Cherokee Nation citizen Sharon Kyles of Locust Grove, Okla., completes a change-of-address form on June 22 after casting a challenged ballot in the Dist. 15 Tribal Council race. Precinct workers in the Locust Grove Town Hall said she was supposed to vote in the Dist. 9 race despite Kyles receiving a letter from the tribe’s Election Commission stating she was in Dist. 15. JAMI CUSTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

6 incumbents to remain on Tribal Council

Cherokee Nation citizen Jimmy Leeds of Tahlequah, Okla., signs in on June 22 to vote in the Tribal Council election at the Dist. 2 precinct in the W.W. Hastings Hospital in Tahlequah. TESINA JACKSON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX A Cherokee Nation citizen on June 22 places her ballot into a ballot machine at the District 2 precinct located in the W.W. Hastings Hospital in Tahlequah, Okla. Candidates Tamsye Dreadfulwater and Joe Byrd were vying for the seat. TESINA JACKSON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Lorraine A. Gifford of Rocky Ford, Okla., places her ballot for the Dist. 2 Tribal Council race in a ballot machine located at the precinct inside Lowery Public School. The Cherokee Nation’s election was held on June 22 and Dist. 2 pitted Tamsye Dreadfulwater against incumbent Joe Byrd. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Cherokee Nation citizen Jeanette Riley of Locust Grove, Okla., votes in a Tribal Council election on June 22 at the precinct located in the Locust Grove Town Hall. JAMI CUSTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Cherokee Nation citizen Linda Keener of Rose, Okla., votes in the Tribal Council elections on June 22 at the precinct located in the tribe’s AMO Clinic in Salina. JAMI CUSTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen Jimmy Leeds of Tahlequah, Okla., signs in on June 22 to vote in the Tribal Council election at the Dist. 2 precinct in the W.W. Hastings Hospital in Tahlequah. TESINA JACKSON/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
06/23/2013 04:42 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – According to unofficial results from the Cherokee Nation’s June 22 election, six current Tribal Councilors will remain on the legislative body when the new 15-district representative map replaces the five-district map on Aug. 14. In two other district races, one incumbent faces a runoff while another incumbent lost.

Incumbent Joe Byrd of Tahlequah will serve as councilor for the new Dist. 2. Unofficial results showed Byrd receiving 67.97 percent of the votes, or 416 ballots, while Tamsye Dreadfulwater of Tahlequah received 32.03 percent or 196 votes.

“Now it’s time to go to work,” Byrd said. “And all the people that helped, the volunteers, the people that let me put signs in their yard, it was really a team effort and there were a lot of people involved with my reelection and I just want to thank all of the people that supported me.”

Byrd previously served on the Tribal Council from 1987-95 and since 2012. He also served as principal chief from 1995-99.

“One of my main initiatives in this go-around is going to be making sure that any of the elderly that want a storm shelter, I want to make sure they have one available to them because of the uncertainty of what our weather patterns have been,” he said. “Everybody talks about health care and scholarships, and that’s OK and I still support that, but I’m really going to concentrate on our elders this go-around.”

In the Dist. 4 race, incumbent Don Garvin of Muskogee will face challenger Mike Dobbins of Fort Gibson in a runoff election on July 27 because Garvin did not receive more than 50 percent of the vote.

Garvin received 304 votes, or 43.8 percent, while Dobbins received 240 votes or 34.58 percent. Candidate Justin Carlton of Muskogee received 150 votes or 21.61 percent.

Attempts to reach Garvin for a comment were unsuccessful.

Dobbins said he was “happy” to be in the runoff and he has a lot of work in front of him. He added that the biggest concern for Dist. 4 constituents is health care.

“With sequester cuts, I’m trying to reassure the Cherokee people that we will everything we can to keep health services intact,” he said.

Incumbent David Thornton of Vian will serve as Tribal Councilor for the new Dist. 5 when he’s inaugurated. Results showed that Thornton received 56.75 percent of the votes, or 311 votes, while his opponents Dink Scott of Vian received 35.22 percent or 193 votes. Candidate Sherri Doolin of Braggs received 44 votes for 8.03 percent.

Thornton was first elected to the council in 2003. The Phoenix attempted to reach him but was unsuccessful.

In the Dist. 7 race, incumbent Frankie Hargis of Stilwell received 547 votes, or 55.09 percent, to defeat Joe Adair of Stilwell who received 446 votes or 44.91 percent.

Hargis first won a seat on the council in December 2011 during a special election to fill a seat vacated by now Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden. She also defeated Adair in that race.

Hargis credited her friends and family for working “tirelessly” with her to win the race. She said she appreciated those who voted for her and gave her their support.

Hargis said she’s heard from Cherokee people that they need help with application processes to receive tribal services such as housing, health care and education.

“We’ve made progress with all of that, and I’m so happy that I get to continue to help moving us forward to even better opportunities for our people,” she said.

In Dist. 9, unofficial results show that incumbent Curtis G. Snell of Rose won by 57.49 percent, or 407 votes, to defeat Lonus Mitchell of Rose who got 301 votes for 42.51 percent. Attempts to reach Snell were unsuccessful.

In Dist. 10, Harley Buzzard of Eucha received 66.82 percent of the vote for getting 290 ballots, while his opponent Nettie Detherage of Fairland received 33.18 percent or 144 votes.

Buzzard was not available for comment when election results were posted.

Tribal Councilor Chuck Hoskin Jr., drew no opponent for the new Dist. 11, so he will be inaugurated on Aug. 14 as that district’s council representative.

Three candidates campaigned for the Dist. 15 seat and unofficial results show that Janees Taylor of Pryor won with 50.7 percent or 289 votes. Incumbent Meredith Frailey of Locust Grove had 45.96 percent of the vote or 262 votes, and candidate Marilyn Cooper of Locust Grove got 19 votes for 3.33 percent.
Attempts to reach Taylor were unsuccessful.

The council’s At-Large Seat No. 2 had six candidates vying for it. Unofficial results show incumbent Jack Baker of Nichols Hills winning with 739 votes for 51.64 percent.

Candidates Curtis Bruehl of Norman received 30.4 percent from 435 votes. Ken Luttrell of Ponca City got 5.87 percent from 84 votes, while Robin Mayes of Denton, Texas, received 5.24 percent from 75 votes. Curtis West of Klamath Falls, Ore., received 3.63 percent of the vote, 52 votes overall, while Carol Richmond of Tulsa received 46 votes for 3.21 percent.

Although the results were unofficial, Baker said he feels he “fought a clean fight and did not run down any other candidate.”

“Even with all the money that was spent trying to take me out, I think the Cherokee people were able to see through that and still re-elect me,” he said.

The Election Commission is expected to certify the results within three days. – Senior Reporter Will Chavez and Reporters Jami Custer, Tesina Jackson and Stacie Guthrie contributed to this report.


10/05/2015 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – At its Sept. 18 meeting, the Cherokee Nation Gaming Commission approved two upgrades for Cherokee Nation Entertainment’s system software. Tracy Christie, CNGC gaming systems analyst, said he reviewed all of the information provided and saw a need for an upgrade. “The issue was that there were a couple of key boxes, it was retaining the data in the actual box and whenever you logged into the web server you weren’t able to see that data, but with these two upgrades and it being tested, it resolved that issue,” he said.
10/05/2015 02:00 PM
TULSA, Okla. – The Tulsa Cherokee Community Organization will host its monthly meeting at 6 p.m. on Oct. 6 at the Tulsa United Indian Methodist Church located at 1901 North College. The meeting will feature Cherokee Nation citizen Regina Gayle (Martin) Thompson, of Locust Grove, who will bring her traditional basket weaving skills. According to TCCO officials, meeting attendees will be able to weave their own Cherokee basket. “As a certified Cherokee Nation TERO artist, Thompson is uniquely qualified to teach Cherokee basket weaving. Thompson’s award-winning Cherokee baskets are on display in public collections across the Cherokee Nation throughout northeastern Oklahoma and as far away as Washington, D.C., in the Daughters of the American Revolution Museum. Private collectors have taken her Cherokee baskets abroad to Australia, Switzerland, India, France, England,” a TCCO release states. “My mentor is the incredible Cherokee National Treasure, Bessie Russell. I am blessed and humbled by the art and skill of Cherokee double wall basket weaving. My grandmother, a full-blood Cherokee, weaved baskets to put food on the table while my grandfather served in France during World War II,” she said. “My grandmother would create mid-size baskets for the market to trade for eggs, flour, chickens, and sometimes sewing material.” All materials will be provided by TCCO through Tribal Council General Assistance grant funds provided by Dist. 13 Tribal Councilman Buel Anglen. There is no cost for the class, the release states. To contact TCCO, email <a href="mailto:"></a> or call TCCO President Brandon Caruso at(805) 551-6445. You can also visit TCCO’s Facebook page at Tulsa Cherokee Community Organization.
10/05/2015 10:04 AM
MURPHY, N.C. – After nearly two years of construction and $100 million Harrah’s Cherokee Valley River Casino & Hotel opened its doors on Sept. 28, according to The facility is owned by the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and will be managed by Caesars Entertainment LLC. It’s expected to create approximately 900 to 1,000 jobs, features a 50,000-square-foot gaming floor with 70 table games and 1,050 slot machines and a full-service 300-room hotel. While the casino does not have any formal dining or restaurants, visitors will be able to choose from the Panda Express, Starbucks, Papa John’s, Earl of Sandwich and Nathan’s Famous located in the casino’s Food Market. Regional General Manager and Harrah’s Senior Vice President Brooks Robinson said the casino would positively affect the tribe and area. “For the area, we know we’re going to have around 1,000 jobs. It will put around $40 million into the local economy through payroll that will be here. For the tribe, it will just be another way to build the revenue stream and through tribal distribution. All of the projections look like it should be very successful for the tribe,” Robinson said. Estimated by officials to draw in excess of 1 million visitors annually, the Valley River Casino is the tribe’s second Harrah’s casino. The first and larger Harrah’s Cherokee Casino also located in Jackson County, sits at the entrance to the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. It recently underwent a $650 million expansion and now boasts 150,000-square-feet of gaming space.
10/02/2015 12:00 PM
CATOOSA, Okla. – On Oct. 22, the Beatles tribute band, The Fab Four, will perform at The Joint inside Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. The Fab Four’s stage performances include three costume changes representing every era of the Beatles ever-changing career, from the moptop early days in London to the shaggy-haired final public performance on the Apple headquarters’ rooftop. Formed in 1997, this loving tribute to the Beatles has amazed audiences in countries around the world, including Japan, Australia, France, Hong Kong, the United Kingdom, Germany, Mexico and Brazil. In 2013, The Fab Four received an Emmy for their PBS special “The Fab Four: The Ultimate Tribute.” For more information about the tribute band, visit <a href="" target="_blank"></a>. Tickets go on sale Oct. 1 and start at $40. For more information, call The Joint box office at 918-384-ROCK or visit <a href="" target="_blank"></a>.
10/02/2015 10:00 AM
PHOENIX – Native American activist and Cherokee Nation citizen Jess Sixkiller was slain in a home invasion on Sept. 25. He was 78. Reports state his wife locked herself in a room and called 911 around 3:15 a.m. after she heard noises inside the home she shared with her husband. When the police arrived they removed her from the home and re-entered the home to perform a sweep and discovered the body of Sixkiller, who had been shot to death. “The Cherokee Nation and tribal citizens throughout the country lost a true champion with the tragic passing of Jess Sixkiller. He was the first Native detective on the Chicago Police Force and in Phoenix he continued to champion the rights of Indian people. He was a warrior and advocate for Native rights, especially urban-based Indian people,” said Principal Chief Bill John Baker in a statement. “Throughout Indian Country, Jess will be forever known as a man committed to his Native brothers and sisters who suffered as a result of federal relocation and assimilation policies.” Baker said as the leader of the National Urban Indian Organization, Sixkiller fought tirelessly for the rights of those he said faced a different kind of crisis than Indians living close to their community or on the reservation. “Jess was a man who led by example, and I was proud to have met and known this iconic activist. He was proud to be Cherokee, and we are proud of him. He will be missed immensely, and we are holding his family in our thoughts and prayers,” Baker said. By the time he was 30 years old, Sixkiller was the first Native American to become a detective for the Chicago Police Department. Soon he gained national recognition within the National Congress of American Indians. He was an urban representative to NCAI’s annual conference in 1968 from the Chicago American Indian Center. At that conference in Seattle, Sixkiller was elected to chair a 12-person committee called the National Urban Indian Consultation that was charged with studying the issues impacting urban American Indians living away from reservations. The committee progressed rapidly and received an $88,500 grant from the Ford Foundation and formed the National Urban Indian Organization. Sixkiller became the organization’s first director. The Phoenix Police Department described the home invasion as “random” and has no suspects. Phoenix Police Homicide detectives are asking anyone who may have seen or heard anything at the time of the shooting or anyone who has information about this homicide to call Silent Witness at (480) WIT-NESS. As always, any caller may remain anonymous. A memorial fund has been set up in Sixkiller’s name at Wells Fargo Bank. Donations can be made to Wells Fargo Bank, Jess Sixkiller Memorial, account No. 2457886071.
10/01/2015 02:00 PM
VONORE, Tenn. – The Sequoyah Birthplace Museum is offering a Cherokee language class from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m., Oct. 19 and 26 and Nov. 2 and 9. Cost of the class is $40 for all four nights. Shirley Oswalt and Mary Brown, who are Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indian citizens, will teach the class. People interested in taking this class should call the museum at 423-884-6246. In case of inclement weather, please call before coming. Sequoyah was born near the museum site in 1776. The mission of the Sequoyah Birthplace Museum, a property of the EBCI, is to promote the understanding and appreciation of the history and culture of the Cherokee Indians in Eastern Tennessee, particularly the life and contributions of Sequoyah. The museum collects, preserves, interprets and exhibits objects and data that support this mission.