Feds grant 1-year waiver for Insure Okla. program

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
09/11/2013 08:32 AM
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) – The federal government will let the state operate its Insure Oklahoma health care plan for another year to buy state leaders more time to consider an alternative plan to provide coverage to the working poor, Gov. Mary Fallin announced on Sept. 6.

Flanked by state health officials, Fallin called the extension a “great win for the people of Oklahoma.”

“Insure Oklahoma has been around since 2005. It’s been a success for thousands of small businesses that have used it to help their employees purchase insurance,” Fallin said. “It’s been a success for tens of thousands of families of modest means, who would be uninsured without it. Moving forward, I strongly encourage our federal partners to review Insure Oklahoma’s many successes and announce their support for a permanent, ongoing program.”

Insure Oklahoma, which provides coverage to about 30,000 Oklahoma residents through both individual and employer-sponsored plans, was scheduled to cease operating at the end of the year. Federal officials expected many of the recipients to be eligible for Medicaid expansion if they earned up to 138 percent of federal poverty, or about $32,499 for a family of four.

But amid bitter resistance from some Republicans, Fallin rejected both the Medicaid expansion and the opportunity to set up a state-based insurance exchange where Oklahomans could purchase health insurance with federal tax subsidies. Both were offered under the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

Instead, Oklahoma residents who earn up to 400 percent of the federal poverty level, or $94,200 for a family of four, will be able to use federal tax subsidies to buy policies online through a federal exchange beginning Oct. 1.

But some state residents, including thousands on the Insure Oklahoma program, would have fallen into a “coverage crater” where they would have been ineligible for tax subsidies or Medicaid.

Under the one-year waiver, about 8,000 individuals currently on Insure Oklahoma who earn between 100 and 200 percent of federal poverty will instead purchase their health insurance through the federal exchange. Some of the co-pays required through Insure Oklahoma also will be reduced, including a $25 co-pay for doctor visits that will drop to $4, said Nico Gomez, director of the Oklahoma Health Care Authority, the state agency that oversees the Medicaid program in Oklahoma.

A spokeswoman for the U.S. Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services said federal officials are urging states to accept billions of dollars in available Medicaid funding made possible through the new federal health care law, which provides 100 percent federal funding for three years and then drops incrementally to 90 percent.

“We look forward to working with Oklahoma and all other states in bringing a flexible, state-based approach to Medicaid coverage expansion and encourage the state to explore these options,” spokeswoman Emma Sandoe said in a statement.

Republican legislators favor the Insure Oklahoma program over Medicaid expansion because individual recipients pay modest co-pays, with the rest of the premiums covered by employer payments in some cases, along with state and federal matching funds.

“There’s some personal responsibility in the plan,” Fallin said.

The state’s portion of the funding comes from a tobacco tax approved by voters and is used to draw down matching federal Medicaid dollars.

News

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
10/22/2017 04:00 PM
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BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
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BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
10/21/2017 04:00 PM
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BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
10/21/2017 12:00 PM
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BY STAFF REPORTS
10/20/2017 04:00 PM
TULSA, Okla. – Cherokee Nation Technologies is hosting job fairs from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Oct. 24 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Oct. 28 at 10837 E. Marshall St. The tribally owned company anticipates hiring 100 bilingual call center specialists to respond to calls from Disaster Recovery Service Centers. Hired support specialists will answer questions and perform data entry for individuals and businesses affected by hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria. CNT is looking for experienced and entry-level bilingual agents. All applicants must be U.S. citizens, be at least 18 years of age with a high school diploma or GED and have the ability to pass a background and drug screening. Job fair attendees should bring their résumés and be prepared for an interview at the CN Nation Career Services office on Marshall Street. CNT is part of the Cherokee Nation Businesses family of companies and is headquartered in Tulsa, with a regional office in Fort Collins, Colorado, and client locations nationwide. CNT provides unmanned systems expertise, information technology services and technology solutions, geospatial information systems services, as well as management and support of programs, projects, professionals and technical staff. For more information or to apply online, visit <a href="https://cnbjobs.cnb-ss.com/#/jobs/11540" target="_blank">https://cnbjobs.cnb-ss.com/#/jobs/11540</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
10/19/2017 04:00 PM
WASHINGTON – U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke in October announced the selection of Bryan Rice, a veteran federal administrator and Cherokee Nation citizen, as the new director of the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the federal agency that coordinates government-to-government relations with 567 federally recognized tribes in the United States. “Bryan has a wealth of management expertise and experience that will well serve Indian Country as the BIA works to enhance the quality of life, promote economic opportunity, and carry out the federal responsibility to protect and improve the trust assets of American Indians, Indian tribes and Alaska Natives,” Zinke said. “I have full confidence that Bryan is the right person at this pivotal time as we work to renew the department’s focus on self-determination and self-governance, give power back to the tribes, and provide real meaning to the concept of tribal sovereignty.”?? Rice, who started his new position on Oct. 16 recently led the Interior’s Office of Wildland Fire, and has broad experience leading Forestry, Wildland Fire and Tribal programs across the Interior, BIA and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. “Native Americans face significant regulatory and bureaucratic hurdles to economic freedom and success,” Rice said. “I am honored to accept this position and look forward to implementing President Trump’s and Secretary Zinke’s regulatory reform initiative for Indian Country to liberate Native Americans from the bureaucracy that has held them back economically.” His federal government career has spanned nearly 20 years, beginning with service on the Helena Interagency Hotshot Crew for the U.S. Forest Service in Montana. He served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Nepal, working in both community forestry and rural development and supervised timber operations as a timber sale officer on the Yakama Reservation as well as a forester on the Tongass National Forest in Alaska. Rice also served in leadership capacities internationally in Tanzania, Mexico, Brazil and Australia for both Interior and the U.S. Forest Service. ?? Rice has served in two senior executive service natural resources management leadership positions, including as deputy director for the BIA Office of Trust Services from 2011-14, and as director of Forest Management in the U.S. Forest Service from 2014-16. ?? Rice spent his school years in the Midwest in Whitewater, Wisconsin, and Peoria, Illinois. ?He holds a bachelor’s degree in forestry from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne and a master’s degree in business administration from the University of Alaska – Southeast, focusing on rural development and transportation systems. Principal Chief Bill John Baker said he looks forward to working with Rice. “The Cherokee Nation is certainly proud of our citizen, Bryan Rice, and his accomplished career stemming in natural resources and now in Washington, D.C., overseeing the agency that most directly works with all federally recognized Indian tribes,” Baker said. Rice’s position does not require Senate confirmation.