Trail of Tears commemoration set at Red Clay
7/30/2013 8:52:31 AM
 
Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chad Smith, center, and Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Michell Hicks, left, carry torches on April 16, 2009, to relight the Eternal Flame of the Cherokee Nation located at Red Clay State Park in Cleveland, Tenn. The park is hosting the commemoration of the 175th anniversary of the Trail of Tears on Aug. 3-4. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Chad Smith, center, and Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians Michell Hicks, left, carry torches on April 16, 2009, to relight the Eternal Flame of the Cherokee Nation located at Red Clay State Park in Cleveland, Tenn. The park is hosting the commemoration of the 175th anniversary of the Trail of Tears on Aug. 3-4. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
BY STAFF REPORTS CLEVELAND, Tenn. – Red Clay State Park will host “Honor and Remember” on Aug. 3-4 to commemorate the 175th anniversary of the Trail of Tears. The event will be held 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. While the event is free and open to the public, there is a $5 donation fee per vehicle. Re-enactors will demonstrate 18th and early 19th century southeastern life featuring Cherokee and non-Native settlers. The event will also include Cherokee foods, music, dancing, storytelling and demonstrations of traditional crafts and skills. Park rangers will lead hikes and speakers will give lectures discussing various topics related to the Cherokee and the Trail of Tears. “Red Clay’s commemoration of the 175th anniversary of the Trail of Tears is a great opportunity for visitors to view a depiction of Cherokee life in the 1700s and early 1800s,” park manager Erin Medley said. For more information on the anniversary event, call Red Clay’s park office at 423-478-0339 or visit www.tnstateparks.com/RedClay. Red Clay State Historic Park is located in the extreme southwest corner of Bradley County, just above the Tennessee-Georgia state line and is the site of 11 of the last 12 Cherokee Council meetings before the infamous Trail of Tears. The park encompasses 263 acres of narrow valley and forested ridges and features picnic facilities, a loop trail and amphitheater. The park also contains a natural landmark, the Blue Hole Spring, which arises from beneath a limestone ledge to form a deep pool that flows into Mill Creek. The Cherokee used the Blue Hole Spring as their water supply during council meetings. For more information about the park, visit www.tnstateparks.com/RedClay.
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