http://www.cherokeephoenix.orgDawn Wormington, left, shows students attending the fourth annual Native Youth in Food and Agriculture Leadership Summit the grounds of the Downstream Casino Resort Greenhouses in Quapaw, Oklahoma. The stop was one of many the students took during the July 16-25 summit. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Dawn Wormington, left, shows students attending the fourth annual Native Youth in Food and Agriculture Leadership Summit the grounds of the Downstream Casino Resort Greenhouses in Quapaw, Oklahoma. The stop was one of many the students took during the July 16-25 summit. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Food, agriculture summit educates Native youth

A row of plants line one of the greenhouses at the Downstream Casino Resort Greenhouses in Quapaw, Oklahoma. The Quapaw Tribe grows the vegetables chefs use in the Downstream Casino Resort as well as provide the floral for the casino. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX Cherokee Nation citizen Zachary Ilbery walks through the Downstream Casino Resort Greenhouses in Quapaw, Oklahoma. Ilbery has attended the Native Youth in Food and Agriculture Leadership Summit since its 2014 inception and has learned more about agribusiness, which he studies at Seminole State College in Seminole. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
A row of plants line one of the greenhouses at the Downstream Casino Resort Greenhouses in Quapaw, Oklahoma. The Quapaw Tribe grows the vegetables chefs use in the Downstream Casino Resort as well as provide the floral for the casino. STACIE GUTHRIE/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
BY STACIE BOSTON
Reporter – @cp_sguthrie
07/31/2017 08:30 AM
Video with default Cherokee Phoenix Frame
QUAPAW, Okla. – Now in its fourth year, the Native Youth in Food and Agriculture Leadership Summit continues to teach Native students about food and agriculture while introducing them to tribes and programs that work within those industries.

This year the summit was held July 16-25 and had approximately 150 Native American, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian students representing 76 tribes.

While attending, students could tour animal and food sciences labs as well as horticulture and freight farm programs at the University of Arkansas. They also toured the Quapaw Tribe’s food and agriculture facilities.

Summit counselor Odessa Oldham said the summit is important because it highlights the significance of learning about food and agriculture. She also said 2017 marked the “biggest” year for attendance.

“The summit is about getting Native American youth involved in agriculture. Embracing our culture and indigenous heritage, more so advocating for education and the importance of food,” she said. “We’ve been getting bigger and bigger. This year is our biggest year.”

The University of Arkansas School of Law’s Indigenous Food and Agriculture Initiative sponsors and organizes the summit to give students the opportunity for in-class lectures and hands-on opportunities while helping further their interests in the food and agricultural industries.

On July 21, students visited the Quapaw Tribe’s facilities, including its greenhouse operations.

“Our whole idea here is to kind of educate them on the diversity that you have in agriculture,” Oldham said. “The significance about this place in particular is that we have bison that the tribe is utilizing.”

Gilbert Johnston, Downstream Casino Resort Greenhouses horticulture manager, said the summit has brought students to the Quapaw’s facilities in previous years, and each time they can see the greenhouses’ growth.

Johnston said he and his team grow all the vegetables for the chefs to use in the casino and provide the casino’s floral. He said the greenhouses also produce honey from on-site bees.

“We normally grow 21 different varieties of herbs,” he said. “We grow potatoes, squash, tribal tobacco, ceremonial red corn. Just a lot of different things.”

The greenhouses were created approximately four years ago, and other than providing for the casino, Johnston said they also donate produce to schools and elder centers.

“The Quapaw Tribe has really put a huge effort into sharing with the community, donating vegetables to the schools, to the elder centers. Really working the area and giving back what we can,” he said.

Cherokee Nation citizen Zachary Ilbery, a Seminole State College agribusiness student, said this is his fourth year attending the summit and it helped him learn more about his field of study.

“Throughout my four years attending the summit I’ve kind of learned the difference in their business aspects. How to build a business plan from the ground up, what you really need to look for,” he said.

Ilbery said he hopes the CN becomes more involved in the agriculture industry.

“Being a Cherokee citizen and seeing the difference that the Quapaw does and getting to interact with the other tribes, I would really like for our tribe to partake more in sustainable agriculture and get more involved in our agriculture industry because agriculture is what feeds us and what clothes us,” he said.

Ilbery also recommended future college students look at the food and agricultural industries.

“There are thousands of jobs being left unfilled within the agricultural industry, and we really need people in it,” he said. “Anywhere from agricultural food sciences, animal science, veterinarians, even agricultural lawyers, we just need a variety of people in our ag community because we need those jobs.”

Oldham said it’s important to provide students with an opportunity to learn about the food and agriculture industries because there is a “disconnect” in today’s society.

“Most youth today are three to four times moved from the land with every generation, and with that becomes food is less important. People don’t understand where their food comes from,” she said. “What we trying to do is not only teach the importance of the food but teach how the farmer and the rancher are important. So for us to say to keep the farmer in business, we’ve got to educate the young youth and keep it going so they can not only learn it, but hopefully they can go and give back to the communities as well.”
About the Author
Stacie Boston started working at the Cherokee Phoenix in 2013 as an intern. After graduating from Northeastern State University with a bachelor’s degree in mass communications she was hired as a reporter.

Stacie not only writes for the Phoenix, but also produces videos and regularly hosts the Cherokee Phoenix radio broadcast.

She found her passion for video production while taking part in broadcast media classes at NSU. It was there she co-created a monthly video segment titled “Northeastern Gaming,” which included video game reviews, video game console reviews and discussions regarding influential video games.

While working at the Phoenix she has learned more about her Cherokee culture, saying she is grateful for the opportunity to work for and with the Cherokee people.

In 2014, Stacie won a NativeAmerican Journalists Association award for a video she created while working as an intern for the Phoenix. She was awarded first place in the “Best News Story-TV” category.

Stacie is a member of NAJA.
stacie-boston@cherokee.org • 918-453-5000 ext. 5903
Stacie Boston started working at the Cherokee Phoenix in 2013 as an intern. After graduating from Northeastern State University with a bachelor’s degree in mass communications she was hired as a reporter. Stacie not only writes for the Phoenix, but also produces videos and regularly hosts the Cherokee Phoenix radio broadcast. She found her passion for video production while taking part in broadcast media classes at NSU. It was there she co-created a monthly video segment titled “Northeastern Gaming,” which included video game reviews, video game console reviews and discussions regarding influential video games. While working at the Phoenix she has learned more about her Cherokee culture, saying she is grateful for the opportunity to work for and with the Cherokee people. In 2014, Stacie won a NativeAmerican Journalists Association award for a video she created while working as an intern for the Phoenix. She was awarded first place in the “Best News Story-TV” category. Stacie is a member of NAJA.

Education

BY ASSOCIATED PRESS
02/13/2018 04:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH (AP) – Projects ranging from lizard analysis to recyclable materials, and even a tin can telephone, took center stage at Northeastern State University on Feb. 1 for the 12th annual Cherokee Nation Science and Engineering Fair. The fair was open to all tribal citizens – in and outside of the tribe’s 14-county jurisdiction – from grades 5-12. The rules follow International Sustainable World Project Energy Engineering Environment Project Olympiad guidelines. “It’s got the whole kind of green theme to it,” said Daniel Faddis, school community specialist. “There’s whole long list of subcategories. Robotics is a category, reuse and recycle is a category, water quality is a category, and so is noise pollution.” Participants could choose to work on projects as individuals or in pairs. Faddis said team projects are graded on stiffer criteria, with more ways to lose points than individuals. “Obviously, if you have two kids working on it, you would expect it to be better than one,” he said. “So the way ISWEEEP sets it up, there’s a whole other set of categories that the teamwork has to meet.” Caitlyn Luttrell, eighth grader from Westville, centered her project on paper domes. “It’s basically about the structural integrity of different types of paper to use for these domes,” said Luttrell. “I made two different type of domes: a construction paper one and a notebook paper one. I was trying to see which one was stronger and by how much it was stronger. The construction paper dome held 170 percent of its own weight and the notebook paper held 146 percent of its own weight.” Luttrell’s hypothesis was correct in that the construction paper would hold more weight, even though it costs less to purchase. The young science enthusiast’s the project took several hours to accomplish over the course of a few days, but Luttrell said she didn’t mind because the science fair is something she has come to enjoy. “Last year, it was introduced to me and I got pretty interested in it,” she said. “Now, I’m going to be doing it probably until I graduate. I really enjoy this a lot.” More and more jobs are becoming available for those who work in STEM – Science, Technology, Engineering and Math – and Faddis said the younger students can get involved, the better. “STEM is the evolution of the future,” said Faddis. “Everything you see and every different discipline is focusing around STEM. So it’s really good for them to learn the proper, academic scientific method. And it’s good prep for college research, because they’re going to have to do it when they get to graduate school and undergraduate school.” Not all of the projects at the fair came without a trial-and-error phase. Breeze Ward, sixth grader from Rose, was among that group. “I wanted to see if I could blow up a balloon with baking soda and vinegar, and it can,” said Ward. “It was kind of messy. The first time I made it, it exploded on me. I think I added too much baking soda.” The overall high school winner was Kevin Guthrie, of Westville High School. Guthrie also won the High School Engineering division, as well as the “Live an Honest Day” Paul Bickford Memorial Award, which comes with a $1,000 scholarship to Rogers State University. Keysha Kendall, Westville, won the High School Environmental division. The middle school Outstanding Scientist Award went to Crystal Maggard, of Westville, and Hayden Faddis, also of Westville, won the Energy division. Leach School students Neveah Zuniga and Zylee Ward won the Middle School Engineering division and Environmental division, respectively. “The Cherokee Nation Science and Engineering Fair is a great opportunity for students to learn about the fields of science, technology, engineering and math while they also interact and network with their peers and professionals,” said Ron Etheridge, Education Services deputy executive director. “This is a healthy challenge that engages Cherokee students, and I’m positive those who participate could one day use the skills they learn to give back to the Cherokee Nation.”
BY STAFF REPORTS
02/13/2018 10:00 AM
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Each summer the Sequoyah National Research Center hosts three tribally affiliated student interns for June and July. Interns are required to work a minimum of 25 hours per week in the center doing basic archival and research work under the direction of SNRC staff. The SNRC at the University of Arkansas-Little Rock houses the papers and special collections of tribal individuals and organizations and holds the world’s largest archival collection of newspapers and other periodicals published by tribal individuals and organizations. The goal of the American Indian Student Internship Program is to provide students an experiential learning environment in which to acquire an understanding of the value of archives and the research potential of the collections of the center and to engage in academic research and practical database building activities related to tribal culture, society and issues. Interns are expected to demonstrate the value of their experience by either a summary report of work, finding aids for collections or reports of research or other written work that may be shared with their home institutions. To qualify for an internship students must be tribally affiliated, have completed at least 60 college hours and be in good standing at their home institutions of higher learning. Applications should include a unofficial copy of the student’s academic transcript, a recommendation letter from the head of the student’s major department or from another relevant academic official and a statement of at least 250 words expressing why the intern experience would likely be beneficial to the student’s academic or career goals. To assist the student in meeting expenses during the two-month tenure of the internship, SNRC will provide on-campus housing and $2,000 to defray other living expenses. Students interested in applying should send applications or inquiries by email to Daniel F. Littlefield or Erin Fehr at Sequoyah@ualr.edu. The SNRC must receive applications by March 15. SNRC staff will select three applicants and three alternates. Staff will notify students of their decision by April 3. For information regarding UALR and its guest housing facilities, visit <a href="http://www.ualr.edu/housing" target="_blank">www.ualr.edu/housing</a>. For information on the SNRC and its work, visit <a href="http://www.ualr.edu/sequoyah" target="_blank">ualr.edu/sequoyah</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
02/09/2018 03:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – GateHouse Media has launched its first ever-national scholarship competition for college-bound students. In order to participate, students must select one of four words - impact, trusted, community or local - and submit an essay of up to 500 words describing what the word means to them. The competition will award five $1,000 scholarships and one $3,000 grand prize scholarship. According to Alain Begun, vice president of marketing, the contest grew out of the company’s national branding campaign, which focuses on the role that GateHouse journalists play and the service they provide in local markets across the country. “Each ad in that campaign revolves around one of the key words that describe what we do and how we feel about our role in the community. We thought it would be a great way to give back to students in the communities we serve by creating a scholarship competition,” he said. “And tying it into our brand campaign was a way to hear from students about what those words, which are so important to our journalists, mean to them.” Deadline for essay submissions is Feb. 16. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.GateHouseScholarship.com" target="_blank">GateHouseScholarship.com</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
02/08/2018 12:00 PM
TULSA – The Cherokee Nation is accepting grant applications for its spring education tours. The sponsored tours provide an exclusive look at the Nation’s rich history and culture. Applications will be accepted Feb. 5 through March 23. Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism awards the grants in the spring and fall to elementary public schools within the tribe’s 14-county jurisdiction. Complimentary curriculum is provided to schools that receive the grant and is available to teachers upon registration. Curriculum includes a teacher’s guide to prepare students for the education tour as well as a student activity. The tour options are: • Cherokee History consisting of Tahlequah’s historic Capitol Square and Cherokee National Supreme Court Museum, Cherokee National Prison Museum, Murrell Home, Cherokee Heritage Center and ancient Cherokee village, Diligwa. • Will Rogers consisting of the Will Rogers Memorial Museum and Dog Iron Ranch. • Civil War consisting of Tahlequah’s historic Capitol Square, Murrell Home and Fort Gibson Historic Site. Grants are available for grades third through sixth and funding is provided on a first-come, first-served basis. Minimum requirements for eligibility for schools include being located within the Nation’s jurisdiction, a majority of the school’s students must hold Certificate of Degree of Indian Blood cards, the school’s class size may not exceed tour capacity and the majority of the school’s students must be eligible for free and/or reduced school lunches. Schools that do not meet the requirements or miss the deadline may experience the program for a small fee. Special rates are available for seventh through 12th grade and college students. Applications are available at <a href="http://www.VisitCherokeeNation.com" target="_blank">www.VisitCherokeeNation.com</a>. For more information or to book a tour, call 918-384-7787.
BY STAFF REPORTS
02/02/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH — Registration is open for the Cherokee Nation Foundation’s spring ACT prep classes in Fort Gibson and Sallisaw. The six-week course is offered to juniors and seniors. The program is offered for free to citizens of any federally recognized tribe and costs $150 for non-Native students. Preference is given to Cherokee Nation citizens. Classes begin in late February and conclude with students taking the ACT exam on April 14. A practice test is available on Feb. 24 for students who have not previously taken an ACT test to establish a base score. Curriculum includes interactive instruction by a Princeton Review instructor and two practice tests. In previous years, students have increased their scores by an average of 3.5 points, and some individual scores have increased by as much as 10 points. The Fort Gibson classes are Monday evenings from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Fort Gibson High School Library located at 500 S. Ross St. A pre-test is from 8 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. on Feb. 24. A mid-test is from 8 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. on March 17. Class dates are Feb. 19, March 5, March 12, March 26, April 2 and April 9. The Sallisaw classes are Tuesday evenings from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.?at Carl Albert State College in the Sallisaw Campus?Back building, Room 8127 located at?1601 S. Opdyke St. A pre-test is from 8 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. on Feb. 24. A mid-test is from 8 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. on March 17. Class dates are Feb. 27, March 6, March 13, March 27, April 3 and April 10. No classes will be held during Spring Break. Applications are available at <a href="http://www.cherokeenationfoundation.org" target="_blank">www.cherokeenationfoundation.org</a>. Students may also pick up registration forms from their high school guidance counselors or call 918-207-0950. The deadline to enroll is Feb. 21.
BY STAFF REPORTS
01/24/2018 12:00 PM
LONGMONT, Colo. – First Nations Development Institute on Jan. 23 launched a request for proposals for its newest effort, the Native Language Immersion Initiative. First Nations will award about 12 grants of up to $90,000 each to build the capacity of and directly support Native language-immersion and culture-retention programs. This request for proposals is for the first year of a three-year initiative. Similar requests will be conducted in each of the next two years. Under the NLII, First Nations is seeking to build a dialogue and a community of practice around Native language-immersion programs and consensus on and momentum for Native language programs. The effort is made possible through funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Lannan Foundation, Kalliopeia Foundation and the NoVo Foundation. The initiative includes American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian language programs. The full request for proposal can be found at <a href="https://firstnations.org/grantmaking/2018NLII" target="_blank">https://firstnations.org/grantmaking/2018NLII</a>. It contains information on eligibility, application process, grant requirements, selection criteria, allowable activities and more. The application deadline is March 23. Eligibility is limited to U.S.-based tribal government programs, tribal 7871 entities, Native-controlled nonprofit organizations and Native-controlled community organizations with a fiscal sponsor. There are currently about 150 Native languages spoken in the U.S., many of them spoken only by a small number of elders. Without intervention many of these languages are expected to become extinct within the next 50 to 100 years, which means a significant loss of cultural heritage. These grants can support curriculum development, technology access and recruitment and training of teachers. Language retention and revitalization programs have been recognized as providing key benefits to Native American communities by boosting educational achievement and student retention rates. They also support community identity, Native systems of kinship, and management of community, cultural and natural resources. Through this initiative, First Nations seeks to stem the loss of Indigenous languages and cultures by supporting new generations of Native American language speakers, and establishing infrastructure and models for Native language-immersion programs that may be replicated in other communities.