Tahlequah Mayor Jason Nichols, left sitting, watches Principal Chief Bill John Baker, right sitting, on Aug. 8 sign a lease on a Cherokee Nation-owned property that will be the new site of a splash pad for the city in 2014. They were joined by, left to right in back, Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden, Northeastern State President Steve Turner, Miss Cherokee Christy Kingfisher, Tribal Councilor Joe Byrd and CN Senior Assistant Attorney General Linda Donelson. JAMI CUSTER/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

CN, Tahlequah officials partner for splash pad

BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter
08/22/2013 08:51 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation signed a 25-year lease on Aug. 8 with the city of Tahlequah to build a splash pad that will be free for all community members – Cherokee and non-Cherokee.

According to a CN press release, the agreement made with the city allows officials to build the water playground on .72 acres of tribally owned land located downtown.

“The city will lease the space for $1 a year,” the release states.

The splash pad, which has yet to be named, will be located at the corner of Downing and Water streets. Mayor Jason Nichols said during the signing that the plan is to have the site constructed by March or early April in 2014.

“But with the help of the Cherokee Nation we’re going to spend another $183,000…that will put this facility in place that will improve the quality of life for Cherokee children and non-Cherokee children,” Nichols said.

The splash pad will offer picnic tables, dumping water buckets, a foam pad, water shooters, two water wheels as well as other water-related toys.

Principal Chief Bill John Baker said that this is the best use of this property.

“We truly believe that for the next 25 years, this is the highest and best use of that property for the Cherokee Nation,” Baker said. “It will help our youth, the tourism. It helps tie our parks together when we try to attract people to see the courthouse, to see the Supreme Court, to see the jail…this is just one more plus why people might want to come to Tahlequah.”

Baker added that the partnership between the city and the CN will improve the lives of Cherokee and non-Cherokees alike.

“…we will continue to develop these kinds of infrastructure improvements for our citizens,” he said.

The splash pad is a part of $150 million worth of new infrastructure that’s been planned for or been built in the city during the past several years.

Northeastern State University is building a new multipurpose event center, and the CN is planning a new $50 million hospital. The city’s sports complex and new swimming pool are future projects, the CN release states.

jami-custer@cherokee.org


918-453-5560

ᏣᎳᎩ
ᏓᎵᏆ, ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ. – ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎤᏬᏪᎳᏅ ᎯᏍᎩᏦᏁ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎤᏓᏙᎵᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎦᎶᏂ ᏧᏁᎵᏁ ᎾᎿ ᎦᏚᎲ ᏓᎵᏆ ᎤᏃᏢᏗ ᎠᎹ ᏧᎾᏁᎶᏙᏗ ᎤᏂᏱᏍᏛᏗ ᎠᏎᏊ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ ᏂᎦᏓ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎠᏁᎳ-- ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ.

ᏚᎾᏙᎵᏤᎸᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏗᏂᎴᏴᏗᏍᎩ ᏫᏚᏂᏲᏒᎢ, ᎾᎿ ᏚᎾᏓᏁᏤᎸ ᎾᎿ ᎦᏚᎲ ᎠᎵᏍᎪᎸᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᏂᏁᏥᏙᎯ ᎤᏃᏢᏗ ᎠᎼᎯ ᏧᎾᏁᎶᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ .72 ᎢᏳᏟᎶᏓ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᎳᏍᏓᏢ ᎤᎾᏤᎵ ᎦᏙᎯ ᏗᎦᏚᎲ ᎤᏂᎲᎢ.

“ᎾᎿ ᎦᏚᎲ ᏛᎾᏙᎵᏏ ᎤᏠᏅᏛ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏃᏍᏗ ᏑᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᏧᎬᏩᎶᏗ,” ᎪᏪᎸᎢ ᎪᏪᎵ ᏧᏂᏲᏒᎢ.

ᎠᎹ ᏧᎾᏁᎶᏙᏗ ᎠᏱᏍᏓᎥᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ Ꮭ Ꮟ ᏱᏚᏙᎠ, ᎤᏃᎸᏗᏃ ᎤᏅᏏᏴ Downing ᎠᎴ ᎠᎹ ᏕᎦᏅᏅᎢ. ᎦᏚᎲ ᎤᎬᏫᏳᎯ Jason Nichols ᎤᏛᏅ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏃᏪᎵᏍᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏂᏃᎮᏢ ᎤᏃᏢᏗ ᎯᎠ ᏧᎾᏁᎶᏗᎢ ᎡᎵᏊ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏅᏱ ᎠᎴ ᎢᎬᏱᏊ ᎧᏬᏂ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ.

“ᎠᏎᏃ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᏕᎸᏗ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏙᏓᏛᏔᏂ ᏏᏊ ᏐᎢ 183,000… ᎾᏍᎩ ᏛᏙᏢᏂ ᎯᎠ ᏧᎾᏁᎶᏗ ᏓᏤᏞᏍᏗ ᎤᏂᏓᏍᏗ ᏓᎾᏛᏍᎬ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ ᎢᏧᎳ,” ᎤᏛᏅ Nichols.

ᎾᎿ ᎠᎹ ᏧᎾᏁᎶᏙᏗ ᎠᏱᏍᏓᎥᎢ ᏃᎴᏍᏊ ᏕᎦᏍᎩᎴᏍᏗ ᏗᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗᎢ, ᏏᏙᏂ ᎠᎹ ᏗᏟᏍᏙᏗ, ᎠᏟᏲᎷᎲᏍᎩ pad, ᎠᎹ ᏗᏟᏍᏙᏗ ᏧᎾᏁᎶᏙᏗ, ᏔᎵ ᎠᎹ wheels ᎤᎪᏕᏍᏗ ᎠᎹᏱ ᏧᎾᏁᎶᏙᏗ ᎤᏂᎲᏍᏗ.

ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎤᎬᏫᏳᎯ Bill John Baker ᎤᏛᏅ ᎯᎠ ᏬᏌᏂᏴ ᏓᏛᏔᏂ ᎦᏙᎯ.

“ᏙᎯᏳ ᎣᎪᎯᏳ ᎾᎿ ᏐᎢᎯᏍᎩᏦᏁ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏩᎦᎸᎳᏗᏴ ᎠᎴ ᏬᏌᏂᏴ ᏓᏛᏔᏂ ᎯᎠ ᎦᏙ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ,” ᎤᏛᏅ Baker. “ᏓᏳᏂᏍᏕᎸᎯ ᏗᎾᏛᏍᎩ, ᎠᏂᎦᏖᏃᎵᏙᎯ. ᎢᎩᏍᏕᎵᎭ ᎾᎿ ᏴᏫ ᎤᏁᏓᏍᏗ ᎢᏧᎳ ᏃᎴ ᎢᏗᏁᎶᏗᏍᎪ ᏴᏫ ᎤᏂᎪᏩᏛᏗ ᎤᏪᏘ ᏧᎾᏓᏰᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᏩᎦᎸᎳᏗᏴ ᏧᎾᏓᏱᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᎠᏓᏁᎸ, ᎤᏪᏘ ᏧᎾᏓᏍᏚᏗᎢ…. ᎯᎠ ᏥᏛᏙᏢᏂ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏳᎾᏚᎵ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎤᎪᏛ ᎤᏁᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᏓᎵᏆ.”

Baker ᎤᏁᏉᎥ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᏗᎵᎪᎯ ᏥᎩ ᎾᎿ ᎦᏚᎲ ᎠᎴ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏓᏤᏞᏍᏗ ᎢᏕᎲ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᎤᏠᏯ ᎢᏧᎳ.

“……. ᏂᎦᏯᎢᏎᏍᏗ ᏓᏙᏢᏍᎨᏍᏗ ᎯᎠ ᎢᏧᏍᏗᏓᏂ ᏓᏤᏢᎯ ᎢᏳᎾᎵᏍᏓᏁᎸᏍᏗ ᎠᏁᎯ,” ᎤᏛᏅ.

ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎠᎹ ᏧᎾᏁᎶᏙᏗ ᎠᏱᏍᏓᎥ ᎢᎦᏓ 150 ᏳᏆᏗᏅᏓ ᏧᎬᏩᎶᏗ ᎢᏤ ᏧᏃᏢᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏂᏃᎮᏓ ᏧᏄᎪᏔᏅᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏃᏢᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎦᏚᎲ ᎢᎸᏍᎩ ᎾᏕᏘᏯ ᎬᏩᎴᏅᏓ.

ᎤᏴᏢᎢ ᎧᎸᎬ ᎢᏗᏢ ᏗᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᎾᏁᏍᎬ ᎢᏤ ᏧᏓᎴᏅ ᎢᎬᏙᏗ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏗ ᎠᏰᏟ, ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ CN ᎠᎾᏛᏅᎢᏍᏗᎭ ᎢᏤ ᎤᎾᏁᏍᎬᏗ ᏧᏂᏢᎩ 50 ᏳᏆᏗᏅᏓ ᏧᎬᏩᎶᏗ. ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᎦᏚᎲ ᎤᎾᏁᏦᏗ ᎤᏃᏢᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎢᏤ ᎤᎾᏓᏬᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏩᎫᏗᏗᏒ ᏳᎾᏛᏗ, ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏚᏂᏲᏏ ᏄᏂᏪᏒᎢ.
About the Author
Reporter

Jami Murphy graduated from Locust Grove High School in 2000. She received her bachelor’s degree in mass communications in 2006 from Northeastern State University and began working at the Cherokee Phoenix in 2007.

She said the Cherokee Phoenix has allowed her the opportunity to share valuable information with the Cherokee people on a daily basis. 

Jami married Michael Murphy in 2014. They have two sons, Caden and Austin. Together they have four children, including Johnny and Chase. They also have two grandchildren, Bentley and Baylea. 

She is a Cherokee Nation citizen and said working for the Cherokee Phoenix has meant a great deal to her. 

“My great-great-great-great grandfather, John Leaf Springston, worked for the paper long ago. It’s like coming full circle. I’ve learned so much about myself, the Cherokee people and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it.”

Jami is a member of the Native American Journalists Association, and Investigative Reporters and Editors. You can follow her on Twitter @jamilynnmurphy or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/jamimurphy2014.
jami-murphy@cherokee.org • 918-453-5560
Reporter Jami Murphy graduated from Locust Grove High School in 2000. She received her bachelor’s degree in mass communications in 2006 from Northeastern State University and began working at the Cherokee Phoenix in 2007. She said the Cherokee Phoenix has allowed her the opportunity to share valuable information with the Cherokee people on a daily basis. Jami married Michael Murphy in 2014. They have two sons, Caden and Austin. Together they have four children, including Johnny and Chase. They also have two grandchildren, Bentley and Baylea. She is a Cherokee Nation citizen and said working for the Cherokee Phoenix has meant a great deal to her. “My great-great-great-great grandfather, John Leaf Springston, worked for the paper long ago. It’s like coming full circle. I’ve learned so much about myself, the Cherokee people and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it.” Jami is a member of the Native American Journalists Association, and Investigative Reporters and Editors. You can follow her on Twitter @jamilynnmurphy or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/jamimurphy2014.

News

BY STAFF REPORTS
03/29/2015 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. –Red Dirt musician Stoney LaRue will be headlining this years Cherokee Nation Employee Appreciation Day, which honors employees for their hard work throughout the past year. The outdoor free concert is open to the public and is on April 2. It will take place just west of the W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex in Tahlequah. The opening act will be the all-Cherokee group, Pumpkin Hollow Band. They will kick off the show at 5:30 p.m. “These Oklahoma musicians have a strong local following and will put on a great show for our community and the entire Cherokee Nation,” said Principal Chief Bill John Baker. “We wanted to show our appreciation to our employees and the community with a night of good music and family fun.” LaRue, who is Texas-born but a longtime Oklahoman, is known for his hits “Down in Flames,” “Feet Don’t Touch the Ground,” “Oklahoma Breakdown” and “One Cord Song.” The crowd can expect to hear his hits and also songs from his new album, “AVIATOR.” “The theme is, essentially, following direction, trusting in yourself and new beginnings,” said LaRue. “I’d say it’s a little combination of rootsy rock, country, folk and whatever else is in the hodge podge, and separate as much of the pride and ego from it, and put it in a format that’s easy to listen to.” CN citizens Rod Buckhorn, Doo Reese, Kirk Reese and Spider Stopp named the band in honor of their birthplace, Pumpkin Hollow. The country and red dirt genre band has opened for Luke Bryan, Mark Chesnutt, Brantley Gilbert and Tracy Lawrence. According to a CN press release, no alcohol, tobacco or ice chests are permitted on the premises. Food vendors will be on site and shuttles available for parking. Bringing lawn chairs and blankets to sit on is encouraged. The Cherokee Nation W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex is located at 17675 S. Muskogee Ave.
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/29/2015 12:00 PM
OOLOGAH, Okla. –The Indian Women’s Pocahontas Club is having its ninth annual Old Fashioned Picnic at 10:30 a.m. on May 16 at the Will Rogers Birthplace Ranch. The event is free to the public but a $10 food donation is suggested to help raise funds for the Indian Women’s Pocahontas Cub Higher Education Scholarship fund. It is suggested to bring a lawn chair to the event. The event will include a hog fry, live music, an auction, Cherokee marbles, corn stalk shoots and hatchet throwing. Cherokee Nation Registration will also be set up at the event getting information for CN photo ID cards. Principal Chief Bill John Baker will be an honored guest at the event. Cherokee Nation Businesses and the Oklahoma Pork Council are sponsoring the event. For more information, call Debra West at 918-760-0813 or Ollie Starr at 918-760-7499 or visit <a href="http://www.iwpclub.org" target="_blank">www.iwpclub.org</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/28/2015 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. –There will be an Oklahoma Blood Institute blood drive from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on April 16 at the Cherokee Nation O-si-yo Ballroom behind the Restaurant of the Cherokees. Blood donors will receive donor T-shirts for their contributions. If they chose to reject the T-shirts the funds designed for the T-shirt will go to the Global Blood Fund, which is a nonprofit organization that provides safe blood services in developing countries. Donating blood takes approximately an hour and can be made every 56 days. According to an OBI press release, those with negative blood types are urged to donate. Only 18 percent of the population has negative blood types and patients with negative blood types can only receive blood from those 18 percent of people. A photo ID is required to donate at OBI blood drives. Participants must be 16 years old or older to donate. Participants who are 16 years old must provide a signed parental permission form and weigh in at 125 pounds or more to donate, those who are 17 years old must weigh in at 125 pounds or more and those 18 and older must weigh in at 110 pounds or more to donate. For more information, email <a href="mailto: patricia-hawk@cherokee.org">patricia-hawk@cherokee.org</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/28/2015 12:00 PM
MINNEAPOLIS – On March 25, the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community announced Seeds of Native Health, a philanthropic campaign to improve the nutrition of Native Americans across the country. “Nutrition is very poor among many of our fellow Native Americans, which leads to major health problems,” said SMSC Chairman Charlie Vig. “Our Community has a tradition of helping other tribes and Native American people. The SMSC is committed to making a major contribution and bringing others together to help develop permanent solutions to this serious problem.” The campaign will include efforts to improve awareness of Native nutrition problems, promote the wider application of proven best practices, and encourage additional work related to food access, education and research. “Many tribes, nonprofits, public health experts, researchers, and advocates have already been working on solutions,” said SMSC Vice Chairman Keith Anderson. “We hope this campaign will bring more attention to their work, build on it, bring more resources to the table, and ultimately put Indian Country on the path to develop a comprehensive strategy, which does not exist today.” According to the Seeds of Native Health website, approximately 16 percent of Native Americans suffer from type 2 diabetes and more than 30 percent of Native Americans are obese. Native Americans are 1.6 times more likely to become obese than others. “Native health problems have many causes, but we know that many of these problems can be traced to poor nutrition,” said SMSC Secretary/Treasurer Lori Watso, who provided the original idea for the SMSC’s nutrition campaign. “Traditional Native foods have a much higher nutritional value than what is most easily accessible today. By promoting best practices, evidence-based methods, and the re-introduction of healthy cultural practices, we believe that tribal governments, nonprofits, and grassroots practitioners can collectively make lasting strides towards a better future.” For more information, visit <a href="http://seedsofnativehealth.org/" target="_blank">http://seedsofnativehealth.org/</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/27/2015 04:00 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY – On April 2, the public is invited to the Oklahoma State Capitol’s first floor rotunda for a program concerning violence against Native women, which will be followed with the Monument Quilt viewing on the capitol’s east lawn. The Monument Quilt is described as a bright red, hand-sewn story of survival. It is made up of numerous 4-square-foot pieces that are created by survivors of sexual assault or domestic violence. There will 400 stories displayed on the lawn for others to read. Survivors and supporters will have the chance to add their stories on their own quilt square following the program and viewing. According to a press release, the Monument Quilt is a physical space that provides public recognition to survivors and reconnects them with their community. The Monument Quilt seeks to change the public perception of who experience sexual violence by telling many stories, not just one. The release states, Native American women suffer from the highest rate of sexual assault in the country, and non-Natives commit 80 percent of those assaults. A staggering 39 percent of Native women will experience domestic violence in their lifetime. The Native Alliance Against Violence is Oklahoma’s tribal domestic violence and sexual assault coalition. NAAV serves tribal programs that provide victims with the protections and services they need to have safe and happy lives. FORCE and the NAAV are partnering to put on the event with hopes of bringing attention to the state of violence against Native women and to reconnect survivors to their community. The April 2 program is at 10:30 a.m. to noon and the quilt viewing is from noon to 3 p.m.
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/27/2015 02:00 PM
PARK HILL, Okla. – The Friends of the Murrell Home Gift Shop have launched a brand new online store, which carries a variety of items relating to Cherokee history and nineteenth century life in Indian Territory. The museum gift shop, housed at the Murrell Home Historic Site, sells history and language books, maps, historic toys, handmade reproductions, souvenirs and more. A new line of heirloom seeds are also available in-store and online. These vegetable, flower and herb seeds are provided by Seed Savers Exchange, which is a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation of historic seed varieties. The varieties sold at the Murrell Home are representative of nineteenth-century flora that would have been grown in Indian Territory. These vegetables and herbs will be planted in the historic site’s kitchen garden beginning this spring. Cherokee Trail of Tears beans, bloody butcher corn, Cherokee purple tomatoes and Moon & Stars watermelon are just a few of the twenty-four varieties now available for purchase. All of the proceeds from the gift shop and online store benefit the Friends of the Murrell Home, the support organization for the Murrell Home Historic Site. To view the new online store, visit <a href="http://www.mkt.com/murrellhome" target="_blank">mkt.com/murrellhome</a> or <a href="http://www.facebook.com/murrellhome" target="_blank">facebook.com/murrellhome</a>. The historic site is located at 19479 E. Murrell Home Road, three miles south of Tahlequah. The museum store is open from 10 a.m. to5 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday. For more information, call 918-456-2751.