A replica of a March 13, 1828, issue of the Cherokee Phoenix sets on top of the January 2012 issue. The Cherokee Phoenix began on Feb. 21, 1828. ARCHIVE PHOTO

Cherokee Phoenix turns 185

BY STAFF REPORTS
02/21/2013 09:23 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Phoenix turned 185 years old today on Feb. 21.

Being the first Native American newspaper and bilingual publication in North America, its first issue was printed on Feb. 21, 1828, in New Echota, Cherokee Nation (now Georgia), and edited by Elias Boudinot. It was printed in English and Cherokee, using the Cherokee syllabary created by Sequoyah.

Rev. Samuel Worcester and the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions helped build the printing office, cast type in the Cherokee syllabary and procure the printer and other equipment. Also, Boudinot, his brother Stand Watie, John Ridge and Elijah Hicks, all leaders in the tribe at that time, raised money to start the newspaper.

In 1829, the newspaper name was amended to include the Indian Advocate at the request of Boudinot. The Cherokee National Council approved of the name change and both the masthead and content were changed to reflect the paper’s broader mission.

In the 1830s Boudinot and Principal Chief John Ross used the Cherokee Phoenix to editorialize against the Indian Removal Act of 1830 and the growing encroachment and harassment of settlers in Georgia.

The newspaper also contained news items, features, accounts about Cherokees living in Arkansas and other area tribes, and social and religious activities. The two U.S. Supreme Court decisions (Cherokee Nation v. Georgia and Worcester v. Georgia), which affected Cherokee rights, were also written about extensively.

As pressure for the Cherokee to leave Georgia increased, Boudinot changed his stance and began to advocate for the removal of Cherokee to the west. At first Chief Ross supported Boudinot’s opposing view but by 1832 the two leaders’ differences caused them to split and Boudinot resigned.

Elijah Hicks, a brother-in-law of Ross, was appointed editor in August 1832, but the Phoenix was silenced in May 1834 when the Cherokee government ran out of money for the paper. Attempts were made to revive the paper. When word leaked that Chief Ross intended to move the printing press from New Echota to nearby Red Clay, Tenn., the Georgia Guard, who were already brutally oppressing the Cherokee people, moved in and destroyed the press and burned the Cherokee Phoenix office with the help of Stand Watie who was a member of the Treaty Party. The party advocated selling what remained of Cherokee land and moving west.

Four years later most of the Cherokees who remained on their lands in Georgia, Tennessee and North Carolina were rounded up and forcibly marched or sent by boat to Indian Territory.

A Cherokee Nation newspaper was again published in September 1844 in the form of the Cherokee Advocate. The paper was published in Tahlequah and edited by Cherokee citizen William Potter Ross, a graduate of Princeton University.

The Cherokee Advocate returned after the Cherokee government was officially reformed in 1975. The newspaper continued under that name until October 2000 when the paper began using the name Cherokee Phoenix and Indian Advocate again. Also, that same year, the Tribal Council passed the Cherokee Independent Press Act of 2000, which ensures the coverage of tribal government and news of the Cherokee Nation is free from political control and undue influence.

In January 2007, the newspaper began using the original Cherokee Phoenix name, launched a website and began publishing in a broadsheet format. Today, the newspaper reports on the tribe’s government, current events and Cherokee culture, people and history. The news organization has also broadened its outreach to include locally aired radio shows that are also available online as well as podcasting those same shows on iTunes.

News

BY STAFF REPORTS
03/31/2015 02:00 PM
MUSKOGEE, Okla. – Bacone College senior forward Matt Qualls has been named to the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics 2014-15 Division I Men’s Basketball All-America teams. Qualls, of Tahlequah, was named to the NAIA Third Team All-America list. Qualls led the country and Red River Athletic Conference in scoring at 26.0 points per game and pulled down a conference leading 11 boards per game. He scored 351 points in the 2013-14 season and 676 points in 2014-15 for a total of 1,027 points. Additionally, Qualls was named RRAC All-Conference first team and a NABC-NAIA Men’s Basketball All-Star for his efforts during the 2014-2015 season. On Feb. 20, Qualls scored a career-high 47 points against LSU Shreveport in an 88-82-overtime loss. Qualls also pulled in 19 rebounds on his way to winning player of the week. He also became just the third player in school history to record 1,000 career points since the Bacone Warriors of Muskogee joined the NAIA. Though frequently injured this season, the Cherokee Nation citizen picked up other honors during the season including being named the Red River Athletic Conference “Men’s Basketball Player of the Week” three times and being named the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics “National Division I Men’s Basketball Player” of the Week for Feb. 16-22. He is studying health and physical education at Bacone and hopes to get a chance in the D-League, the National Basketball Association’s development league, or join a professional team in Europe. Eventually, he said wants to be a coach like his father Leroy Qualls.
BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter
03/31/2015 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation Supreme Court will hear an appeal regarding the disqualification of Tribal Councilor Julia Coates as a deputy chief candidate by the tribe’s Election Commission. The EC stated that Coates did not meet the residency requirements to run for the seat in the upcoming 2015 general election. The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments at 2 p.m. on April 1 at the CN Courthouse in Tahlequah. In the appeal filed March 20, Coates states the EC’s decision is contrary to a previous court ruling. “The Commission’s decision is contrary to this Court’s holding in Mayes v. Cherokee Nation Election Commission,” the appeal states. The SC has until 5 p.m. April 3 to make a decision on Coates’ candidacy. To view the court documents filed in the case, visit <a href="http://www.cherokeecourts.org/SupremeCourt/SC1504CoatesvFishinghawkRichmond.aspx" target="_blank">http://www.cherokeecourts.org/SupremeCourt/SC1504CoatesvFishinghawkRichmond.aspx</a>. Check back with the Cherokee Phoenix for updates.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
03/31/2015 10:00 AM
CLAREMORE, Okla. (AP) - The Claremore Police Department and the Cherokee Nation Marshal’s Office recently entered into a cross-deputation agreement, allowing officers from both agencies to serve in each other’s jurisdictions in case of an emergency or any situation. “I’ve been waiting for this moment for about 15 years, when I became deputy marshal,” said Cherokee Nation Marshal Shannon Buhl. “Claremore is one of the largest cities in our jurisdiction we were never cross-deputized with. What that meant was they couldn’t help us if we needed something and we couldn’t help them out if they needed assistance in Native American jurisdictions that are within city limits, such as K2 product being sold at tribal smoke shops.” Buhl said this agreement has been a long time coming. Cross-deputation agreements first went into effect in July 1992 when the U.S. Congress provided authority for the U.S. Secretary of Interior to enter into agreements between the U.S. and Native American tribes and nations, states and their political subdivisions in accordance with the Indian Law Enforcement Reform Act of August 1990. “Cross-deputation can be misunderstood a lot of the time. There’s a lot to it,” said Buhl. “It’s not a mutual aid agreement. There are mutual aid agreements, such as that between the sheriff’s office and Claremore PD or Verdigris; however, Native American tribes cannot create a mutual aid agreement with non-Native American affiliations. “What that means is you have to go through the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the city, agency and the State Attorney General’s Office, which can be a long process.” Buhl said one of the reasons the cross-deputation agreement took place is because of efforts from the Claremore Police Department. “Police Chief Stan Brown has been very proactive in the city. He’s a huge supporter of cooperative agreements with us, the sheriff’s office and other agencies, and I think he’s in some ways taken the lead on this to make this happen for us,” said Buhl. “It’s a good day for the people of Claremore and for the people of the Cherokee Nation.” Brown said the agreement acts as a “force multiplier.” “The CPD now has the opportunity to utilize nationally-recognized special operations teams through the marshal’s office for everything from high-priority arrests, to hostage rescue and search and rescue operations,” Brown said. “Anytime you have agencies that can cooperate, it makes the community safer and it raises the level of service that both agencies can bring to the population.” The Cherokee Nation Marshal’s Office covers 9,000 square miles and holds a total of 52 deputations with agencies across the 14 historical counties.
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/29/2015 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. –Red Dirt musician Stoney LaRue will be headlining this years Cherokee Nation Employee Appreciation Day, which honors employees for their hard work throughout the past year. The outdoor free concert is open to the public and is on April 2. It will take place just west of the W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex in Tahlequah. The opening act will be the all-Cherokee group, Pumpkin Hollow Band. They will kick off the show at 5:30 p.m. “These Oklahoma musicians have a strong local following and will put on a great show for our community and the entire Cherokee Nation,” said Principal Chief Bill John Baker. “We wanted to show our appreciation to our employees and the community with a night of good music and family fun.” LaRue, who is Texas-born but a longtime Oklahoman, is known for his hits “Down in Flames,” “Feet Don’t Touch the Ground,” “Oklahoma Breakdown” and “One Cord Song.” The crowd can expect to hear his hits and also songs from his new album, “AVIATOR.” “The theme is, essentially, following direction, trusting in yourself and new beginnings,” said LaRue. “I’d say it’s a little combination of rootsy rock, country, folk and whatever else is in the hodge podge, and separate as much of the pride and ego from it, and put it in a format that’s easy to listen to.” CN citizens Rod Buckhorn, Doo Reese, Kirk Reese and Spider Stopp named the band in honor of their birthplace, Pumpkin Hollow. The country and red dirt genre band has opened for Luke Bryan, Mark Chesnutt, Brantley Gilbert and Tracy Lawrence. According to a CN press release, no alcohol, tobacco or ice chests are permitted on the premises. Food vendors will be on site and shuttles available for parking. Bringing lawn chairs and blankets to sit on is encouraged. The Cherokee Nation W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex is located at 17675 S. Muskogee Ave.
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/29/2015 12:00 PM
OOLOGAH, Okla. –The Indian Women’s Pocahontas Club is having its ninth annual Old Fashioned Picnic at 10:30 a.m. on May 16 at the Will Rogers Birthplace Ranch. The event is free to the public but a $10 food donation is suggested to help raise funds for the Indian Women’s Pocahontas Cub Higher Education Scholarship fund. It is suggested to bring a lawn chair to the event. The event will include a hog fry, live music, an auction, Cherokee marbles, corn stalk shoots and hatchet throwing. Cherokee Nation Registration will also be set up at the event getting information for CN photo ID cards. Principal Chief Bill John Baker will be an honored guest at the event. Cherokee Nation Businesses and the Oklahoma Pork Council are sponsoring the event. For more information, call Debra West at 918-760-0813 or Ollie Starr at 918-760-7499 or visit <a href="http://www.iwpclub.org" target="_blank">www.iwpclub.org</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/28/2015 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. –There will be an Oklahoma Blood Institute blood drive from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on April 16 at the Cherokee Nation O-si-yo Ballroom behind the Restaurant of the Cherokees. Blood donors will receive donor T-shirts for their contributions. If they chose to reject the T-shirts the funds designed for the T-shirt will go to the Global Blood Fund, which is a nonprofit organization that provides safe blood services in developing countries. Donating blood takes approximately an hour and can be made every 56 days. According to an OBI press release, those with negative blood types are urged to donate. Only 18 percent of the population has negative blood types and patients with negative blood types can only receive blood from those 18 percent of people. A photo ID is required to donate at OBI blood drives. Participants must be 16 years old or older to donate. Participants who are 16 years old must provide a signed parental permission form and weigh in at 125 pounds or more to donate, those who are 17 years old must weigh in at 125 pounds or more and those 18 and older must weigh in at 110 pounds or more to donate. For more information, email <a href="mailto: patricia-hawk@cherokee.org">patricia-hawk@cherokee.org</a>.