http://www.cherokeephoenix.orgPrincipal Chief Bill John Baker receives a gift from Society of American Indian Government Employees Chairwoman Fredericka Joseph on behalf of the organization for the tribe’s support on June 7 at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa in Catoosa, Oklahoma. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Principal Chief Bill John Baker receives a gift from Society of American Indian Government Employees Chairwoman Fredericka Joseph on behalf of the organization for the tribe’s support on June 7 at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa in Catoosa, Oklahoma. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

SAIGE promotes recruitment, advancement of Natives

Cherokee Nation citizen Brian Barlow asks a question during the Society of American Indian Government Employees annual conference on June 7 at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Catoosa, Oklahoma. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee Nation citizen Brian Barlow asks a question during the Society of American Indian Government Employees annual conference on June 7 at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Catoosa, Oklahoma. JAMI MURPHY/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
BY JAMI MURPHY
Former Reporter
06/14/2016 08:15 AM
CATOOSA, Okla. – The Society of American Indian Government Employees held its annual conference June 6-9 at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa where the organization promoted the recruitment, retention, development and advancement of American Indian and Alaska Native government employees.

According to its website, SAIGE is a national nonprofit organization representing American Indian and Alaska Native employees of federal, tribal, state and local governments. It also provides a forum on the issues, challenges and opportunities of those employees and fosters a professional network among them.

SAIGE Chairwoman Fredericka Joseph, a Kaw Nation citizen with Cherokee decent, said the organization also supports American Indians and Alaska Natives being hired in the federal workforce.

“We look at them being hired into the workforce as well as promoted up into programs and into grades that they can make a difference in what happens to our tribes in terms of impacts with policies and that type of thing,” she said.

SAIGE also has veterans and youth programs, with the youth program providing leadership training.

“So we really value our youth. They are the heartbeat of the organization. And then we honor out veterans as well,” she said.

Joseph said during the conference there were several tracks or sessions that attendees could learn from to take information back to their respective communities.

“We have federal Indian law. We have EEOHR (equal employment opportunity). We have professional track. We have natural resources, and we have cultural diversity pieces. We found that being able to give tracks to different people that work in different fields, that they’re able to get more information and learn different things from the trainers that come in here,” she said. “We also look at how we can honor that federal trust responsibility for our agencies and that they should be respecting that government-to-government relationships, so that’s part of our training as well.”

CN citizen Brian Barlow, who’s originally from Tahlequah and a graduate of George Washington University in Washington, D.C., said he was invited to attend SAIGE after his freshmen year of college.

“I had just finished my freshman year at the University of Arkansas, and I received the Gates (Millennium) scholarship my senior year (of high school), and (had) a lot of people in my life pushing me to go further. And so my dad convinced me to apply to school in D.C., and I didn’t think I’d get in and I got in and I had to go. So SAIGE really gave me a lot of the confidence I needed to say ‘well there are Native people there in D.C. and there are people trying to do good things there, and I think I can really find a place where I’ll be comfortable and be happy there,’ so that really helped me,” Barlow said.

He said he continued attending SAIGE conferences to meet different types of people.

“Being here from Tahlequah, sure, you can meet people from Creek Nation, Comanche, Choctaw, Chickasaw and western tribes like Apache and Cheyenne Arapaho, but meeting tribes over there in New Mexico, just meeting all kinds of new people is the best part about SAIGE,” he said. “It really is a blessing to get to learn about other Native peoples because we all do things differently. We have overlap, but it’s unique and a blessing to meet all these people striving to make differences in their communities and Indian Country.”

The conference also brought tribal dignitaries, who thanked and voiced support of the work SAIGE does for Indian Country, including Principal Chief Bill John Baker, Creek Nation Chief James Floyd and Osage Nation Chief Geoffrey Standing Bear.

For more information, visit www.saige.org.
ᏣᎳᎩ

ᎦᏚᏌ, ᎣᎦᎳᎰᎹ – Ꮎ Society of American Indian Government Employees ᏥᎾᏅᏛᏁᎰᎢ ᏑᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᏗᏓᏂᎳᏫᎪᎢ ᏗᎭᎷᏱ 6-9 ᎥᎿ Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa, ᎠᎾᏃ Ꮎ ᎤᎾᏓᏡᎬ ᏚᏂᎧᏁᏉᏍᏓᏅ ᏗᎦᏟᏐᏗ, ᏗᏂᏯᏂᎲ, ᎪᏢᏅᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᎠᏂᎩᏍᏙᏗ Ꮎ American Indian ᎠᎴ Alaska Native ᎠᏰᎵ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᏒᎢ ᏧᏂᎶᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ.

ᎠᏏᎳᏕᏫᏒ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ ᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬ, SAIGE ᎥᎿ ᎬᎾᏕᎾ Ꮭ ᎠᏕᎳ ᎪᏢᏍᎦ ᎤᎾᏓᏡᎦ ᎤᏅᏌ ᎤᎾᏓᏓᏅᏒ American Indian ᎠᎴ Alaska Natives ᏧᏂᎶᏫᏍᏓᏁ Ꮎ ᏂᎬᎾᏛ ᎠᏰᎵ, ᏗᏂᎳᏍᏓᎸ, ᏍᎦᏚᎦ ᎠᎴ ᎡᏍᎦᎾ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏚᏙᏢᏒᎢ. ᏃᎴ ᎠᎵᏍᏕᎵᏍᎪ ᎧᏃᎮᏢᏍᎬ Ꮎ ᏗᏯᏙᎯᎢ, ᏯᏓᏁᎵᏙᏓ ᎠᎴ ᏗᏓᎵᏍᎪᎸᏓᏁᏗᎢ ᎥᎿ ᏧᏂᎶᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎵᏍᏕᎵᏗᎰ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎢᏯᏛᏁᎯ ᏧᎾᏚᏓᎳ ᎤᎾᎵᏧᏴᎢ.

SAIGE ᎠᎨᏯ ᏗᏓᏘᎿᎢ, Fredricka Joseph, Ꭷ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ ᎨᎳ ᏃᎴ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎤᎵᎶᎯᏗᏙᎳᎩ ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᎤᎾᏓᏡᎬ ᏃᎴ ᎤᏂᎫᏍᏓᎣᎢ American Indians ᎠᎴ Alaska Natives ᏗᎨᏥᎾᏢᏍᎬᎢ ᎥᎿ ᏂᎬᎾᏛ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏗᎦᎶᏫᏍᏓᏁᏗ. “ ᏕᎨᏥᎾᏢᏍᎬ ᏙᏥᎪᏫᏘᎰ ᏃᎴ ᎨᎦᎵᏒᎵᏛᏅᎢ ᎥᎿ ᏚᎾᏙᏢᏒ ᎠᎴ ᏧᏂᏅᏍᏗ ᏧᏂᏅᏗ ᎾᎮᏃ ᏄᏓᎴ ᏱᎾᏅᎦ Ꮎ ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏓᏂᏙᎲ ᎥᎿ ᏗᎦᏤᎵ ᏕᎩᎳᏍᏓᎸᎢ Ꮎ ᏓᏓᎴᏂᏍᎬ Ꮎ ᏓᏓᏛᎾᏍᏗᏍᎬ ᏚᎵᎪᏒ ᏗᎳᏏᏙᏗ ᎠᎴ Ꮎ ᎥᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ” ᎤᏛᏅ.

SAIGE ᏃᎴ ᏚᏃᏢ ᎠᏂᏲᏍᎩ ᎤᏁᏙᎸ ᎠᎴ ᎩᎠ ᏗᎾᏛᏍᎩ ᏚᎾᏓᏡᎬᎢ, Ꮎ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ ᎤᎾᏓᏡᎬ ᎠᏓᏍᏕᎵᏍᎬ ᎠᎬᏱ ᎠᏓᏘᏂᏙᎯ ᎠᎾᎵᏏᎾᏍᏗᎲᎢ. “ᎤᏙᎯᏳᏃ ᏧᏂᎬᏩᎶᏗ ᎥᎿ ᎩᎳ ᏗᎾᏛᏍᎩ. ᎥᏍᎩᎾ ᎤᎾᏙᎯᏳ ᎥᎿ ᎤᎾᏓᏡᎬᎢ. ᎠᎴ ᏙᏣᎮᎵᏍᏗᏍᎪᎢ ᎠᏂᏲᏍᎩ ᎤᏁᏙᎸᎢ ᎥᏍᏊ.” ᎤᏛᏅᎢ.

Joseph ᏃᎴ ᎤᏛᏅ, ᎾᎯᏳ ᏥᏓᏂᎳᏫᎬ, ᎢᎦᏓ ᏗᏍᏓᏫᏛᏍᏗ ᎠᎴᏱᎩ Ꮎ ᏗᏂᎳᏫᏗᏍᎩ ᎡᎷᏊ ᏯᎾᏕᏠᎩ ᎨᏥᏃᎮᏎᎸᏅ ᎤᏂᏫᏓ ᎥᎿ ᎤᏂᏙᎯᏳᏌᏛᎢ ᏍᎦᏚᎩᎢ.

“ᏗᎧᏅᏩᏛᏍᏓᏅ ᏂᎬᎾᏛ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏙᎩᎭ. ᎣᎩᎭ EEOHR (equal emplyment opportunity). ᎣᎩᎭ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎢᏯᏛᏁᎯ ᎠᏍᏓᏫᏗᏅᏍᏗ. ᏙᎩᎭ ᏂᎬᏩᏍᏛ ᏧᎬᏩᎶᏗ ᎦᎷᎩ, ᎠᎴ ᏙᎩᎭ ᏧᏓᎴᏅᏓ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᎦᏟᏏᏍᏗ. ᎣᎦᏕᎸᎰᏒ Ꮎ ᏧᏓᎴᏅᏓ ᏴᏫ ᏱᏙᏥᏁ ᏗᏍᏓᏫᏛᏍᏗ Ꮎ ᏧᏓᎴᏅᏓ ᏧᏂᎶᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᏓᏁᏙᎲᎢ, ᎡᎷᏊ ᎤᎪᏓ ᏯᏂᎩᏏᏓ ᎧᏃᎮᏓ ᎠᎴ ᏯᎾᏕᏠᎩ ᏧᏓᎴᏅᏓ ᏗᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎩ ᏚᏂᏪᏲᎲᏍᎬᎢ ᏳᏁᏙᎳ”, ᎤᏛᏅ. ᏃᎴ ᎣᎩᎦᏛᎲᏍᎪ ᎦᏙ ᎣᎦᏛᏂᏗ ᏙᏥᎸᏉᏙᏗ Ꮎ ᏂᎬᎾᏛ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎰᏩ ᎠᏰᎸᏗ ᎤᎾᏚᏓᎸᎢ ᏙᎦᏤᎵ ᏙᏥᏅᏍᏓᏅ ᎠᎴ ᏓᎾᎴᎮᎵᏍᏗᏍᎨᏍᏗ Ꮎ ᏂᎬᎾᏛ ᎠᏰᎵ -ᎥᎿ-ᏂᎬᎾᏛ ᎠᏰᎵ ᏗᎾᏓᏙᎵᎩ, ᎾᎮᏃ ᎥᏍᎩᎾᏍᏊ ᏗᏙᏣᏕᎶᏆᏍᎪᎢ”. CN ᎨᎳ, Brian Barlow, ᏓᎷᏈ ᎤᏙᎯᏳᎨᏒ ᏓᏳᎶᏒ ᎠᎴ ᏧᏍᏆᏓ ᎥᎿ George Washington University Ꮎ ᏩᏒᏓᏂ D.C., ᎤᏛᏅ, ᎠᏥᏯᏅ ᎤᏪᏓᏍᏗ SAIGE ᎤᏍᏆᏙᎾ ᎠᎬᏱ ᎠᎴᏂᏍᎩ Ꮎ ᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᏗᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ.

ᎩᎳ ᎠᎬᏱ ᏗᏕᎶᏆᏍᏙᏗ ᏗᎦᏍᏆᏛ ᎨᏒ ᎥᎿ University of Arkansas, ᎠᏩᏓᏌᏅ ᎨᏒ Gates (Millenium) ᏗᏕᎶᏆᏍᏙᏗ Ꮎ ᏗᏥᏆᏗᏍᎬ (high school), ᎠᎴ ᏴᏫ ᎬᎩᏍᏗᏰᏗᏍᎬ Ꮟ ᎭᎢᏎᏍᏗ ᎬᏬᏎᎲᎢ. ᎡᏙᏓᏃ ᎠᎦᏍᏗᏰᏓᏅ ᎪᏪᎳ ᏗᎧᎵᏐᏓ ᎥᎿ D.C., Ꮭ ᏯᏩᏓᏴᏎᎴᎢ ᎨᎵᏍᎬ, ᎠᏎᏃ ᎠᏩᏓᏴᏎᎴᎢ, ᎠᏎᏃ ᎠᏪᏅᏍᏓ ᏄᎵᏍᏓᏅᎢ. Ꮎ SAIGE ᎤᏙᎯᏳ ᎰᏩ ᏂᎬᏭᏂᏎᎸᎢ ᎡᎷᏊ ᏂᎩᏪᏍᏓ, “ᎭᏩ ᎡᎷᏊ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯ ᎠᏁᎭ ᎥᎿ D.C., ᎠᎴ ᏴᏫ ᎠᏁᎭ ᎠᎾᏁᎵᏗ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏳᎾᏛᏁᏗᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎡᎷᏊ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᏱᏏᏩᏔ Ꮎ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎠᎩᏰᎸᏅᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎥᎿ ᏱᎦᎴᎮᎵᏍᏓ,” ᎥᏍᎩᎾ ᎤᏙᎯᏳ ᎠᎦᏍᏕᎸᎲᎢ,” Barlow ᎤᏛᏅᎢ.

ᎤᏛᏅ ᏃᎴ, Ꮟ ᏕᎨᏙᎲ SAIGE ᏱᏚᏂᎳᏫᏥ ᎾᏊᏃ ᎠᏂᏐᎢ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᏧᎾᏠᎯᏍᏗ.

“ᏓᎷᏈ ᏗᎩᎶᏒ ᏥᎩ, ᎡᎷᏊ ᏱᏗᎯᏩᏔ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯ ᎥᎿ ᎠᎫᏐ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ, ᎧᎺᏂᏥ, ᏣᎦᏔ, ᏥᎦᏌ, ᏃᎴ ᎠᏂᏐ ᏭᏕᎵᎬ ᎠᏂᎳᏍᏓᎸ, Ꮎ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎠᏇᏥ ᎠᎴ ᏌᏰᎾ ᎠᎴᏈᎰ, ᎠᏎᏃ ᏙᏣᏠᏍᎬ ᎠᏂᏐᎢ ᏗᎾᎳᏍᏓᎸ ᎥᎿ ᏍᏆᏂ ᏤᏍᏛᎢ, ᏙᏨᏠᏍᎬᏫᏊ ᎠᏂᏐ ᏴᏫ ᎥᏍᎩᎾ ᏫᏓᏤᏢᎢ Ꮎ SAIGE.” ᎤᏛᏅᎢ. “ᏙᏳᏃ ᎠᎵᎮᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎠᏂᏐ ᏄᎾᏍᏛ ᎠᏂᎦᏰᎯᏯ, ᎾᎮᏃ ᏄᏓᎴᏏᏅᏊ ᏃᏣᏛᏁᎵᏙᎰᎢ. ᎤᏠᏱ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᏃᎦᏛᏃᎢ, ᎠᏎᏃ ᎤᎵᏍᏆᏂᎦᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎵᎮᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᏗᎪᎵᏍᏓ ᎥᎿ ᏴᏫ Ꮎ ᏣᏂᎦᏙ ᏓᏤᏢ ᏄᏅᏂᏗ ᏧᎾᏤᎵ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏴᏫᏯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎤᏙᏢᏒᎢ”

Ꮎ ᏗᏓᏂᎳᏫᎪ ᏃᎴ ᎠᏂᏐ ᏗᎦᎨᏑᏰᏓ ᏚᏂᎷᏨᎢ, ᏚᎾᎵᎮᎵᏍᏓᏅ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏂᏬᏂᏒ Ꮎ ᎠᏂᎫᏍᏛᏍᎬ ᏚᏂᎶᏫᏍᏓᏁᎲᎢ Ꮎ SAIGE ᏥᎾᏅᏛᏁᎰᎢ ᏗᏍᏕᎵᏗ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯ ᏍᎦᏚᎩᎢ, Ꮎ ᎨᏥᏠᏯᏍᏗᎲ ᎤᎬᏫᏳᎯ Bill John Baker, ᎫᏐ ᎠᏰᏟ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ ᎤᎬᏫᏳᎯ James Floyd ᎠᎴ ᎠᎦᏌᏌ ᎠᏰᏟ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ ᎤᎬᏫᏳᎯ Geoffrey Standing Bear.

ᎤᎪᏓ ᏣᏕᎶᎰᏍᏗ ᏱᎩ ᏪᏓ: www. saige.org

News

BY STAFF REPORTS
06/18/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH –The applications for the Cherokee Nation’s Miss Cherokee, Junior Miss Cherokee and Little Cherokee Ambassadors are now available for download. To download an application, visit <a href="http://www.cherokee.org/Services/Education/Cherokee-Ambassadors" target="_blank">http://www.cherokee.org/Services/Education/Cherokee-Ambassadors</a>. The deadline for all competition applications is July 16. For more information, call Lisa Trice-Turtle at 918-453-5000, ext. 4991.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
06/16/2018 02:00 PM
LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — A husband and wife who don't want the proposed Keystone XL pipeline to run through their farm have deeded a plot of their land over to a Native American tribe, creating a potential roadblock for the project. Art and Helen Tanderup signed over a 1.6-acre plot of land to the Ponca Indian Tribe on Sunday. The Ponca enjoy special legal status as a federally recognized tribe. The land has been used as a planting space for sacred Ponca corn for the last five years, and it was chosen in part because it sits on the $8 billion pipeline's proposed route. It's also part of the historic route that Ponca tribe members were forced to take when the U.S. government relocated them to present-day Oklahoma in 1877.
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
06/16/2018 10:00 AM
PIERRE, S.D. (AP) — South Dakota's Supreme Court this week dismissed an appeal from opponents of the Keystone XL oil pipeline, saying a lower court lacked jurisdiction to hear their cases. But an attorney battling the project says the "fight is not over." Groups fighting TransCanada Corp.'s pipeline appealed a judge's decision last year upholding regulators' approval for the pipeline to cross the state. But the high court said in a Wednesday ruling that justices didn't "reach the merits of the case" because the lower court didn't have jurisdiction to weigh the appeal of the Public Utilities Commission's decision. Robin Martinez, an attorney for conservation and family agriculture group Dakota Rural Action, on Thursday called the high court's decision "disappointing," but said "this fight is not over." Martinez said the organization, one of the appellants, is regrouping and evaluating its options. "That's really disappointing that the court didn't reach the merits, because the risk to South Dakota's land and water resources is clearly there," Martinez said. "It's a shame that that did not get a closer look by the court." TransCanada spokesman Terry Cunha said in an email that the pipeline developer is pleased with the court's decision. Keystone XL would cost an estimated $8 billion. The 1,179-mile pipeline would transport up to 830,000 barrels a day of Canadian crude through Montana and South Dakota to Nebraska, where it would connect with lines to carry oil to Gulf Coast refineries. TransCanada announced in April it was meeting with landowners and starting aerial surveillance of the proposed route. The company hopes to begin construction in early 2019. The Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe, Yankton Sioux Tribe and conservation and family agriculture group Dakota Rural Action appealed to the South Dakota high court after a judge had affirmed state regulators' approval for the pipeline. The Public Utilities Commission initially authorized TransCanada's project in 2010, but the permit had to be revisited because construction didn't start within the required four years. The panel voted in 2016 to accept TransCanada's guarantee that it would meet all conditions laid out by the commission when it first approved that state's portion of the project. Cunha said the company is working to get needed land easements for the pipeline in Nebraska. But Nebraska landowners have filed a lawsuit challenging the Nebraska Public Service Commission's decision to approve a route through the state. Separately in Nebraska, a husband and wife who don't want the proposed Keystone XL pipeline to run through their farm this week deeded a plot of their land to a Native American tribe, creating a potential roadblock for the project. Art and Helen Tanderup signed over a 1.6-acre plot of land to the Ponca Indian Tribe on Sunday. The Ponca enjoy special legal status as a federally recognized tribe. The land has been used as a planting space for sacred Ponca corn for the last five years, and it was chosen in part because it sits on the $8 billion pipeline's proposed route. It's also part of the historic Ponca route that tribe members were forced to take when the U.S. government relocated them to present-day Oklahoma in 1877. "What the impact will be, I don't know," Tanderup said. "But now, they'll have a voice in this issue. They will be a player at the table." It's not clear whether deeding the land to the tribe would hinder the company or create a new legal argument for the Ponca, given their status as a federally recognized Indian tribe. Brad Jolly, an attorney for the Ponca Tribe of Nebraska, said he was focusing more on overturning state regulators' approval of the pipeline in a case pending before the Nebraska Supreme Court. "I haven't gotten to all the what-ifs yet," Jolly said. The Keystone pipeline also faces a potential obstacle in a federal lawsuit brought by Montana landowners and environmental groups seeks to overturn President Donald Trump's decision to grant a presidential permit for the project.
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/15/2018 04:00 PM
CALHOUN, Ga. – The next meeting of the Georgia Chapter of the Trail of Tears Association is set for 10:30 a.m. on July 14 at the Gordon County Historical Society at 345 S. Wall St. This is part three of the chapter’s remembrance of the 180th anniversary of the Cherokee removal. “The Journey To Indian Country” will be presented by past chapter president W. Jeff Bishop. The meeting is free and open to the public. The Trail of Tears Association was created to support the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail established by an act of Congress in 1987. The TOTA is dedicated to identifying and preserving sites associated with the removal of Native Americans from the southeastern United States. The Georgia TOTA chapter is one of nine state chapters representing the nine states that the Cherokee and other tribes traveled through on their way to Indian Territory (now Oklahoma). People need not have Native American ancestry to attend GATOTA meetings, just an interest and desire to learn more about this tragic period in this country’s history. For more information about the May GCTOTA meeting, email Walter Knapp at <a href="mailto: walt@wjkwrites.com">walt@wjkwrites.com</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/15/2018 08:15 AM
OOLOGAH – The Will Rogers & Wiley Post Fly-In starts at 7:30 a.m. on Aug. 11 at the Will Rogers Birthplace Ranch. Planes will begin landing at 7:30 a.m. on a 2,000-foot grass airstrip next to the ranch located at 9501 E. 380 Road. Admission is free, and there is ample parking. The annual event celebrates aviation and marks the anniversary of Will and Wiley’s Aug. 15, 1935, deaths in Alaska due to a plane crash. A moment of remembrance will be observed at 10 a.m. honoring those who have died in small plane crashes and lapel pins will be presented especially designed in tribute to crash victims Vintage aircraft, World War I fighters, experimental planes, bi-planes, helicopters and fly-overs are all part of the event as well as food and concessions, antique and classic cars, a Cherokee storyteller and kids’ activities. Special tribute will be paid to Dr. Bill Kinsinger, who departed Wiley Post Airport in Oklahoma City in January on an animal rescue mission for Pilots N Paws to Georgetown, Texas, but never reached his destination. After being spotted on radar headed into the Gulf of Mexico, it was reported by searchers, “the pilot was slouched over and appeared unconscious.” Members of Dr. Kinsinger’s family will be on hand to receive a lapel pin. Attendees are encouraged to bring lawn chairs. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.willrogers.com" target="_blank">www.willrogers.com</a> or call 918-341-0719.
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/14/2018 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Nation will commemorate the 175th anniversary of the 1843 intertribal peace gathering with the June 20 opening of a new pavilion, located east of the Cherokee National Capitol. The pavilion’s design pays tribute to the gathering by interpreting the look of the large log structure that hosted what former Principal Chief William P. Ross called “the most important Indian council ever held on the American continent.” “Chief John Ross saw the need for tribal governments to come together and stand united on issues that would ensure the survival of Native people,” Principal Chief Bill John Baker said. “We hope this pavilion will serve as a reminder of that sacred event and of the power we yield when we unify our Native voice in an effort to preserve, promote and protect our cultural identities.” A ribbon-cutting ceremony will take place at 12:30 p.m. with special guests from the annual Cherokee Tri-Council meeting. The celebration will include performances by the Cherokee National Youth Choir and a hog fry lunch that is open to the public. In addition to opening the pavilion, Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism is hosting an exhibit about the historical event at the Cherokee National Supreme Court Museum through November 2019. The exhibit provides a deeper look at the momentous gathering, including who attended and what was discussed. The Cherokee National Supreme Court Museum is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday to Saturday and is at 122 E. Keetoowah St.