The Cherokee Nation’s latest effort involves using Microsoft Office products such as Word, Excel and Power Point that use the Cherokee language. The products are available in Microsoft’s online SkyDrive program. COURTESY PHOTO

Microsoft, CN collaborate again on Cherokee language

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Senior Reporter
12/26/2013 09:34 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation has again worked with Microsoft to increase the usage of the Cherokee language.

Cherokee Language Program Manager Roy Boney Jr. said this latest effort involves using Microsoft Office products such as Word, Excel and Power Point that use the Cherokee language. The products are available in Microsoft’s online SkyDrive program.

“Instead of working with the desktop version that consumers have to pay for, the tribe’s Cherokee Language Program worked with the online Microsoft version that is free called SkyDrive,” Boney said.

SkyDrive is a file hosting service that allows users to upload and sync files to cloud storage and then access them from a Web browser or their local devices. The service allows users to keep files private, share them with contacts or make the files public.

Boney said once a SkyDrive account is set up the language for the account can be changed to Cherokee.

“You can then start creating documents in Word and in Excel, and it’s all in the Cherokee language. The interface is in Cherokee,” Boney said. “The idea is to have an environment where they are creating content (in Cherokee) and if they use it enough they will get accustomed to what it’s saying. Everyone is used to using Word. It has the same menu structures and everything, it’s just in Cherokee.”

Boney said he hopes that being an “immersive environment” the person using SkyDrive will begin to learn to read and write Cherokee because they are actively using the language.

The tribe’s translation specialists spent two years translating Cherokee to work with the cloud-based SkyDrive.

The Cherokee version went public on Dec. 16 and joins 106 other languages offered by Microsoft. It allows anyone to make spreadsheets in Excel, Power Point presentations or a basic Word document in Cherokee.

Cherokee is the first Native American language to be supported by Microsoft. In December 2012, Microsoft and CN officials celebrated the integration of the language into the new Windows 8 operating system.

Sixteen CN language translators and other staff members worked with Microsoft to prepare for the integration of Cherokee into Windows 8. More than 180,000 words were translated for the program.

In November 2012, the tribe partnered with Google to add Cherokee to its email service Gmail, which allowed people to exchange emails using Gmail and instant message chats in the Cherokee syllabary.

will-chavez@cherokee.org


918-207-3961



How to enable the Cherokee version of Microsoft Office Web Apps in SkyDrive:

1. Sign in to https://skydrive.live.com/ (or sign up for a free account if you don’t have a Microsoft account).

2. After signing in, scroll to the bottom of the page. Click the language options on the far right to change the language to Cherokee. Click Save.

3. After saving settings, go to the Create menu at the top. The menu will give options to create a new Word, PowerPoint, Excel or other documents. Select the desired type of document.

4. An interface on screen should now be in Cherokee. This works on any Internet-enabled device regardless if a Cherokee font is installed on your device or not.

For more information or questions, email languagetech@cherokee.org
About the Author
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M.

He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life.
He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association.

Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years.
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M. He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life. He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association. Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years.

News

BY STAFF REPORTS
12/18/2014 02:23 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Hunger Buster Beef Cuts, a made-in-Oklahoma company, donated 720 pounds of beef cuts to the Cherokee Nation Foundation to supplement programs helping the tribe’s citizens facing food insecurities. Wal-Mart, Hunger Buster and Jason Christie, professional angler and CN citizen, presented the donation to tribal officials on Dec. 11. “Our mission is to provide education assistance to Cherokee students,” CNF Executive Director Janice Randall said. “We know hunger is often an obstacle to learning. This is a way for us to support the Nation’s efforts in addressing food insecurities and provide more food for backpacks going home with kids this winter.” As part of Christie’s partnership with Hunger Buster Beef Cuts and Wal-Mart, the company is donating 25 percent of all products sold at participating Wal-Mart locations to the CNF in the form of beef sticks. Hunger Buster as well as Cherokee Nation Businesses sponsors Christie. “Wal-Mart is proud to partner with Hunger Buster Beef Cuts and Jason Christie to provide a great product to our customers,” Jim Enneking, fishing buyer for Wal-Mart, said. “We are excited to be part of the donation to the Cherokee Nation Foundation to combat hunger.” Christie and Wal-Mart chose the CNF to receive the beef cuts in hopes a portion would be used to support backpack programs throughout the rural areas of the CN as well as other CN programs addressing food insecurities. Backpack programs provide a bag of shelf-stable food to elementary, junior high and high school students at risk of going hungry over weekends and school holidays. “I am a big advocate of giving back to the community, and Cherokee Nation is a major part of our community,” Christie said. “I take pride in representing Hunger Buster Beef Cuts not only because they are a healthy snack, but because of their 25 percent donation of food to charities. I value being a part of that.” Tribal Councilor David Walkingstick was instrumental in forming the partnership and praised the donation. “Jason is a former educator and coach at a rural school district and is aware of some of the hardships our kids face,” he said. “His generosity to give back to our tribe and help these kids from missing one less meal is overwhelming. It takes a tribe to raise these children.” “We couldn’t be more proud of Jason and his example of leadership and giving back,” Principal Chief Bill John Baker said. “We will work diligently alongside the foundation to ensure this donation supplements our existing programs. I know it will be utilized by Cherokee families and Cherokee children in need.” Hunger Buster beef sticks are 100 percent beef, gluten-free, low-calorie, low-carb, low-sugar and contain no MSG or trans fat. “Jason Christie is a valuable partner of ours, having been a major supporter of our products and our mission to help feed the hungry,” Richard Cranford, owner of QuarterShare LLC, said. “We are pleased that the Cherokee Nation Foundation is his choice to receive our donation. To provide children with nutritious snacks is a principal priority for our company.”
BY STAFF REPORTS
12/18/2014 12:21 PM
TULSA, Okla. – Cherokee Nation Technologies, a division of Cherokee Nation Businesses, has advanced and expanded its abilities to support unmanned systems integration and operations. Recently retired Department of Defense acquisition professional and naval aviator John Coffey is leading CNT’s efforts to offer unmanned support and services. “We have a long standing relationship with several key agencies focused on developing unmanned systems,” Steven Bilby, president of CNB diversified businesses, said. “John’s experience and knowledge has proven to be valuable and we look forward to his leadership in advancing our position in the market.” Coffey teamed up with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to create and implement an unmanned systems strategy that delivers recommendations for the operation of unmanned aircraft systems and other unmanned technologies as well. “This is a wonderful opportunity for CNT to advance into a thriving business with the potential to have a lasting economic impact and create jobs,” Coffey said. “There is estimated to be $70 to $100 billion pumped into the economy through the development of UAS (unmanned aircraft systems) over the next 10 years, and CNT is striving to be at the forefront of the industry.” The team works to conduct in-depth analyses of new and developing systems and evaluates the different observation requirements in hopes to establish how those needs can be attained by using unmanned aerial vehicles. According to a CN press release, the two major systems in development are the Puma, a ship-launched unmanned aerial vehicle specializing in low-altitude and short-endurance missions and the Global Hawk, which is the size of a 737 aircraft and made for high-altitude and long-endurance missions. “Our goal is to match systems to requirements that will increase organizational observing capacity and develop high-science-return missions such as high-impact weather monitoring, polar monitoring and marine monitoring,” Coffey said. “Unmanned systems have the potential to efficiently, effectively and economically fulfill observation requirements in an environmentally friendly manner, and it is a privilege to be a part of these industry advancements.” For more information, visit <a href="http://www.cherokee-cnt.com" target="_blank">www.cherokee-cnt.com</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
12/18/2014 10:18 AM
PORTLAND, Ore. – Eradicating Offensive Native Mascotry, a national group of Native American parents dedicated to ending the use of Native mascots, have shown support for the Oklahoma City Public School Board of Education’s recent decision to stop the re¬enactment of the 1889 Land Run and to change the name of the Redskins mascot at Capital Hill High School. According to its press release, the group stated it applauded “the efforts of Native American students and parents of OKCPS Native American Student Services to educate their community on the harm of Native mascotry.” For more information, call Jennie Stockle at 918-¬312-¬0467 or email jenniestockle@yahoo.com or call Jacqueline Keeler at 503-¬915-¬5011 or email <a href="mailto: jackiekeeler@mac.com"> jackiekeeler@mac.com</a>.
BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter
12/18/2014 08:06 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – At its Dec. 9 meeting, the Cherokee Nation’s Election Commission denied a request by former Principal Chief Chad Smith for an investigation of current Principal Chief Bill John Baker and his use of monies prior to the 2015 tribal election. Commissioners and their attorney in executive session discussed a letter sent by Smith that alleges Baker is illegally operating push polls, stating that Baker’s “illegal expenditures continue.” “On Nov. 11, 2014, Cherokee citizens Pat Stanek of Portland, Oregon, and Brenda Smith Jaye reported push polls,” the letter states. Smith also states he sent the same request to CN Marshal Shannon Buhl with his point of contact being Deputy Marshal Scott Craig, who informed Smith that the CN Attorney General’s Office told the Marshal Service to terminate the investigation until the EC determined there was wrongdoing. In a response letter from EC Chairman Bill Horton, he states the commission requested EC attorney Harvey Chaffin to determine if any illegal activity had taken place. “Mr. Smith’s letters allege acts of expenditures in violation of Election Law. No provision in Election Law prohibits expenditures more than six months prior to an election,” the letter states. “Further, no prohibition is found prohibiting a potential candidate from making expenditures from their own funds more than six months prior to an election. The prohibition is on accepting contributions more than six months prior to an election. Mr. Smith’s letters do not allege that campaign contributions have been accepted more than six months prior to the election.” The letter further states the commission would not act on Smith’s request because it found no investigation was warranted because no election laws look to have been violated. In other business, the EC voted to mail out voter identification and voter registration notification cards. EC officials said notification cards are sent out after a voter-initiated change is made. The card tells the type of voter one is and his or her precinct. “The red card goes out in May for the jurisdictional voters (voters who vote within the 15 districts), which gives the address of their precinct location,” EC officials state. “The reason there are red cards sent out in May to the jurisdictional voters is because we have to confirm addresses of all the precincts locations and let voters know at least 45 days before the election. Red cards are not sent out to the At-Large voters who are not registered in the districts because they vote by absentee ballot.” It costs approximately 34 cents to mail either card. That cost is subject to change depending on postage. As of Dec. 1, there were 63,498 registered voters, which is subject to change daily. The EC voted to use the post cards it previously operated with and revisit the new cards after the 2015 election. “They will go to all voters who either send in a new application or make any changes,” officials said. The EC approved the voter ID or “red card” that EC Director Connie Parnell presented at the meeting. Also, commissioners heard two public requests, one from At-Large tribal citizen Deborah Scott and one from the Cherokee Phoenix. Scott requested that EC official attend a meeting in Anadarko to present information to assist voters in the 2015 election. That request was denied because the information requested is online or will be near the first of the year, officials said. The Cherokee Phoenix requested that it and the EC enter into a memorandum of understanding reflecting an agreement that the Phoenix not be charged for any public documents requested from the EC, including voter lists. “Under the Cherokee Nation Freedom of Information Act, disclosure of these documents is in the public interest because it is likely to contribute significantly to public understanding of the operations or activities of the government and is not primarily in any commercial interest,” the Phoenix request states. “We believe that this agreement would be beneficial to both departments because it would demonstrate the Election Commission’s commitment to transparency, and it would allow the Cherokee Phoenix to reliably report this valuable public information to the Cherokee people.” However, the EC denied the request stating the Phoenix is like anyone else and should pay for voter lists.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
12/16/2014 04:00 PM
WASHINGTON (AP) – Federal officials appear to have violated ethics rules governing impartiality in awarding a contract to evaluate schools attended by tens of thousands of Native American students, a federal watchdog says. The report comes as President Barack Obama makes high-profile promises to fix the schools, which are among the nation’s lowest performing and have been plagued by crumbling buildings needing $1 billion in repairs. It is the latest to highlight problems in the management and oversight of the schools. The Interior Department’s inspector general investigation concerned an $800,000-plus contract awarded early in Obama’s term to assess the schools’ management and student achievement. The main focus was Brian Drapeaux, who served as chief of staff of the department’s Bureau of Indian Education, when the contract was issued and later became acting director. The initial contract had been awarded to Personal Group Inc., a South Dakota-based company, where Drapeaux had worked on separate occasions, including within 12 months of joining the Interior Department. A department contract specialist raised conflict of interest concerns and canceled the contract and said the company, known as PerGroup, could not participate in the contract at any level and that all key decision makers should certify that there was no conflict of interest. She alleged in 2011 that she had been removed from handling the contract because of her actions. Nevertheless, the IG concluded, PerGroup was allowed to stay on the project as a subcontractor under another company and was responsible for 41 percent of the contractual work. Keith Moore, who served as director of BIE until 2012, along with Drapeaux maintained a longstanding friendship with PerGroup, according to the inspector general. The report said the two officials “appear to have acted in violation of federal ethics regulations governing impartiality ... and the use of public office for private gain.” “Finally,” it said, “other BIE officials who knew of these conflicts of interest chose to ignore them during the procurement process.” The IG said the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Virginia had declined to prosecute the case but referred it back to the Interior Department for further action, which was taken on Sept. 30. “This issue is considered resolved and no further action will be taken,” Jessica Kershaw, a spokeswoman for the Interior Department, said in an email. She said the department would not reveal the action because of privacy reasons. Kershaw said the department did not adopt the contractor’s recommendations. Drapeaux and Moore declined to comment. Officials from PerGoup did not respond to requests for comment. Obama addressed the challenges facing Native American youth in a historic visit to an Indian reservation last summer and again at the White House summit this week. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell has announced a series of steps to restructure the federal bureaucracy that oversees the schools and turn more control over tribes. Just this week as part of the White House summit on Native Americans, Jewell reaffirmed the federal government's historic failures in connection with the schools, which goes back to the 19th century when many Native American children were forcibly assimilated in boarding schools away from their families. The government has a treaty and trust responsibility to run them, and about 40,000 students attend the more than 180 schools. The IG report follows one by the Government Accountability Office that found the schools had millions in unaccounted for dollars, including money for special education. The IG’s findings were posted initially online, but the IG’s office temporarily took the report down to make minor adjustments. It was reposted.
BY STAFF REPORTS
12/16/2014 11:03 AM
WASHINGTON – The Office of Special Trustee for American Indians is seeking nominations for individuals to serve on its advisory board. The board’s purpose, as defined in the 1994 American Indian Trust Fund Management Reform Act, is to provide advice to the special trustee on all matters associated with the trust responsibilities overseen by the office. “This board is an opportunity for OST to receive meaningful advice and prudent perspectives on trust management reforms at the Department of the Interior,” Special Trustee Vincent G. Logan said. “The Reform Act directed the special trustee to appoint leaders from academia and finance so that OST can maintain a beneficiary focus and deliver well-informed trust management services to individual Indian and tribal beneficiaries.” Members will serve two-year terms without compensation. The board, as required by the Reform Act, is composed of five members representing trust fund account holders, including both tribal and Individual Indian Money accounts; two members with practical experience in trust fund and financial management; one member with practical experience in fiduciary investment management; and one member from academia with knowledge of general management of large organizations. Nominations must include a resume or other documents demonstrating qualifications for at least one of the board member categories. Self-nominations will receive equal consideration. Nominations must be submitted by Dec. 29 to the Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians, Attn: Lee Frazier, Department of the Interior, located at 1849 C Street, NW, Mailstop 3256, Washington, D.C. 20240. Additional details about the request for nominations can be found in the Federal Registry notice located at <a href="https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2014/11/28/2014-28139/request-for-nominations-to-serve-on-the-special-trustee-advisory-board" target="_blank">https://www.federalregister.gov/articles/2014/11/28/2014-28139/request-for-nominations-to-serve-on-the-special-trustee-advisory-board</a>.