CN coat vouchers available until Nov. 8

BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter
11/01/2013 11:29 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – For the second year, Cherokee Nation officials are giving out $50 Stage gift cards to Cherokee children for warmer clothing this winter.

More than 6,700 children received clothing vouchers during the summer for back-to-school clothing, and those same children qualify for the winter clothing/coat vouchers.

The application for the winter program is based off the school clothing voucher program. If a child received a summer voucher, then he or she is eligible to receive the winter voucher.

“It’s an extension of the clothing program that they take applications for in the summer,” Angela King, CN Family Services assistant manager, said. “And it’s only those that applied during the summer and got approved for clothing assistance that will receive a coat.”

This program she said is designed to keep kids warm in the winter.

“That’s the whole goal of the coat program,” King said.

Families who receive the gift card can use it for any winter clothing item such as coats, gloves and jackets.

“Yeah, if there is not a coat there (in their size or that they like) then they can get like maybe a hoodie or a small jacket rather than a coat – gloves or mittens,” she said.

King added that 6,762 gift cards were to be distributed to children within the Cherokee Nation jurisdiction starting Nov. 1.

Principal Chief Bill John Baker said the winter vouchers could help ease the burden of spending for some Cherokee families this winter.

“And make sure our youngest citizens stay warm as we move into the coldest part of the season,” he said.

Those who received the $100 school clothing voucher should have been notified by mail of the $50 gift card. If a Cherokee family was not made aware of the coat voucher, call King at 918-453-5000, ext. 5266 or Lee Robins at 918-453-5000, ext. 5231 for more information.

jami-custer@cherokee.org


918-453-5560



Voucher Distribution sites:

Nov. 1 – Will Rogers Health Center, 1020 Lenape Dr., in Nowata

Nov. 4 – Catoosa Indian Child Welfare Office, 750 S. Cherokee Suite H

Nov. 5 – Jay Community Center, 429 S. 9th St.

Nov. 6 – Sallisaw Indian Child Welfare Office, 1450 Carson Road

Nov. 7 – Stilwell Human Services Office, Third & Oak St.

Nov. 8 – W.W. Keeler Complex, 17675 S. Muskogee, Tahlequah
About the Author
Reporter

Jami Murphy graduated from Locust Grove High School in 2000. She received her bachelor’s degree in mass communications in 2006 from Northeastern State University and began working at the Cherokee Phoenix in 2007.

She said the Cherokee Phoenix has allowed her the opportunity to share valuable information with the Cherokee people on a daily basis. 

Jami married Michael Murphy in 2014. They have two sons, Caden and Austin. Together they have four children, including Johnny and Chase. They also have two grandchildren, Bentley and Baylea. 

She is a Cherokee Nation citizen and said working for the Cherokee Phoenix has meant a great deal to her. 

“My great-great-great-great grandfather, John Leaf Springston, worked for the paper long ago. It’s like coming full circle. I’ve learned so much about myself, the Cherokee people and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it.”

Jami is a member of the Native American Journalists Association, and Investigative Reporters and Editors. You can follow her on Twitter @jamilynnmurphy or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/jamimurphy2014.
jami-murphy@cherokee.org • 918-453-5560
Reporter Jami Murphy graduated from Locust Grove High School in 2000. She received her bachelor’s degree in mass communications in 2006 from Northeastern State University and began working at the Cherokee Phoenix in 2007. She said the Cherokee Phoenix has allowed her the opportunity to share valuable information with the Cherokee people on a daily basis. Jami married Michael Murphy in 2014. They have two sons, Caden and Austin. Together they have four children, including Johnny and Chase. They also have two grandchildren, Bentley and Baylea. She is a Cherokee Nation citizen and said working for the Cherokee Phoenix has meant a great deal to her. “My great-great-great-great grandfather, John Leaf Springston, worked for the paper long ago. It’s like coming full circle. I’ve learned so much about myself, the Cherokee people and I’ve enjoyed every minute of it.” Jami is a member of the Native American Journalists Association, and Investigative Reporters and Editors. You can follow her on Twitter @jamilynnmurphy or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/jamimurphy2014.

News

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
01/27/2015 11:01 AM
Tahlequah Sequoyah certainly has picked a proper time to peak during the season. The Indians and Lady Indians have taken advantage of a grueling January slate. The boys (11-5) are riding a seven-game win streak and the girls (13-3) have a six-game win streak of their own, too. Saturday, Jan. 24, Sequoyah claimed the boys and girls championship trophies at the Tri-State Classic in Jay. That type of domination couldn’t have come at a better time with No 1 boys and girls’ basketball teams in Class 4A coming to Sequoyah on Tuesday, Jan. 27. Fort Gibson is a combined 27-1, as it has dominated its opponents throughout the season consistently. The girls game will start at 6:30 p.m. and the boys will follow at 8 p.m. The same night, Sequoyah will honor a group who helped pave the way for basketball success at SHS--the Native American “Dream Team,” of 1998. “This was the team that broke the ice, being the first SHS team to reach the state basketball tournament,” Sequoyah Athletic Director Marcus Crittenden said. Leroy Qualls, who is now a superintendent, was the head coach of the boys team. Also, Cherokee Nation Tribal Councilor David Walkingstick was a member of the team, too, among notables. In addition to the ceremony honoring the team, an autographed basketball from a notable Oklahoma City Thunder guard can be won, too. “Thanks to a generous donation from BancFirst of Tahlequah, we have a basketball autographed by Russell Westbrook that we will raffle off the same night,” Crittenden said.
BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter
01/27/2015 08:15 AM
CATOOSA, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation and Cherokee Nation Entertainment purchased three properties each in 2014. The properties total approximately 152 acres with the largest being in Rogers County. CNE purchased 89.98 acres on Sept. 30 from John and Velma Mullen. According to Rogers County records, the cost was $3.7 million. The land is located west/northwest of CNE’s Cherokee Hills Golf Course. The golf course is located at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa. The Cherokee Phoenix reported in September that the acquired property would be used for the golf course. According to artist renderings, “Cherokee Outlets” a premium outlet shop and entertainment and dining zone that was announced on Sept. 10 is expected to be built behind the Hard Rock and could possibly use land occupied by the golf course and its clubhouse. CNB officials said they were awaiting a master plan for “Cherokee Outlets” as well as a plan from a golf course architect. “We are in the process of negotiating with the golf course architect. I anticipate getting that agreement in place in the next couple of weeks and starting to do some preliminary work there,” CNB Executive Vice President Charles Garrett said in September. According to CNE Communications, CNB officials are still planning work to be done on the golf course. CNE also purchased approximately 6 acres for $256,500 in Sequoyah County, according to county records. Cherokee Nation Property Management purchased the land from Benjamin and Judy Cowan and later deeded it to Cherokee Nation Construction Resources for housing. CNCR will build 23 homes that the Housing Authority of the Cherokee Nation will purchase after construction is complete. On July 2, Jim and Connie Jolliff sold 57.75 acres in Delaware County to CNPM for $85,000, according to county records. “This property is directly south/east of and abutting the Saline District Courthouse property owned by the Cherokee Nation,” CNE Communications officials said. However, CNB officials did not release the land’s intended use citing “competitive information exemption.” The three properties the CN bought are located in Cherokee County. Two properties were purchased from HLD Investments, a corporation in Tahlequah owned by the Mason and Minor families. On Nov. 3, the CN purchased a property and its building known as the “Clinic in the Woods,” which is located near W.W. Hastings Hospital off Boone Street. According to CN Communications, the tribe paid $1,078,500 for the 1.536 acres, and the building’s anticipated use will be for the tribe’s Behavioral Health Program. Also purchased on Nov. 3 was the Cascade property totaling less than 1 acre. It’s located near Northeastern Health System Tahlequah and Hastings Hospital. The property cost $771,500 and will be used for Health Services. The tribe also bought property located at 120 E. Balentine Road in Tahlequah for its motor vehicle tag office. It was purchased on Jan. 30 from Don Smith for $300,000, according to county records.
BY STAFF REPORTS
01/26/2015 03:45 PM
LINCOLN, Neb. – Vision Maker Media will be offering summer, or fall, 10-week, paid internships for Native American and Alaska Native college students at various public TV stations. “Providing experience for Native students in the media is vitally important to ensure that we can continue a strong tradition of digital storytelling,” Shirley K. Sneve, Vision Maker Media executive director, said. “We are grateful for the support of local PBS stations in helping us achieve this goal.” During the internship at least two short-form videos on local Native American or Alaska Native people, events or issues for on-air or online distribution should be completed. With major funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the purpose of this paid summer internship is to increase the journalism and production skills for the selected college student. One of the major goals of the internship will be to increase the quantity and quality of multimedia reporting available to public television audiences and other news outlets. Students interested in applying for this internship opportunity must apply online at <a href="http://www.visionmakermedia.org/intern" target="_blank">www.visionmakermedia.org/intern</a> by March 24. The application process requires submission of a cover letter, resume, work samples, an official school transcript and a letter of recommendation from a faculty member or former supervisor. Top applicants will be notified in late April with the internships spanning between May 1 and Dec. 18. Up to 10 public television stations will be selected to host an intern and an award of $5,000 to the station will be used to provide payment to the intern, cover any travel expenses and administrative fees. Stations that would like to be considered for hosting a public media intern must apply online at <a href="http://www.visionmakermedia.org/intern" target="_blank">www.visionmakermedia.org/intern</a> by Feb. 3.
BY STAFF REPORTS
01/26/2015 02:09 PM
WASHINGTON – On Jan. 9, President Barack Obama announced that the Choctaw Nation is among five areas of the United States that will be part of the Promise Zone Initiative. The president first announced the Promise Zone Initiative during last year’s State of the Union Address, as a way to partner with local communities and businesses to create jobs, increase economic security, expand access to educational opportunities and quality, affordable housing and improve public safety. “I am very thankful that the Choctaw Nation and partners have been awarded the Promise Zone designation,” said Choctaw Chief Gregory Pyle. “We are blessed to work with many state, regional, county, municipal, school, and university partners who, along with the Choctaw Nation, believe that great things can occur to lift everyone in southeastern Oklahoma when we work together.” Parts of the president’s plan include investing in and rebuilding hard-hit communities are to restore the basic bargain at the heart of the American story; that every child should have a fair chance at success and that if you’re willing to work hard and play by the rules, you should be able to find a good job, feel secure in your community and support a family. “This designation will assist ongoing efforts to emphasize small business development and bring economic opportunity to the high-need communities,” Pyle said. “I am confident that access to the technical assistance and resources offered by the Promise Zone designation will result in better lifestyles for people living and working within the Choctaw Nation.” The other Promise Zone Initiative areas are located in San Antonio, Philadelphia, Los Angeles and southeastern Kentucky.
BY TESINA JACKSON
Reporter
01/26/2015 11:06 AM
CLAREMORE, Okla. – After growing up on her father’s ranch, Cherokee Nation citizen Dr. Kristin Vickrey knew she wanted to become a veterinarian. “I’ve always wanted to be a vet,” she said. “I grew up raising cows so my dad always had cows. I was always out there working, and I always loved the medicine side of things. Going out and actually helping make the animals feel better, it was just something I’ve always wanted to do. It led to where I am today.” Vickrey attended Oklahoma State University where she received her bachelor’s degree in animal science and veterinary doctorate. In 2011, she began working at the Regional Animal Care Center in Claremore as an associate veterinarian with Dr. Jerome Yorke. While Vickrey still attends larger animals for her family, her focus is small animals such as cats and dogs with the occasional ferret, rabbit and guinea pig. “I think my smallest patient is a little 2-pound Chihuahua and my biggest patient is a 200-pound Bull Mastiff,” she said. “So there’s a big range difference. It makes my job interesting, going from one to the next and everybody is just a little bit different. They might have the same problem but it doesn’t always present the same.” Kimberlee Coates, pet owner and Claremore resident, said she began going to Vickrey after being assigned to her two years ago. “…we just really loved her and the compassion that she had for our pets and the fact that she was very personable and attentive to them and reassured us that everything was going to be OK whenever we had to have a procedure done,” Coates said. “It just gives us a lot of piece of mind to know that our pets will be well taken care of and that we don’t have to worry.” Coates has four cats and one dog that she has brought to Vickrey. “They can’t speak for themselves, and so as a pet parent you really feel like you need a doctor that can tune into them and can show them the compassion because there’s that gap in communication that you so much wish your pets could just talk,” Coates said. “Because if they could it would just make everything so much easier, but they can’t so you really have to have somebody that can fine tune into looking for the signs and the things that we as pet parents sometimes miss and don’t see, and she’s excellent at being able to do that.” Regional Animal Care Center offers several types of surgeries and services such as exploratory surgery, spaying, neutering, bone surgeries, dental, vaccinations, micro chipping, amputations, general medicine, therapeutic lasers, digital x-rays, endoscopic ear exams and blood work. “I think probably my favorite part is that I really like orthopedic work,” Vickrey said. “I like fixing the broken bones and repairing torn ACLs (anterior cruciate ligaments). Those I get the biggest reward out of because I fixed it and now it’s better. I like those big rewarding cases.” Vickrey said the most challenging part of her job is telling owners that their animals will need to be put down. “We’re the advocate for the animal. The animals can’t tell you what they’re going through so we have to come to the owners and tell them ‘unfortunately your animal is not going to make it or it’s suffering’ and it’s not always the easiest part because the owners love it. They want to keep it alive. They want to do everything they can for it, but at the end of the day if I don’t tell the owner that their animal is suffering and is in pain, the only thing it’s hurting is the animal,” she said. “I wish I could save them all, but unfortunately you just can’t.” Vickrey, along with Yorke, also work with a nonprofit animal rescue group called Zoi’s Animal Rescue, which is a no-kill animal rescue with locations in Claremore and Navasota, Texas. Regional Animal Care Center, which is located at 1201 N. Lynn Riggs Blvd., also offers grooming and a full indoor and outdoor boarding facility. For more information, call 918-341-5551.
BY STAFF REPORTS
01/25/2015 04:00 PM
MUSKOGEE, Okla. – The Jack C. Montgomery Veteran Affairs Medical Center will hold its annual creative arts competition on Feb. 2-3 for enrolled veterans. The competition includes 51 categories in the visual arts division this year that range from oil painting to leatherwork to paint-by-number kits. In addition, there are 100 categories in the performing arts pertaining to all aspects of music, dance, drama, and creative writing. Nationwide, VA medical facilities use the creative arts as one form of rehabilitative treatment to help veterans recover from and cope with physical and emotional disabilities. Each year, veterans treated at VA facilities compete in a local creative arts competition. A national selection committee chooses first, second and third place winners among all of the entries. Select winners will be invited to attend the National Veterans Creative Arts Festival, which will be held Oct. 12-19 at the Durham VA Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina. For registration information, call Deborah Moreno at 918-577-4014. For information about the National Veterans Creative Arts Competition and other VA special events, visit VA’s Adaptive Sports website: <a href="http://www.va.gov/adaptivesports/" target="_blank">http://www.va.gov/adaptivesports/</a>.