Bill John Baker

Candidates for 2015 election declare

S. Joe Crittenden Chad Smith Cara Cowan Watts Lee Keener
S. Joe Crittenden
BY TESINA JACKSON
Reporter
01/10/2014 02:55 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Despite the filing period for the Cherokee Nation’s next election being more than a year away, three CN citizens have stated their intentions to run for the principal chief position in 2015.

Current Principal Chief Bill John Baker, former Principal Chief Chad Smith and Tribal Councilor Cara Cowan Watts have publicly stated they plan to run for the position in 2015.

As of Jan. 10, CN Election Commission officials said they had not set dates for the candidate filing period. According to the tribe's election law, the filing date shall be a four-day period commencing at 8 a.m. on the first Monday of March of the election year and end at 5 p.m. on the first Tuesday following the first Monday.

Baker, who was elected principal chief in 2011, said he intends on having a second term as principal chief.

“We’re making progress everyday. We’ve got $100 million in our hospital and clinics. We’re in different stages of construction. We’re building homes for our people for the first time in a decade. We’ve done more scholarships for Cherokee students than have ever been done. The businesses are more profitable than they have ever been. We’ve expanded car tags to the entire state of Oklahoma. I mean things that have been dreamed about for years have happened only in the first two years of my administration.”

Baker also said he plans to have Deputy Chief Joe Crittenden as his running mate in the 2015 election.

“When I was running the first time, one of the things I heard when I was out in the communities was the need for positive change,” Crittenden said. “I believe change has happened and working with someone who has a vision and such a benevolent heart like Bill John Baker, it’s easy to follow someone like that. It’s been a good couple of years and I look forward to more.”

Smith, who announced his intention to run on Dec. 23, served three terms as principal chief from 1999 to 2011. Smith lost to Baker after a tumultuous election that had four recounts, the federal government intervening and a second chief’s election.

“Thousands and thousands of Cherokees have believed in me in the past years, and in the last election, and continue to share our optimistic vision for our Cherokee Nation,” he said.

Smith said he currently has no running mate.

Cowan Watts, who was elected as a Tribal Councilor in 2003, currently represents the tribe’s Dist. 13. She said she decided to run for chief in 2015 because she wants to continue serving the Cherokee people.

“I pledge to restore the Cherokee Nation to the Cherokee people by ensuring Cherokee preference in hiring and contracting is fully enforced,” Cowan Watts said. “By serving the Cherokee people first, there are many opportunities to improve our government and protect tribal sovereignty for future generations.”

Cowan Watts’ running mate for the deputy chief seat will be fellow Tribal Councilor Lee Keener, who represents Dist. 14. Keener said he is deciding to run as deputy chief because he feels the Nation is on an uncertain course.

“We will work with the council to bring transparency to our government, increase our productivity and workforce and expand access to health care, housing and education. Instead of making promises, we will deliver on them. It's time for new faces and new perspectives. We need new thinking in government. I run for the Cherokee families and for the future that they will inherit.”

The CN is Oklahoma’s largest American Indian tribe and one of the nation’s biggest, with a citizenship of more than 300,000 people. The Tahlequah-based tribe has a 14-county jurisdiction in eastern Oklahoma.

As of Jan. 9, the CN had more than 50,000 registered voters, according to EC officials.

According to a previous Cherokee Phoenix article, more than 15,000 voters cast ballots in the 2011 principal chief election.

tesina-jackson@cherokee.org


918-453-5000, ext. 6139

News

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
02/12/2016 12:00 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Budget cuts of 3 percent that began in January for Oklahoma agencies, including its public schools, will grow deeper beginning in March, the state's finance director warned on Monday. Collections to the state treasury have continued to come in below projections, exacerbating the revenue failure that was declared in December, Secretary of Finance Preston Doerflinger said in an email to state agency directors and finance officers. "We are communicating as proactively as possible because we recognize how challenging continued changes to the reduction levels will be for agencies," Doerflinger wrote. The exact amount of the reductions won't be known until next week after the state's Board of Equalization updates the forecast for the fiscal year that ends June 30. Doerflinger noted that because the Legislature is in session, state leaders could take further actions that could affect the size of the next reduction. House Speaker Jeff Hickman said before the session started that lawmakers might consider a bill to adjust agency allocations to protect priority areas like education and public safety, mandating deeper cuts to a state agency to ease the reductions for another. The 3 percent cuts ordered last month are expected to cost public schools about $47 million for the rest of the fiscal year that ends June 30. State Superintendent Joy Hofmeister said at the time she believes continued cuts could force some school districts to close their doors before the end of the current school year. Already, the University of Oklahoma announced a plan to cut about $20 million in spending through a voluntary retirement offer, travel restrictions and a reduction in staff resulting from attrition. OU President David Boren announced Monday he also intends to recommend a pay cut of 3 percent for himself and other top administrators, including vice presidents and deans, for the upcoming fiscal year. Revenue collections have fallen below the estimate upon which the state-appropriated budget for this fiscal year was based. Lawmakers are facing even deeper cuts to agency budgets for the fiscal year that begins July 1, with a hole of about $900 million, or 13 percent. That figure is expected to grow larger once the final revenue figures are certified next week. Much of the decline is a result of the plummeting price of oil and natural gas, and the impact of the energy industry's contraction on the state's economy. The state's individual income tax rate declined in January from 5.25 percent to 5 percent, a move that will cost the state about $147 million annually when fully implemented.
BY TRAVIS SNELL
Assistant Editor – @cp_tsnell
02/11/2016 11:30 AM
STILWELL, Okla. – According to Adair County court records, a Cherokee Nation marshal on Jan. 12 arrested CN employee Joshua Lee Littlefield, 26, for claiming ownership of tribal equipment that was pawned at a shop in Stilwell. Court documents state that James Harper, a Cherokee Nation Marshal Service investigator, arrested Littlefield for pawning an Infocus projector to H&H Pawn Shop on or about Dec. 7 and signing an ownership certificate for the projector when it belongs to and was stolen from the CN. According to state law, any person selling or pledging property to a pawnbroker who uses a false declaration of ownership shall be guilty of a felony, upon conviction. The fine for a violation shall not exceed $500. Court documents show District Court Judge Liz Brown on Jan. 11 issued an arrest warrant and a $3,000 bond. Records state the warrant was served on Jan. 12 and that Littlefield posted bond that day. According to court records, Littlefield on Jan. 20 pleaded not guilty to one felony count of false declaration of ownership to a pawnbroker and that he was to reappear on Feb. 17 in Adair County District Court. In a Feb. 10 email, Chrissi Nimmo, CN senior assistant attorney general, said the CNMS was investigating possible theft of electronic equipment but did not state if Littlefield was the focus of that investigation. “Regarding…inquiry regarding J. Littlefield, and his state arrest for ‘false declaration of ownership of pawn,’ I can tell you that the Marshal service has an open investigation regarding possible theft of electronic equipment. Because it is an open investigation, we are unable to release any additional details at this time,” Nimmo wrote. Human Resources officials said Littlefield, as of Feb. 10, still worked for the tribe as a health technical analyst for Health Services’ Information Technology department. CN Communications officials added that Littlefield was on leave, but didn’t specify what type. As of publication, the Cherokee Phoenix attempted to contact Littlefield for comment but was unable to reach him. Court records show no attorney listed for Littlefield.
BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
02/10/2016 02:30 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – The Cherokee Nation’s Election Commission on Feb. 9 voted to recommend election law changes that will go before the Tribal Council’s Rules Committee on Feb. 17. Election Commissioner Carolyn Allen made a motion that the EC adopt the law changes that were discussed during the EC’s Policy Committee meeting. Allen then made a motion to recommend those changes to the Tribal Council. One election law change the EC recommended defines “term” to mean a full four years in which the elected or appointed officer may perform the functions of office…and shall not include the remainder of any unexpired or partial year. Another recommendation adds language that fines $5,000 to any person who fails to file as a candidate for office after receiving in-kind contributions and/or raised funds in excess of $1,000. Also on Feb. 9, the EC voted to purchase a safety deposit box and selected the commissioners and staff needed to be able to retrieve the box. The Rules Committee is scheduled to meet at 1 p.m. on Feb. 17. The election law amendment item is No. 8 under New Business, according to the Rules Committee agenda.
BY STAFF REPORTS
02/09/2016 04:30 PM
CLAREMORE, Okla. – Steve Gragert, former Will Rogers Memorial executive director, will open the 2016 Milam Lecture Series telling about his Aug. 15 visit to the plane crash site that claimed the lives of Will Rogers and Wiley Post. Rogers and Post died Aug. 15, 1935, in Point Barrow, Alaska. The lecture will be at 7 p.m. on Feb. 18 in the Will Rogers Memorial Museum Theatre in Claremore. Admission is free and open to the public. Gragert, who started his involvement with Will Rogers in 1967 working on the Will Rogers Research project at Oklahoma State University, was named museum director in 2006, serving until 2014. He edited or co-edited 17 of the 22 volumes in the scholarly series “The Writings of Will Rogers,” published by OSU and two volumes of “The Papers of Will Rogers.” Gragert is also expected to share his most recent research on Will Rogers the humanitarian. For more information, call 918-341-0719 or toll free 1-800-324-9455.
BY JAMI MURPHY
Reporter – @cp_jmurphy
02/09/2016 01:15 PM
GLENPOOL, Okla. – Deputy Principal Chief S. Joe Crittenden and Cherokee artist Bill Glass Jr. were honored at the 2016 Greater Tulsa Indian Art Festival on Feb. 5 at the Glenpool Expo Center. As part of its 30th anniversary, the GTIAF honored veterans and Native Code Talkers. Crittenden, who served in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War, said he was surprised and humbled at being selected as the honorary chairman of the GTIAF. “The theme of this year’s festival was honoring our veterans and Code Talkers,” he said. “CNB (Cherokee Nation Businesses) represented the Cherokee Nation with a sponsorship at the Bear level, $5,000.00. It is my understanding that we have helped with this event in the past.” According to the GTIAF program, Crittenden is a champion for the rights and privileges of American military veterans, and during his tenure as deputy principal chief he has supported programs to better serve the brave men and women who have served the United States. Among the featured artists was Glass, who was honored as the elder artist. According to the GTIAF, the festival annually honors a Native American artist whose support of American Indian art has been extraordinary throughout his or her lifetime. “It’s an honor and its fun to see the new artists that are coming up and doing so good. I always think of art as cultural retention for our tribes,” Glass said. “This is the first time in a long time that I’ve been here. Some friends nominated me and it’s an honor to be selected.” This year’s featured artist was Choctaw Nation citizen Gwen Coleman Lester, who paints and draws Choctaw history, legends and culture. According to the GTIAF, “Lester began her artistic career in the commercial sector and gradually moved to fine art working in colored pencil, charcoal, pastel, watercolor, acrylic, and occasionally oils.” A primary mission of the festival has been to provide scholarships to Native students. Money raised via sponsorships and auctions helps aid that cause. The weekend event included an art market, cultural demonstrations, silent and live auctions, honor dances and Cherokee fiddling. “Today the Greater Tulsa Indian Art Festival is a national premier juried art show, which showcases Native art, cuisine and entertainment. Most importantly, many Native students have been recipients of the Festival’s scholarship program. Scholarships began in the early 1990s,” a GTIAF official said. The art festival is a project of the National Indian Monument and Institute, a national non-profit 501(c)(3) organization.
BY TRAVIS SNELL
Assistant Editor – @cp_tsnell
02/09/2016 08:45 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Officials with the Cherokee Nation’s Election Commission are urging CN citizens who want to vote in the 2017 Tribal Council elections to register to vote or ensure that their voter registration information is correct at the Election Commission Office. “The 2017 election year is fast approaching and we would like to encourage the Cherokee citizens who would like to vote in the 2017 Council elections to register to vote,” an EC press release states. “Registered voters of the Cherokee Nation who have had an address or name change should also complete a voter registration form and submit to the Election Commission Office to update your registration information.” According to the release, a registered voter living in the tribe’s jurisdiction who has moved to a new district and wishes to change precincts within his or her district shall re-register for a new district and/or precinct on or before the last business day in March of the election year. In 2017, that day will be Friday, March 31. According to CN law, every resident registered voter shall be registered to vote in the district of his or her residence. Also, a resident registered voter shall have the right to vote only for a Tribal Council candidate of the district in which the voter resides and cannot vote for a candidate of any other district. Tribal Council seats that are up for election next year are districts 2, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10, 11, 15, and one At-Large seat. EC officials said At-Large registered voters should be registered to vote in the At-Large District, unless a voter has elected to remain a voter in a district pursuant to Article VI, Section 3 of the CN Constitution. At-Large voters who move to new at-large address should provide the EC their new addresses for registration and mailing purposes. At-Large voters who move to addresses within a jurisdictional district should reregister within the district of their new addresses. EC officials also stressed that tribal citizenship cards do not automatically register citizens to vote in CN elections and that citizens wanting to vote must register with the EC. According to CN law, one must be 18 years old as of the election day to register to vote. Also, a person must be registered to vote no later than the last business day in March of the election year. Registration and change of address forms are available at the EC Office located at 22116 S. Bald Hill Road or online at <a href="http://www.cherokee.org/election" target="_blank">www.cherokee.org/election</a>. For more information, call 918-458-5899 or toll free at 1-800-353-2895. One can also email <a href="mailto: election-commission@cherokee.org">election-commission@cherokee.org</a> or visit <a href="http://www.cherokee.org/election" target="_blank">www.cherokee.org/election</a>. The EC’s mailing address is P.O. Box 1188 Tahlequah, OK 74465.