The Cherokee Nation’s latest effort involves using Microsoft Office products such as Word, Excel and Power Point that use the Cherokee language. The products are available in Microsoft’s online SkyDrive program. COURTESY PHOTO

Microsoft, CN collaborate again on Cherokee language

BY WILL CHAVEZ
Senior Reporter
12/26/2013 09:34 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation has again worked with Microsoft to increase the usage of the Cherokee language.

Cherokee Language Program Manager Roy Boney Jr. said this latest effort involves using Microsoft Office products such as Word, Excel and Power Point that use the Cherokee language. The products are available in Microsoft’s online SkyDrive program.

“Instead of working with the desktop version that consumers have to pay for, the tribe’s Cherokee Language Program worked with the online Microsoft version that is free called SkyDrive,” Boney said.

SkyDrive is a file hosting service that allows users to upload and sync files to cloud storage and then access them from a Web browser or their local devices. The service allows users to keep files private, share them with contacts or make the files public.

Boney said once a SkyDrive account is set up the language for the account can be changed to Cherokee.

“You can then start creating documents in Word and in Excel, and it’s all in the Cherokee language. The interface is in Cherokee,” Boney said. “The idea is to have an environment where they are creating content (in Cherokee) and if they use it enough they will get accustomed to what it’s saying. Everyone is used to using Word. It has the same menu structures and everything, it’s just in Cherokee.”

Boney said he hopes that being an “immersive environment” the person using SkyDrive will begin to learn to read and write Cherokee because they are actively using the language.

The tribe’s translation specialists spent two years translating Cherokee to work with the cloud-based SkyDrive.

The Cherokee version went public on Dec. 16 and joins 106 other languages offered by Microsoft. It allows anyone to make spreadsheets in Excel, Power Point presentations or a basic Word document in Cherokee.

Cherokee is the first Native American language to be supported by Microsoft. In December 2012, Microsoft and CN officials celebrated the integration of the language into the new Windows 8 operating system.

Sixteen CN language translators and other staff members worked with Microsoft to prepare for the integration of Cherokee into Windows 8. More than 180,000 words were translated for the program.

In November 2012, the tribe partnered with Google to add Cherokee to its email service Gmail, which allowed people to exchange emails using Gmail and instant message chats in the Cherokee syllabary.

will-chavez@cherokee.org


918-207-3961



How to enable the Cherokee version of Microsoft Office Web Apps in SkyDrive:

1. Sign in to https://skydrive.live.com/ (or sign up for a free account if you don’t have a Microsoft account).

2. After signing in, scroll to the bottom of the page. Click the language options on the far right to change the language to Cherokee. Click Save.

3. After saving settings, go to the Create menu at the top. The menu will give options to create a new Word, PowerPoint, Excel or other documents. Select the desired type of document.

4. An interface on screen should now be in Cherokee. This works on any Internet-enabled device regardless if a Cherokee font is installed on your device or not.

For more information or questions, email languagetech@cherokee.org
About the Author
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M.

He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life.
He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association.

Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years.
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M. He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life. He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association. Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years.

News

BY STAFF REPORTS
04/17/2015 02:00 PM
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BY WILL CHAVEZ
Senior Reporter
04/16/2015 12:00 PM
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BY WILL CHAVEZ
Senior Reporter
04/16/2015 08:00 AM
BULL HOLLOW, Okla. – Cherokee Nation Natural Resources staff members are excited about a new calf that was born April 8 and are expecting more to be born soon. In October, the tribe received 38 cows from the Badlands National Park in South Dakota and 12 bulls from the Teddy Roosevelt National Park in North Dakota. The 51 head of bison are fenced in on 66 acres of tribal land in rural Delaware County. The CN owns approximately 24,000 acres in the county. “The one who just had her calf this week, she came out the Badlands. She’s one of the original 38 that came out of the Badlands of South Dakota,” Chris Barnhart, Natural Resources bison herdsman, said. “We were looking this morning, there are probably three or four others that came from South Dakota that are getting close to ready to calf.” He said the cows were moved to Bull Hollow in the middle of their mating season, so he is not sure how many are pregnant. He said he would be happy if five calves were born this spring. “Honestly, I’d say if we got five calves on the ground, I’d say we’d be pretty successful this year,” he said. “They’ll (calves) be born away from the herd, and then the mother within the next few hours will bring them and introduce them to the herd. They’ll stay within the herd their entire life.” The gestation period for a bison, commonly referred to as buffalo, is the same as a domesticated cow, which is nine months. Barnhart said because the bison are wild there hasn’t been much caretaking for the potentially pregnant cows. “We keep an eye on them every day. We keep mental notes on which one we think is getting close. These buffalo are new to us and they’re different from a cow, and because of their characteristics we can’t really walk up and say ‘she’s pregnant, she’s going to have one today.’ We’re kind of learning how to figure that part of it out,” he said. Barnhart said the bison came through the winter with no problems. They had been kept in pens and were slightly underweight when they arrived at Bull Hollow but have put on weight during the winter eating hay and 100-pound range cubes, which are pelletized feed made up of corn and nutrients. It is not known how the bison will stand up to Oklahoma’s summer heat and humidity, but Barnhart said he and his crew will keep an eye on the herd and there will plenty drinking water and ponds available for the bison to get in and cool off. In September, crews installed three-quarters of a mile of new fencing for the bison. Three-and-half-inch pipe was used for all of the corners and braces on the fence, and the pipe has eight strands of barbed wire. Also, 7-foot T-posts were used on the fence line to keep in the bison. A mature male can reach up to 2,000 pounds while a mature cow can weigh 1,100 pounds. In mid-May, Barnhart said the bison would be moved to a 200-acre area south of their current location to give them more space. The InterTribal Buffalo Council has provided a $70,000 grant to the CN to help the tribe get its bison operation off the ground. The funding was used for fencing, sheds for the bison and a pond. The ITBC is based in Rapid City, South Dakota. It is a cooperative of 57 Native American nations with more than 15,000 head of bison. The CN Tribal Council provided an additional $75,000 for working pens and fencing.