show. It’s intimate. You see a lot of your friends here, and the prize money helps,” Maybee said. “I come to this show every time that I can just because it’s a good time.” For a full list of winners, visit <a href="http://www.Cherokeeartmarket.com" target="_blank">Cherokeeartmarket.com</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
10/17/2017 12:00 PM
CARTERSVILLE, Ga. – The next meeting of the Georgia Chapter of the Trail of Tears Association will begin at 10:30 a.m. on Nov. 11 at the Bartow History Museum. The speaker will be Jim Langford, and his topic will be “Impact of de Soto on Southeastern Native Americans.” Langford is a member and former officer of the Society of Georgia Archaeology and has been doing research on the Native American presence in the Southeast for many years. The Bartow History Museum is located at 4 E. Church St. Its phone number is 770-382-3818. The TOTA was created to support the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail established by an act of Congress in 1987. It is dedicated to identifying and preserving sites associated with the removal of Native Americans from the southeastern United States. The Georgia TOTA chapter is one of nine state chapters representing the nine states that the Cherokee and other tribes traveled through on their way to Indian Territory, now Oklahoma. GATOTA meetings are free and open to the public. People need not have Native American ancestry to attend GATOTA meetings, just an interest and desire to learn more about this tragic period in this country’s history. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.nationaltota.com" target="_blank">www.nationaltota.com</a> or <a href="http://www.gatrailoftears.org" target="_blank">www.gatrailoftears.org</a>. For more information about the November meeting, email Tony Harris at <a href="mailto: harris7627@bellsouth.net">harris7627@bellsouth.net</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
10/12/2017 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Families looking for a fun, educational adventure for their children during fall break should plan to visit the Cherokee Nation museums on Oct. 20.  Museums participating are the Cherokee National Prison Museum, the Cherokee National Supreme Court Museum and the John Ross Museum. Enjoy free admission and special activities at all three locations. There will be paper bandolier bags at the Cherokee National Prison Museum, Cherokee syllabary lessons at the Cherokee National Supreme Court Museum and make your own clay beads at the John Ross Museum. The educational activities occur from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The Cherokee National Prison was the only penitentiary building in Indian Territory from 1875 to 1901. It housed sentenced and accused prisoners from throughout the territory. The interpretive site and museum give visitors an idea about how law and order operated in Indian Territory. The site features a working blacksmith area and reconstructed gallows, exhibits about famous prisoners and daring escapes, local outlaws and Cherokee patriots, jail cells and much more. Built in 1844, the Cherokee National Supreme Court Museum is Oklahoma’s oldest public building. The 1,950-square-foot museum features exhibits on the Cherokee National Judicial System; the Cherokee Advocate and Cherokee Phoenix newspapers; and the Cherokee language, with various historical items, including photos, stories, objects and furniture. Touch screen kiosks offer visitors documentary-style learning on various legal topics as well as teaching conversational Cherokee. The John Ross Museum highlights the life of John Ross, principal chief of the CN for more than 38 years, and houses exhibits and interactive displays on the Trail of Tears, Civil War, Cherokee Golden Age and Cherokee Nation’s passion for the education of its people. The museum is housed in an old, rural school building known as School No. 51 and sits at the foot of Ross Cemetery, where John Ross and other notable Cherokee citizens are buried. The Cherokee National Supreme Court Museum is located at 122 E. Keetoowah St., and the Cherokee National Prison Museum is at 124 E. Choctaw St., both in Tahlequah. The John Ross Museum is located at 22366 S. 530 Road in Park Hill. For more information, call 1-877-779-6977 or visit <a href="http://www.visitcherokeenation.com" target="_blank">www.visitcherokeenation.com</a>.
BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
10/09/2017 08:15 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – With the hope of teaching more Cherokees soapstone carving, United Keetoowah Band citizen Matt Girty is spreading his knowledge of the ancient art by offering classes in Tahlequah to people willing to learn. His latest class was on Sept. 16 at the UKB Culture Center, where students gained insight and hands-on experience with soapstone carving. “My goal was to get more carvers out here because I see a lot of opportunity. So what many people are going to have to do around here is look within their self, look (at) who they are, and most of us out here are Cherokees,” he said. “If I can do it, there’s more out here that can do it. Even if they don’t get seen...then they’ve got a piece of their culture. They can show whoever they want to…so that way it’ll stay alive here within us and not die like it almost has been.” Girty said he starts his students with creating a turtle. “This right here is basically to get them to figure out their shapes and to get their hands on soapstone,” he said. “Figure out how to work it, how it feels on your hands.” As for tools, Girty uses X-Acto knives, files and hacksaws to shape his works. “I wanted these guys to get the feel of the grass roots of it because that’s how our people did it, not with power tools,” he said. “I want them to get the slow process of it, to get the blocking out and taking off a lot of the object to get to your main goal of making your object piece. So I want them to get used to doing it by hand first before they jump on any power tools.” By creating stone carved art, Girty said he feels he’s helping keep the art form alive. “It’s better for me to pass this on because this is all I know how to do that could better our people,” he said. “In my opinion, we should all be able to create beauty and make people smile in everything we do…to keep us going as Cherokee people.” UKB citizen Ernestine Berry said she is no stranger to the art world, so when she heard about Girty’s class she decided to take it. “I’m always interested in anything having to do with art,” she said. “I haven’t done stone carving before. I’ve done a little bit of woodcarving. I also have a degree in art for the University in Tulsa. So, I’ve done a little bit of artwork.” She said Girty is a “good” teacher and thinks what he does, by teaching and preserving the culture, is important. “I think anything to do with our tradition and our heritage is important to our people,” she said. “It helps us to know who we are. It helps to know where we came from, and it helps us to understand the ancestors and what they went through and the kind of lives that they lived.” Berry said she encourages anyone interested in preserving Cherokee culture to take Girty’s class. “It’s an enjoyable thing as well as a learning experience,” she said. “I just encourage anybody who wants to come, to come, because we’re not exclusive here. We accept everybody, Keetoowahs, Cherokee Nation, non-Indians, other tribes, anybody that wants to come.” So far Girty has taught two classes and hopes to continue teaching, while building upon each one to help students create more advanced pieces. “I have an idea for you to carve bears. The next class I want you to bring whatever you want to carve and then we can do it,” he said. “Next thing, I have a vision of our old pipe effigies that we used to make. That will be an advanced class because that’s what I’m (personally) doing now is recreating these ceremonial objects.” Girty hopes to have his next class in either late November or early December. “I’m here for instruction. Everything I know, it’s no secret,” he said. “I want to show you everything I know, then in turn you go show who you know. Come back and show me what you did, and hopefully you become to be a lot better than I am.” For more information, find him under Matt Girty on Facebook.