http://www.cherokeephoenix.orgThe Gates Millennium Scholars Program funded Cherokee Nation citizen Felicia Manning’s 2016 study abroad trip to Mossel Bay, South Africa. She interned with Oceans Research, an organization that studies marine wildlife in an effort to manage and conserve South African wildlife. COURTESY
The Gates Millennium Scholars Program funded Cherokee Nation citizen Felicia Manning’s 2016 study abroad trip to Mossel Bay, South Africa. She interned with Oceans Research, an organization that studies marine wildlife in an effort to manage and conserve South African wildlife. COURTESY

Cherokee Gates scholars reflect on program’s influence

Cherokee Nation citizen Wrighter Weavel, 20, received the Gates Millennium Scholarship in 2015 and plans to transfer to the University of Oklahoma to complete his undergraduate studies. COURTESY Gates Millennium Scholarship recipient and United Keetoowah Band citizen Corey Still, 26, graduated from the University of Oklahoma in 2013 with a bachelor's in Native American Studies with an emphasis in education. COURTESY
Cherokee Nation citizen Wrighter Weavel, 20, received the Gates Millennium Scholarship in 2015 and plans to transfer to the University of Oklahoma to complete his undergraduate studies. COURTESY
BY BRITTNEY BENNETT
Reporter – @cp_bbennett
06/16/2017 09:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – It has been more than a year since the last cohort for the Gates Millennium Scholars Program was announced, giving several Cherokee recipients time to reflect on the scholarship’s legacy and impact it has made on their lives.

“It was just a huge, huge blessing,” Felicia Manning said.

Manning is one of 326 Cherokees who are citizens of the three federally recognized Cherokee tribes to receive the scholarship during the program’s 16-year run, according to the American Indian Graduate Center, which oversees the GMSP.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation created the program in 2000. It funds any undergraduate study area and seven graduate study areas: computer science, education, engineering, library science, mathematics, public health and science.

A 2010 scholarship selection, Manning recently completed her first year of graduate study in marine science at Jacksonville University in Jacksonville, Florida.

The program also funded Manning’s 2016 study abroad trip to Mossel Bay, South Africa. While there she tagged sharks with Oceans Research, an organization dedicated to Southern African wildlife management and conservation via marine research.

“That’s a group that I had been following for a long time,” Manning said. “The fact that they actually picked my school, and I’m partnered with them and I get to do my thesis work with them, that has just been so awesome. Gates (scholarship) definitely helped pave the way for me to do that.”

The scholarship is also paving a better future for Wrighter Weavel, 20, a 2015 recipient.

“I wasn’t even going to go to college, but when I found out that I got Gates, that opened so many opportunities for me to go anywhere I want, to experience any life, any culture in the entire United States,” he said.

Weavel said he plans to transfer to the University of Oklahoma to complete his undergraduate studies in education or medicine, with an overall goal to obtain a doctorate.

“I want to get my Ph.D. and I want to be called Dr. Weavel because I have a plan,” he said. “I want to have little ones, and I want them to look at me and see where I came from and to understand that it doesn’t matter the background you have, if you want to do something, you can do whatever you set your mind to.”

Weavel said he has also benefited from the scholarship beyond financial assistance.

“They offer mentors, which the mentors are a huge help,” he said. “They really help expand your mind on exactly what the scholarship can do for you.”

Weavel’s mentor is Corey Still, 26, a United Keetoowah Band citizen who received the scholarship in 2009.

Though initially interested in business and law, Still is now obtaining a doctorate in adult and higher education at OU.

“I really began to fall in love with this idea of education and how we can help our communities through education,” he said. “I really wanted to be able to help other people and especially other students.”

Still said he looks forward to joining the few Native American men with doctorates, which he decided to pursue because of the “faith” the GMSP puts into its scholars. “Whether they know it or not, that by selecting us as scholars and putting a little bit of faith into us, we’re going to go out and make something with those scholarships and with those degrees, that we’re going to make some type of impact within our community or greater society.”

Still serves on the Gates Millennium Alumni Advisory Council as the American Indian Graduate Center liaison and said he appreciates the “communal and family ties” the GMSP creates. “You really see the impact this scholarship has, and not just within Indian Country, because the scholarship itself is for minority students in under-represented fields. And so you really see the connections that are created across cultural barriers and across the country and it really does become a family.”

Of the Cherokee recipients, 313 are CN citizens, eight are UKB citizens and five are Eastern Band citizens.

In its 16 years, the GMSP funded more than 20,000 scholars and awarded more than $934 million in scholarship funds. The program ended in 2016, but the Hispanic Scholarship Fund manages a new version.

Editor’s Note: Reporter Brittney Bennett is a 2011 Gates Millennium Scholarship recipient.
ᏣᎳᎩ

ᏓᎵᏆ, ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ. – ᎤᎪᏓ ᎠᎪᎯᎸ ᎾᏃ ᏑᎶᏘᏴᏓᎾᏍᎩ ᎣᏂ ᎤᎾᏓᏢᎩ ᎠᏂᎦᏟᏯ ᎨᏒ ᎤᎾᏚᎵᏍᎩ Gates Millennium Scholars Program ᎤᏂᏃᎮᏢ, ᏓᏂᏅᏁᎲ ᎢᎸᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏁᏍᎦ ᏄᏍᏛ ᎾᏁᎵᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏙᏗ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏂᏙᎸ ᎠᎴ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅ ᏓᎾᎴᏂᏙᎲᎢ.

“ᎢᎦᏃ ᎤᏔᎾ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎠᏰᎸᏓ ᎨᏒᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Felicia Manning.

Manning ᎾᏍᎩ ᏌᏊ ᎾᏍᎩ 326 ᎾᏂᎥ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏁᎳ ᎾᎿ ᏦᎢ ᏄᎾᏓᏡᎬ ᎨᎪᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎾᏂᎳᏍᏓᏢ ᏗᎬᏩᏂᏁᏍᏗ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏙᏗ ᎬᏩᏂᏍᏕᎸᏙᏗ ᏧᏂᏁᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏓᎳᏚ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᏂᎦᏯᎢᏐᎢ, ᎾᏂᏪᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎹᎵᎧ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯ ᏗᏂᏍᏆᏗᏍᎩ ᎠᏰᏟ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᎦᏎᏍᏙᏗ GMSP.

ᎾᏍᎩ Bill ᎠᎴ Melinda Gates Foundation ᎤᏬᏢᏅ ᎯᎠ ᎬᏩᎾᎵᏍᏕᎸᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩ ᏚᏂᎲ ᎠᏕᎳ ᎾᎿ Ꮭ ᏧᏍᏆᏛ ᏱᎩ ᎤᎾᎦᏎᏍᏔᏅᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎦᎵᏉᎩ ᏗᏂᏍᏆᏗᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᎦᏎᏍᏙᏗ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ: ᎯᎠ ᏥᏕᎪᏪᎵ ᎤᎾᎦᏎᏍᏙᏗᎢ computer science, ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ, engineering, library science, ᏗᏎᏍᏗᏅ, public health and science.

ᎾᎿ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏍᎪᎯ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᏧᎾᏑᏰᏓ, Manning ᎾᏝᎬ ᏚᏍᏆᏛ ᎢᎬᏱ ᏑᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎨᏒ ᎤᎦᏎᏍᏩᏛᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ Marine science ᎾᎿ Jacksonville University ᎾᎿ Jacksonville, Florida.

ᎯᎠ ᎤᏙᏢᏅ ᎾᎿ ᎬᏩᎾᎵᏍᏕᎸᏙᏗ Manning ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏓᎳᏚ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ ᎤᎾᎦᏎᏍᏗ ᏭᏁᏙᎸ ᎾᏍᎩ Mossel Bay, South Africa. ᎾᎿ ᏪᏙᎲ ᏚᏬᏪᎳᏅ ᎯᎠ sharks ᎾᎿ ᎠᎻᏉ ᎤᏂᏯᎸᏍᎩ, ᎯᎠ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ Southern African ᎢᎾᎨ ᎡᎾᎢ ᎤᎾᎦᏎᏍᏗᏕᎦ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎾᎦᏎᏍᏔᏅ ᏄᏍᏗᏓᏅ via marine ᎤᏂᏯᎸᏍᎨᎢ.

“ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᎤᎾᏓᏡᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎦᏥᏍᏓᏩᏗᏙᎲ ᎪᎯᏓ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Manning. “ᎾᏍᏳᏃ ᎯᎠ ᏧᎾᏑᏰᏒ ᏗᏆᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᏥᏙᎩᎾᏦᎸᏔᏅ ᎠᎴ ᎡᎵᏊ ᏃᎬᏁᎸ thesis ᏂᎦᏓ, ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎢᎦᎢ ᎠᏆᎵᎮᎵᏨᎢ. Gates (scholarship) ᎤᏙᎯᏳ ᎬᎩᏍᏕᎸᎲ ᎾᎿ ᎢᎬᏁᎸ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏆᏚᎵᏍᎬᎢ.”

ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᏕᎶᏆᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏓᏤᏢ ᏫᏥᎦᏛᎢ ᎾᎿ Wrighter Weavel, 20, ᎾᏍᎩ 2015 ᎤᏁᏍᏗᎢ.

“ ᏝᏃ ᏱᏙᏛᎦᏕᎶᏆᎢᏎ ᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ, ᎠᏎᏃ ᏣᏆᏕᎶᎰᏒ ᎠᎩᏁᏒ Gates, ᎾᎿ ᎤᎵᏍᏚᎢᏒ ᏓᏝᏅᏓᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᏇᏅᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏆᏚᎵᏍᎬ, ᎾᎿ ᎠᎩᎦᏙᎢᎲᏍᏗ ᎦᎴᏂᏙᎲᎢ, ᏧᏓᎴᏅᏓ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᎠᏂᏴᏫ ᎠᎯᎲᎢ ᎠᎹᏱᏟ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

Weavel ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᏚᏭᎪᏛ ᎤᏁᏟᏴᏍᏗ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ University of Oklahoma ᏧᏍᏆᏗᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᎦᏎᏍᏙᏗ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ Ꮟ ᎤᏁᏓ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᎢᎬᏱ ᎤᏁᏍᏓ ᎨᏒᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎤᎬᏩᏟ ᎠᎴ ᏅᏬᏘ, ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎨᏒ a doctorate.

“ᎠᏆᏚᎵ ᎠᎩᏁᏍᏗ Ph.D. ᎠᎴ ᎠᏆᏚᎵ ᎬᎩᏯᏅᏙᏗ Dr. Weavel ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᏓᏊᎪᏓ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ᎠᏆᏚᎵ ᏗᏂᏲᏟ ᏗᎩᎧᎯ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗ, ᎠᎴ ᏗᎬᎩᎧᏃᏗ ᏃᎴ ᎤᎾᏅᏘ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᏳ ᏂᏛᏆᏓᎴᏅ ᎨᏒ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏃᏟᏗ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᎨᏒ ᎾᎿ ᏂᏓᏣᏓᎴᏅ ᎨᏒᎢ, ᎢᏳᏃ ᏱᏣᏚᎵ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᎢᏣᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᏱᎾᏛᎦ.”

Weavel ᎤᏘᏂᏙᎯ ᎾᏍᎩ Corey Still, ᏔᎵᏍᎪ ᏑᏓᎵ ᏳᏕᏘᏴᏓ, ᎠᏂᎩᏚᏩᎩ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯ ᎩᎳ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏁᏎ ᎠᎴ ᏚᎩᏎ ᏧᏕᎶᏆᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏐᏁᎳ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ.

ᎠᏓᏅᏖᏍᎬ ᎯᎠ ᎢᏳᏛᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎧᎾᏩᏛᏍᏗ, Still ᏃᏊ ᏓᏕᎶᏆᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ doctorate ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᎿ ᏧᎾᏔᏂ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎦᎸᎳᏗᏴ ᏗᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎾᎿ OU.

“ᏙᎯᏳ ᏥᎸᏉᏗᏍᎪ ᎾᏍᎩᎾ ᎦᏓᏅᏖᏍᎬ ᏗᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎢᎦ ᏗᎬᏍᏕᎸᏗ ᎨᏒ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎾᎿ ᏗᏕᏲᏗ ᏗᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ᏙᎯᏳ ᏯᏆᏚᎵ ᎡᎵ ᏯᏆᏛᏗ ᎠᏂᏐᎢ ᎦᎦᏥᏍᏕᎸᏗ ᎨᏒᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏐᎢ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ.”

Still ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᎦᏖᏃᎯ ᏧᏖᎳᏕᏗ ᎠᏂᎦᏲᏟ ᎠᏂᎯᏯ ᎠᎹᏱᏟ ᎠᏁᎯ ᎠᏂᏍᎦᏯ ᎾᏍᎩ doctorates ᏧᏂᎾᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏠᏯ ᎾᏍᏊ ᎠᏁᎶᏗ ᎤᏁᏍᏗᎢ ᎾᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ “ᎤᏬᎯᏳᏒᎢ” ᎾᏍᎩ GMSP ᏧᏢᏗ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏙᏗ. “ᎢᏳᏃ ᏳᎾᏅᏘ ᎠᎴ ᏝᏱᎩ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏑᏰᏍᎬ ᏗᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎪᎪᎯᏳᎲᏍᎬ, ᏓᏲᏣᏂᎩᏏ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᎣᏍᏗ ᏗᎬᏙᏗ ᏂᏙᏓᏲᏨᏁᎵ ᎯᎠ ᏙᏣᏕᎶᏆᏍᎬ, ᎠᎴ ᏗᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᏚᏙᏢᏒ ᏓᏲᏣᏁᎶᏔᏂ ᏄᏓᎴ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎪᏛ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎢᏧᎵᏍᏙᏗᎢ.”

Still ᏓᏍᏕᎵᏍᎪ ᎾᎿ Gates Millennium Alumni Advisory Council ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᎠᎹᎵᎧ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯ ᏗᏂᏍᏆᏗᏍᎩ ᎠᏰᏟ liaison ᎠᎴ ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᎵᎮᎵᎪ ᎾᏍᎩ “ᏴᏫ ᏓᏁᎲ ᎠᎴ ᏏᏓᏁᎸ ᏚᎾᏓᏂᏴᏛ” ᎾᏍᎩ GMSP ᎪᏢᏍᎬᎢ. “ᏂᎯᏃ ᏙᎦᏳ ᎢᏥᎪᏩᏘᏍᎪ ᎯᎠ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏙᏗ ᎣᏍᏓ ᎨᏒ, ᎠᎴ Ꮭ ᏙᎯᏳ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯ ᎢᎦ ᎠᏁᎲᎢ, ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᏗᏕᎶᏆᏍᏙᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᎦᏲᏢ ᎢᏗᏝ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᏓᏁᎲᎢ ᎰᏩ ᎾᎾᏛᎩᏍᎬᎾ. ᎢᏗᎪᏩᏘᏃ ᏓᏓᏂᏴᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᎬᏩᎾᏗᏫᏍᏗ ᏓᏁᎲ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗ ᏚᏓᎴᎾᎥ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎬᏩᎾᏗᏫᏍᏗ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ ᎠᎴ ᏙᎯᏳ ᏏᏓᏁᎸ ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗᏍᎪᎢ.”

ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏚᏂᏢᎥ, 313 ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏁᎳ, ᏧᏁᎳ ᎾᏍᎩ UKB ᎠᏁᎳ ᎠᎴ ᎯᏍᎩ ᏯᏂ ᎠᏂᎩᏚᏩᎩ ᎠᏂᏴᏫᏯ ᎠᏁᎳ.

ᎾᏍᎩ ᏓᎳᏚ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ, ᎾᏍᎩ GMSP ᎠᎾᎵᏍᎪᎸᏗᏍᎪ ᎤᎪᏛ ᎾᏃ ᏔᎵᏍᎪ ᎢᎦᏴᎵ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏙᏗ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎨᏥᏅᏁᏗ ᎤᎪᏛ ᎾᏃ 934 ᎢᏳᏆᏗᏅᏓ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏙᏗ ᎠᏕᎳ. ᎯᎠ ᎤᏙᏢᎯ ᎠᏍᏆᏗᏍᎬ ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏓᎳᏚ, ᎠᏎᏃ ᎾᏍᎩ Hispanic Scholarship Fund manges a new version.

Editor’s note: Reporter Brittney Bennett is a 2011 Gates Millennium Scholarship recipient.

About the Author
Brittney Bennett is from Colcord, Oklahoma, and a citizen of the United Keetoowah Band.  She is a 2011 Gates Millennium Scholarship recipient and graduated from the University of Oklahoma in 2015 with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and summa cum laude honors.
 
While in college, Brittney became involved with the Native American Journalists Association and was an inaugural NAJA student fellow in 2014. Continued mentorship from NAJA members and the willingness to give Natives a voice led her to accept a multimedia internship with the Cherokee Phoenix after college.  
 
She left the Cherokee Phoenix in early 2016 before being selected as a Knight-CUNYJ Fellow in New York City later that same year. During the fellowship, she received training from industry professionals with The New York Times and instructors at the City University of New York. As part of the program, she completed a social media internship with USA Today’s editorial department.
 
Now that Brittney has made her way back to the Cherokee Phoenix, she hopes to use the experience gained from her travels to benefit Indian Country and the Cherokee people.
brittney-bennett@cherokee.org • 918-453-5560
Brittney Bennett is from Colcord, Oklahoma, and a citizen of the United Keetoowah Band. She is a 2011 Gates Millennium Scholarship recipient and graduated from the University of Oklahoma in 2015 with a bachelor’s degree in journalism and summa cum laude honors. While in college, Brittney became involved with the Native American Journalists Association and was an inaugural NAJA student fellow in 2014. Continued mentorship from NAJA members and the willingness to give Natives a voice led her to accept a multimedia internship with the Cherokee Phoenix after college. She left the Cherokee Phoenix in early 2016 before being selected as a Knight-CUNYJ Fellow in New York City later that same year. During the fellowship, she received training from industry professionals with The New York Times and instructors at the City University of New York. As part of the program, she completed a social media internship with USA Today’s editorial department. Now that Brittney has made her way back to the Cherokee Phoenix, she hopes to use the experience gained from her travels to benefit Indian Country and the Cherokee people.

Education

BY STAFF REPORTS
02/22/2018 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. — Cherokee Nation Chief of Staff Chuck Hoskin is being honored as one of nine Northeastern State University 2018 Centurions. Centurions are individuals whose leadership and commitment, in the course of helping others, have made a significant impact during NSU’s history. Honors are given to university alumni, faculty, staff, students or any member of the NSU community, past or present, who impacted the NSU community or the public at large. Hoskin graduated from NSU in 1982 with a bachelor’s degree in social sciences and earned his master’s degree in education in 1998. Along with his service to the CN as chief of staff, Hoskin served 12 years on the Tribal Council, between 1995 and 2007, and is now serving his sixth term as an Oklahoma State Representative for Dist. 6. “Like so many Cherokees in northeast Oklahoma, my experience at NSU helped define my personal life, as well as my professional career as an educator and administrator. I am profoundly honored to be recognized as a Centurion by my alma mater, an institution where I earned both undergraduate and graduate degrees,” Hoskin said. “One of the most important lessons I learned at NSU is the value of public education. As a member of the Oklahoma House of Representatives and as a former Cherokee Nation Tribal Councilor, I have endeavored to make life-changing educational opportunities more accessible. I am proud of NSU, whose rich history is tied directly to the education of Cherokee Nation citizens, and hope its mission continues to flourish.” Hoskin is a U.S. Navy veteran and a former Ironworkers Union Local 584 member. He also spent nearly two decades working in public education as a high school teacher and school administrator for Locust Grove Public Schools. As chief of staff, Hoskin oversees Education Services and is an advocate for the tribe’s continued support of NSU. He is a member of the leadership team that contributed funding to restoration and enhancement efforts for NSU’s historic Seminary Hall. “Chuck Hoskin’s selfless devotion to serving others is a model that few of us can match,” NSU President Dr. Steve Turner said. “He continues to impress me with his humility and tireless effort to improve the lives of Cherokee citizens and all Oklahomans. He embodies all the values of an NSU Centurion. I am honored to call him my friend and to participate in the ceremony of recognition for this honor.” Hoskin resides in Vinita with his wife, Stephanie. He has three children, Amy, Chuck Jr. and Amelia, along with three grandchildren. He and eight other new NSU Centurions will be honored during a March 6 luncheon at 11:30 a.m. at the NSU Event Center in Tahlequah. The luncheon is open to the public, and tickets are $25 per person. To reserve a seat, visit <a href="http://www.nsualumni.com/centurions" target="_blank">www.nsualumni.com/centurions</a> or call the NSU president’s office at 918-444-2000.
BY KENLEA HENSON
Reporter
02/20/2018 08:00 AM
MOORE – Cerissa Key, a Cherokee Nation citizen and osteopathic medicine doctor, learned at an early age how much of a difference doctors can make in a child’s life. Now Key is making a difference in children’s lives as a pediatrician. As a child, Key underwent eye surgeries, which sparked her interest in medicine. “I really loved math and science, and I really loved kids, so at first I thought I wanted to be a teacher. Then in high school I joined the pre-med society, and I thought ‘this is what I am going to do,’” Key said. She graduated in 2005 with a bachelor’s degree in biology from Northeastern State University. In 2009, she graduated from Oklahoma State University’s College of Osteopathic Medicine. Key then began a three-year residency at Oklahoma State University Medical Center and St. Francis Children’s Hospital in Tulsa in which she spent “many long hours” learning pediatrics. “I rotated through many pediatric specialties like cardiology, pulmonology, surgery and ER, just learning everything there is to know about pediatrics,” Key said. As part of her Indian Health Services scholarship obligation, Key worked in pediatrics for the Absentee Shawnee Health Center in Norman for four years. After that, she worked for Kids First Urgent Care in Oklahoma City. She said working for Kids First allowed her to spend more time with her family. Key and her husband, Stephen, have three children. She said having a family and a career as a physician is challenging, but it’s all about “balance.” “It’s hard. I am not going to lie. But it’s about balance being a full-time working mom and being able to separate that and know that I am doing my best on both ends and not feeling guilty or selfish if I need that time with my family, or guilty or selfish if I need that time to finish my charts and be the best doctor,” she said. “I just think it is important to be able to compartmentalize work and home. So when I am home I am mom, and when I am at work I am doctor.” Although being a physician comes with challenges and sacrifices, she said helping children reminds her why she chose her career. “While I was working at the urgent care I actually saw a kiddo and she looked really good. But something about her was off to me. So I got a chest X-ray on her and she ended up having a huge heart issue, and had I not gotten that chest X-ray taken care of she would of likely died. But now she is alive because I caught that, and that really is a proud moment,” Key said. Key now works in pediatrics at Mercy Clinic Primary Care in Moore. “I am in a great group of physicians. We get along really well, and everyone is nice here. They’re also Catholic, and I am Christian, so it’s nice here at my front work place because they pray before we eat and they’ll pray before a meeting,” she said. “So its nice that here I am allowed to share my faith with my patients and not fear getting in trouble over it.” She also said her Cherokee heritage is important, and working for Mercy she is able to express that and connect with her patients. “I love being Native, and my heritage is very important to me. Even my stethoscope is beaded, which I love, and everyone asks me about it, so I get to tell them that I am Cherokee,” she said. “And I think that kids are really interested in that and there are a lot of Natives in this area, too. Even though I am working for Mercy I think they are able to relate to that, and it’s a proud thing to see a doctor that is also Native.”
BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
02/13/2018 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH (AP) – Projects ranging from lizard analysis to recyclable materials, and even a tin can telephone, took center stage at Northeastern State University on Feb. 1 for the 12th annual Cherokee Nation Science and Engineering Fair. The fair was open to all tribal citizens – in and outside of the tribe’s 14-county jurisdiction – from grades 5-12. The rules follow International Sustainable World Project Energy Engineering Environment Project Olympiad guidelines. “It’s got the whole kind of green theme to it,” said Daniel Faddis, school community specialist. “There’s whole long list of subcategories. Robotics is a category, reuse and recycle is a category, water quality is a category, and so is noise pollution.” Participants could choose to work on projects as individuals or in pairs. Faddis said team projects are graded on stiffer criteria, with more ways to lose points than individuals. “Obviously, if you have two kids working on it, you would expect it to be better than one,” he said. “So the way ISWEEEP sets it up, there’s a whole other set of categories that the teamwork has to meet.” Caitlyn Luttrell, eighth grader from Westville, centered her project on paper domes. “It’s basically about the structural integrity of different types of paper to use for these domes,” said Luttrell. “I made two different type of domes: a construction paper one and a notebook paper one. I was trying to see which one was stronger and by how much it was stronger. The construction paper dome held 170 percent of its own weight and the notebook paper held 146 percent of its own weight.” Luttrell’s hypothesis was correct in that the construction paper would hold more weight, even though it costs less to purchase. The young science enthusiast’s the project took several hours to accomplish over the course of a few days, but Luttrell said she didn’t mind because the science fair is something she has come to enjoy. “Last year, it was introduced to me and I got pretty interested in it,” she said. “Now, I’m going to be doing it probably until I graduate. I really enjoy this a lot.” More and more jobs are becoming available for those who work in STEM – Science, Technology, Engineering and Math – and Faddis said the younger students can get involved, the better. “STEM is the evolution of the future,” said Faddis. “Everything you see and every different discipline is focusing around STEM. So it’s really good for them to learn the proper, academic scientific method. And it’s good prep for college research, because they’re going to have to do it when they get to graduate school and undergraduate school.” Not all of the projects at the fair came without a trial-and-error phase. Breeze Ward, sixth grader from Rose, was among that group. “I wanted to see if I could blow up a balloon with baking soda and vinegar, and it can,” said Ward. “It was kind of messy. The first time I made it, it exploded on me. I think I added too much baking soda.” The overall high school winner was Kevin Guthrie, of Westville High School. Guthrie also won the High School Engineering division, as well as the “Live an Honest Day” Paul Bickford Memorial Award, which comes with a $1,000 scholarship to Rogers State University. Keysha Kendall, Westville, won the High School Environmental division. The middle school Outstanding Scientist Award went to Crystal Maggard, of Westville, and Hayden Faddis, also of Westville, won the Energy division. Leach School students Neveah Zuniga and Zylee Ward won the Middle School Engineering division and Environmental division, respectively. “The Cherokee Nation Science and Engineering Fair is a great opportunity for students to learn about the fields of science, technology, engineering and math while they also interact and network with their peers and professionals,” said Ron Etheridge, Education Services deputy executive director. “This is a healthy challenge that engages Cherokee students, and I’m positive those who participate could one day use the skills they learn to give back to the Cherokee Nation.”
BY STAFF REPORTS
02/13/2018 10:00 AM
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Each summer the Sequoyah National Research Center hosts three tribally affiliated student interns for June and July. Interns are required to work a minimum of 25 hours per week in the center doing basic archival and research work under the direction of SNRC staff. The SNRC at the University of Arkansas-Little Rock houses the papers and special collections of tribal individuals and organizations and holds the world’s largest archival collection of newspapers and other periodicals published by tribal individuals and organizations. The goal of the American Indian Student Internship Program is to provide students an experiential learning environment in which to acquire an understanding of the value of archives and the research potential of the collections of the center and to engage in academic research and practical database building activities related to tribal culture, society and issues. Interns are expected to demonstrate the value of their experience by either a summary report of work, finding aids for collections or reports of research or other written work that may be shared with their home institutions. To qualify for an internship students must be tribally affiliated, have completed at least 60 college hours and be in good standing at their home institutions of higher learning. Applications should include a unofficial copy of the student’s academic transcript, a recommendation letter from the head of the student’s major department or from another relevant academic official and a statement of at least 250 words expressing why the intern experience would likely be beneficial to the student’s academic or career goals. To assist the student in meeting expenses during the two-month tenure of the internship, SNRC will provide on-campus housing and $2,000 to defray other living expenses. Students interested in applying should send applications or inquiries by email to Daniel F. Littlefield or Erin Fehr at Sequoyah@ualr.edu. The SNRC must receive applications by March 15. SNRC staff will select three applicants and three alternates. Staff will notify students of their decision by April 3. For information regarding UALR and its guest housing facilities, visit <a href="http://www.ualr.edu/housing" target="_blank">www.ualr.edu/housing</a>. For information on the SNRC and its work, visit <a href="http://www.ualr.edu/sequoyah" target="_blank">ualr.edu/sequoyah</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
02/09/2018 03:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – GateHouse Media has launched its first ever-national scholarship competition for college-bound students. In order to participate, students must select one of four words - impact, trusted, community or local - and submit an essay of up to 500 words describing what the word means to them. The competition will award five $1,000 scholarships and one $3,000 grand prize scholarship. According to Alain Begun, vice president of marketing, the contest grew out of the company’s national branding campaign, which focuses on the role that GateHouse journalists play and the service they provide in local markets across the country. “Each ad in that campaign revolves around one of the key words that describe what we do and how we feel about our role in the community. We thought it would be a great way to give back to students in the communities we serve by creating a scholarship competition,” he said. “And tying it into our brand campaign was a way to hear from students about what those words, which are so important to our journalists, mean to them.” Deadline for essay submissions is Feb. 16. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.GateHouseScholarship.com" target="_blank">GateHouseScholarship.com</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
02/08/2018 12:00 PM
TULSA – The Cherokee Nation is accepting grant applications for its spring education tours. The sponsored tours provide an exclusive look at the Nation’s rich history and culture. Applications will be accepted Feb. 5 through March 23. Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism awards the grants in the spring and fall to elementary public schools within the tribe’s 14-county jurisdiction. Complimentary curriculum is provided to schools that receive the grant and is available to teachers upon registration. Curriculum includes a teacher’s guide to prepare students for the education tour as well as a student activity. The tour options are: • Cherokee History consisting of Tahlequah’s historic Capitol Square and Cherokee National Supreme Court Museum, Cherokee National Prison Museum, Murrell Home, Cherokee Heritage Center and ancient Cherokee village, Diligwa. • Will Rogers consisting of the Will Rogers Memorial Museum and Dog Iron Ranch. • Civil War consisting of Tahlequah’s historic Capitol Square, Murrell Home and Fort Gibson Historic Site. Grants are available for grades third through sixth and funding is provided on a first-come, first-served basis. Minimum requirements for eligibility for schools include being located within the Nation’s jurisdiction, a majority of the school’s students must hold Certificate of Degree of Indian Blood cards, the school’s class size may not exceed tour capacity and the majority of the school’s students must be eligible for free and/or reduced school lunches. Schools that do not meet the requirements or miss the deadline may experience the program for a small fee. Special rates are available for seventh through 12th grade and college students. Applications are available at <a href="http://www.VisitCherokeeNation.com" target="_blank">www.VisitCherokeeNation.com</a>. For more information or to book a tour, call 918-384-7787.