http://www.cherokeephoenix.orgOn Easter Sunday, April 10, 1887, the Cherokee Female Seminary caught fire and was a complete loss. Only the exterior brickwork and the classical brick columns remained standing. Three of those columns still stand in front of the Cherokee Heritage Center. OKLAHOMA HISTORICAL SOCIETY
On Easter Sunday, April 10, 1887, the Cherokee Female Seminary caught fire and was a complete loss. Only the exterior brickwork and the classical brick columns remained standing. Three of those columns still stand in front of the Cherokee Heritage Center. OKLAHOMA HISTORICAL SOCIETY

Little-known Cherokee Female Seminary facts shared

Students stand in front of the newly build Cherokee Female Seminary north of Tahlequah in the Cherokee Nation before Oklahoma statehood. The seminary or high school was dedicated on May 7, 1889, and is now used by Northeastern State University for classrooms and offices. OKLAHOMA HISTORICAL SOCIETY A limestone window sill on the east side of the former Cherokee Female Seminary shows wear from the time when cooks used the window sill to sharpen knives. That part of the building once served as the kitchen area for the seminary. LUKE WILLIAMS
Students stand in front of the newly build Cherokee Female Seminary north of Tahlequah in the Cherokee Nation before Oklahoma statehood. The seminary or high school was dedicated on May 7, 1889, and is now used by Northeastern State University for classrooms and offices. OKLAHOMA HISTORICAL SOCIETY
BY WILL CHAVEZ
Assistant Editor – @cp_wchavez
05/05/2015 08:22 AM
WESTVILLE, Okla. – Guest speaker Luke Williams shared little-known facts about the construction and use of the second Cherokee Female Seminary during the Goingsnake District Heritage Association meeting on April 18.

In October 1846, Principal Chief John Ross proposed the creation of two Cherokee Nation high schools or seminaries, one for males and one for females. Construction began in 1847 with the male seminary located about a mile and a half southwest of Tahlequah and the female seminary located in Park Hill, about a mile and half south of town.

“Both of these structures consisted of three-storied brick buildings with classical-style columns on three sides. The buildings measured 185 feet long and 109 feet wide, and each one of these buildings cost in excess of $60,000,” Williams said.

Some subjects taught at the schools included geometry, Greek history, algebra, geography and vocal music.

“These rigorous academics prepared young Cherokees to become educators,” he said.

On Easter Sunday, April 10, 1887, the Cherokee Female Seminary caught fire and was a complete loss. Only the exterior brickwork and the classical brick columns remained standing. Three of those columns still stand in front of the Cherokee Heritage Center.

A month later, Principal Chief Dennis Bushyhead recommended the reconstruction of the seminary and signed a bill on May 21, 1887, to order its construction on the north edge of Tahlequah near a fresh water source called Hendricks Spring.

Charles Edward Ilsley of St. Louis, who owned an architectural firm, was chosen to design the building. He completed its design in July 1887, and it called for a three-story brick building that had two main wings in an L shape. The Richardsonian-Romanesque style of the building called for two three-story towers with conical roofs, a five-story bell tower and numerous round-top arches over windows and doors.

The construction project was to cost $57,500. The CN National Council requested a project completion date of Aug. 1, 1888. Construction began Nov. 3, 1887. Because the nearest railroad was 30 miles away in Muskogee, the construction project relied on materials that were acquired locally, Williams said.

“Quarries near Tahlequah provided the lime and sandstone necessary for the large foundation stone and the window sills. Yellow pine timber provided the lumber for the joists, the studding and the flooring, and local kilns fired the extra bricks required for this project,” he said.

In autumn 1888, the council approved an additional $4,000 for completion of the project, which included funding for a wrought-iron fence surrounding it.

On April 18, 1889, Ilsley transferred the completed building into the hands of the tribe’s building committee, and on May 7 a celebration was held “to celebrate the revival of the Cherokee Female Seminary.” On Aug. 26, the seminary opened its doors with an enrollment of 232 young women.

Williams said the building contained modern conveniences including indoor toilets, hot and cold water, a steam heating system and a trunk elevator. Also, the building had 356 windows and two 70-foot chimneys to provide ventilation for the building’s boiler. The 98-foot bell tower on the east side of the building stood out on the north side of Tahlequah.

“The L-shaped building consisted of a main east-to-west wing measuring 226-feet long and 78-feet wide. A smaller north-to-south wing measured 146-feet long and 40-feet wide,” he said.

The first floor contained a front vestibule that included a fireplace, a hallway that ran down the length of the 226-foot long building, five large classrooms, a parlor, chapel, kitchen, kitchen storage, and a dining room (in the north-south wing), which was the largest room on the first floor.

The second floor contained only dormitory rooms that lined both sides of the hallways. The third floor contained large bedrooms with closets and smaller bedrooms with no closets. The far northeast corner of the third floor contained the sick ward.

About three years after the seminary’s construction, the toilets and the building’s sewer system failed. The system was set up to allow sewer to empty into a pit about 300 yards from the building, Williams said. Water quickly filled the pit and water and sewage backed up into the seminary.

“If that’s not bad enough, this sewer pit was only 100 yards from Hendricks Spring. Remember, this is where they are getting their source of fresh drinking water,” he said. “The Cherokee Advocate referred to the seminary’s plumbing problems as, quote, ‘a health destroyer.’ After several students died and the constant fear of typhoid fever, the Cherokee National Council ordered the indoor toilets sealed. After this closure, the students used a row of outdoor privies that were constructed out on the east lawn.”

In March 1909, the “dissolving” CN government sold the seminary building to the new state of Oklahoma for $45,000. In September 1909, the doors reopened as the Northeastern State Normal School.

Today, the building is used for classrooms for Northeastern State University. On May 7, 2014, CN, NSU and state officials celebrated the 125th anniversary of the building being opened on May 7, 1889.
ᏣᎳᎩ

ᎢᎪᏓ ᏗᎦᏚᎲ, ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ. – ᎦᏬᏂᏍᎩ Luke Williams ᎤᏃᎮᏢ ᎤᏅᏛ ᎢᎦ ᎤᎾᏁᏍᎨᎲ ᎠᎴ ᏄᏅᏔᏅ ᏔᎵᏁ ᎤᎾᏁᏍᎨᏓ ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᎨᏯ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎤᏬᏂᏒ ᎾᎿ ᎢᎾᏓᏛᎠᎾ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᏧᎾᏓᎴᏅ ᎤᎾᏙᏢᎯ ᏓᎾᏠᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᎧᏬᏂ ᏁᎳᏚᏏᏁ.

ᎾᎿ ᏚᏂᏃᏗ ᎧᎸ ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏅᎩᏍᎪ ᏑᏓᎵ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ, ᎤᎬᏫᏳᎯ ᏣᏂ ᎫᏫᏍᎫᏫ ᎤᏃᎮᎸ ᎤᏃᎮᎸ ᏗᎪᏢᏗ ᏔᎵ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎤᎾᏅᏔ ᎤᎾᏕᎶᏆᎥ ᎤᎪᏛ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ, ᏌᏊ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᏧᏣ ᎠᎴ ᏌᏊ ᎾᏍᏊ ᎠᏂᎨᏳᏣ. ᎠᎾᏁᏍᎨᎲ ᎤᎾᎴᏅᎲ ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏅᎩᏍᎪ ᎦᎵᏉᎩ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏍᏒᎢ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᏧᏣ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ ᎾᎿ ᏑᏟᎶᏓ ᎠᏰᏟ ᎤᎦᎾᏮ ᎤᏕᎵᎬ ᎢᏗᏢ ᏓᎵᏆ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᎨᏳᏣ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏭᏂᏴᏍᏗ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏎ ᏑᏟᎶᏓ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏰᏟ ᎤᎦᎾᏩ ᎢᏗᏢ ᏓᎵᏆ ᎦᏚᎲᎢ.

“ᎢᏧᎳ ᎯᎠ ᏓᎾᏁᏍᎨᏍᎬ ᏦᎢ ᎢᏗᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᏂᏚᏅᏁᎸ ᏗᎬᏓᏅ ᏚᏅᏔᏅ ᎾᎿ ᏧᏔᎾ ᏚᏁᏘᏁ ᏦᎢ ᏂᏚᏅᏏᏴ. ᎯᎠ ᎠᎾᏁᏍᎨᏍᎬ ᎠᏟᎶᏓ ᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏁᎳᏍᎪ ᎯᏍᎩ ᎢᎳᏏᏓ ᎢᎦᏅᎯᏓ ᎠᎴ ᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏐᏁᎳ ᎢᎳᏏᏗ ᎢᏯᏖᎾ, ᎠᎴ ᏌᏊᎭ ᎯᎠ ᏓᎾᏁᏍᎨᏍᎬ ᏓᎵᎬᏩᏢᏍᎬ ᏑᏓᎵᏍᎪ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Williams.

ᎢᎦᏓᏃ ᏗᎪᏪᎵ ᏓᏅᏗᏍᎬ ᏓᎾᏕᏲᎲᏍᎬ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ geometry, Greek history, algebra, geography ᎠᎴ vocal ᏗᎧᏃᎩᏍᏗ.

ᎾᎿ ᎤᎵᎮᎵᏍᏗ ᏧᏪᏥ ᏧᏅᏍᎦᎶᏗ ᎤᎾᏙᏓᏆᏍᎬ ᎦᏰᏉᏂ ᏍᎪᎯᏁ, ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏁᎵᏍᎪ ᎦᎵᏉᎩ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ, ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᎨᏳᏣ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎪᎱᏍᏗ ᏧᎵᏍᏙᏔᏁ ᎤᏥᏠᏎ ᎠᎴ ᏂᎦᏓᏊ ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎤᎪᏁᎢ.

ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏩᏌ ᏗᎬᏓᏅ ᏗᎬᏔᏅ ᏚᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎸ ᎠᎴ ᏧᏔᎾ ᏥᏕᎨᏘ ᏧᏩᏌ ᏕᎦᏙᎨ. ᏦᎢ ᎢᎦ Ꮟ ᏕᎨᏔ ᎢᎬᏯᏗᏢ ᏣᎳᎩᎯ ᏧᎾᏓᎴᏅ ᎠᏰᏟ.

ᏏᏅᏓ ᎢᏴ ᏭᏟᎢᎶᏟ, ᎤᎬᏫᏁᎯ Dennis Bushyhead ᎣᏏ ᏱᎦ ᏱᎦᏁᏍᎨᎯᏎᏂ ᎯᎠ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏃᏪᎳᏅ ᎠᏔᏲᎯᎯ ᎠᏂᏍᎬᏘ ᏔᎵᏍᎪ ᏌᏊᎯᏁ, ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏁᎵᏍᎪ ᎦᎵᏉᎩᏁ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ, ᎤᏓᏅᏍᏗ ᎤᎾᏁᎢᏍᏗ ᎤᏴᏢ ᎢᏗᏝ ᎠᏍᏛ ᏓᎵᏆ ᎾᎠᏂᎨ ᎢᏤᎢ ᎠᎹ ᎦᏁᎲ ᏚᏙᎥ Hendrick’s ᎦᏅᎪᎬᎢ.

Charles Edward Ilsley of St. Louis, ᎾᏍᏯ ᎤᏤᎵ ᎨᏎ ᎾᏍᎩ architectural firm. ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏑᏰᏓ ᎨᏎ ᎾᎿ ᏧᏟᎶᏍᏙᏗ ᎦᎵᏦᏕ ᎠᏁᎩᏍᏗᎢ.ᎤᏍᏆᏕ ᏓᏟᎶᏍᏗᏍᎬ ᎦᏰᏉᏂ ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏁᎵᏍᎪ ᎦᎵᏉᎩ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ, ᎠᎴ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏦᎢ ᏯᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᏗᎬᏓᏅ ᎬᏔᏅ ᎠᏁᏍᎨᎲᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏔᎵ ᏂᏚᎬᏫᏁᏒ ᏕᎪᏯᏕ ᎤᏠᏯ L ᎤᏙᏢᏒᎢ. ᎾᎿ Richardsonian—Romanesque ᎤᏠᏯ ᎠᏁᎩᏍᏗ ᏚᏙᎡᎢ ᎾᎿ ᏔᎵ ᎠᎴ ᏦᎢ ᎢᎬᎸᎳᏗ ᎾᎿ conical ᎦᎵᏦᏘ, ᎯᏍᎩ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᎤᎭᎸᏂ ᎤᎾᏗᎢ ᎠᎴ ᎢᎸᏍᎦ ᏗᎦᏐᏆᎸ ᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᎢᎬᎾ ᎾᎿ ᏦᎳᏂ ᎠᎴ ᏗᎦᎶᏍᏗᎢ.

ᎾᏍᎩ ᎯᎠ ᏳᎾᏁᏍᎨᎯ ᎯᎩᏍᎪ ᎦᎵᏉᎩ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᎯᏍᎩᏧᏈ ᏧᎵᎬᏩᎶᏗ ᎨᏎᎢ. ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎬᎾᏕᎾ ᏗᏂᎳᏫᎩ ᎤᏂᏁᏤ ᎯᎠ ᎤᎾᏁᎢᏍᏗ ᎤᏂᏍᏆᏗᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎦᎶᏂ ᎢᎬᏱ, ᏁᎳᏚᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧ ᏁᎵᏍᎪ ᏧᏁᎳ. ᎠᎾᏁᏍᎨᏍᎬ ᎤᎾᎴᏅᎲ ᏅᏓᏕᏆ ᏦᎢᏁ, ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏁᎵᏍᎪ ᎦᎵᏉᎩ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ. ᏅᏗᎦᎵᏍᏙᏗᏍᎨ ᎾᎠᏂᎨᏍᏗ ᎠᏥᎳᎦᏅᏅ ᏦᏍᎪ ᎢᏳᏟᎶᏓ ᎨᏎ ᎫᏐᎢ, ᏂᎦᏓ ᎠᏁᎢᏍᏙᏗ ᎠᏅᏔᏅᏍᎬ ᎾᎥᏆ ᎠᎾᏁᎶᏗᏍᎬ ᎤᏂᏩᎯᏍᏗ, ᎠᏗᏍᎬ Williams.

ᏅᏯ ᎤᏂᎴᏍᏗ ᎾᎥ ᏓᎵᏆ ᎠᏓᏁᎸᏍᎬ ᎪᏍᏚᎤᏁᎬ ᎠᎴ ᏃᏯᏅᏯ ᎠᏎ ᏗᎬᏙᏗ ᎨᏒ ᎯᎠ ᎤᏔᎾ ᏚᎫᏍᏓᎥ ᏅᏯ ᎠᎴ ᏦᎳᏂ ᏅᎩ ᏂᏕᎬᏛᎢ. ᏗᏓᎶᏂᎨ ᏃᏥ ᎠᏁᏢᏍᎬ ᏧᏯᏖᎾ ᎾᎿ ᏗᏒᏓᎾᎳᏗᏍᏗ, ᎠᏁᎢᏍᏙᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏲᏓᏠᏙᏗ, ᎠᎴ ᎾᎥ ᏗᎬᏓᏅ ᏧᏃᏢᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎤᎪᏛ ᏱᏚᏂᏂᎬᎦ ᎾᎿ ᎠᎾᏁᏍᎨᏍᎬᎢ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

ᎤᎳᎪᎲᏍᏗ ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏁᎵᏍᎪ ᏧᏁᎳ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ, ᏗᏂᎳᏫᎦ ᎤᏂᎶᎯᏍᏔᏅ ᎤᎪᏛ ᎯᎠ ᎢᎦ ᏅᎩ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᎤᏂᏍᏆᏗᏍᏙᏗ ᎠᎾᏁᏍᎨᏍᎬᎢ, ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏠᏯᏍᏛ ᎤᏂᏩᎯᏍᏙᏗ ᏔᎷᎩᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᏐᏯᏍᏙᏗ ᎬᏩᏕᏯᏓ ᎣᏂ.

ᎾᎿ ᎧᏬᏂ ᏁᎳᏚᏏᏁ, ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏁᎵᏍᎪ ᏐᏁᎳ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ, Ilsley ᏫᏚᏲᏎ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏍᏆᏙᏅ ᎠᏓᏁᎸ ᎾᎿ ᏧᏃᏱᎾ ᎠᏂᎳᏍᏓᏢ ᏗᎾᏁᏍᎨᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᎧᎻᏗ, ᎠᎴ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏂᏍᎬᏘ ᎦᎵᏉᎩᏁ ᎠᎾᎵᎮᎵᎬ ᎤᏂᏍᏆᎸᎲᎢ “ᎠᎾᎵᎮᎵᎬ ᎠᎾᎴᏂᏍᎬ ᎾᎿ ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏂᎨᏳᏣ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ,” ᎾᎿ ᎦᎶᏂ ᏔᎵᏍᎪ ᏑᏓᎵᏁ, ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᏚᏂᏍᏚᎢᏒ ᏗᎦᎶᎯᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎦᏳᎳ ᏧᏃᏪᎳᏅ ᏔᎵᏧᏈ ᏦᏍᎪ ᏔᎵ ᏯᏂ ᎠᏂᎨᏳᏣ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎤᎬᏩᏟ.

Williams ᎠᏗᏍᎬ ᎠᏓᏁᎸ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏂᎬᎾᏅ ᏯᏛᎾ ᎦᎵᏦᏕ ᏕᎪᏢᏒ ᏙᏯ ᏤᏓᏍᏗ, ᎤᏗᏢᎦ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏴᏢ ᎠᎹ ᏃᎴ ᎠᎹ ᎤᏔᏃᎸᏓ ᎠᎦᏃᏗᏍᎩ ᎪᏢᏒ ᎠᎴ ᏴᏫ ᎤᎾᏦᏗ ᎠᎵᏌᎳᏗᏍᎩ. ᎾᏍᏊ, ᎠᏓᏁᎸ ᏦᎢᏧᏈ ᎯᎦᏍᎪ ᏑᏓᎵ ᏗᏦᎳᏂ ᏕᎪᏢᏒ ᎠᎴ ᏔᎵ ᎦᎵᏆᏍᎪ ᎢᎳᏏᏓ ᎢᎦᏘ ᏓᎱᏣᏬᎳᏛ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏃᎴ ᎤᏪᏓᏍᏗ ᎾᎿ ᎠᏓᏁᎸ ᎤᏔᎾ ᎠᏙᏙᏗ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᏐᏁᎳᏍᎪ ᏧᏁᎳ ᎢᎳᏏᏓ ᎢᎦᏘ ᎤᎭᎸᎾ ᎦᏛᎢ ᎾᎿ ᎧᎸᎬ ᎢᏗᏢ ᎠᏓᏁᎸᎢ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏴᏢ ᎢᏗᏢ ᎨᏒ ᏓᎵᏆ.

“ᎾᏅ L ᎢᏳᏍᏗ ᎠᏓᏁᎸ ᎤᏠᏯᏍᏛ ᏄᎬᏫᏳᏒ ᎧᎸᎬ ᎠᎴ ᎤᏕᎵᎬ ᏫᎪᏯᏛ ᎠᏟᎶᏓ ᏔᎵᏧᏈ ᏔᎵᏍᎪ ᏑᏓᎵ ᎢᎳᏏᏓ ᎢᎦᏅᎯᏓ ᎠᎴ ᎦᎵᏆᏍᎪ ᏧᏁᎳ ᎢᎳᏏᏓ ᎢᏯᏖᎾ. ᎤᏍᏗᎯᎨ ᎤᏓᏢ ᏩᎪᏛ ᏫᎪᏯᏛ ᎠᏟᎶᎠ ᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏅᎩᏍᎪ ᏑᏓᎵ ᎢᎳᏏᏓ ᎢᎦᏅᎯᏓ ᎠᎴ ᏅᎩᏍᎪ ᎢᎳᏏᏓ ᎢᏯᏖᎾ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ.

ᎢᎬᏱ ᎠᏲᏓᏝᎲ ᎠᏠᏯᏍᏛ ᎢᎬᏱ ᎠᏍᏚᏅ ᎠᏴᏍᏙᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏠᏯᏍᏗ ᎪᏛᏗᎢ, ᎤᏠᏅᏛ ᎡᏓᏍᏗ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎪᏠᏯ ᎢᎦᏅᎯᏓ ᏔᎵᏧᏈ ᏔᎵᏍᎪ ᏑᏓᎵ ᎢᎳᏏᏓ ᎢᎦᏅᎯᏓ ᎠᏓᏁᎸᎢ, ᎯᏍᎩ ᏧᏔᎾ ᏕᎧᏅᏑᎸ, ᎤᎾᏅᏗ, ᎤᎾᏓᏙᎵᏍᏙᏗ, ᎠᏓᏍᏓᏴᏗ, ᎠᎾᏓᏍᏓᏴᎲᏍᎩ ᎤᏂᏍᏆᏂᎪᏔᏅᎲᏍᏗ, ᎠᎴ ᎤᎾᎵᏍᏓᏴᏗᎢ (ᎾᎿ ᎤᏴᏢ--ᎤᎦᎾᏮ ᎪᏯᏛᎢ), ᎾᏍᎩ ᏭᏔᏂᏴ ᎧᏅᏑᎸ ᎾᎿ ᎢᎬᏱ ᎠᏲᏓᏢᎲᎢ.

ᏔᎵᏁ ᎠᏲᏓᏢᎲ ᏕᎧᏅᏑᎸ ᎢᏧᎳ ᏗᎬᎪᏛ ᎠᏰᏟ ᎦᎳᏅᏛᎢ. ᏦᎢᏁ ᎠᏲᏓᏢᎲ ᏧᏔᎾ ᏗᏒᏍᏗ ᏕᎧᏅᏑᎸ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏗᎾᏬ ᏗᎦᏛᏗ ᏗᎪᏢᎯ ᎠᎴ ᏧᏍᏗᎯᎨ ᏗᏒᏍᏗ ᏕᎧᏅᏑᎸ ᏗᎾᏬ ᏗᎦᏛᏗ ᏂᏗᎪᏢᏒᎾ. ᎾᏍᎩᏃ ᎤᏴᏢᎧᎸᎬ ᎢᏗᏢ ᎤᏅᏏᏴ ᎾᎿ ᏦᎢᏁ ᎠᏲᏓᏢᎲ ᎾᎿ ᏧᏂᏢᎩ ᎤᏂᏴᏍᏗ ᎨᎡᎢ.

ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏎ ᏦᎢ ᏧᏕᏘᏴᏓ ᎣᏂᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎤᎾᏁᏍᎨᏓ, ᏙᏯ ᏧᏁᏓᏍᏗ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏓᏁᎸ ᏂᎦᏓ ᏧᏒᏙᏓ ᏂᏕᎬᏅᏗᏓᏅ ᏚᏓᏲᏒ ᏚᏲᏨ. ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎬᎾᏅ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎤᏲ ᎨᏒ ᎠᏟᎦ ᏂᎬᏅ ᏦᎢᏧᏈ ᎢᎳᏏᏓ ᎠᏂᎩᏓ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏔᎾ ᎠᏓᏁᎸᎢ, ᎤᏛᏅ Williams. ᎠᎹ ᎤᏟᏍᏗ ᎤᎧᎵᏨ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏔᎴᏒ ᎠᎴ ᎠᎹ ᎠᎴ ᏧᏓᎴᏅᏓ ᎤᏲ ᏂᎦᏓ ᏧᏏᏅᏎ ᎾᎿ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ.

“ᎢᏳᏃ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎡᎵ ᎤᏐᏅ ᏂᎨᏒᎾ ᏱᎩ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏂᎦᏓ ᎤᏲ ᎨᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈᏛ ᎢᎳᏏᏓ ᎤᏣᏘᏂ ᎨᏒ ᎦᏅᎪᎬ ᎠᎹ Hendricks Spring ᏚᏙᎥᎢ. ᎢᏣᏅᏓᏛ, ᎾᎿᏃ ᎠᏂᏁᎩᏍᎬ ᎤᏴᏢ ᎠᎹ ᎤᎾᏗᏔᏍᏗ,” ᎠᏗᏍᎬᎢ. “ᏣᎳᎩ Advocate ᎤᏂᏃᎮᏢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎯᎠ ᏧᏒᏙᏓ ᏓᏲᎬ ᏂᎦᎵᏍᏗᏍᎬ ᎾᏍᎩ ‘ᏙᎯ ᎠᎯᎯ’ ᎤᎾᏛᏅᎢ.’ ᏃᏊᏃ ᎢᎸᏍᎩ ᏯᏂ ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᏚᏂᏲᎱᏒ ᎠᎴ ᎠᏂᏍᎦᎢᎲ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏍᎦᏎᏗ ᎤᏗᏢᎲᏍᎩ, ᎠᏂᏣᎳᎩ ᎬᎾᏕᎾ ᏗᏂᎳᏫᎦ ᎤᎾᏓᏅᏒ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎦᎵᏦᏕ ᎪᏢᏒ ᏙᏯ ᎤᏁᏓᏍᏗ ᎠᏍᏚᏗᎢ. ᎣᏂ ᎯᎠ ᎤᏂᏍᏚᎾ, ᏗᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᎩ ᎤᎾᎴᎾᏅᎲ ᏙᏯ ᏚᏃᏢᏅ ᏙᏯ ᏧᏁᏓᏍᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎧᎸᎬ ᎢᏗᏢ ᎣᏂ.”

ᎠᏅᏱ ᏐᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏐᏁᎳ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ, “ᎠᏲᎬ” ᏣᎳᎩ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎠᏰᎵ ᎤᏙᏢᏒ ᎤᏂᎾᏗᏅᏒ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ ᎠᏓᏁᎸ ᎾᎿ ᎢᏤ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎣᎦᎵᎰᎹ ᎾᎿ ᏅᎩᏍᎪᎯᏍᎩ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏚᏂᎬᏩᎶᏔᏅ. ᏚᎵᏍᏗ ᏐᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏐᏁᎳ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ, ᏗᎦᎶᎯᏍᏗ ᏚᏂᏍᏚᎢᏒ ᎾᎿ ᎤᏴᏢᎢ ᎧᎸᎬ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎣᏍᏓ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗ.

ᎪᎯᎢᎦ, ᎠᏓᏁᎸ ᏃᏊ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ ᎾᏍᎩ ᎤᏴᏢᎢ ᎧᎸᎬ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᎦᎸᎳᏗ ᏧᎾᏕᎶᏆᏍᏗᎢ. ᎾᏍᎩ ᎠᏂᏍᎬᏘ ᎦᎵᏉᎩᏁ, ᏔᎵ ᏯᎦᏴᎵ ᏂᎦᏚ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒ, CN, NSU ᎠᎴ ᏍᎦᏚᎩ ᏧᏂᎸᏫᏍᏓᏁᎯ ᎤᎾᎵᎮᎵᏨ ᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᎯᏍᎩᏦᏁ ᎾᏕᏘᏯ ᎾᎿ ᎾᏓᏁᎶᎢ ᏧᎵᏍᏚᎢᏎ ᎠᏂᏍᎬᏘ ᎦᎵᏉᎩᏁ, ᏁᎳᏚ ᎢᏍᎪᎯᏧᏈ ᏁᎵᏍᎪ ᏐᏁᎳ ᎤᏕᏘᏴᏌᏗᏒᎢ.

About the Author
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M.

He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life.
He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association.

Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years. He was named interim executive editor on Dec. 8, 2015, by the Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board.
WILL-CHAVEZ@cherokee.org • 918-207-3961
Will lives in Tahlequah, Okla., but calls Marble City, Okla., his hometown. He is Cherokee and San Felipe Pueblo and grew up learning the Cherokee language, traditions and culture from his Cherokee mother and family. He also appreciates his father’s Pueblo culture and when possible attends annual traditional dances held on the San Felipe Reservation near Albuquerque, N.M. He enjoys studying and writing about Cherokee history and culture and writing stories about Cherokee veterans. For Will, the most enjoyable part of writing for the Cherokee Phoenix is having the opportunity to meet Cherokee people from all walks of life. He earned a mass communications degree in 1993 from Northeastern State University with minors in marketing and psychology. He is a member of the Native American Journalists Association. Will has worked in the newspaper and public relations field for 20 years. He has performed public relations work for the Cherokee Nation and has been a reporter and a photographer for the Cherokee Phoenix for more than 18 years. He was named interim executive editor on Dec. 8, 2015, by the Cherokee Phoenix Editorial Board.

Multimedia

BY ROGER GRAHAM
Multimedia Producer – @cp_rgraham
05/22/2018 04:00 PM
AKINS – Visitors to the first “Sequoyah Day” event held May 20 experienced all things Cherokee such as art, music, lectures, performances, demonstrations and National Treasures all on the grounds of the historic Sequoyah’s Cabin Museum where the Cherokee syllabary creator lived. “This is a chance to celebrate Sequoyah’s life and his legacy,” Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism Director Travis Owens said. “We’ve had a flute-playing performance, the Cherokee National Youth Choir performed. We had the Girty Family Singers and presenters on our language today.” Others attending the event included Cherokee National Treasures Lorene Drywater and David Scott, as well as Cherokee artists Roy Boney, Jeff Edwards and Mary HorseChief. Tribal Councilors Bryan Warner and E.O. Junior Smith, and 2017-18 Miss Cherokee Madison Whitekiller also attended. Another highlight was the Traditional Native Games competition. CN citizen and games coordinator Bayly Wright said “Sequoyah Day” was a great place to hold Cherokee marbles, cornstalk shoot, horseshoes, blowgun, a hatchet throw and chunky competitions. “Today is the second of the five competitions leading up to the championships, which will be held on Aug. 25, the weekend before the Cherokee National Holiday,” she said. For more information on cultural events, visit <a href="http://www.visitcherokeenation.com" target="_blank">www.visitcherokeenation.com</a> or call 1-877-779-6977.
BY KENLEA HENSON
Reporter
05/18/2018 08:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH – Every year on May 7 the Descendants of the Cherokee Seminaries Students Organization hold its annual reunion at Northeastern State University where it awards two NSU students with scholarships. This year’s recipients were Cherokee Nation citizens Bryley Hoodenpyle and Marilyn Tschida. Both students received a $1,000 scholarship based on their GPAs, activities and interviews. Hoodenpyle said her fourth great-grandmother’s aunt and two cousins attended the Cherokee Male and Female seminaries, which she discovered through online research and NSU’s archives. She said after college she plans to attend NSU’s optometry school. “It means a lot to me to receive this scholarship just because this university has given so much to me and has helped me grow personally,” Hoodenpyle said. “NSU has developed me as a student and as a leader so its really awesome to me that my family played a part in that story however many years ago.” Tschida is an education graduate student and plans to graduate in December. She said she found her grandmother’s name in the Cherokee Female Seminary roll book in NSU’s archives and decided to apply for the scholarship. “I am really proud to accept it, I think she would be very proud for me to have gotten something on her behalf,” Tschida said. On May 7, 1889, the Cherokee Female Seminary reopened north of Tahlequah after a fire destroyed it two years earlier. So, no matter what day May 7 falls on, the descendants of students who attended the Cherokee Male and Female seminaries gather to honor their ancestors and their time at the schools. DCSSO President Rick Ward said the reunion is the oldest tradition on NSU’s campus, accruing annually for 167 years with the exception of one year during World War II. “It started out as a picnic, but it wasn’t the descendants getting together it was the actual students of the seminaries coming together, bringing food and visiting out in front of the sycamore tree,” he said. After noticing the number seminary students fading away, Jack Brown established the DCSSO in 1975. Brown served as the executive vice president of the Cherokee Seminaries Students Alumni Association for years. He wanted to get the descendants of the alumni involved in the activities of the association as well as keep the tradition alive. In 1984 the name officially changed to the Descendants of Cherokee Seminaries Students Organization. The state bought the Female Seminary in 1909, which now serves as Seminary Hall and the centerpiece of NSU. DCSSO Secretary Ginny Wilson said she wants to keep the reunion tradition alive for her grandmother, who was a student at the Female Seminary. “I do this for my grandmother. We used to bring her up here to this reunion. It was always the one thing in her life she wanted to do,” Wilson said. Wilson said the DCSSO follows the same format as their ancestors did during their reunions, which consists of the organization’s meeting, lunch, a speaker, the Cherokee choir and Miss Cherokee. “We follow that format as close as we can to just do the same thing. It’s gotten a whole lot smaller, but that’s what we do as descendants in memory of those people,” she said. Since the DCSSO established a scholarship for students who are descendants in the early 2000s, its goal is to continue to provide that scholarship. “Our biggest plan is to increase our scholarship amount. That’s the most important, but also to keep the (May 7) tradition going at Northeastern. Otherwise it will die,” Wilson said.
BY STAFF REPORTS
05/16/2018 12:00 PM
SALLISAW – Enjoy a day of traditional Cherokee art, music and more, honoring legendary statesman and inventor of the Cherokee syllabary, Sequoyah. The event will be held in conjunction with Cherokee Nation’s Traditional Native Games. Sequoyah Day begins at 10 a.m. on May 19 at Sequoyah’s Cabin Museum. “We are proud to bring to life an event like Sequoyah Day. It’s a unique daylong celebration of Cherokee history and culture at the home of the man who pioneered the Cherokee syllabary,” Principal Chief Bill John Baker said. “Now that Cherokee Nation owns and operates the Sequoyah Cabin Park, we can organize these types of family-driven events that are both educational and fun for all.” The event runs until 4 p.m. and features live performances, activities for children and cultural demonstrations such as pottery, flint-knapping, bow-making, stone carving and graphics. The event includes multiple performances from the Cherokee National Youth Choir and a special language presentation at 1:30 p.m. Sequoyah built the cabin in 1829 and welcomes more than 12,000 visitors each year. It was designated as a National Historic Landmark in 1966 and a National Literary Landmark in 2006. The homestead includes a one-room cabin and nearly 200 acres. Prior to reopening under CN management in 2017, Sequoyah’s Cabin Museum received much-needed repairs and renovations. The museum now features large displays that share the story of Sequoyah, his development of the Cherokee syllabary and the Cherokee language today. The museum also features a retail space offering Cherokee Nation apparel, gifts and souvenirs. The museum is located at Highway 101, 7 miles east of Highway 59. For more information, visit <a href="http://www.VisitCherokeeNation.com" target="_blank">www.VisitCherokeeNation.com</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
05/09/2018 12:00 PM
PARK HILL – Explore the messages of John Ross in his correspondences with fellow tribesmen and political allies throughout his 38 years as principal chief of the Cherokee Nation. “The Letters of John Ross” is the tribe’s first digital exhibit and allows guests to view documents that are usually off view and housed in collections at the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa. Featured writings address topics such as delegation nominations, potential resolutions, rumors of assassination plots and the possible removal of Cherokee people to Mexico. “This is the first exhibit of its kind for Cherokee Nation, and we are eager to see how the public responds,” Travis Owens, Cherokee Nation Businesses cultural tourism director, said. “The digital format enables guests to focus on their specific interests in an interactive and engaging way.” The exhibit runs May 4 through Jan. 31 at the John Ross Museum, which highlights Ross’ life and legacy and houses exhibits and interactive displays on the Trail of Tears, Civil War, Cherokee Golden Age and tribe’s passion for education. The museum is housed in an old, rural school building known as School #51 and sits at the foot of Ross Cemetery, where Ross and other notable CN citizens are buried. The museum is located at 22366 S. 530 Road. It’s open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. For information, call -1877-779-6977 or visit <a href="http://www.VisitCherokeeNation.com" target="_blank">www.VisitCherokeeNation.com</a>.
BY STAFF REPORTS
05/09/2018 10:00 AM
TAHLEQUAH – The Cherokee Speakers Bureau will be held Thursday May 10, 2018 from 12:30 – 4 p.m. We will meet in the Community Ballroom that is located behind the Restaurant of the Cherokee. All Cherokee speakers are invited to attend. If you want to bring a side dish or a dessert, feel free to bring it. Come speak Cherokee and enjoy food and fellowship. For further information about the event, please contact: the Language Program at 918-453-5151. Tsalagi aniwonisgi unadatlugv dodvnatlosi Nvgineiga Anisgvti 10, 2018, ganvsulvi 12:30pm adalenisgi 4 p.m. igohida. Na Anitsalagi tsunalisdayetiyi tsigotlv unaditli wayvsdi onadilvyvi utani kanvsula dodvnatlosi. Naniv Anitsalagi aniwonisgi otsitayohiha uniluhisdii. Alisdayvdi ayohisdi yodulia. Dodayotsadatlisani ale dodayotsalisdayvna hilutsvi. Ugodesdi tsadulihesdi tsadelayohisdi hiina wigehiyadvdi: Tsalagi Gawonihisdi Unadotlvsv 918- 453-5151.
BY STAFF REPORTS
05/08/2018 08:00 AM
BENTONVILLE, Ark. – The Museum of Native American History will host storytelling and a beadwork class on May 12. The museum is located at 202 S.W. “O” St. Admission is free, and the events are open to all. From 10:30 a.m. to 11 a.m., MONAH staff will share traditional Yup'ik (Alaska) and Cherokee stories about how berries came to be just in time for berry season. “Our stories for the day include ‘Berry Magic,’ written and illustrated by Teri Sloat and Betty Huffmon, and ‘The First Strawberries: A Cherokee Story,’ retold by Joseph Bruchac and illustrated by Anna Vojtech. Stick around after the stories to make a self-portrait using nature and try akutaq, a traditional Yup'ik dish made with berries,” MONAH Director Charlotte Buchanan-Yale said. Storytime is geared toward ages 4 and up, but kids of all ages and their adults are welcome. A Creative Visions artist will host and teach a “Beadwork for Beginners” class beginning at 5:30 p.m. in the museum. Join Cherokee beadwork and jewelry artist Carolyn Chumwalooky for an in-depth introduction to the intricate art of beading. This hands-on workshop will lead participants through the process of creating a beaded keychain to take home. Registration is free and required. Supplies and refreshments will be provided. For more information, call the museum at 479-273-2456 or visit <a href="http://www.momah.us" target="_blank">www.momah.us</a>.