A replica of a March 13, 1828, issue of the Cherokee Phoenix sets on top of the January 2012 issue. The Cherokee Phoenix began on Feb. 21, 1828. ARCHIVE PHOTO

Cherokee Phoenix turns 185

02/21/2013 09:23 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Phoenix turned 185 years old today on Feb. 21.

Being the first Native American newspaper and bilingual publication in North America, its first issue was printed on Feb. 21, 1828, in New Echota, Cherokee Nation (now Georgia), and edited by Elias Boudinot. It was printed in English and Cherokee, using the Cherokee syllabary created by Sequoyah.

Rev. Samuel Worcester and the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions helped build the printing office, cast type in the Cherokee syllabary and procure the printer and other equipment. Also, Boudinot, his brother Stand Watie, John Ridge and Elijah Hicks, all leaders in the tribe at that time, raised money to start the newspaper.

In 1829, the newspaper name was amended to include the Indian Advocate at the request of Boudinot. The Cherokee National Council approved of the name change and both the masthead and content were changed to reflect the paper’s broader mission.

In the 1830s Boudinot and Principal Chief John Ross used the Cherokee Phoenix to editorialize against the Indian Removal Act of 1830 and the growing encroachment and harassment of settlers in Georgia.

The newspaper also contained news items, features, accounts about Cherokees living in Arkansas and other area tribes, and social and religious activities. The two U.S. Supreme Court decisions (Cherokee Nation v. Georgia and Worcester v. Georgia), which affected Cherokee rights, were also written about extensively.

As pressure for the Cherokee to leave Georgia increased, Boudinot changed his stance and began to advocate for the removal of Cherokee to the west. At first Chief Ross supported Boudinot’s opposing view but by 1832 the two leaders’ differences caused them to split and Boudinot resigned.

Elijah Hicks, a brother-in-law of Ross, was appointed editor in August 1832, but the Phoenix was silenced in May 1834 when the Cherokee government ran out of money for the paper. Attempts were made to revive the paper. When word leaked that Chief Ross intended to move the printing press from New Echota to nearby Red Clay, Tenn., the Georgia Guard, who were already brutally oppressing the Cherokee people, moved in and destroyed the press and burned the Cherokee Phoenix office with the help of Stand Watie who was a member of the Treaty Party. The party advocated selling what remained of Cherokee land and moving west.

Four years later most of the Cherokees who remained on their lands in Georgia, Tennessee and North Carolina were rounded up and forcibly marched or sent by boat to Indian Territory.

A Cherokee Nation newspaper was again published in September 1844 in the form of the Cherokee Advocate. The paper was published in Tahlequah and edited by Cherokee citizen William Potter Ross, a graduate of Princeton University.

The Cherokee Advocate returned after the Cherokee government was officially reformed in 1975. The newspaper continued under that name until October 2000 when the paper began using the name Cherokee Phoenix and Indian Advocate again. Also, that same year, the Tribal Council passed the Cherokee Independent Press Act of 2000, which ensures the coverage of tribal government and news of the Cherokee Nation is free from political control and undue influence.

In January 2007, the newspaper began using the original Cherokee Phoenix name, launched a website and began publishing in a broadsheet format. Today, the newspaper reports on the tribe’s government, current events and Cherokee culture, people and history. The news organization has also broadened its outreach to include locally aired radio shows that are also available online as well as podcasting those same shows on iTunes.


11/30/2015 02:00 PM
MULDROW, Okla. (AP) – The first American soldier to die in combat against the Islamic State group in Iraq was remembered Nov. 24 during a memorial service as a man who was passionate about his wife, children, church and making others happy. The service was held at Trinity United Methodist Church in Muldrow for U.S. Army Master Sgt. Joshua Wheeler, 39, a Cherokee Nation citizen who lived in nearby Roland and graduated Muldrow High School in 1994 before joining the Army a year later. “I was so mad at him when he went to the service, but I want to take it back because good Lord, look what he’s done,” Zach Wheeler, his brother, said during the service. “He’s one of the best soldiers in the world.” Joshua Wheeler joined the Army as an infantryman in 1995 and completed his initial training at Fort Benning in Georgia. He had been assigned to the U.S. Army Special Operations Command in Fort Bragg, North Carolina, since 2004. He was killed Oct. 22 when he and dozens of U.S. special operations troops and Iraqi forces raided a compound near the city of Kirkuk, freeing approximately 70 Iraqi prisoners from captivity. “He made it through so many (tours). We just thought he was invincible,” Joshua Wheeler’s aunt, Linda Cole, said. Wheeler deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq 14 times and received 11 Bronze Stars during his career, and was posthumously awarded a Purple Heart and Silver Star. A private burial was held Nov. 18 at Arlington National Cemetery following a memorial service in North Carolina, where Wheeler lived with his family before he died. He is survived by his wife and four children.
11/30/2015 12:00 PM
OOLOGAH, Okla. – Father Christmas will be at the Will Rogers Birthplace Ranch near Oologah from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Dec. 11-12 for “Will’s Country Christmas,” a first-ever holiday celebration at the ranch. Advance tickets are on sale now at $10 for adults (one night only). Children 17 and under are free. Tickets are limited and must be purchased in advance. They are available at the Will Rogers Memorial Museum admissions desk, Lakeside State Bank in Oologah and RCB Bank, 86th Street in Owasso. Hayrides, caroling, brass trio, walking lantern tours of house and grounds, visiting the house where Rogers was born and stories of Christmas on the prairie will be highlighted by a visit from Father Christmas and photo opportunities. There will be vendors for last minute Christmas shopping. Staff from the Murrell Home at Tahlequah, an Oklahoma Historical Society Museum, will be on hand to help make Christmas ornaments to take home. Because it is a two-day event, people can enjoy Christmas parades in area towns and come to the Birthplace for “Country Christmas” later or on alternate nights. Hot chocolate and cider will be available for purchase when visitors return from the hayride or walk around the ranch grounds. Will’s favorite food, beans and ham, will also be sold with Indian fry bread. Ample parking will be provided in the airstrip area of the ranch. Santa will be available for photo opportunities at the Will Rogers Memorial Museum in Claremore on Saturdays from 10 a.m. to noon and 1 p.m. to 3 p.m., Nov. 28, Dec. 5 and Dec. 12 Admission is free for members and ages 17 and under. For more information, call 918-341-0719 or toll free 1-800-324-9455 or visit <a href="http://www.willrogers.com" target="_blank">www.willrogers.com</a>.
11/27/2015 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. (AP) - In preparation for upcoming balloting, the Oklahoma Scenic Rivers Commission has made notification of its Dec. 1 election and eligible candidates. The election is Dec. 1 for commissioners representing Cherokee and Adair counties. Those elected serve a term of four years on the OSRC Board of Commissioners, which numbers 12. Running for Cherokee County representative are Gary Dill, incumbent John Larson, Kathy Ryals and Howard Tate. Incumbent George Stubblefield and Kathy Tibbits are running for Adair County representative. Steve Randall, incumbent, is unopposed for the Delaware County seat. Under its rules, the OSRC must post prior public notice of the election in five conspicuous locations in both Cherokee and Adair counties. It must also be published twice in newspapers of record in each county and sent by email to all on the OSRC email list. Eligible voters must be registered to vote in Oklahoma, and reside or own real property within 660 feet of a scenic river. They must also have filed a voter registration qualification affidavit with the OSRC between 2001 and Nov. 7, 2015. Absentee voting is prohibited. Voters may cast ballots from 7 a.m. – 7 p.m. Cherokee County polling site is OSRC Headquarters, 15971 Highway 10, two miles northeast of Tahlequah. Adair County polling site is the Chewey Area Community Center. For further information contact Ed Fite, OSRC administrator, at 918-456-3251 or write to <a href="mailto: ed.fite@osrc.ok.gov">ed.fite@osrc.ok.gov</a>.
Assistant Editor
11/27/2015 12:00 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY – The Oklahoma Indian Gaming Association held a Nov. 17 press conference at the Gaylord-Pickens Oklahoma Heritage Museum to celebrate tribal gaming’s nearly billion-dollar contribution to education in the state. OIGA officials released findings from the 2015 Inaugural Statewide Economic Impact from Oklahoma Tribal Governmental Gaming study. The study states more than $980 million from Oklahoma-based gaming tribes has been deposited into two state education funds in the 10 years since gaming was approved by a statewide vote. “We are thrilled to share the results of this important study, and happy to have such a great story to tell about our vital and growing industry,” OIGA Chairman Brian Foster said. “We are very proud of the enormous contribution our Oklahoma tribes in gaming have been able to make to education and look forward to that number growing substantially in the coming years. With our continued commitment to financially supporting education in Oklahoma, we want to become a driving force in making our state’s education system one others want to emulate.’’ According to the Cherokee Nation’s gaming compact with Oklahoma, the tribe pays fees on Class III gaming activities to the state’s treasurer. The compact states the tribe pays 4 percent of the first $10 million, 5 percent of the next $10 million and 6 percent of any subsequent amount of adjusted gross revenues received by the tribe from its electronic games, as well as a monthly 10 percent payment of net wins from non-house banked card games. In exchange for these fees, the tribe receives certain geographic exclusivity, limits to the number of gaming machines at existing horse racing tracks and the prohibition of non-tribal operation of certain machines and covered games. Prior to the 2004 approval of State Question 712, Oklahoma-based tribes could only operate Class I or Class II gaming, which did not require state compacts. According to OK.gov, there are now 34 tribes that have state gaming compacts. According to a Nov. 16 Cherokee Nation Gaming Commission report, the CN has paid $162.9 million in gaming exclusivity fees, or compact fees, to the state since 2005. That report also states that $12.1 million in compact fees had been paid this year, with four months remaining. According to the report, compact fees include payments to the state, Fair Meadows racetrack in Tulsa and the Oklahoma Horse Racing Commission. The Nation’s payments to the state alone total $111.7 million since 2005, according to the CNGC report. Principal Chief Bill John Baker said the OIGA study shows tribal governments have and will continue to make the state stronger and better for all Oklahomans. “For the Cherokee Nation and other tribes in Oklahoma, gaming represents economic opportunities that improve the lives of our tribal citizens. But secondary economic impacts from gaming revenues are equally important. The direct revenue we pay to the state of Oklahoma is significant, but the Cherokee Nation and other tribes also support thousands and thousands of jobs. That impact on Oklahoma families is immeasurable,” he said. “Money generated by our casinos also creates additional educational opportunities for our children, improves roads and infrastructure in our neighborhoods, provides greater access to quality health care and creates homeownership opportunities for our citizens. Our impact on the lives of Oklahomans is very real. Since the passage of State Question 712, 10 years ago, the tangible results have far surpassed initial expectations, and we are eager to continue our work making Oklahoma better for all.” According to OIGA, the state initially projected $71 million per year in revenue from gaming compacts. Other highlights of the study were: • The total estimated impact on Oklahoma from gaming was nearly $6.2 billion in 2014, • Tribal gaming is now Oklahoma’s 19th largest employment sector, • In 2014, tribal gaming supported 23,277 jobs – 19,523 of which were full-time positions, • Tribal gaming workers earned $1.16 billion in wages and benefits in 2014, and • Gaming workers paid more than $264 million in state and federal payroll taxes in 2014. For more information on the OIGA study, go to <a href="http://www.oiga.org" target="_blank">www.oiga.org</a>.
11/26/2015 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – On Nov. 21, the 2015-16 Cherokee Nation Tribal Youth Councilors were sworn into office to begin serving and potentially help shape future tribal policy. “It’s going to be a good opportunity to get involved and make a difference and build relationships within the tribe,” Laurel Reynolds, a Claremore High School sophomore, said. The 17-member Council learns the CN Constitution and bylaws and identifies issues affecting Cherokee youths to pass on to the Tribal Council and administration. The leadership program started in 1989 and has 184 alumni. Students meet monthly and serve as tribal ambassadors. “The best days of the Cherokee Nation are in front of us and we need leaders in every field imaginable from doctors, lawyers, engineers, teachers, administrators and business people. Leadership starts with young people like you, who are willing to serve,” Principal Chief Bill John Baker said. “The Tribal Youth Council is an opportunity for young Cherokees from all over the 14-county tribal jurisdiction to gain exposure to our tribal government, get to know the elected officials and have a voice in the discussions that will impact the Cherokee Nation today and in the future.” The 2015-16 Tribal Youth Council members are Taylor Armbrister, of Kansas; Jori Cowley, of Vinita; Bradley Fields, of Locust Grove; Amy Hembree, of Tahlequah; Camerin James, of Fort Gibson; Austin Jones, of Hulbert; Destiny Matthews, of Watts; Emily Messimore, of Claremore; Treyton Morris, of Salina; Sarah Pilcher, of Westville; Sunday Plumb, of Tahlequah; Laurel Reynolds, of Claremore; Abigail Shepherd, of Ochelata; Julie Thornton, of Gore; Chelbie Turtle of Tahlequah; Jackson Wells, of Tahlequah; and Sky Wildcat, of Tahlequah.
11/26/2015 12:00 PM
KETCHUM, Okla. – Pine Lodge Resort at Grand Lake is inviting people to its 12th annual “Winter Wonderland Christmas Light Tour” seven nights a week from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. from Nov. 26 through January 1. The “old fashion” Christmas light display features nearly half a million lights, lighted antique vehicles, a nativity scene and a host of characters. Admission is free and visitors may drive or walk through the light displays. Pine Lodge Resort is located one-hour northeast of Tulsa and 2.5 miles east of Ketchum off of Hwy 85. The resort, owned by Art and June Box, a Cherokee Nation citizen, sits near Grand Lake and has 17 cabins, seven mobile homes and RV sites for rent. The couple opened Pine Lodge Resort 15 years ago. Ten minutes away from the resort is golfing, a swim beach, spas, hiking, wave runner rentals and the South Grand Lake Regional Airport with free shuttles to and from the airport provided by the Pine Lodge Resort staff. The lodge is also close to casual and fine dining. Groups may reserve the resort’s clubhouse for dinners or special occasions. The resort has won the “Crystal Pelican Award” given by the Grand Lake Association for “The Most Outstanding Visitor’s Accommodations.” For more information, call 918-782-1400 or visit the Pine Lodge website at <a href="http://www.pinelodgeresort.com" target="_blank">www.pinelodgeresort.com</a>. You can also find the resort on Facebook.