Chilocco class of 1963 to hold 50th high school reunion

BY STAFF REPORTS
04/15/2013 08:51 AM
NEWKIRK, Okla. – The Chilocco Indian Agricultural School’s class of 1963 will celebrate its 50th high school reunion on May 30 through June 2 on the Chilocco campus.

Activities for the reunion include a reception at 6:30 p.m. on May 30. There will also be games, horseshoes, gourd dancing, a powwow and intertribal activities on May 31.

Activities for June 1 include a veterans breakfast, bingo and a banquet and hall of fame induction for the class of 1963. On June 2, there will be a prayer service on campus.

The following individuals are being sought: Joe Bolin, Russell Feeling, Jim Roach, Betty Weeley, Albert Wolfe and Alfred Wyly.

For more information, call Ida Jane (McCoy) Johnson at 918-284-1703 or Betty J (Tanner) Belt at 918-859-0664.

Education

BY STAFF REPORTS
07/23/2016 10:00 AM
WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of the Interior on July 20 announced that the quarter’s transfer of nearly $500,000 to the Cobell Education Scholarship Fund brings the total amount contributed so far close to $40 million. The Scholarship Fund provides financial assistance through scholarships to American Indian and Alaska Native students wishing to pursue post-secondary and graduate education and training. Funded in part by the Land Buy-Back Program for Tribal Nations, the scholarship program is overseen by the Cobell board of trustees and administered by Indigenous Education Inc., a non-profit corporation created to administer the scholarship fund. So far approximately $2.2 million has been awarded in graduate and undergraduate scholarships to qualified American Indian students. Based on data gathered by Indigenous Education, the most recent Cobell scholars include 404 undergraduate students and 64 graduate students representing 89 federally recognized tribes. Applications and information concerning scholarships for the academic year 2017-18 can be found at <a href="http://www.cobellscholar.org" target="_blank">www.cobellscholar.org</a>. “With every new contribution, the scholarship fund will enable increasing numbers of Native American students across Indian Country to gain the advanced education and training that will help them meet the leadership challenges of the 21st century,” Interior Solicitor Hilary Tompkins, a Navajo Nation citizen who negotiated the Cobell settlement on behalf of the Interior, said. “They are pursuing their dreams, opening doors to new opportunities, preparing themselves for leadership and advancing self-determination for their communities all thanks to the vision of Elouise Cobell, whose life and legacy inspires and guides this noble initiative.” Cobell board of trustees Chairman Alex Pearl said: “The latest distribution aids our mission of carrying out the vision of Elouise Cobell to enhance educational opportunities for American Indians and Alaskan Native students. With the beginning of the new school year, we are excited to continue awarding the talented students in Indian Country. Our board understands the financial aid needs in Indian Country are enormous. These transfers provide an important foundation from which to positively impact Native students. We remain committed to creating a uniquely tuned scholarship program attentive to the needs and issues of Native students.” The Buy-Back Program was created to implement the land consolidation component of the Cobell settlement, which provided $1.9 billion to purchase fractionated interests in trust or restricted land from willing landowners. Consolidated interests are transferred to tribal government ownership for uses benefiting the reservation community and tribal citizens. The Interior makes quarterly transfers to the scholarship fund as a result of the program’s land sales, up to a total of $60 million. The amount the Interior contributes is based on a formula set forth in the settlement that sets aside a certain amount of funding depending on the value of the fractionated interests sold. These contributions do not reduce the amount that an owner will receive. Since December 2013, more than $760 million has been paid to individual landowners and more than 1.5 million acres have been transferred to tribal governments. Participation in the Buy-Back Program is voluntary. Landowners can call the Trust Beneficiary Call Center at 1-888-678-6836 or visit a local Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians to inquire about their land or purchase offers and learn about financial planning resources. More information and detailed frequently asked questions are available at <a href="https://www.doi.gov/buybackprogram/FAQ" target="_blank">https://www.doi.gov/buybackprogram/FAQ</a>. For more information on the Cobell scholarships, go to <a href="http://cobellscholar.org" target="_blank">http://cobellscholar.org</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
07/12/2016 12:00 PM
PARK HILL, Okla. – The Cherokee Heritage Center-sponsored Cherokee Humanities Course is taking applications until Aug. 9 for the fall academic semester at Northeastern State University. Through a grant from the Inasmuch Foundation, the CHC is providing tuition, books, child care and transportation at no cost to qualified students. Students may take the course in the fall and spring semesters for a total of six college credit hours in Cherokee studies. Priority is given to nontraditional Cherokee students not currently enrolled in a university and those considering returning to college. The late Dr. Howard Meredith, a former professor and head of the American Indian Studies degree program at the University of Science and Arts, established the course that replicates the original Clemente course offered in New York City by academic scholar Dr. Earl Shorris in 1995. It is designed to bring to light ideas and experiences that have remained quiet in general history books and creates a collaborative learning environment in which personal experiences and oral traditions are respected. These are interdisciplinary, college-level humanities courses offering credit hours through NSU. The classes are primarily held in the Osiyo Training Room behind the Restaurant of the Cherokees on the Tribal Complex in Tahlequah. For more information, call Tonia Weavel at 918-456-6007 or email <a href="mailto: tonia-weavel@cherokee.org">tonia-weavel@cherokee.org</a>.
BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
07/11/2016 08:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen LaNice Belcher, 18, recently graduated from Tahlequah High School and will attend Oklahoma City University this fall on several scholarships that provide her a “full-tuition waiver.” Belcher said she received a $110,000 tuition wavier after auditioning for the university’s Wanda L. Bass School of Music. She said she also received a $25,000 OCU Presidential Scholarship. “The thing was I was also academically strong, so they had to dial back my music scholarship because they wanted it to be known that…I had received the Presidential Scholarship. Otherwise, I have a full-tuition waiver for the school,” she said. Belcher also received a Cherokee Nation Foundation scholarship. “I also have several of the Cherokee Nation scholarships and other Native American scholarships.” While attending OCU, Belcher said she would play bassoon and other woodwind instruments. She said she also has an emphasis on piano and will be learning the fundamentals of percussion and brass. Belcher said she would be auditioning for the orchestra in August, as well as several operas and musicals. “They have about two operas and a few musicals every semester, so hopefully I’ll get to be in those pit orchestras,” she said. Belcher said she’s had an interest in performing in orchestra pits since she was a freshman at THS. “I had the opportunity at NSU (Northeastern State University) to play in ‘The Magic Flute,’ and so for me opera is a very large part of why I want to go to OCU because they are extremely known for their arts and their musical theater program,” she said. During her first semester she said she would be teaching at the music-based, after-school program El Sistema in Oklahoma City. “I’ll be teaching second and fourth year student’s music fundamentals. So I’ll already be a teacher making money,” she said. Belcher added that the opportunity to teach helps with her goal of being the band director at Sequoyah High School. “That is the overall dream, overall goal.” Belcher said she hopes to see success in her musical career so she can show that Cherokees go out and “make things happen.” “For me, it’s getting the stereotype out there that we (Cherokees) don’t just stay here,” she said. “We go out, we make things happen and we’re not just sitting ducks.” What is a Student Spotlight? A Student Spotlight is a 200-to-400-word feature on a Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band or Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians citizen who is a student, whether they are in grades kindergarten through 12 or higher education, either excelling in school or doing something out of the ordinary. How do I recommend a student for the Student Spotlight series? To recommend a student, email stacie-guthrie@cherokee.org with the student’s name, contact information and a brief summary of why he or she should be chosen.
BY TRAVIS SNELL
Assistant Editor – @cp_tsnell
06/09/2016 08:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – With Oklahoma public schools facing massive budget cuts next fiscal year, Lee Ann Reeves, a Cherokee Nation citizen who teaches seventh and eighth grade language arts at Oklahoma Union, said she appreciated the chance to earn free professional development hours at the tribe’s Teachers of Successful Students conference June 7-8 at Northeastern State University. “At our school we offer our own professional development for us to get our hours, but a lot of teachers go outside of that to get enrichment,” Reeves said. “When the schools see something that is free they are all for you going.” Reeves said being a teacher at a school with Cherokee students she wanted to get more information on how to be a better teacher and how to incorporate more strategies in the classroom. “We have a lot of kids who have tribal cards that go to our school, and so I want to better inform them of some of the Cherokee Nation offerings,” she said. “It shows me different strategies I can use to reach the students who may need a little different way to reach them, strategies I haven’t seen before, I haven’t used, from my instructors as well as other teachers who are in the classroom with me.” Now in its fourth year, the TOSS conference offers professional development workshops for teachers at public schools located in the tribe’s jurisdiction. The tribe’s Education Services held the conference for at least 150 teachers at NSU’s University Center. Dr. Gloria Sly, Education Services education liaison, said the initiative is provided through the tribe’s Motor Vehicle Tax funding so that public schoolteachers can focus on areas where schools receive failing grades from the Oklahoma Department of Education. “It was based on the public schools’ need to have professional development in the STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) areas because that’s where a lot of them were really failing or receiving F’s, and so we thought we could assist the public schoolteachers and make it accessible to them in this 14-county area because our little schools have just taken cuts and taken cuts, and it’s harder for them to pay for their teachers to go to attend a professional development,” Sly said. She said the conference also focused on reading and had 79 workshops for five school groups: early childhood, elementary, middle school, junior high and high school. The workshops varied in length from 45 minutes to two hours, and the conference was completely self-contained for convenience, Sly said. “We keep them self-contained in this building from beginning to end because one year we tried it where they would have to go to another building for a workshop, and all those that traveled back and forth got lost. We ended up with a very small population at the end of the day. So now we keep them in one building,” she said. Sly added that the tribe pays for housing so teachers who have to drive longer distances don’t have to leave town or pay for hotel rooms. “We pay for housing for those that come from up north like Nowata, Bluejacket. They come down here and they stay in seminary suites. We pay for that. Northeastern is a partner. As a partner they give us a very good rate. So they’ll come in Tuesday night, the night before, and be here and leave the last day,” she said. Carrie Steele, a CN citizen and math teacher at Kansas High School, said she appreciated that the conference was free and a short drive for her. “There is hardly any free training anymore and especially close to home. We always have to go to Tulsa or Oklahoma City. Tahlequah is a great place to have a meeting,” Steele said. Sly said many teachers get most, if not all, of their professional development for the whole year at the conference. “Because they have to have 15 hours of professional development, we have 15, 16 hours here,” she said. “What it all boils down to is the achievement of a lot of Cherokee students. We want them to have the best education they can. In order to have the best education they have to have the best teachers. In order to help those teachers to be able to reach our students we do this.” Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. said with the TOSS conference the tribe has assumed a role in giving teachers better tools to teach Cherokee youth. “As we prepare our citizens for a growing global economy, it’s critical to have a strong academic foundation. TOSS is a unique gathering because it is a chance to share what truly works in classrooms as we try to better engage kids and spark that interest in lifelong learning,” he said.
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/07/2016 02:00 PM
TULSA, Okla. – Three Cherokee Nation citizens were recently named Students of Excellence by the Greater Tulsa Area Indian Affairs Commission during the 39th annual Tulsa Public Schools Academic Awards Banquet. Evan Barton of Booker T. Washington High School, Nikki Prince of Daniel Webster High School and Haley Neel of Tulsa MET High School were three of seven graduating seniors from the Tulsa area to receive the for their outstanding achievements in and out of the classroom. The Greater Tulsa Area Indian Affairs Commission presents the awards to Native American students annually based on recommendations made by the students’ high school administrators and the Tulsa Public Schools Indian Education staff. The other 2016 Student of Excellence award winners are: • Chance Lamho, Muscogee Creek, East Central High School; • Thomas Scott, Muscogee Creek, Edison Preparatory High School; • Victoria Carney-Peters, Choctaw, Tulsa Memorial High School; and • Anthony Barnett, Muscogee Creek, Will Rogers High School. The Greater Tulsa Area Indian Affairs Commission’s primary mission is the advancement of American Indian culture and heritage and/or the provision of services to American Indians.
BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
05/31/2016 12:00 PM
TULSA, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen Nicolas Crear, a 17-year-old junior at Union High School, spent the first few days of May serving as an Oklahoma House of Representative page for Rep. Regina Goodwin as part of the House of Representative Page Program. “A select few high school students get picked from different parts of Oklahoma to aid a senator or a House representative,” he said. “We sit at this desk and when the phone rings they tell us to go run this errand in the House or in the Senate. We’re pretty much running all over the state Capitol just doing errands for senators or representatives.” Crear said he previously was a page for Oklahoma Sen. Anastasia Pittman, so he was excited to serve for Goodwin and see what the House had to offer. “I was on the floor a little bit more this time because in the Senate I think they were like starting to slow down in this session. It was like one of the last weeks when they didn’t have too many bills to pass,” he said. “So, on the House side there were a lot more bills. We spent like, I think, three hours on the floor one day.” Crear said next year he hopes to be a page for the Oklahoma Senate again. “I would like to do a little bit more on the Senate side because it’s not as many people and you get to do more jobs because when there’s like 28 kids or something like that work is distributed. Everyone does a good amount of work, but I just wish I could have did a little bit more,” he said. Crear said the opportunities he has received to serve as a page for both the Oklahoma Senate and House have given him new educational experiences. He added that he suggests others his age try becoming a page. “I think it’s important for teenagers to understand why these things or how these bills get passed because it just doesn’t happen over night,” he said. “I highly suggest that someone should try this out because if we’re going to want to better our community we need to know what goes on to passing a bill and we need to be just a little more educated on how government works.” What is a Student Spotlight? A Student Spotlight is a 200-to-400-word feature on a Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band or Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians citizen who is a student, whether they are in grades kindergarten through 12 or higher education, either excelling in school or doing something out of the ordinary. How do I recommend a student for the Student Spotlight series? To recommend a student, email stacie-guthrie@cherokee.org with the student’s name, contact information and a brief summary of why he or she should be chosen.