http://www.cherokeephoenix.orgCherokee artist Keli Gonzales recently opened an online store called Keladi, her Cherokee name, to sell prints, original paintings and buttons that are affordable and “accessible” after realizing how many people wanted to buy her designs. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee artist Keli Gonzales recently opened an online store called Keladi, her Cherokee name, to sell prints, original paintings and buttons that are affordable and “accessible” after realizing how many people wanted to buy her designs. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX

Gonzales showcases interpretive Cherokee art

Cherokee artist Keli Gonzales displays an original drawing titled “Anejodi” from her sketchbook. The drawing’s inspiration derives from the Cherokee sport of stickball and a story she once heard about stickball. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX This original comic drawn by Keli Gonzales is titled “Nigohilv” (Constant) and features two skeletons stuck in a never-ending conversation with the dialogue in Cherokee. COURTESY This original painting by Keli Gonzales titled “Digvyaluyv” (Pieces) symbolizes a fragmented Cherokee culture with the hope that the “pieces” can one day be reunited. COURTESY Cherokee artist Keli Gonzales designs buttons for sale that can be found at the Spider Gallery in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. Shown are “Danawa Usdi” (Little War), left, and “Osdadv (Good). LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
Cherokee artist Keli Gonzales displays an original drawing titled “Anejodi” from her sketchbook. The drawing’s inspiration derives from the Cherokee sport of stickball and a story she once heard about stickball. LINDSEY BARK/CHEROKEE PHOENIX
BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
08/09/2017 08:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH, Okla. – Cherokee Nation citizen Keli Gonzales found joy in art as a child from watching her father and cousins draw and paint. As she grew, she developed her modernized art style using Cherokee culture.

Gonzales recently opened an online store called Keladi, her Cherokee name, to sell prints, original paintings and buttons that are affordable and “accessible” after realizing people wanted to buy her designs.

She said people who know Cherokee culture are intrigued by her drawings because they identify with it. “I think that a lot of people like to see the syllabary on stuff, and they like to own things that…(are) Cherokee-specific items.”

Gonzales incorporates Cherokee syllabary, stories, animals and sports into her art. Her drawing “Anejodi” portrays stickball players vying for a stickball in the air.

“In (the) stickball drawing, I was told that there’s a story about a guy; he cheated in stickball because he picked the ball up with his hands; and you’re not supposed to do that. And he threw the stickball really hard, and it got stuck in the sky and it became the moon. That’s like a reminder to not cheat. So in that drawing, it’s got little…moon bursts because of that story,” Gonzales said.

Gonzales said she doesn’t like to be “overt” in her drawings and uses hints of Cherokee culture to leave it open for interpretation. “I like things that don’t look like real things, if that makes sense. It’s like an interpretation of a real thing instead of copying it. I like to interpret.”

Her painting “Digvyaluyv” (Pieces) features body parts such as an arm and a leg that she said are a “comment on how fragmented our culture is” and that “hopefully one day we can unite all the pieces.”

Gonzales also has an affinity for comic-style illustrations with characters speaking in Cherokee. She does not translate the syllabary because the viewer should translate the language and learn in the process.

Her drawing “Nigohilv” (Constant) is a comic about a pair of skeletons caught in a conversation with the dialogue in the Cherokee language. To her, it represents being constant. To others, she has heard it meant the language being constant or someone not growing up being a second-language learner.

Gonzales said her style is influenced by her love of cartoons such as The Simpsons, using graphite and ink as a medium. Many of her drawings include bold lines and bright colors.

“I love colorful things because of The Simpsons or just cartoons in general. I love defined lines around things…(cartoons) influenced my style quite a bit, bright colors and bold lines,” she said.

Gonzales also draws inspiration from Cherokee artists such as Dan HorseChief, Roy Boney Jr. and Joseph Erb because their art features more “modern spins.”

“In my head I always thought of Native art as being something very specific…like dreamcatchers,” she said. “I always promised myself I would never do a Trail of Tears painting because we’re doing more now. That’s not what I want to focus on is this horrible thing that happened, and it did happen, but we made it through. We went across and finished. We’re stronger because of it. I like to show that we’re innovative and that we’re doing more and we’re doing better.”

Gonzales earned a fine arts degree from Northeastern State University and hopes to expand her art by entering more shows, attending art markets and learning more about screen-printing to start selling her designs on T-shirts.
ᏣᎳᎩ

ᏓᎵᏆ, ᎣᎦᎳᎰᎹ. – ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎨᎳ Keli Gonzales ᎠᏲᏟᏃ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ ᎤᎵᏉᏕᎢ ᏗᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᎤᎦᏙᏍᏛᎢ ᎤᏙᏓ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎾᏓᏤᎵᎢ ᏓᎾᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏓᏂᏑᏫᏍᎬᎢ. ᎤᏛᏏᏗᏒᏃ, ᎤᏩᏌᏊ ᎤᏬᎷᏩᏛᎲᎢ ᏧᏟᎶᏍᏙᏗᎢ ᎢᏯᏛᏁᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ.

Gonzales ᎾᏞᎬᏭ ᏥᎨᏒᎢ ᎤᏍᏚᎢᏒᎢ ᎠᏏᎳᏕᏫᏒᎢ ᎠᏓᎾᏅᎢ ᎨᎳᏗ Ꮓ ᎤᏬᏎᏗ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎬᏗ ᏚᏙᎥᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᎾᏗᏅᏗ ᏗᏓᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ, ᎢᎬᏱᎢ ᏧᏑᏫᏒᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎦᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏰᎵᎢ ᏗᎬᏩᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ “ᎠᎯᏓ ᏗᎬᏩᏛᏗ” ᎤᏕᎶᎰᏏ ᏚᎾᏚᎵᎲᎢ ᏧᏩᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ.

ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᏃ ᎠᏂᏏᏴᏫ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᎦᏔᎭ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᏂᏍᏆᏂᎬᏓᏁᎰ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏃᏟᎬᎢ. “ᏂᎨᎵᏍᎬᏃ ᎤᏂᎪᏗ ᏴᏫ ᎤᏂᎸᏉᏙᎢ ᎤᏂᎪᏩᏛᏗᎢ ᏣᎳᎩ ᏕᎪᏪᎸᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎤᏂᎸᏉᏙᎢ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᎤᎾᏤᎵᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ... (ᏥᎩ) ᏣᎳᎩ-ᎤᏤᏟᏓᎭᎢ.”

Gonzales ᏓᏠᏯᏍᏗᏍᎪᎢ ᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᎪᏪᎵ, ᏗᎧᏃᎮᏗ, ᏅᎩ ᏗᏂᏅᏌᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏁᏦᏗ ᎥᎿ ᏓᏟᎶᏍᏗᏍᎬᎢ. ᎤᏤᎵᏃ ᏗᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ “ᎠᏁᏦᏗ” ᎬᏂᎨᏒᎢ ᏂᎬᏁᎭ ᎠᎾᎳᏍᎦᎵᏍᎩ ᎠᎾᏁᏦᏍᎩ ᏓᎾᎵᎪᏂᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᏁᏦᏗ ᎦᏃᎯᎵᏒᎢ.

“ᎥᎿᎾᏂ (ᎾᏍᎩ) ᎠᏁᏦᏗ ᏗᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ, ᎥᎩᏃᎯᏎᎸᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏏᏴᏫ ᎠᏍᎦᏯ ᎤᏂᎬᎮᏗ; ᎤᎶᏄᎮᏢᎢ ᎠᎾᏁᏦᏍᎬᎢ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᎤᏬᏰᏂᏊ ᎬᏗ ᎤᏟᏔᎩᏒᎢ ᎠᏁᏦᏙᏗ: ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎥᏝ ᎥᏍᎩ ᎢᏯᏛᏁᏗ ᏱᎩ. ᎠᎴ ᏍᏓᏱ ᏭᏗᎾᏒᎢ ᎠᏁᏦᏙᏗ, ᎠᎴ ᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᏗᎨᏒᎢ ᎬᏩᎬᏘ ᏫᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏅᏓ ᎤᏒᎢ ᎡᎯ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏁᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᏅᏓᏗᏍᏙᏗ ᎥᏝ ᎦᎶᏄᎮᏗ ᎢᎩ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ Ꮎ ᏗᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᏥᎩ, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏂᎤᏍᏗ ᎤᏍᏗᎢ...ᏅᏓ ᎤᏒᎢ ᎡᎯ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᏦᎩᎭ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎧᏃᎮᏗ,” Gonzales Z ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ.

Gonzales Ꮓ ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎥᏝ ᏳᎸᏉᏙᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ (ᎬᏂ ᎢᏳᎵᏍᏙᏗ) ᎥᎿ ᏓᏟᎶᏍᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎦᏲᎵᏉ ᎧᏃᎮᏍᎪᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎢᏳᎾᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎠᏁᏟᏙᏗ ᎢᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏔᏅᏍᎬᎢ ᏓᏟᎶᏍᏛᎢ. “ᎠᎩᎸᏉᏙᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᎰᏩᏭᏊ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᎡᎵᏍᏗ ᏥᎨᏐᎢ, ᎢᏳᏃ ᎬᏰᎵᏍᏗ ᏱᎩ.

ᎾᏍᎩᏯᏃ ᏯᏁᏟᏔᏂ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᎰᏩ ᏱᎩ ᎠᏏᏅ ᎤᏣᏘᎾ ᏱᏮᎩᎠ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ. ᎠᎩᎸᏉᏙᎢ ᎠᏆᏁᏟᏙᏗᎢ.”
ᎾᏍᎩᎬ ᏧᏤᎵᎢ ᏧᏑᏫᏒᎢ “ᏗᎬᏯᎷᏴᎢ” (ᏗᎬᏯᎷᎨᎢ) ᎬᏂᎨᏒᎢ ᏂᏛᎬᏁᎲᎢ ᎥᏰᎸᎢ ᏂᏚᏍᏛᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏥᎩ ᏗᎧᏃᏱᎨ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎦᏅᏍᎨ ᎾᏍᎩ Ꮓ ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏥᎩ “ᎧᏁᎢᏍᏗᎭ ᎤᏲᏨᎢ ᏥᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏲᎦᏛᏁᎵᏓᏍᏗᎢ” ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ “ᎤᏚᎩᏃ ᎬᏗ ᎠᏮᏐᎢ ᎢᎸᎯᏳᎢ ᏥᎨᏎᏍᏗ ᏌᏉᎢ ᏱᏗᎬᏩᎵᏍᏙᏗ ᎨᏎᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᎬᏯᎷᎨᎢ.”

Gonzales Ꮓ ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᏅᏌᏁᏍᎪᎢ ᎰᏩᏭᏊ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᎠᎾᏛᏁᎵᏍᎩ - ᏗᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᏅᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ Ꮓ ᏧᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᏴᏫ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᏬᏂᏍᎩ. ᎥᏝ Ꮓ ᏱᏓᏁᏟᏗᏍᎪᎢ ᏗᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᎪᏪᎵ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᎾᏍᎩ Ꮎ ᎠᎪᎵᏰᏍᎩ ᎠᏎ ᎤᏩᏌ ᎤᏁᏟᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎯᎵᏒᎢ ᎤᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ.

ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ “ᏂᎪᎯᎸᎢ” (ᏂᎪᎯᎸᎢ) ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎾᏛᏁᎵᏍᎩ ᏥᎩ ᏧᎾ ᎪᎳᎭ ᎠᎾᏟᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎬᏗ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏁᎵᏍᎬᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎦᏛᎬᎢ ᏂᎪᎯᎸᎢ. ᎠᏂᏐᎢᏃ ᎨᏒ, ᎤᏛᎦᏅᏃ ᏄᏍᏛᎢ ᎦᏛᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎦᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗᎢ ᏂᎪᎯᎸᎢ ᏂᎬᏩᏍᏗᏗᏒᎢ ᎠᎴᏱᎩ ᎩᎶ ᎥᏝ ᎤᏛᏒᎢ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᎦᏬᏂᏍᎩ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᏔᎵᏁᏃ ᎠᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎤᏬᏂᎯᏍᏗᎢ.

Gonzales Ꮓ ᎢᎧᏃᎮᏍᎬᎢ ᏄᏍᏛᎢ ᏓᏟᎶᏍᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏚᎵᏉᏛᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎾᏛᏁᎵᏍᎩ ᏥᎩ The Simpsons, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎧᏅᎦᎵ ᎠᎴ ᎦᏁᎯ ᏗᏙᏪᎵᏍᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏥᎩ ᏩᎦᏲᏢᎢ. ᎤᎪᏗᏃ ᏧᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᏅᎢ ᏂᏙᏳᏍᏗ ᏧᎵᏏᎩ ᏓᏍᏅᏅᎢ ᎠᎴ ᏧᏍᎪᏍᏗ ᏚᎵᏑᏫᏒᎢ.

“ᏓᎩᎸᏉᏙᎢ ᏧᎵᏑᏫᏓᎭ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᎾᏍᏗ ᏥᎩ The Simpsons ᎠᎴᏱᎩ ᎠᎾᏗᏁᎵᏍᎩᏭ ᎠᏓᏅᏖᏗᎢ. ᏓᎩᎸᏉᏙᎢ ᎾᏍᎩᏊ ᏧᎵᏍᏓᏅᏂ ᏕᎦᏕᏱᏍᏛᎢ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ... (ᎠᎾᏛᏁᎵᏍᎩ) ᏙᏧᏓᎴᏅᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᏗᏆᏟᎶᏍᏙᏗᎢ, ᏧᏍᎪᏍᏗ ᏧᎵᏑᏣᏓ ᎠᎴ ᏧᎵᏏᎩ ᏧᎵᏍᏔᏅᏂ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.
Gonzales ᏃᏍᏊ ᏓᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᏍᎬᎢ ᏚᎸᏉᏙᎢ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᏗᎾᏟᎶᏍᏗᏍᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎢᏳᎾᏍᏗ Dan HorseChief, Roy Boney Jr. ᎠᎴ Joseph Erb ᏂᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᎭ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᎾᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᎬᏂᎨᏒᎢ ᏂᎬᏁᎰᎢ “ᎪᎯᏴᎢ ᏥᎩ ᏥᏄᏍᏗᏓᏂ.”

ᏄᏍᏛᎢ ᎦᏓᏅᏖᏍᎬᎢ ᏂᎪᎯᎸᎢ ᏅᏁᎯᏯᎢ ᏗᎾᏟᎶᏍᏗᏍᎩ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᎤᏤᏟᏓ... ᎾᏍᎩ ᏳᏍᏗ ᎥᏍᎩᏓᏍᎬᎢᏗᎦᏂᏱᏍᎩ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ ᏂᎪᎯᎸᏃ ᏂᏥᏪᏍᎪᎢ ᎥᏝ ᎢᎸᎯᏳᎢ ᏗᎨᏥᎢᎸᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᏅᏃᎯ ᏚᎾᏠᎯᎢ ᎠᏑᏫᏒᎢ ᎤᎪᏙᏃ ᎾᏊ. ᎥᏝᏃ ᏯᏆᏚᎵᎰᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏆᎦᏎᏍᏙᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏄᏲᎢᏳᎢ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅᏅᎢ, ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏄᎵᏍᏔᏅᎢ, ᎣᎩᎦᏛᎴᏒᎢ. ᏙᎩᎾᏗᏫᏒᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎣᎩᏍᏆᏛᎢ. ᎣᎦᏟᏂᎩᏓ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏱᎬᏩᎵᏍᏔᏅ. ᎠᎩᎸᏉᏙᎢᎾᏍᎩ ᎬᏂᎨᏒᎢ ᎢᏯᏋᏁᏗᎢ ᎢᏤᎢ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎪᏙᎢ ᏃᏣᏛᏁᎭ ᎠᎴ ᏓᏤᏝ ᏃᏣᏛᏁᎭ.”

Gonzales Z ᎤᏁᏎᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏚᏍᏆᏛᎢ ᎪᏪᎵ ᎤᏁᏎᎢ ᎥᎿᎾᏂ ᎤᏴᏢᎢᎧᎸᎬᎢ ᏩᎦᎸᎳᏗᎬᎢ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏚᎩ ᎤᏌᏐᎢ ᎤᏁᏉᎢᏍᏗᎢ ᏓᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎲᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᏖᎳᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᏗᎾᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎲᏍᎩ ᎬᏂᎨᏒᎢ ᏂᏓᏅᏁᎲᎢ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᏚᎾᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ, ᎤᏖᎳᏗᏍᏗᎢ ᏗᎾᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎲᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏅᏔᏅᏍᎬᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎤᎪᏗ ᏄᏍᏛᎢ ᎠᏱᏙᎳᏛᎢ-ᏓᏂᎴᏗᏍᎬᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᎴᏅᏗᎢ ᏕᎦᎾᏕᏴᎢ ᏧᏟᎶᏍᏔᏅᎢ ᎥᎿ ᏗᎿᏬᎢ.

– Translated by David Crawler

About the Author
Lindsey Bark grew up and resides in the Tagg Flats community in Delaware County. She graduated from Northeastern State University in 2012 with a bachelor’s degree in mass communication, emphasizing in journalism. She started working for the Cherokee Phoenix in 2016.
 
Working for the Cherokee Phoenix, Lindsey hopes to gain as much knowledge as she can about Cherokee culture and people. She is a full-blood Cherokee and a citizen of the United Keetoowah Band.
 
Her favorite activities are playing stickball and pitching horseshoes. She is a member of the Nighthawks Stickball team in Tahlequah and enjoys performing stickball demonstrations in various communities. She is also a member of the Oklahoma Horseshoe Pitchers Association and competes in sanctioned tournaments throughout the state.
 
Previously a member of the Native American Journalists Association, she has won three NAJA awards and hopes to continue as a member with the Cherokee Phoenix.
lindsey-bark@cherokee.org • 918-772-4223
Lindsey Bark grew up and resides in the Tagg Flats community in Delaware County. She graduated from Northeastern State University in 2012 with a bachelor’s degree in mass communication, emphasizing in journalism. She started working for the Cherokee Phoenix in 2016. Working for the Cherokee Phoenix, Lindsey hopes to gain as much knowledge as she can about Cherokee culture and people. She is a full-blood Cherokee and a citizen of the United Keetoowah Band. Her favorite activities are playing stickball and pitching horseshoes. She is a member of the Nighthawks Stickball team in Tahlequah and enjoys performing stickball demonstrations in various communities. She is also a member of the Oklahoma Horseshoe Pitchers Association and competes in sanctioned tournaments throughout the state. Previously a member of the Native American Journalists Association, she has won three NAJA awards and hopes to continue as a member with the Cherokee Phoenix.

Culture

BY STAFF REPORTS
06/14/2018 08:30 AM
FORT SMITH, Ark. – Cherokee artist Daniel HorseChief is designing the Lighthorse Monument for the U.S. Marshals Museum in Fort Smith after being selected by the Five Tribes InterTribal Council. HorseChief’s life-size bronze statue will reflect a Native law enforcement officer of the post-Civil War era patrolling Indian Territory. His attire will include a Native-designed hunting jacket and the base of the statue traditional Southeast Indian designs to honor the ancestral homelands of the Five Tribes that consist of the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Muscogee (Creek) and Seminole, prior to forced removal. The tribes referred to their law enforcement entities as lighthorsemen. Formed in some of the tribes as early as the late 18th century, the law enforcement companies remain on duty today under the title of marshals. “This design truly honors our Native law enforcement who historically and today serve as protectors of our tribal people and land,” Principal Chief Bill John Baker, who also serves as president of the Five Tribes InterTribal Council, said. “This monument is to honor the dedication and sacrifice of Choctaw, Chickasaw, Cherokee, Muscogee (Creek) and Seminole lawmen and Indian U.S. Marshals who worked tirelessly to bring peace and order to Indian Territory and its borders.” Leaders of the Five Tribes selected HorseChief’s design during this past April’s InterTribal Council gathering. It was presented on June 4 to the U.S. Marshals Museum board. HorseChief, of Sallisaw, Oklahoma, also designed statues for Sequoyah High School, Northeastern State University, the Cherokee Heritage Center and the Cherokee Nation Veterans Center in Tahlequah, Oklahoma. The Lighthorse Monument will be set at the center of a 40-foot square plaza outside the museum. A completion date has not been announced. “The United States Marshals Museum is honored to be the home of the Five Civilized Tribes Lighthorse monument,” Dr. R. Cole Goodman, chairman of the U.S. Marshals Museum board of directors, said. “Sculptor Daniel HorseChief’s ability to bring to life such beauty and movement in honoring the history of tribal law enforcement and their connectivity to the U.S. Marshals will enhance the museum’s guest experience. This is also an opportunity to showcase an understanding of the importance of the history of this city, this region and our country.” The U.S. Marshals Museum is slated to open in late 2019 and will highlight the 225-year history and achievements of America’s oldest federal law enforcement agency, from their creation in 1789 to the present.
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/11/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Speakers Bureau will be held Thursday June 14 from 12:30 p.m. to 4 p.m. We will meet in the Community Ballroom that is located behind the Restaurant of the Cherokee. All Cherokee speakers are invited to attend. If you want to bring a side dish or a dessert, feel free to bring it. Come speak Cherokee and enjoy food and fellowship. For further information about the event, please contact the Language Program at 918-453-5151. Tsalagi aniwonisgi unadatlugv dodvnatlosi Nvgineiga Dehaluyi 14 ganvsulvi 12:30 p.m. adalenisgi 4 p.m. igohida. Na Anitsalagi tsunalisdayetiyi tsigotlv unaditli wayvsdi onadilvyvi utani kanvsula dodvnatlosi. Naniv Anitsalagi aniwonisgi otsitayohiha uniluhisdii. Alisdayvdi ayohisdi yodulia. Dodayotsadatlisani ale dodayotsalisdayvna hilutsvi. Ugodesdi tsadulihesdi tsadelayohisdi hiina wigehiyadvdi Tsalagi Gawonihisdi Unadotlvsv 918-453-5151.
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/08/2018 05:15 PM
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – The Sequoyah National Research Center is offering the 2018 Sequoyah Chapbook Award for emerging American Indian and Alaska Native poets, with the winner receiving 250 copies of the chapbook that will be archived in the Center’s Tribal Writers Digital Library. The award is open to any enrolled citizen of a federally recognized tribe in the United States. Poetry manuscripts should be 20 to 36 pages in length and may be submitted in hard copy or digitally. Hard copy manuscript should be single-spaced, one poem per page, paginated, with a table of contents and bound with a binder clip. Digital submissions should be single-spaced, one poem per page (start each poem on a new page). Individual poems may have been published previously in a journal or magazine, but we will not accept work that has appeared as a whole (self-published or otherwise). A cover letter should include a short bio and identify the writer’s tribal affiliation along with name, mailing address, email and phone number. Those submitting paper copy should include a self-addressed stamped envelope for confirmation of receipt of the manuscript. Manuscripts will not be returned. Mail hard copy submissions to H.K. Hummel, Department of English, 501 Stabler Hall, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 South University Avenue, Little Rock, AR 72204. Manuscripts in hard copy must be postmarked by Sept. 1. Electronic submissions should reach the editor by noon, Central Standard Time, on Sept. 1. Digital submissions and questions regarding contest should be sent to <a href="mailto: dflittlefiel@ualr.edu">dflittlefiel@ualr.edu</a> and <a href="mailto: mevanslooten@ualr.edu">mevanslooten@ualr.edu</a>. The collections of the University of Arkansas at Little Rock Sequoyah National Research Center constitute the largest assemblage of Native American and Native Alaskan expression in the world. Its mission is to acquire and preserve the writings and ideas of Native North Americans.
BY STAFF REPORTS
06/07/2018 12:00 PM
CLAREMORE – An “Enhanced Tour” of Will Rogers Memorial Museums is bringing a new level of information to people visiting the memorial in Claremore and the Oologah Birthplace Ranch. The voice of Michael Wallis, author of “Rt. 66 – the Mother Road” and voice of the Sheriff in Disney Pixar movie “Cars,” narrates a tour of the museum starting in the west gallery through the final journey of the American cowboy philosopher. Using an electronic device, areas in both museums are marked with “Stop” numbers to provide audio information, images and other content. There are 16 enhanced features in the museum. The “Enhanced Tour” can also be accessed from the website, www.willrogers.com and people can take the tour anytime. Each month people come from most of the United States and foreign countries to learn more about Will Rogers. Now, through use of smart devices, they are able to see what he had to say about their state or country. “Will commented on about every state and many countries,” Tad Jones, museum executive director, said. “He was aware of their politics and their surroundings and shared them in his writings. The new ‘Enhanced Tour’ will allow visitors to search their state or country and read what Will had to say about them and hopefully have a new connection with him.” An “Enhanced Tour” brochure is available at the museum entry with a map and numbers for various galleries and stops. “This program will be ever-changing and expanding as we add more content to each page and visitors will really enjoy listening to Michael Wallis’ voice as he gives a personal tour,” Jones said. The museum and ranch are open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily and are closed Thanksgiving and Christmas. From Nov. 11 through Feb. 28, the museums are closed Monday and Tuesday. Visit <a href="http://www.willrogers.com" target="_blank">willrogers.com</a> for more information.
BY LINDSEY BARK
Reporter
06/06/2018 12:00 PM
TAHLEQUAH – During a March meeting, Cherokee speakers added 88 newly translated words to the tribe’s language. The new additions contain science, art and grammar terminology, which will be added to a terminology booklet. Since 2007, a Cherokee language consortium of fluent speakers from the Cherokee Nation, United Keetoowah Band and Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians have translated more than 2,500 modern English words into Cherokee. “The reason we formed was because there are so many words that we did not have in Cherokee, for instance, ‘computer.’ All the newer stuff that we have in school and that we use in our homes, we didn’t have Cherokee words for that,” Anna Sixkiller, CN translator specialist, said. Kathy Sierra, language consortium chairwoman, said at each quarterly meeting, a new list of words is brought and translations begin by writing out the English version, looking at the definition and describing the words using the Cherokee language. “Just about everything that we say is described. We find the best description for that word,” she said. Sixkiller said one English word, such as balloon, could have a long Cherokee name because Cherokee is a descriptive language. She said the translation for balloon is “you put air in there and it goes out.” Also, laser printer when translated into Cherokee is described as “it lights up” and “it prints.” Sixkiller said the consortium looks at the linguistics of the English word in what it does, who does it and when in time someone does it. “The English language and the Cherokee language are two different languages. They don’t mix. I think the Cherokee language is unique, pretty and to the point,” Sixkiller said. Sierra said the EBCI’s Cherokee dialect differs from Oklahoma Cherokees’ dialect and that the group takes that into consideration when translating words. In the terminology booklet, Sixkiller said some words with two translations are marked with an (e) or (w) to denote eastern and western-style Cherokee. The next language consortium meeting is set for June 13-15 in Cherokee, North Carolina, home of the EBCI. To view the new words, <a href="http://www.cherokeephoenix.org/Docs/2018/6/42325__art_180518_88words_lb.pdf" target="_blank">click here</a>.
BY MARK DREADFULWATER
Multimedia Editor – @cp_mdreadfulwat
06/04/2018 08:30 AM
CLAREMORE – Humorist, newspaper columnist, social commentator and actor are a few words to describe William Penn Adair Rogers, better known as Will Rogers. Another is Cherokee. Will was born Nov. 4, 1879, to Clement Vann and Mary America Schrimsher Rogers in Indian Territory near present-day Oologah. Built in 1875, the Birthplace Ranch where Will grew up was known as “the White House on the Verdigris River.” Clement was a prominent Cherokee politician, and the home was used as a meeting place for commerce, government, social events and funerals, according to willrogers.com. “His dad was very involved in the Cherokee Nation,” Tad Jones, Will Rogers Memorial Museum and Will Rogers Birthplace Ranch executive director, said. “He sat on the council and was a judge. He was very involved in Cherokee politics.” According the website, the home was a “seat of power and site of culture” and a working ranch. Will worked as a cowboy on the 400-acre ranch, learning to lasso from a freed slave. He later used that skill on the Vaudeville stage and in movies. Clement moved to nearby Claremore after Mary died in 1890. However, the family has always owned the home and acreage. Today, the home is conserved and used as homage to the family. “We hope people that come to the ranch will see what it was like for the Rogers family in that time in history,” Jones said. “That’s why they come here.” It hosts annual events such as Family Day, Frontier Days Kids Camp and the Will Rogers/Wiley Post Fly-In. It’s located at 9501 E. 380 Road and is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free, but donations are encouraged. As for Will’s life and career outside the Birthplace Ranch, the Will Rogers Memorial Museum in Claremore houses the largest collection of memorabilia and his entire writings collection. According to the website, the memorial has become “a world class museum of paintings sculptures and other artifacts” about the life and times of Will. “Will has been gone since 1935 and the facility was built in 1938,” Jones said. “Our biggest thing now is we are kind of reintroducing Will Rogers to a new generation. There are very few people alive that remember Will. Most travelers coming through know just a little bit about Will Rogers. So our process now is how do we tell that story to a new generation of people that don’t know anything about him or very little. That’s one of our biggest challenges.” Jones said he and his staff are working to design exhibits using better technology to share with the public. One project was slated to launch in mid-May. “We are going to have a new audio tour…and that will be good for visitors.” Jones said. “The world-renowned voice of Michael Wallace of the Pixar movie ‘Cars’ fame is going to be doing the audio tour. We’ll have that audio tour at the Birthplace and Memorial Museum for visitors.” Among the museums’ posters, statues, paintings and furnishings, guests can visit its movie theater to view one of Will’s 71 films. The museum also hosts annual lecture series, Halloween Night and pictures with Santa Claus. Will died in a plane crash on Aug. 15, 1935, in Point Barrow, Alaska, along with famed aviator Wiley Post. He was buried in California but later interred on the museum’s grounds. According to the website, his wife, Betty, and three of their four children are also buried there. The museum is at 1720 W. Will Rogers Blvd. It’s open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $7 for adults and $5 for seniors 62 and older and military personnel with ID. Children ages 6 to 17 are $3 and children under 5 are free. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.willrogers.com" target="_blank">willrogers.com</a>, call 918-343-8116 or email <a href="mailto: wrinfo@willrogers.com">wrinfo@willrogers.com</a>.