http://www.cherokeephoenix.orgCherokee Nation citizen Kristin Treager stands at the podium after finish third in the 2013 Porsche Club of America Cup Car Challenge Series. Treager has been racing since she was 7-years-old. COURTESY
Cherokee Nation citizen Kristin Treager stands at the podium after finish third in the 2013 Porsche Club of America Cup Car Challenge Series. Treager has been racing since she was 7-years-old. COURTESY

Cherokee woman fulfills auto-racing dream

Cherokee Nation citizen Kristin Treager’s 2012 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup Car has the CN flag on the driver’s side along with her name. Treager’s helmet also bares the CN flag. COURTESY Cherokee Nation citizen Kristin Treager co-hosts “The Car Guy Show,” which is based in the Dallas/Fort Worth area. Treager began racing in the International Motorsports Association GT3 Challenge on M15 in Florida. COURTESY
Cherokee Nation citizen Kristin Treager’s 2012 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup Car has the CN flag on the driver’s side along with her name. Treager’s helmet also bares the CN flag. COURTESY
BY STACIE GUTHRIE
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
04/03/2014 08:17 AM
TULSA, Okla. – Many young girls dream of becoming a princess, but Cherokee Nation citizen Kristin Treager’s dreams were different when she was a child. She dreamed of racing cars. And now at age 26, she drives for the Wright Motorsports team and competes in a 2012 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup Car.

“I started racing when I was 7 years old at Junior Raceway Park over on the west side of Tulsa. A retired, German sports car racer named Alf Gebhardt started the school for kids,” Treager said. “I went through his program. I won a championship through his program and fell in love with racing from the very beginning. I’ve basically been doing it ever since.”

Treager said her inspiration for racing came from her father.

“My dad was always very into racing, and he was a big Formula One fan. He got me into the school and I just loved it. He was my crew chief growing up as well.”

So far in her career, she’s won five championships: Junior Raceway Park Series Championship, Oklahoma Bandelero State Championship, COMMA Production Stock A Championship, La Luna y Sol 6 Hour Enduro Championship and the 2013 National Points Championship in the Porsche Club of America GTC4 Cup Car Challenge series.

Treager said she’s proud to have the latest championship because it was a national win. She credits her competitors for helping her get to a higher level of racing.

“We have a lot of tough competitions,” she said. “We had about 40 guys in our group, really good drivers, tough competitors, and I’m actually very thankful to them because they made me a better driver competing against them.”

Treager has raced all over the country including Texas, Kansas, New York, Wisconsin and Georgia. In her next series, the International Motorsports Association GT3 Challenge she will be racing in more states and even venture into Canada.

This series is a step above the one she competed in 2013. It is a support series for the United SportsCar Championship, which is where she said the “top dogs” compete.

On March 15 she began competing at the Sebring International Raceway in Sebring, Fla. and on Oct. 4 she will wrap up the series in Braselton, Ga. She said she’s most excited for the Sept. 20 race at the Circuit of the Americas in Austin, Texas.

“That’s the brand new Formula One track that was built specifically for Formula One. Beautiful track, I can’t wait to drive on it.”

When competing Treager will be in the Gold Class, which houses Porsche Cup Cars from 2013 and older.

This is Treager’s first full season in the series. She said she hopes to rank in the top three of the championship but is also gunning for Rookie of the Year.
Treager said she races within the Spec Series, which means the competing cars are essentially the same.

“They’re grouped to similar years, makes and models,” she said. “The good thing about a Spec Series is it relies on driver ability for you to succeed because most of the cars are basically the same. It takes skill and ability to be able to get a podium finish and a little bit of luck. It’s less about who has the bigger engine and more about driver ability.”

Treager’s Porsche displays the Cherokee Nation flag on the driver’s side along with her name and a design of a white tiger along the car. Her helmet will also feature the CN emblem and the American flag.

“In racing we usually have our nation of origin on our car or on our driving suit, so I chose to represent both the United States and the Cherokee Nation, since I am a citizen of both.”

Aside from racing, Treager is also an instructor at the Hallet Motor Racing Circuit, 35 miles west of Tulsa.

“It’s a 1.8-mile road course and I consider that my home track. I grew up there. I learned to race there,” she said. “I volunteer, and sometimes they pay me, which is nice. The Audi guys pay me to come in and teach for them, so I do Audi days. The dealership brings a bunch of their new cars in and their customers and I teach them how to drive their cars fast. I enjoy getting other people involved and get excited about this sport.”

She also recently began co-hosting “The Car Guy Show,” a 30-minute show based out of the Dallas/Fort Worth area. ‘The Car Guy Show” premiered on March 1. Those interested can watch it at www.youtube.com/user/CarGuyShowTV.

Treager graduated from Northeastern State University-Broken Arrow with a bachelor’s degree in psychology. She earned a juris doctorate from the University of Tulsa College of Law in 2013 and recently opened a firm with a partner in Tulsa named Boston Avenue Law.

For more information, visit her Facebook page at www.facebook.com/KristinTreagerRacing or follow her on Twitter @KristinTreager.

stacie-guthrie@cherokee.org


918-453-5000 ext. 5903

About the Author
Stacie Guthrie started working at the Cherokee Phoenix in 2013 as an intern. After graduating from Northeastern State University with a bachelor’s degree in mass communications she was hired as a reporter.

Stacie not only writes for the Phoenix, but also produces videos and regularly hosts the Cherokee Phoenix radio broadcast.

She found her passion for video production while taking part in broadcast media classes at NSU. It was there she co-created a monthly video segment titled “Northeastern Gaming,” which included video game reviews, video game console reviews and discussions regarding influential video games.

While working at the Phoenix she has learned more about her Cherokee culture, saying she is grateful for the opportunity to work for and with the Cherokee people.

In 2014, Stacie won a NativeAmerican Journalists Association award for a video she created while working as an intern for the Phoenix. She was awarded first place in the “Best News Story-TV” category.

Stacie is a member of NAJA.
stacie-guthrie@cherokee.org • 918-453-5000 ext. 5903
Stacie Guthrie started working at the Cherokee Phoenix in 2013 as an intern. After graduating from Northeastern State University with a bachelor’s degree in mass communications she was hired as a reporter. Stacie not only writes for the Phoenix, but also produces videos and regularly hosts the Cherokee Phoenix radio broadcast. She found her passion for video production while taking part in broadcast media classes at NSU. It was there she co-created a monthly video segment titled “Northeastern Gaming,” which included video game reviews, video game console reviews and discussions regarding influential video games. While working at the Phoenix she has learned more about her Cherokee culture, saying she is grateful for the opportunity to work for and with the Cherokee people. In 2014, Stacie won a NativeAmerican Journalists Association award for a video she created while working as an intern for the Phoenix. She was awarded first place in the “Best News Story-TV” category. Stacie is a member of NAJA.

People

BY STAFF REPORTS
01/12/2018 12:00 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY – AARP Oklahoma is accepting nominations for its 10th annual Indian Elder Honors to celebrate 50 Native American elders who have positively impacted their respective communities, families, tribes and nation. Since its inception in 2009, AARP Oklahoma has recognized 450 elders from all 39 tribal nations in Oklahoma. “The AARP Indian Elder Honors recognizes the extraordinary contribution of Indian elders – many of whom have never been recognized before,” AARP Oklahoma Volunteer State President Joe Ann Vermillion said. The 2017 honorees from 33 Oklahoma tribal nations included teachers, veterans, nurses, artists, tribal leaders, language and culture preservationists, champion archer and champion arm wrestler. Cherokee Nation citizens Mary Rector Aitson, Dianne Barker Harrold, Marcella Morton and Joe T. Thornton, as well as United Keetoowah Band citizen Woody Hansen, were honored in 2017 and presented medallions by national and state AARP officials. “This event celebrates a lifetime of service from these distinguished elders,” AARP State Director Sean Voskuhl said. “The common thread between the honorees, regardless of the contribution, is the commitment to community and service.” This year’s Indian Elder Honors will be held Oct. 2 in Oklahoma City. Nomination applications are available at <a href="https://www.aarp.org/states/ok/stateeventdetails.eventId=671063&stateCode=OK/" target="_blank">https://www.aarp.org/states/ok/stateeventdetails.eventId=671063&stateCode=OK/</a>. Nominations may be submitted electronically or mailed to AARP Oklahoma, 126 N. Bryant, Edmond, OK, 73034. Nominees must be enrolled citizens of federally recognized Oklahoma tribal nations, at least 50 years old and be living. Nominees do not have to be AARP members. For more information, call Mashell Sourjohn at 405-715-4474 or email msourjohn@aarp.org. The deadline for submitting nominations is April 30.
BY BRITTNEY BENNETT
Reporter – @cp_bbennett
01/09/2018 08:15 AM
TAHLEQUAH – When shooters took the line for an Oklahoma Archery Shooters Association qualifier recently at Obsession Archery, Cherokee Nation citizen Michael Lackey was among them despite being in a wheelchair. “I didn’t get to play regular sports like kids that were not in a wheelchair, so my dad got me into archery and I started doing that,” Lackey said. “I’ve been shooting bows since I was about 12 or 13 years old.” Lackey joined 64 archers competing for bragging rights and prize money at the Dec. 17 qualifier. Shooters received four minutes to shoot five arrows at a five-spot target through 12 ends, or rounds, for a total of 60 arrows. Each arrow had the potential to earn up to five points depending on its target placement. Lackey shot with the compound bow he uses when hunting. “The compound is definitely easier from a wheelchair standpoint, in my opinion, because I shoot the recurve also and they’re a lot longer than your compounds. So a string will hit the wheel sometimes or you’re closer to the ground, so the limbs will hit the ground. The compound is definitely easier to shoot from a wheelchair.” Although paralyzed most of his life, Lackey said he doesn’t believe in limits. He’s an avid outdoorsman who often hunts, a skill honed by competitive archery. “It’s really helped my shooting, getting back into the target shooting,” he said. “It’s made me more consistent for hunting. I like the competition, and I like to improve myself.” The competition marked Obsession Archery’s first time hosting a qualifier for the ASA, which aims to grow archery through clubs that provide competition, training and education opportunities. It’s a development Lackey said he appreciates. “It’s harder on people who don’t have the funding to drive clear across the state to shoots. So it’s nice to have somewhere where we can do it here in town, in Tahlequah.” Obsession Archery owner John Obenrader called the development a “big deal” for his business and customers. “ASA is the main organization that I shoot for. It’s one of the biggest ones in the country. It’s where all your top archers are and at the state level. They hold championships and qualifiers all across the state. They just came to me and asked me if I wanted to shoot since I have a shop with an indoor range.” Obenrader said he hopes the competition brings in new shooters and their families to get them familiar with indoor and 3-D range shoots. “It’s pretty much a family-oriented kind of sport because a lot of times you’ll see the kids get started in it, and then mom and dad get started in it because they want to do it.” For Lackey, the qualifier was a family affair as both his children competed in the cub class. “My daughter Makayla, she’s been shooting for two or three years now. Hayden just got his first compound bow this year,” he said. “They’re both shooting really well. It’s good for them. It teaches them discipline, practicing. You got to be good to make a shot on a deer. You want to deer hunt, you got to practice and get good at shooting.” In addition to passing his archery passion onto his children, Lackey hopes to see archery grow among others in wheelchairs. “I don’t see it quite as much as I would like to see,” he said. “It’s a big challenge from sitting in a wheelchair, but I do know a lot of guys that hunt (and compete). It just takes lots of practice because I have to, I don’t have a lot of balance, so I have to kind of position myself where I can maintain my balance while I’m shooting my bow.” For more information, call Obsession Archery at 918-951-9540.
BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
12/20/2017 04:00 PM
WASHINGTON – Cherokee Nation citizen Jessica Henry, of Salina, Oklahoma, was one of five women selected to participate in the Global Press Institute’s training-to-employment program – a weeklong training in Washington, D.C., learning the aspects of journalism. GPI offers Native American women who have no prior journalism experience, and who are enrolled citizens of federally recognized tribes, the opportunity to become journalists and use journalism “as a development tool to train and employ women in developing media markets to produce high-quality local news coverage that elevates local and global awareness and ignites social change.” Cristi Hegranes, GPI founder and executive director, said graduates receive long-term employment with GPI covering their communities. Henry, a Northeastern State University graduate with a public relations degree, was a Cherokee Nation Businesses intern when she applied for the program after seeing an article on <a href="http://www.cherokeephoenix.org" target="_blank">www.cherokeephoenix.org</a>. “It wasn’t really that different because I had to do journalism with my degree plan. I had to be with NSU News for a semester. I kind of had a little bit of knowledge about it but not as in depth as we learned in training,” Henry said. She said she received hands-on experience once training began by learning to conduct interviews and about photojournalism, taking newsworthy photos and ethics and accuracy. “All of the experts from each department came in talking about verification and source types and how to get the right news angles and the photojournalism. They all came in and directly taught us from that. So it was a lot to take in, but it helped a lot, too. We had a lot of time to just ask questions,” she said. Henry said she wants to focus on being as accurate as possible in her writing. “That’s a really big deal, being ethical and accurate in our writing. I think that will be interesting, to see how far I can get with fact checking everything that people say, what’s really true and what’s not because a lot of people believe what they first read and they don’t really look into it for themselves. So I guess that will be a big part of what I want to d0,” she said. Now home, Henry continues to train through an online forum with GPI editors. She said one of her first assignments was to “pitch” story ideas to editors to learn what types of stories to look for and that her main focus is to write untold stories in the Cherokee community. “I want to learn things that I don’t know about…and be able to share that information accurately about our community because there is a lot of stories here. It just takes someone to tell them,” Henry said.
BY STAFF REPORTS
12/14/2017 03:30 PM
TULSA, Okla. – Deborah Fritts, a Cherokee Nation Businesses employee, recently joined Tulsa’s Resilient Advisors on Racial Equity. Tulsa became part of the Rockefeller Foundation’s 100 Resilient Cities program in 2015. As part of the program, the advisory committee develops strategies addressing physical, social and economic challenges facing Tulsa. “I am incredibly honored and humbled to be asked to serve in this capacity,” Fritts said. “The spirit of Tulsa is built on resiliency, and it is a trait shared by the Cherokee people. However, there is always more work to be done, and we must all do our part to stay engaged in our communities and informed on the issues impacting our fellow residents. I’m thankful for the opportunity to serve on this committee and look forward to the positive impact we can have on our city.” Fritts has worked at CNB for 13 years and manages the Cherokee Art Market. To learn more about Tulsa’s Resilience Challenge, visit <a href="http://www.CityofTulsa.org" target="_blank">www.CityofTulsa.org</a>. For more information about the 100 Resilient Cities program, visit <a href="http://www.100resilientcities.org" target="_blank">www.100resilientcities.org</a>.
BY KENLEA HENSON
Reporter
12/13/2017 08:15 AM
EVANSVILLE, Ind. – Cherokee Nation citizen Sydney Lawrence recently earned All-American status at the 2017 National College Athletic Association Division II women’s cross-country championship. Lawrence, 20, was one of two student-athletes to achieve the status for Oklahoma Baptist University. She and her teammate, Abby Hoover, are the first athletes of any sport to receive that honor for OBU since it joined the NCAA in August. “It is a huge honor to be one of the first to receive something like this in OBU’s history, but I cannot take all of the credit for it. God has worked in incredible ways to allow me to be here at OBU and to continue to run and compete for his glory, Lawrence, who OBU recruited from Stilwell (Oklahoma) High School, said. “It was an honor to receive this because this was my first time to ever compete in the NCAA. All of the work I had put in since my freshman year of college to prepare for this opportunity paid off.” She also thanked her family, coach and teammates for her and the Lady Bison’s success, which as a team placed 20th at the championship. “My family has supported me through this entire process and helped me keep the right perspective about everything,” she said. “And also my coach and teammates, everyone’s dedication to being successful and also having the mindset of competing and living for Christ is what makes this team and program such a special and life-changing thing to be a part of.” To receive All-American honors, student-athletes must place in the top 40. Although Lawrence said she was “doubtful” in the race’s beginning, she steadily progressed past other runners to the finish line in 40th place for the final All-American spot. “I was kind of doubtful in the beginning of the race because I was hearing that I was in like the seventy, eighties and I thought ‘wow I’ve got a lot of work to do and people to pass,’ but I tried to stay focused on racing smart and being patient. I truly cannot deny that the Lord was at work and giving me strength through the entire race,” she said. At Stilwell, running in Class 4A, Lawrence won state in the 3,200-meter and 1,600-meter runs as a freshman and was a three-time all-state cross-country runner. She also won a national championship as a junior. She excelled in cross-country after picking up the sport as a freshman. Up to that point she had concentrated on track. She said she was also recruited by the University of Central Oklahoma and Stephen F. Austin and John Brown universities but chose OBU because of the people she met and its Christian environment. As cross-country season closes, Lawrence said she’s had a successful season with awards and achievements, including All-Region, Great American Conference Meet runner-up, First-Team All-Great American Conference, GAC Scholar-Athlete, GAC Runner of the Week and NCAA All-American. Lawrence said with indoor track season beginning she would work hard to meet her goals. “It would be really great to go to the national indoor meet as well. The national standard is much more difficult than previous years of competing in NCCAA’s (National Christian College Athletic Association), but I am excited to have that motivation to keep working hard and meeting running times I never thought I could run,” she said.
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
12/12/2017 12:00 PM
TULSA, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen JoKay Dowell on Nov. 7 received a 2017 Dream Keepers award from the Greater Tulsa Area Indian Affairs Commission and the city of Tulsa Human Rights Department as part of National Native American Heritage Month. The GTAIAC’s annual Dream Keeper Awards Banquet celebrates Native American leaders “who exemplify strong character and have made a difference through solid dedication to public service.” Dowell (Cherokee/Quapaw/Peoria/Eastern Shawnee) was awarded the “Will Anquoe Humanitarian Award.” The award “recognizes humanitarianism and overall contributions to the Native community but also recognizes those who bridge communication and understanding among diverse groups.” Dowell was honored for her “strong history of advocacy and activism in the areas of Indigenous peoples’ rights, human rights, anti-war actions, peace and the environment.” She has traveled to Central and South American Indigenous communities to collaborate on ways to address shared injustices and successes, stated the Dream Keepers booklet. In 2016, she and her daughter Anna delivered supplies to the Oceti Sakowin camp on the Standing Rock Reservation in North Dakota and spent five weeks there to help resist the Dakota Access Pipeline. “I looked around the room at the awards banquet and saw so many people of our people who have made profound contributions to their tribe, the community, the world. I felt inadequate, undeserving,” Dowell said. “I brought my grandchildren with me so that they can see that even though there is little financial reward or gain in community work, in service to others, there is so much reward. In fact, it’s mostly volunteer work. Many times we take money from out own pockets, but even then there is much reward when someone thanks us for something we’ve done or when we are recognized by our own community, our tribes, our peers like these Dream Keeper awards.” Residing in rural northern Cherokee County, Dowell is also a photographer whose work has shown at Gilcrease Museum and a writer published in Indian Country Today, Native American Times, Native Oklahoma Magazine, First American Art Magazine, Native Americas Journal, the Cherokee Phoenix and Indigenous Women's Magazine. Dowell served as faculty-in-residence for the 2004 University of Oklahoma’s National Education for Women’s Leadership Conference. She earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Northeastern State University and has won awards for creative writing. In 2011, as part of the 7th Generation Fund’s delegation, she attended the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues at UN headquarters in New York City. “I think each one of us has an obligation of service to our fellow human beings, to our home, Earth,” she said. “I’ve always been told that we Indigenous people have been given directions from the creator to take care of each other and Mother Earth and to demonstrate respect for all living things. I’m just doing what I’m supposed to do.”