Remember the Removal participant Keeley Godwin leads riders and staff during a May 25 training ride near Tahlequah, Okla. Godwin and 12 other cyclists from the Cherokee Nation were expected to leave New Echota, Ga., on June 1 and travel nearly 1,000 miles along the northern route of the Trail of Tears and arrive on June 19 in Tahlequah. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Remember the Removal riders get special send off

The 2014 Remember the Removal cyclists who will retrace the northern route of the Trail of Tears are, from left to right, Chance Rudolph, Zane Scullawl, Charli Barnoskie, Madison Taylor, Noah Collins, Adriana Collins, Elizabeth Burns, Keeley Godwin, Kassidy “Tye” Carnes, Cassie Moore, Jamekah Rios, Jordan McLaren and Jacob Chavez. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
The 2014 Remember the Removal cyclists who will retrace the northern route of the Trail of Tears are, from left to right, Chance Rudolph, Zane Scullawl, Charli Barnoskie, Madison Taylor, Noah Collins, Adriana Collins, Elizabeth Burns, Keeley Godwin, Kassidy “Tye” Carnes, Cassie Moore, Jamekah Rios, Jordan McLaren and Jacob Chavez. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Senior Reporter
06/04/2014 08:33 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – On May 28, 13 Remember the Removal bike riders and staff departed Tahlequah, officially beginning a three-week journey to retrace their ancestors’ path along the Trail of Tears.

Family and friends joined tribal leaders for a send-off ceremony at the W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex to wish the riders a prosperous journey and safe return.

The ride, which originated 30 years ago, is a leadership program allowing Cherokee students to get a glimpse of the hardships their Cherokee ancestors faced while making the same trek on foot in 1838-39.

Keeley Godwin, 21, of Welling, said she was inspired to take the challenge of riding nearly 1,000 miles along the northern route of the Trail of Tears because some of her friends had done it.

“I wanted to see as close as possible what it was like for them (ancestors) and what they went through, how they got here, and why I’m here,” she said.

The recent college graduate said she wants to complete something major in her life and the bike ride is it for her. She added that she wants to complete the ride to add to her successes and make her family proud.

“The first thing I’m excited about is actually getting to Cherokee (N.C.) and just having that moment to take in and realize this is where we came from and to travel and say ‘this is where they traveled, this is where they stayed.’ When I think about I get goose bumps,” she said.

The ride’s coordinator Joseph Erb, said education has been more of a focus for this year’s trip. On weekends, the participants attended a Cherokee history course before taking their training rides. And during the actual trip, the riders will have more contact with historians at stops along the route.

“So when they go to see these places, not only will they have been educated beforehand, but when they get there they will have another lesson about it,” he said. “We are also doing journals to talk about what they have learned. We also did their genealogy to actually tie the riders to the different locations so that’ll know their family history.”

Erb explored the northern route this past winter to see if it could be improved. He said the bicyclists were expected to travel 98 percent of the route Cherokee people used during the winter of 1838-39.

The 13 CN riders will meet six riders from the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians in Cherokee, N.C., to train together. The 19 riders are then expected to travel to the capital of the old Cherokee Nation at New Echota, Ga., and leave there on June 1. During the ride, cyclists will have traveled seven states before ending the journey on June 19 in Tahlequah.

“A comprehensive genealogy was completed for every rider and staff making the trip. As they learn more about their own family, the universal Cherokee experience becomes much more personal for them,” Principal Chief Bill John Baker said. “These riders will live out an exceptional experience over the next three weeks that will bond them forever. It is physically demanding and can be emotionally draining, but completing the trip will be a spiritual reward in and of itself. Just as our ancestors were 175 years ago, these young Cherokee people will be responsible for each other on this journey.”

This year marks the 175th anniversary of the arrival of the final group of Cherokees forced from their homes in Georgia and Tennessee and other southeastern states to what is now northeastern Oklahoma. Of the estimated 16,000 Cherokees forced to make the journey to Indian Territory, an estimated 4,000 died from exposure, starvation and disease.

“The Remember the Removal ride not only commemorates this important event in our people’s history, but it is an opportunity for our youth to learn more about our history,” EBCI Principal Chief Michell Hicks said. “Our riders are a true cross-section of our tribal community, and this experience offers a means for them to connect across generations and to learn from one another about our history.”

Rider Adriana Collins said Oklahoma history is “deficient” in informing students about the Trail of Tears, and her goal is learn more about the forced removal firsthand.

“I want to be able to have an opinion. I don’t think you should really be allowed to have an opinion if you don’t understand what happened or you don’t study what happened. So, to be able to have an educated opinion, I think I need to do this ride,” Collins said.

Along with Godwin and Collins, the CN riders are Charli Barnoskie, Cassie Moore, Noah Collins, Chance Rudolph, Jordan McLaren, Elizabeth Burns, Zane Scullawl, Madison Taylor, Jamekah Rios, Kassidy “Tye” Carnes and Jacob Chavez. The EBCI riders are Patricia Watkins, Richard Sneed, Ty Bushyhead, Kelsey Owl, Russell Bigmeat and Katrina Sneed.

Follow the riders at www.facebook.com/removal.ride or with the Twitter hash tag #RememberTheRemoval.
About the Author
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M.

He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life.
He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association.

Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years.
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M. He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life. He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association. Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years.

News

BY STAFF REPORTS
03/02/2015 04:00 PM
WASHINGTON – The National Congress of American Indians Executive Council Winter Session announced that the White House invited tribal leaders to join the Generation Indigenous challenge. The Gen-I challenge is an initiative that focuses on building a bright future for Native youth. “The White House is inviting tribal leaders to take concrete steps to engage with Native youth in their communities, including working with or creating a youth council, hosting a joint meeting between youth and tribal leaders or partnering with youth to plan a program to support positive change in their community,” NCAI stated in a release. According to the release, seven tribes have accepted the Gen-I challenge, the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Tribes of Alaska, Gila River Indian Community, Ho-Chunk Nation of Wisconsin, Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians, Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians and Three Affiliated Tribes. “Existing elements of the Gen-I challenge include the recently launched Cabinet officials’ Native Youth Listening Tour and a steering committee of Native youth to plan the first ever White House Tribal Youth Gathering,” the release states.
BY STAFF REPORTS
03/02/2015 02:00 PM
During the 6 p.m. Dec. 15, 2014 Tribal Council meeting, Councilors discussed: • AN ACT AMENDING LEGISLATIVE ACT #24-14 AUTHORIZING THE COMPREHENSIVE CAPITAL BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2015 - MOD. 1; AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY Councilor Taylor moved to approve. Councilor Vazquez seconded the motion. Councilors Byrd, Garvin, Cowan Watts, Buzzard, Fullbright and Snell requested to be added as sponsors. The motion carried by acclimation. • AN ACT AMENDING LEGISLATIVE ACT #25-14 AUTHORIZING THE COMPREHENSIVE OPERATING BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 2015 - MOD. 4; AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY Councilor Taylor moved to approve. Councilor Hargis seconded the motion. Councilors Byrd, Vazquez Garvin, Snell, Cowan Watts, and Buzzard requested to be added as sponsors. The motion to approve carried by acclimation. ...and more. <a href="http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/Docs/2015/3/8988_Dec15_2015CoucilMinutes.pdf" target="_blank">Click here to read</a> the Dec. 15, 2014 meeting minutes. <a href="https://cherokee.legistar.com/DepartmentDetail.aspx?ID=3301&GUID=C557BD6A-E296-4A30-BF3E-2035FF8607CC&Mode=MainBody" target="_blank">Click here to view</a> the Dec. 15, 2014 Tribal Council meeting video.
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Senior Reporter
03/02/2015 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – In February, the Cherokee Phoenix requested compensation amounts for all Cherokee Nation-affiliated boards and commissions through the tribe’s Freedom of Information Act. Some boards such as the tribe’s five-member Home Health Services board is not compensated for meeting monthly. The board includes Chairman Freddie Ferrell and members Debra Proctor, Dr. Roger Montgomery, Elmer Tadpole and Connie Davis. The tribe’s Election Commission is responsible for running the tribe’s elections and each commissioner receives a monthly $500 stipend and $100 per meeting. The five-member commission also receives an hourly pay rate of $30. Commissioners are Chairman Bill W. Horton and Co-Chairwoman Teresa Hart and members Shawna Calico, Carolyn Allen and Martha Calico. The Gaming Commission oversees gaming regulations and standards, and its commissioners receive a $1,500 stipend each month, mileage rate of 55 cents per mile and paid travel. Commissioners are Jennifer Goins, Shannon Fisher, Steve Barrick, Ruth Ann Weaver and Chairwoman Stacy Leeds. The three members of the Tax Commission are paid $700 per month and meet quarterly in Tahlequah. Commissioners Jim Hummingbird, Steve Wilson and Chris Carter are responsible for rules regulating car tag operations and tax revenue from tribally operated businesses. The Administrative Appeals Board hears appeals made by employees who have been terminated from their jobs. The three-member board receives $600 per meeting and a $200 monthly stipend. They also receive 55 cents per mile for traveling to meetings. Board members are James Cosby and Nathan Barnard. One seat is vacant. The Waste Management board is responsible for oversight of the tribe’s landfill and meets monthly. Chairwoman Fan Robinson receives a monthly stipend of $1,500 while board members Shawn Shepard and Luanne Collins receive $1,000 each. Board members also receive 55 cents per mile in travel expenses. Comprehensive Care Agency board members receive no compensation for serving. The members, which oversee the Programs for All-inclusive Care for the Elderly and Elder Care, are Chairwoman Janie Dibble and Dr. Roger Montgomery, Elmer Tadpole and Connie Davis. There is one vacant seat. The five-member Economic Development Trust Authority is also not paid for its work, according to the FOIA response. EDTA members are Mike Crawley, Johnnie Earp, Pamela Bickford, Glendon Watkins and Brian Hartley. The Environmental Protection Commission meets monthly in Tahlequah and administers environmental rules and regulations. Its five members are Marty Matlock, Ed Fite, Lynna Carson, Jack Spears and Blake Fletcher. They are paid $500 per meeting. Cherokee Nation Foundation board members, who oversee a scholarship program that includes scholarships established by CN citizens and others, are not compensated. Its six members are Tonya Rozell, Carole Richmond, Leroy Qualls, Patsi Nix Smith, Amber George and Susan Chapman Plumb. CN Community Association Corporation members are also not paid for their service. The five-member board currently has one vacancy and its members are Dawnena Mackey, Jacquie Archambeau, Ron Qualls, and Robin Smith. The board supports the efforts of Cherokee community groups that are tribally affiliated. The Registration Committee works on registration concerns and is compensated $250 per monthly meeting. Members include Registrar Linda O’Leary and Farrell Prater. In January, the Tribal Council voted to fill the committee vacancy with Carrie Philpot. She has yet to be confirmed. The Phoenix requested the compensation for the Cherokee Nation Businesses board of directors but was denied. According to the FOIA response, the information is exempt from public disclosure. “In response to your request, the information requested is exempt from disclosure pursuant to Cherokee Nation Legislative Act 16-14, 105(A)(6), which states: ‘all salary compensation paid by public bodies to individuals by authorized positions as classified by Cherokee Nation laws or Executive and Legislative Human Resources or Personnel Policies and Procedures. The annual budgets shall contain such position listings without the names of the individual holding such positions,’” states the FOIA response. The Phoenix attempted to get a clarification from CNB officials for why board compensation could not be disclosed but did not receive a response. According to a 2010 story, the CNB board chair received $72,000 annually while other members’ base pay ranged from $24,000 to $54,000. According to the story, as part of the base pay, each member served on at least one committee, but members also received $12,000 for each additional committee on which they served. The story also states committee chairs received an additional $6,000 annually and that Executive Committee members received an additional $12,000 annually except the board chairman, who forewent any Executive Committee compensation.
BY STAFF REPORTS
02/28/2015 04:00 PM
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – The Sequoyah National Research Center is seeking three tribally affiliated student interns for summer 2015 during the period of June 1 through July 31. Interns will work at least 25 hours per week in the center doing basic archival and research work under the direction of SNRC staff. The SNRC at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock houses the papers and special collections of tribal individuals and organizations, the world’s largest archival collection of newspapers and other periodicals published by tribal individuals and organizations, and the Dr. J. W. Wiggins Collection of Native American Art, consisting more than 2,500 artworks. The goal of the American Indian Student Internship Program is to provide students an experiential learning environment in which to acquire an understanding of the value of archives and the research potential of the collections of the center and to engage in academic research and practical database building activities related to tribal culture, society, and issues. Interns are expected to demonstrate the value of their experience by either a summary report of work, finding aids for collections, reports of research or other written work that may be shared with their home institutions. To qualify for an internship, students must: be tribally affiliated, have completed at least 60 college hours, and be in good standing at their home institutions of higher learning. Applications should include a unofficial copy of the student’s academic transcript, a recommendation letter from the head of the student’s major department or from another relevant academic official, and a statement of no more than one page expressing why the intern experience would likely be beneficial to the student’s academic or career goals. To assist the student in meeting expenses during the two-month tenure of the internship, the Center will provide on-campus housing and $2,000 to defray other living expenses. Students interested in applying should send applications or inquiries by email to Daniel F. Littlefield at <a href="mailto: dflittlefiel@ualr.edu">dflittlefiel@ualr.edu</a>; Robert E. Sanderson at <a href="mailto: resanderson@ualr.edu">resanderson@ualr.edu</a>; Erin H. Fehr at <a href="mailto: eh-fehr@ualr.edu">eh-fehr@ualr.edu</a>; or by mail to: SNRC, University Plaza, Suite 500, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 S. University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204. The SNRC must receive applications by March 15. The SNRC staff will select three applicants and three alternates. Staff will notify students of their decision by April 1. For information regarding UALR and its guest housing facilities, visit <a href="http://www.ualr.edu/housing" target="_blank">http://www.ualr.edu/housing</a>. For information on the SNRC and its work, visit <a href="http://ualr.edu/sequoyah" target="_blank">http://ualr.edu/sequoyah</a>.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
02/28/2015 12:00 PM
ALEXANDRIA, Va. – A federal government decision to cancel the Washington Redskins’ trademark because it may be disparaging infringes on free-speech rights and unfairly singles the team out, lawyers argued in court papers filed Feb. 23. The team wants to overturn a decision in 2014 by the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board to cancel the Redskins’ trademark on the grounds that it may be offensive to Native Americans. But the team’s attorneys say the law barring registration of disparaging trademarks is unconstitutional under the First Amendment. The trademark board’s decision unfairly singles out the Redskins “for disfavored treatment based solely on the content of its protected speech, interfering with the ongoing public discourse over the Redskins’ name by choosing sides and cutting off the debate. This the U.S. Constitution does not tolerate,” the lawyers write in their brief. The lawyers argue that the government has no business deciding that a name such as Redskins is disparaging and undeserving of trademark protection while deeming other names such as Braves to be content-neutral and allowable for trademarks. The team still disputes that Redskins is a disparaging term and has asked the judge to rule in the team’s favor based on that argument. But the court papers filed Feb. 23 focus on the constitutionality of the law that bans registration of disparaging trademarks. The government has intervened in the civil lawsuit to defend the law’s constitutionality. In similar cases, government lawyers have argued that the law doesn’t ban disparaging speech; it just denies the protection of a federal trademark to those words. For instance, the Redskins would not be prohibited from calling themselves the Redskins just because they lose the trademark case – they would just lose some of the legal protections that go along with a registered trademark. The team says free-speech protections should be understood more broadly. The team says the First Amendment can be violated by government restrictions that burden speech even if they don’t ban it outright. The team argues that canceling a trademark represents such a burden, especially for a football club that has used the name since 1933. A lawyer for the group of Native Americans that sought cancellation of the trademark did not return a call seeking comment Feb. 24. The team also argues that canceling the trademark after decades of lawful registration amounts due a denial of due process because of the difficulty in trying to defend itself so many years after the fact. A hearing on the issue is scheduled for May 5.
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Senior Reporter
02/28/2015 08:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – In a Feb. 13 letter, Cherokee Nation Attorney General Todd Hembree informed Tribal Councilor Lee Keener that he could not use the Cherokee Nation-owned Tribal Council photograph of himself in his campaign materials for deputy chief. “It has come to the attention of the Office of the Attorney General that you have used tribal property for campaign purposes,” Hembree writes. “On numerous political advertisements, letters and emails you have used a photograph of yourself that was paid for by the Cherokee Nation Tribal Council and is currently owned by the Cherokee Nation. Much like council stationary, tribal vehicles or other tribal equipment, pictures owned by the Nation cannot be used in campaign efforts.” Hembree tells Keener to “cease and desist any use of the photograph in question” and attached the photo for clarification. He also requests that Keener removed the photo from any website, email or any electronic form and that it not be disseminated on printed material. Hembree also states that he sent a courtesy copy of the letter to the rest of the Tribal Council to “ensure that all officials are aware that use of Cherokee Nation owned photographs in campaign materials is prohibited.” Keener told the Cherokee Phoenix he would abide by Hembree’s letter and stop using the photo. “The attorney general alerted me to an issue with a particular picture we were using on campaign materials. I am happy to comply and will cease using the photo,” Keener said. Hembree said a CN citizen brought Keener’s use of the official photograph to his attention. <a href="http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/Docs/2015/2/8982_nws_150219_Keener2.pdf" target="_blank">Click here to read</a> Attorney General Todd Hembree’s letter to Keener.