http://www.cherokeephoenix.orgLillie O'Fields Saunty of Shawnee looks over her gifts with help from Cherokee Nation Deputy Chief Garland Eagle, left, and Prinicipal Chief Joe Byrd. Saunty is among nine original Dawes Commission enrollees who were honored Saturday during the Cherokee National Holiday. LYNN ADAIR/CHEROKEE ADVOCATE
Lillie O'Fields Saunty of Shawnee looks over her gifts with help from Cherokee Nation Deputy Chief Garland Eagle, left, and Prinicipal Chief Joe Byrd. Saunty is among nine original Dawes Commission enrollees who were honored Saturday during the Cherokee National Holiday. LYNN ADAIR/CHEROKEE ADVOCATE

Back in the day: 1997

John Belt of Tahlequah takes careful aim at a target 45 feet away during the annual blowgun competition. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE ADVOCATE Fending off a spike, a volleyball player rises in the air but is unable to bat back the ball. Teams from throughout the area competed in the holiday volleyball tournament. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE ADVOCATE Cherokee boys study a new blowgun on the lawn of the Cherokee Heritage Center. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE ADVOCATE People of all ages took part in the stickball exhibitions that took place at Sequoyah High School. SAMMY STILL/CHEROKEE ADVOCATE Badwater Fields, Issac Youngbird, Larry Crittenden and Richard Fields of Kansas, Okla., won the Cherokee National Holiday Marble Tournament. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE ADVOCATE
John Belt of Tahlequah takes careful aim at a target 45 feet away during the annual blowgun competition. WILL CHAVEZ/CHEROKEE ADVOCATE
BY CHEROKEE ADVOCATE
08/28/2015 08:30 AM
Reprinted from the July/August 1997 Cherokee Advocate, Volume XXI, No. 7-8.

Concert, Car Show and Bike Ride Added to Cherokee Holiday

A concert, a car show and a bike ride have been added to the line-up of events for the 45th Cherokee National Holiday, Labor Day weekend, Aug. 28-31, in Tahlequah, Okla.

The concert will feature Native American musicians, performing a variety of musical styles including blues, rock, reggae, traditional and contemporary. Performers include Wes Studi (Cherokee) and his new band, Firecat of Discord; Smiling’ Vic (Creek) and the Soul Monkeys; Knifewing (Chiricahua Apache); Farmboy, featuring Tanya Comingdeer (Cherokee) and Tom Skinner; and Elvus Gene Kishketon (absentee Shawnee).

Performers will take the stage at the Cherokee Cultural Grounds at 1 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 31. The music will continue until midnight, with breaks between performances featuring comedians. The concert will conclude with a fireworks extravaganza.

Car show registration begins at 8 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 30, rain or shine, on the lawn between the Cherokee Human Resources and Marketing Buildings.

Registration for the bike ride, which includes rides of 12, 45 and 55 miles, begins at 7 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 30, at the Restaurant of the Cherokees.

The annual line-up of events will include the cornstalk shoot, the blow gun contest, as well as the powwow, including gourd dancing, and much more.

Gourd dancing, which serves as a prelude to each day’s Cherokee National Holiday Powwow activities, will begin at 5 p.m., Friday, Aug. 29, and at 2 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 30, at the Cherokee Cultural Grounds located south of the Crosswinds Golf Course. The powwow grand entry, social and contest dancing will be held immediately following the gourd dancing each evening. Competition will be held Friday and Saturday evenings with fancy, shawl, straight, traditional, northern shawl, buckskin, women’s cloth, women’s jingle, men’s grass, junior boys, junior girls and tiny tots competition, as well as a drum contest.

The cornstalk shoot registration will begin at noon, Saturday, Aug. 30, next to the Cherokee Nation Election Services office. There are five divisions of competition: Indian bow, compound bow, recurve bow, youth bow (10-12 year olds) and youth bow (under 10 years of age).

The Horseshoe Pitch Tournament will begin at 10 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 30, in the field west of the Cherokee Nation Election Services office. Registration begins at 8 a.m.

The Region 8 Indian Rodeo Finals will be held at 8 p.m., each night, Aug. 29-31, at the Tahlequah Round-Up Club Arena south of Tahlequah and across Hwy. 62 from the Sequoyah softball fields. More than $60,000 in prizes will be awarded to this year’s top finishers. Top cowboys and cowgirls from across the country will be competing to qualify for a trip to the Indian National Finals Rodeo.

Arts and crafts booths vendors will open their booths at 9 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 30, at two locations- the Cherokee Heritage Center and next to the Cherokee Election Services office, formerly the Cherokee Gift Shop, west of the main tribal complex offices. Booths will also be located at the powwow where only traditional Indian arts and crafts will be sold. Arts and crafts booths will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 31. Native American artists from across the country travel to Tahlequah to participate in the Cherokee National Holiday.

A bass tournament will be held beginning at dawn, or safe light, the morning of Saturday, Aug. 23, at Chicken Creek South on Lake Tenkiller.

A Quilting Contest will be held during the Cherokee National Holiday on Saturday, Aug. 30. The quilts will be on display beginning at 10 a.m. in the conference room of the Restaurant of the Cherokees. The judging will take place at 4 p.m.

The Cherokee National Holiday Parade will begin at 10 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 30, in downtown Tahlequah. Immediately following the parade, Cherokee Nation Principal Chief Joe Byrd will give the State of the Nation address at the Cherokee Capitol Square in downtown Tahlequah.

Miss Cherokee 1996-97 will introduced during the State of the Nation address. She will be crowned during the Miss Cherokee Pageant, scheduled Aug. 16 in the Cherokee Nation W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex Council Chambers.

The 10th Annual Master Craftsman awards will also be presented during the Cherokee National Holiday. The Living National Treasures Craftsman Project of the Lost Arts Project presents awards to those craftsmen and women who have dedicated their lives to preserving the culture and traditions of the Cherokees through their work. It is the highest honor the Cherokee Nation can bestow upon its keepers of the culture and heritage. Honored living treasures will be announced at Chief Joe Byrd’s the State of the Nation on Cherokee Capitol Square on Saturday, Aug. 30.

Children’s events are scheduled from 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 30, near the Cherokee Nation Election Services office. A variety of activities are planned and are free or at a nominal fee to the public.

A Cherokee culture workshop will be a part of the Cherokee National Holiday beginning at 1 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 30, next to the Cherokee Election Services office.

The Original Enrollees reception will begin at 1 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 30, in the W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex Council Chambers. Chief Joe Byrd and Deputy Chief J. Garland Eagle will welcome the original enrollees.

A Veterans Reception is scheduled at the tribal complex in the tribal services unit’s large conference room beginning at 5 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 30.

A stickball exhibition will be held on Saturday, Aug. 30, at 2 p.m. at the north end of the Sequoyah High School football stadium. The stomp dance exhibition will be held at 6 p.m., Aug. 30, at the Cherokee Heritage Center.

Golfers from throughout the county are expected to participate in the Holiday Golf Tournament and scramble will be held at the Crosswinds Golf Course Aug. 29-31.

The Holiday All-Indian Men’s and Women’s Slow-Pitch and Fast-Pitch Softball Tournaments will be played at two locations. The men’s games will be played at the Sequoyah High School softball fields, and the women’s games will be played at Phoenix Park off the Bertha Parker Bypass. The tournament begins at 6 p.m., Friday, Aug. 29, and continues at 8 a.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Sixty teams are expected to play.

The 19th Annual Cherokee National Holiday Gospel Singing is scheduled from 4 p.m. to 11 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 30, under the green and white tent located next to the Cherokee Nation Election Services office. The singing is open to the public free of charge. A Sunday Worship Service is scheduled at 10 a.m., Sunday, Aug. 31.

The 14th Annual Little Miss and Mister Cherokee Contest will be held at the W.W. Keeler Tribal Council Chambers at 9:30 a.m., Tuesday, Aug. 19, for 3-10 year olds. A child must be three years old on or before Aug. 1, 1997, to enter the contest.

The Sixth Annual Junior Miss Cherokee Pageant for 11-13 year-olds will be held at 7 p.m., Thursday, Aug. 21, in the W.W. Keeler Tribal Complex Council Chambers.

The Free Feed will begin at 1 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 31, next to the Cherokee Nation Election Services office.

The 13th Annual Cherokee National Holiday Run ’97 will begin at 7:30 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 30, at the Sequoyah High school Softball Fields south of Tahlequah. A two-mile fun run/walk also will be held at 7:30 a.m.

A Co-ed Volleyball Tournament will begin at 9 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 30, at Sequoyah High School.

Arts and crafts booth, along with concessions will be available at most events during the Cherokee National Holiday.

For more information about the 45th Cherokee National Holiday, contact Teresa Tackett, holiday coordinator.

Back in the Day

BY THE CHEROKEE NATION NEWS
08/14/2015 02:00 PM
<strong><large>24th Annual Holiday To Be Long Remembered</large></strong> <p><i>Reprinted from The Cherokee Nation News, Volume 9, Number 37 September 10, 1976</i></p> The 24th Annual Cherokee National Holiday scheduled for September 3, 4, and 5, 1976 was one to be long remembered. From the time that Arts and Crafts show opened Friday until the fire died out at the final stomp dance Sunday night there was a continual round of activities. Six beautiful Cherokee girls competed for the title “Miss Cherokee” and presented their talents. Friday evening then followed by Gospel singing. Early Saturday the candidates for “Miss Cherokee” and guests were honored with a breakfast sponsored by the Soroptimist Club and held at the NEOSU. The downtown streets were lined early to view the parade, which was interesting and well received the welcome, invocation and memorial ceremony was given at the courthouse square and remainder of the program was held at the Tribal Complex area. The golf tournament was off to an early start. Goodlow Proctor and Amon Baker reported a fine turnout. The rain caused the games to be stopped before completely finished but prizes were awarded. The softball tournament proved a big attraction and it was late when they finished. All show and sales of Craft and exhibits were held in the Industrial or Blue building. Stands and exhibits from near and far were set up to display their crafts. The address by Principal Chief Swimmer was one of welcome and of appreciation to be able to speak with so many Cherokees and explain the many things that are happening and that have been made possible for them through the many programs now offered. He spoke of his pride, to be serving as their chief, also in the progress and accomplishments they had made. He asked for their continued loyalty and support in the administration of the Cherokee People. Chief Swimmer gave a report on many projects that have been completed in his year of reign and of many now being implemented. He also gave a report on how the election for the council and Deputy Chief will be executed. Chief Swimmer accepted the Redwood statue of Sequoyah, the work of David Villasenor, noted artist and sandpainter. The statue was presented to the Cherokee Nation by the National Spiritual Assembly of the Baha’is of the United States and Chief Swimmer accepted the gift for the Cherokee Nation. The Chief had the pleasure of crowning the young lady chose to wear the “Miss Cherokee” crown and cape for 1977 – Miss Cynthia Blackfox. Large crowds enjoyed the World Champion Cornstalk Shoot, Indian Adult games and competition. The Indian car contest caused great amusement, it was a 1956 or ’57 brown Chevrolet station wagon in such a shape one wondered how it could run but it did. The winner 1st place was Ruth Osborn, 2nd Kenneth Foster and 3rd Gloria Sly. The horseshoe pitch was won by Enoch Lamb and John Lamb of Rocky Ford. 2nd, Joe Clinton and Silas Lamb of Rocky Ford; 3rd, George Grasshopper of Hulbert and Ross Drywater of Tahlequah. Indian Bow Competition: Indian Bow 1st Lymon Vann, Tahlequah, 2nd Hastings Shade, Hulbert. Modern Bow 1st George Dixon, Muskogee; 2nd, Tenis Stafford, Salina. Compound Bow: Tommy Biffle, Muskogee. When lined up for the barbecue, the count run into thousands and what a feast it was! The Indian stickball game was really an exciting battle. Someone asked, “Do they really try to kill each other?” When the official game was played, Cherokee, North Carolina team defeated the Cherokee Nation team. The powwow was really enjoyed by all, the colorful costumes and shawls and the dancers keeping step with the drum made a beautiful picture. Ms. Gloria Matthews was Head Lady Dancer and Archie Mason was Head Man Dancer and did a fine job leading the dances. Just to sum up the whole celebration it was a huge success and great time was had by all.