Cherokee artist honored by ‘Women in Tyler’ organization

CN veterans advocate Rogan Noble dies

The late Rogan Noble speaks during the tribe's Nov. 10, 2012, Veteran’s Day ceremony honoring military veterans at the Cherokee Warriors Memorial in Tahlequah, Okla. Noble served in the U.S. Marines Corps from 1968-72. TESINA JACKSON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The late Rogan Noble speaks during the tribe's Nov. 10, 2012, Veteran’s Day ceremony honoring military veterans at the Cherokee Warriors Memorial in Tahlequah, Okla. Noble served in the U.S. Marines Corps from 1968-72. TESINA JACKSON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/12/2013 02:39 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Rogan Noble, a longtime employee of the Cherokee Nation’s Office of Veterans Affairs and Housing Authority, died on March 9 at age 64.

Services for Noble will be at 10 a.m. on March 13 at Sequoyah High School’s The Place Where They Play Gymnasium with Steve Campbell and Richard Allen officiating. Former U.S. Marine Cpl. Noble will be buried at 2 p.m. at the Fort Gibson National Cemetery under the direction of Hart Funeral Home of Stilwell.

According to his obituary, Noble was a proud Marine Corps veteran who served in the Vietnam War. While working with the CN, he was instrumental in establishing its Office of Veterans Affairs and the Warrior Memorial that sits adjacent to the Tribal Complex.

Noble also sold Warrior Memorial bricks that listed veterans’ names, their respective branch of service and when they served as a fundraiser for the memorial and could be seen sometimes installing the bricks in the walkway next to the memorial.

He worked diligently as an advocate for Cherokee veterans and served as a liaison between the CN and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. He also supported and helped plan the construction of the tribe’s Veteran’s Center being built next to the Warrior Memorial.

“Rogan was a valued employee of the Cherokee Nation. He was a true warrior and deeply committed to furthering Cherokee veterans,” Principal Chief Bill John Baker said. “He was our director of our tribal veteran’s program and a champion of our Veteran’s Center. He’ll be sorely missed, and I wish he could have seen the completion of the Veteran’s Center.”

Noble was born on Aug. 27, 1948, in Lawrence, Kan. He is the son of the late Clayton Sequoyah Noble and Cynthia (Snell) Noble. He is survived by his wife Sarah of the home; an older brother Jamey L. Noble of Stroud; daughter Kelly Zunie of South Ogden, Utah; stepchildren Ryan Tiger of Stilwell, Dawn Rush and Bronson McNeil of Tahlequah; and seven grandchildren. His parents and his son Brian Noble preceded him in death.

Noble joined the Marines on Jan. 15, 1968. He served with the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Marine Divisions during his four-year enlistment, achieving the rank of corporal. He was trained as a radioman and served in the Republic of Vietnam in 1969 with “Task Force H” in the Northern I Corps area of operations.

During his tour of duty, he received the National Defense Medal, the Vietnam Campaign Medal, the Vietnam Service Medal, the Combat Action Ribbon, the Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation and the Vietnam Cross of Gallantry.

He received an honorable discharge from the Marine Corps on Jan. 15, 1972. He was employed by the CN as the tribal veterans representative and was an accredited service officer of the Oklahoma Department of Veterans Affairs.

Noble was proud of “his Corps” and believed it to be second to none. He was loyal to his comrades and to the Marine Corps, adhering to the motto “Semper Fidelis” or “Always Faithful.”

News

BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter
07/30/2015 08:00 AM
BRIGGS, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation’s Community and Cultural Outreach has found a way to help CN citizens and local community members learn more about the Cherokee culture with its Cultural Enlightenment Series. The series is held the second Tuesday of each month, and in July it took place at the TRI Community Association W.E.B. Building (Welling, Eldon and Briggs) in Briggs. Those attending watched participants play Cherokee marbles, weave baskets and perform other family and culture-friendly activities. CCO Director Rob Daugherty said this is just one of the many communities his department reaches out to within the tribe’s 14-county jurisdiction. “This is one of the buildings that we helped start fund along with other departments of the Cherokee Nation,” he said. “In our jurisdiction area we have several of these building and we work with approximately 38 community buildings that we have. We work with way more communities than that, but this is one of them.” Daugherty, who watched the marble games, said he’s glad the community has taken up the sport. “We’re real proud of this organization here in that they started doing this marbles. (They) picked up one of the old games, and now Cherokee Nation’s coming out here and hosting tournaments,” he said. “The good thing about this game is it doesn’t matter how old you are. It doesn’t matte what size you are. It doesn’t matter what level of skill. This is a game that you’re pretty well even starting out. It looks like it’s a games of just haphazardly movements, but there’s a strategy to this game. They’re playing teams, and you can tell among themselves they’re talking where to move, who to hit, where to sit and so forth.” Daugherty said it is also important to use the Cherokee language in the Cultural Enlightenment Series. “Language is really big in my department, so one of the things that I have suggested is no matter what you do incorporate Cherokee language in there,” he said. John Sellers, TRI Community W.E.B. Association president, said he was glad to have the CN come to the building to show community members Cherokee culture. “We attend classes about once a month at the (Cherokee) Nation’s complex and they saw our facilities and they were talking about the old traditional marble games, and we’ve been asking questions about the rules, how you do it. So they come out here to show us and they said, ‘hey, we’ll just have our regular monthly meeting out here and do that,’” he said. “Then, at the same time we got a call and said they had a lady that wanted to do the basket weaving and I said, ‘bring her on.’” Sellers said he is thankful to the CN for all it has done for the community. “I can’t say enough for Cherokee Nation,” he said. “I mean we couldn’t do what we’re doing if it wasn’t for them.” For more information about the Cultural Enlightenment Series, visit <a href="http://www.facebook.com/CNCCO" target="_blank">www.facebook.com/CNCCO</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
07/29/2015 02:00 PM
KETCHUM, Okla. –The Cherokee Nation recently presented the Native American Association of Ketchum a $57,273 grant to build a park in Ketchum. The park will include two pieces of commercial playground equipment, spring rockers, spinners, swings, teeter-totters and more. The group also plans to add volleyball and basketball courts, as well as a walking trail in the park’s next phase of development. The playground is set to be complete by the end of summer and is located at the corner of Grand Lake Avenue and Amarillo Street. “It means a great deal to partner with the Cherokee Nation because without the tribe there would not be a park in Ketchum,” NAAK President Jerry Taylor said. According to a CN press release, the NAAK is one of several community organizations to receive a grant from the tribe’s Community and Cultural Outreach in 2015. The department awards about 45 grants per year to local organizations that want to make improvements in their communities, helping both Cherokees and non-Cherokees alike. “Helping the town of Ketchum build a family-friendly park is part of the Cherokee Nation’s mission to invest in our citizens and communities,” Principal Chief Bill John Baker said. “This will soon be a beautiful space for children and families to gather and enjoy. I’m proud we are able to improve the quality of life for all citizens in the Ketchum community.” The release states the NAAK was established in 2013 and has been active in the community. In addition to obtaining a grant for the town’s first-ever park, the organization has distributed weatherization kits to citizens in the area and will partner with the CN to do home repairs in the community next month. The organization also hopes to build a community building in the future. For more information about Community and Cultural Outreach, call 918-207-4953.
BY STAFF REPORTS
07/29/2015 10:35 AM
WEST SILOAM SPRINGS, Okla. – The 10th annual Blast to the Past Car & Truck Show makes its return to the Cherokee Casino & Hotel West Siloam Springs on Aug. 15. The show is one of the largest car shows in the region. According to a press release, categories consist of classics built between the years 1900-60, 1961-80 and 1981 to present and customs built between 1900-60, 1961-80 and 1981 to present. There are also the Redneck Award, Car Club Attendance Award and Grand Champion. Steve Perry, of Bentonville, Arkansas, took home the first place prize in the 1900-60 classics category for his 1955 Chevrolet Bel Air at the 2014 show. “It’s a great show and one of our favorites every year,” Perry said. “Blast to the Past is one of the larger draw car shows around. There are a lot of great cars for the enthusiasts in the area. The fact that you can go inside to grab a nice lunch and cool off in a beautiful facility also makes it a great time for the family.” There will be cash prizes and trophies awarded for those who place first through third in each category. All participants will also receive a free shirt. “We are excited to bring back Blast to the Past for the 10th consecutive year,” Cherokee Casino & Hotel West Siloam Springs General Manager Tony Nagy said. “This has been a huge event for us. We’ve had so much interest, we just had to bring it back for 2015. We have some exciting things in the works for this year. It’s going to be a great time.” Jeff Johnson, also of Bentonville, won first in the 1961-80 classics category with his 1971 Chevrolet Camaro 228. “Last year was my third time to attend this show. It is one of the best we have in the region. Everyone in the area looks forward to it,” Johnson said. “The setup is fantastic. We like the environment, and it’s a great place to come show off your hobby. The entire show is nicely put together, with a great location and wonderful employees. It’s a whole lot of fun.” Registration and entry into the car show are free. Those who want to register can do so through noon at the casino on Aug. 15. Participants can also fax their registration forms to 918-422-6229. For more information, visit the promotions page on the Cherokee Casino & Hotel West Siloam Springs section of <a href="http://www.cherokeecasino.com" target="_blank">www.cherokeecasino.com</a> or call 1-800-754-4111.
BY STAFF REPORTS
07/28/2015 11:36 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – In Oklahoma, there is a tax-free weekend in which the state does not require individuals to pay taxes on clothing and shoes. Oklahoma’s sales tax holiday is set for Aug. 7-9. According to the Oklahoma Tax Commission’s website, the annual sales tax holiday will begin at 12:01 a.m. on Aug. 7 and end at midnight on Aug. 9. “Retailers are required to participate and may not collect state and local sales or use tax on most footwear and clothing that are sold for less than $100 during the holiday. Clothing is indicated by all “human wearing apparel,” which includes, but not limited to, aprons, belts, coats, underwear and socks. Having to set aside money for clothing, shoes and school supplies can be a burden on some families that might be struggling financially. USA.gov suggests families to look into qualifying for federal programs that may help ease financial burdens, including low-cost meals and affordable health insurance. For more information and answers to common questions on the sales tax holiday, as well as a listing of sales tax exempt items, please visit the OTC website at <a href="http://www.tax.ok.gov" target="_blank">www.tax.ok.gov</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
07/27/2015 01:09 PM
OOLOGAH, Okla. – Will Rogers and Wiley Post died in an Alaska plane crash on Aug. 15, 1935. It is often called the “crash heard around the world.” This year the Will Rogers & Wiley Post Fly-In at the Will Rogers Birthplace Ranch is set for Aug. 15, the 80th anniversary of the history-making event when bold headlines in newspapers all over the world carried the story. That day and the lives of the two, undoubtedly the world’s strongest aviation boosters of their time, is remembered each year on the Oologah, Indian Territory, ranch were Will Rogers was born. Usually a Sunday event, it was changed to Saturday to reflect the anniversary of the deaths, said Tad Jones, Will Rogers Memorial Museum executive director. Airports across the country have been invited to join in a special Moment of Remembrance at 10 a.m. (CST) at their respective airports to honor those who have lost their lives in a small aircraft accident. At that same time a short program at the Will Rogers Birthplace Ranch airstrip will pay tribute to the lives of Will and Wiley. Mary West of Oologah will sing the “National Anthem” and Ross Adkins, Fly-In announcer for the past several years, will present the commemoration program and call for a moment of silence. RSU Radio will live stream the tribute at 91.3 FM and on their website <a href="http://www.rsuradio.com" target="_blank">www.rsuradio.com</a>. The popular duo of Lester Lurk and Joe Bacon, aka “Will and Wiley,” will land about 9 a.m. The Fly-In provides an opportunity for the public to get a close-up look at airplanes and meet the pilots. Pilots enjoy the fellowship with fellow aviators and people who just enjoy planes. Cherokee Storyteller Robert Lewis will be under a shade tree with his tales of animals, so much a part of early Cherokee tradition. There will be antique cars, inflatables and games for children and food concessions. Ample parking is provided with rides to the viewing area. Roper Martin Howard and members of the Verdigris School football team have assisted with parking several years. Members of Rogers County Sheriff Mounted Troops will be on hand. Air Evac Lifetime, an air medical service, will fly in and be on hand to show their plane and provide information about the access at the Claremore Regional Airport. Ambulances from Oologah-Talala EMS and Northwest First District will have units for the public to see as well as be on hand for emergencies. Bring your own lawn chair or blanket and enjoy watching planes land and take off, walk among the aircraft, visit the house and see the room where Will was born and remember the day 80 years ago when the world learned Will and Wiley had died in Alaska. Admission is free, but donations will be accepted. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.willrogers.com" target="_blank">www.willrogers.com</a>.
BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter
07/27/2015 09:19 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – According to unofficial results, Bryan Warner won the July 25 runoff for the Cherokee Nation’s Dist. 6 Tribal Council seat. Unofficial results show that Warner received 54.06 percent of votes with 619 votes, while Natalie Fullbright received 45.94 percent of votes or 526 ballots. The numbers include 23 accepted challenged ballots. Warner said he feels truly blessed by the results. “This has been a very humbling experience,” he said. He said when he takes office he wants to take a look at everything and already has an idea of what types of resources the CN needs. He added that he wants to get out and meet more people. “I still think there’s people out there that I didn’t get to visit with in this district, and I want them to feel apart of this process,” he said. Warner said he is grateful to all who cast their vote for him to be the next Dist. 6 Tribal Councilor. “Thank you, thank you, thank you. My family thanks you, all my supporters thank you,” he said. “It’s just been a wonderful experience and there’s no way I could have written it out like this at all. I can’t wait to get to work and see what we can do for Dist. 6. When I say we, I mean all of us.” Warner extended congratulations to Fullbright for a well-ran race. “Her family and all her supporters have been wonderful through this campaign, and I feel like they’re all top-notch individuals. They’ve been cordial, they been kind,” he said. “I hope that we can all get together and work together.” In a Facebook post Fullbright conceded defeat to Warner. “Well guys we lost. Not by a lot but by enough. I think a lot of Bryan, get behind him, support him, pray for him work with him,” it stated. The Cherokee Phoenix contacted Fullbright for comment. “Why in the world are you people calling me? You need to call Bryan Warner,” she said. Dist. 6 covers the eastern part of Sequoyah County. Candidates who won their races will be sworn into office on Aug. 14. According to Election Commission officials, candidates had until July 29 to file for a recount. As of publication there was no request for a recount in the Dist. 6 race.