Cherokee genealogist Christina Berry researches a client’s genealogy from her home. COURTESY PHOTO

‘All Things Cherokee’ source for Cherokee genealogy

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
08/13/2013 08:34 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – For more than 10 years, Cherokee Nation citizen Christina Berry has provided genealogy services for the public from her home and website “All Things Cherokee.”

Berry offers three genealogy services: Cherokee Roll Report, Tribal Enrollment Research and In-Depth Genealogy Research.

Berry said Cherokee history and genealogy is complex because of the different migrations of Cherokee people during a period of almost 100 years from their traditional homelands in the east to the west in what are now Arkansas, Texas and Oklahoma.

“It’s a heartbreaking story, but it’s also a fascinating example of how families and cultures can survive despite difficult situations. When you think about how much the Cherokee Nation has been through, it is a fascinating story. So finding other people’s stories within that and helping tie them to major historical events is kind of fascinating to me,” Berry said. “It’s almost like detective work...I find the mystery of genealogy fun to explore.”

She said many times the people who contact her are looking for proof of Cherokee ancestry, which can be difficult if there is no record of their ancestors on Cherokee rolls or census records.

“If their family didn’t live with the tribe during these historic movements then they probably won’t find their ancestors on those rolls,” she said.

Being a Cherokee historian and a genealogist helps her help people understand Cherokee history and if their families were a part of that history, Berry said. And sometimes a person’s genealogy may connect to other tribes that settled in Indian Territory in the 19th century.

“Often times I find my job is to help, in a real non-judgmental way, people understand the reality of Cherokee history and how they may or may not be connected to it,” she said. “Even if they’re not in the documents they still may be connected to it, it’s just they’re not going to find that proof.”

She said she enjoys helping people understand the differences in tribes and that Indian, Native American, and Cherokee are not synonymous.

Berry said her interest in genealogy came from her father, Dave Berry, who is a genealogy buff and has researched her family’s genealogy “many generations back.” She said she has always had a fascination with her family’s genealogy, and when she was in college she created a website to show her family tree and listed a links page, which got “tons” of traffic. She said it made her realize there are many other people interested in genealogy.

“The site just sort of build up organically from that. It just seemed there was an audience of people who wanted to know more about their own genealogy,” Berry said.

She has a degree in history, and she said she has a lot of experience researching Cherokee documents. She said she’s been able to help more than 1,000 families understand their family trees better during nearly 10 years of offering genealogy services.

“I realized that I have the knowledge to help other people to explore their own genealogy. It seems to be still succeeding and everybody seems to be interested, and my clientele seem to be pleased with the research I do,” she said.

The Cherokee Roll Report, she said, is a good for the do-it-yourself researcher. The report provides “tons” of Cherokee genealogy plus custom surname searches of all the Cherokee rolls. Researchers will find a completely customized reference to the 15 Cherokee rolls, as well as other information regarding tribal citizenship requirements and blood quantum calculation.

The cost is $30 for the first surname report and $20 for each additional surname added.

Tribal Enrollment Research is a service that helps determine if you are eligible to enroll with one of the three federally recognized Cherokee tribes – the CN, United Keetoowah Band and Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.

Berry said she asks her clients to provide details about their Cherokee grandparent or grandparents so that she can determine if the client’s family is eligible to enroll with one of the three tribes.

This service costs $75. Research time can vary. Currently, it takes about one to two weeks to complete.

In-Depth Genealogy Research is the most detailed service Berry provides with six hours of dedicated genealogy research into a person’s family tree. She uses census, marriage, birth, and death record searches. Cherokee rolls and secondary Cherokee resources are also used. She also can assist with CN citizenship application through this service. The rate for genealogy research is $400 for six hours of research.

For more information, visit www.allthingscherokee.com.

will-chavez@cherokee.org


918-207-3961

About the Author
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M.

He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life.
He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association.

Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years. He was named interim executive editor on Dec. 8, 2015, by the Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board.
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M. He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life. He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association. Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years. He was named interim executive editor on Dec. 8, 2015, by the Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board.

Culture

BY STAFF REPORTS
02/10/2017 12:00 PM
LONGMONT, Colo. – First Nations Development Institute, a national Native American nonprofit organization that works to improve Native economies and communities, on Feb. 2 announced it has received a $2.7 million grant for a three-year Native arts project. This award will position First Nations to expand its Native Arts Initiative, formerly known as the “Native Arts Capacity Building Initiative,” into 2019. Launched in early 2014, the purpose of the Native Arts Initiative is to support the perpetuation and proliferation of Native American arts, cultures and traditions as integral to Native community life. It does this by providing organizational and programmatic resources to Native-led organizations and tribal government programs that have existing programs in place that support Native artists and traditional arts in their communities. Since 2014, First Nations has awarded more than $600,000 in grant funds to various eligible Native-led nonprofit organizations and tribal programs in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin to bolster the sustainability of their organizational and programmatic infrastructure as well as the professional development of their staff and leadership. Under the expansion, First Nations will continue to offer competitive funding opportunities to Native-led nonprofit organizations and tribal programs in Minnesota, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin. First Nations will begin to offer competitive funding opportunities to Native-led nonprofit organizations and tribal programs in two new regions – the Southwest, including Arizona, New Mexico and Southern California, and the Pacific Northwest, including Washington and Oregon. First Nations expects to release a request for proposals in the coming days and will award approximately 45 Supporting Native Arts Grants of up to $32,000 each over the next three years to eligible Native-led nonprofits and tribal government programs in these regions. NAI recipient organizations and programs will utilize their grants to strengthen their organizational and programmatic infrastructure and sustainability, which will reinforce their support of the field of Native American artists as culture bearers and traditional arts in their communities. In addition to financial support, the NAI will offer individualized training and technical assistance opportunities for grantees as well as competitive professional development opportunities for staff members of eligible Native-led organizations and tribal programs. For a list of current and former NAI grantees, visit <a href="http://www.firstnations.org" target="_blank">http://www.firstnations.org</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
02/09/2017 04:00 PM
PARK HILL, Okla. – The 46th annual Trail of Tears Art Show is set to run from April 8 through May 6 at the Cherokee Heritage Center with categories including painting, sculpture, pottery, basketry, graphics, jewelry and miniatures. Artists will compete for more than $15,000. Artists must be a citizen of a federally recognized tribe to enter the show. A submission fee of $10 is charged per entry and entries must be submitted to callie-chunestudy@cherokee.org by 5 p.m. on March 15. Artists who wish to enter their works should submit photographs of their completed works, an entry form and the fee. These items must be submitted at the same time or the entry will be disqualified. A list of accepted artwork will be posted on March 22 on the CHC website. An awards reception is set for 6 p.m. on April 7 to recognize winners in each category. The Trail of Tears Art Show began in 1972 as a means of fostering the development of painting as a form of expressing Native American heritage. Initiated before the completion of the museum, the art show was held in the rain shelter of the Tsa-La-Gi Theater. In 1975, it became the first major exhibition in the present museum. The CHC is located at 21192 S. Keeler Drive. For more information, call 1-888-999-6007 or visit <a href="http://www.cherokeeheritage.org" target="_blank">www.cherokeeheritage.org</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
02/05/2017 10:00 AM
PARK HILL, Okla. – Native American youths are invited to participate in the 2017 Cherokee Art Market Youth Competition and Show, scheduled for April 8 through May 6. All artists must be citizens of a federally recognized tribe, in grades sixth through 12, and are limited to one entry per person. There is no fee to participate in the competition. Entries will be received between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. on March 31 at the Cherokee Heritage Center. All submissions must include an entry form attached to the artwork, an artist agreement form and a copy of the artist’s Certificate Degree of Indian Blood card or tribal card. Artwork will be evaluated by division and grade level. Awards include Best in Show: $250; first place: $150; second place: $125; and third place: $100. The Best in Show winner will also receive a free booth in October at the Cherokee Art Market. A reception will be held at 6 p.m. on April 7 at the CHC in conjunction with the 46th annual Trail of Tears Art Show. Winning artwork will remain on display throughout the duration of the Cherokee Art Market Youth Show, ending May 9. Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism is hosting the Cherokee Art Market Youth Competition. For more information, call Deborah Fritts at 918-384-6990 or email <a href="mailto: cherokeeartmarket@cnent.com">cherokeeartmarket@cnent.com</a>. The CHC is located at 21192 S. Keeler Drive.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
02/03/2017 04:00 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – Museum officials said construction of the American Indian Cultural Center & Museum in Oklahoma City may resume as soon as this fall after a decades-long effort to create it. Fundraisers have collected $10.8 million in private donations, the Oklahoman reported. Fundraisers said they’ve collected enough funds to complete and open the museum, as outlined in a 2015 state law. Museum officials approved a plan to allow the acceptance of the donated money and give Executive Director Blake Wade authority to deposit the money in a state “completion fund.” According to Oklahoma City attorney John Michael Williams, depositing the private donations would start the process of issuing state bonds. He said the process would take four to five months. “I predict construction, if things go routinely, construction would start in October,” he said. The private donations are the first installment of the state’s $25 million pledge of matching funds to finish the museum. The cost to complete the museum is estimated to be at least $65 million. “This is a milestone resolution, a milestone day,” Williams said. The inside of the 162,000-square-foot museum remained mostly unfinished when construction came to a halt five years ago due to insufficient state funding, with the exterior of the museum nearly finished. In 2015, Oklahoma City leaders and the Chickasaw Nation partnered to complete and open the museum. Their partnership also includes the development of surrounding commercial property. Currently, the board includes $876,000 into its annual expenses to maintain the facility, secure the site and preserve warranties.
BY STAFF REPORTS
01/30/2017 12:15 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism will host cultural classes to learn the art of making traditional pucker-toe moccasins. The Saturday workshops are scheduled from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. for March 11, July 15, Oct. 7 and Nov. 4 at the Cherokee National Prison Museum. Registration costs $35 and is available at <a href="http://www.cherokeegiftshop.com" target="_blank">www.cherokeegiftshop.com</a>. Early registration is recommended, as class size is limited to 15 people. All materials will be provided to make traditional pucker-toe moccasins, which were historically worn by the Cherokee people. Participants are asked to bring their own lunches. The Cherokee National Prison was the only penitentiary building in Indian Territory from 1875 to 1901. It housed sentenced and accused prisoners from throughout the territory. It is located at 124 E. Choctaw St. For more information, call 1-77-779-6977 or visit <a href="http://www.VisitCherokeeNation.com" target="_blank">www.VisitCherokeeNation.com</a>.
BY JAMI MURPHY
Senior Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
01/30/2017 08:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizens Twyla Spear and her mother, Jessie Jackson, often walk around the Whimsy House of Beads looking for that unique string of beads they hadn’t found yet and just enjoying time together. “My mom has always done beadwork and she wanted to come over here (Whimsy House of Beads) for a class, and I thought ‘OK I’ll take it with you.’ I’ve been coming ever since. My mom, she always has made pretty beadwork,” Spear said. Growing up, Spear said she didn’t take to beading like her mother, but remembers her mother beading all the time. She said her mother was always doing something with her hands. As she got older, Spear said she would crochet, but mainly focused on raising her children and never found the time to learn to bead. That all changed after taking that first beading class with her mother. Now Spear said she “loves it.” Spear said her mother continues to bead, and they both help each other when needed. “She still helps me with a lot of stuff and some stuff that I’ve learned, I help her,” she said. However, it’s the time spent with her mom that she enjoys the most about beading, she said. “It’s just fun beading with her. She’s 82, and she’s not going to be around here forever, but I’m enjoying it now that I’m doing it.” Although taking the class was something fun to do with her mother at first, the beading became a hobby. Now it’s a full-blown “obsession,” she said, one she can make money at to supplement her and her husband’s incomes. “I love doing it, but I’ve got a chance to get money,” she said. “I just enjoy blessing someone else (too). There’s lots of stuff I’ve given out.” The extra money she makes helps with odds and ends as well as buying more beads, she said. Spear said she tries to learn as much as she can by taking as many classes as she can. Her most recent item she’s learned to make is a hatband. She uses a homemade loom her brother made for her to bead hatbands for cowboy hats. Both Spear and her mother attended the “5 after 5” event on Jan. 19 at the Whimsy House of Beads. The business donated 10 percent of its purchases during the party to the Tahlequah Help-in-Crisis Organization. CN citizen Sally Williams, who taught Spear in her first class, said teaching is something that comes naturally to her, especially if she is well versed in what she talking about. She’s beaded for many years and always enjoys having students who excel like many of hers have. Students such as Twyla, she said, make a teacher proud to watch their students succeed. “She loves it. She’s just obsessed. She’s been doing it for a year and a half,” Williams said. Anyone interested in beadwork by Spears can call her at 479-287-8360. For more information on taking a class at Whimsy House of Beads, call 918-207-8539 or 918-431-0597. The shop is located at 204 E. Downing St. and is open from 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Wednesday through Friday and from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday.